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Macbeth

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Full list of words from this list:

  1. accurse
    curse or declare to be evil or anathema or threaten with divine punishment
    Some holy angel
    Fly to the court of England and unfold
    His message ere he come, that a swift blessing
    May soon return to this our suffering country
    Under a hand accursed!
  2. equivocator
    a respondent who avoids giving a clear direct answer
    Faith, here's an equivocator, that could
    swear in both the scales against either scale;
    who committed treason enough for God's sake,
    yet could not equivocate to heaven: O, come
    in, equivocator.
  3. Macbeth
    king of Scotland (died in 1057)
    Third Witch
    There to meet with Macbeth.
  4. thane
    a feudal lord or baron
    Enter ROSS

    MALCOLM
    The worthy thane of Ross.
  5. hell-kite
    someone who is a very fierce fighter
    O hell-kite!
  6. slumbery
    inclined to or marked by drowsiness
    In this slumbery agitation, besides her
    walking and other actual performances, what, at any
    time, have you heard her say?
  7. stableness
    the quality or attribute of being firm and steadfast
    MALCOLM
    But I have none: the king-becoming graces,
    As justice, verity, temperance, stableness,
    Bounty, perseverance, mercy, lowliness,
    Devotion, patience, courage, fortitude,
    I have no relish of them, but abound
    In the division of each several crime,
    Acting it many ways.
  8. witch
    a female sorcerer or magician
    Enter three Witches
    First Witch
    When shall we three meet again
    In thunder, lightning, or in rain?
  9. weird sister
    any of the three goddesses of destiny
    ALL
    The weird sisters, hand in hand,
    Posters of the sea and land,
    Thus do go about, about:
    Thrice to thine and thrice to mine
    And thrice again, to make up nine.
  10. alarum
    an automatic signal (usually a sound) warning of danger
    Alarum within.
  11. murderer
    a criminal who commits homicide
    He's here in double trust;
    First, as I am his kinsman and his subject,
    Strong both against the deed; then, as his host,
    Who should against his murderer shut the door,
    Not bear the knife myself.
  12. memorise
    commit to memory; learn by heart
    If I say sooth, I must report they were
    As cannons overcharged with double cracks, so they
    Doubly redoubled strokes upon the foe:
    Except they meant to bathe in reeking wounds,
    Or memorise another Golgotha,
    I cannot tell.
  13. cauldron
    a very large pot that is used for boiling
    In the middle, a boiling cauldron.
  14. gentlewoman
    a woman of refinement
    Enter a Doctor of Physic and a Waiting- Gentlewoman
    Doctor
    I have two nights watched with you, but can perceive
    no truth in your report.
  15. exit
    move out of or depart from
    Exit Sergeant, attended

    Who comes here?
  16. re-enter
    enter again
    Re-enter LADY MACBETH

    LADY MACBETH
    My hands are of your colour; but I shame
    To wear a heart so white.
  17. hautboy
    a slender double-reed instrument
    Hautboys and torches.
  18. brinded
    having a grey or brown streak or a pattern or a patchy coloring; used especially of the patterned fur of cats
    Enter the three Witches
    First Witch
    Thrice the brinded cat hath mew'd.
  19. lady
    a polite name for any woman
    Enter LADY MACBETH, reading a letter
    LADY MACBETH
    'They met me in the day of success: and I have
    learned by the perfectest report, they have more in
    them than mortal knowledge.
  20. Duncan
    United States dancer and pioneer of modern dance (1878-1927)
    Exit Messenger

    The raven himself is hoarse
    That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan
    Under my battlements.
  21. slaughterous
    accompanied by bloodshed
    Exit

    MACBETH
    I have almost forgot the taste of fears;
    The time has been, my senses would have cool'd
    To hear a night-shriek; and my fell of hair
    Would at a dismal treatise rouse and stir
    As life were in't: I have supp'd full with horrors;
    Direness, familiar to my slaughterous thoughts
    Cannot once start me.
  22. feverous
    having or affected by a fever
    LENNOX
    The night has been unruly: where we lay,
    Our chimneys were blown down; and, as they say,
    Lamentings heard i' the air; strange screams of death,
    And prophesying with accents terrible
    Of dire combustion and confused events
    New hatch'd to the woeful time: the obscure bird
    Clamour'd the livelong night: some say, the earth
    Was feverous and did shake.
  23. knocking
    the sound of knocking
    Knocking within

    MACBETH
    Whence is that knocking?
  24. thou
    the cardinal number that is the product of 10 and 100
    Say to the king the knowledge of the broil
    As thou didst leave it.
  25. equivocate
    be deliberately ambiguous or unclear
    Faith, here's an equivocator, that could
    swear in both the scales against either scale;
    who committed treason enough for God's sake,
    yet could not equivocate to heaven: O, come
    in, equivocator.
  26. tempest-tost
    pounded or hit repeatedly by storms or adversities
    I will drain him dry as hay:
    Sleep shall neither night nor day
    Hang upon his pent-house lid;
    He shall live a man forbid:
    Weary se'nnights nine times nine
    Shall he dwindle, peak and pine:
    Though his bark cannot be lost,
    Yet it shall be tempest-tost.
  27. enter
    to come or go into
    Enter three Witches
    First Witch
    When shall we three meet again
    In thunder, lightning, or in rain?
  28. kern
    the part of a metal typeface that projects beyond its body
    The merciless Macdonwald--
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villanies of nature
    Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
    Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
    For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--
    Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like valour's minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave;
    Which...
  29. incarnadine
    redden or make pinkish
    No, this my hand will rather
    The multitudinous seas in incarnadine,
    Making the green one red.
  30. Hecate
    (Greek mythology) Greek goddess of fertility who later became associated with Persephone as goddess of the underworld and protector of witches
    Now o'er the one halfworld
    Nature seems dead, and wicked dreams abuse
    The curtain'd sleep; witchcraft celebrates
    Pale Hecate's offerings, and wither'd murder,
    Alarum'd by his sentinel, the wolf,
    Whose howl's his watch, thus with his stealthy pace.
  31. sprites
    atmospheric electricity (lasting 10 msec) appearing as globular flashes of red (pink to blood-red) light rising to heights of 60 miles (sometimes seen together with elves)
    As from your graves rise up, and walk like sprites,
    To countenance this horror!
  32. provoker
    someone who deliberately foments trouble
    Porter
    'Faith sir, we were carousing till the
    second cock: and drink, sir, is a great
    provoker of three things.
  33. fife
    a small high-pitched flute similar to a piccolo
    ROSS
    From Fife, great king;
    Where the Norweyan banners flout the sky
    And fan our people cold.
  34. avouch
    admit openly and bluntly
    MACBETH
    So is he mine; and in such bloody distance,
    That every minute of his being thrusts
    Against my near'st of life: and though I could
    With barefaced power sweep him from my sight
    And bid my will avouch it, yet I must not,
    For certain friends that are both his and mine,
    Whose loves I may not drop, but wail his fall
    Who I myself struck down; and thence it is,
    That I to your assistance do make love,
    Masking the business from the common eye
    For sundry weighty reasons.
  35. lord
    a person who has general authority over others
    Mark, king of Scotland, mark:
    No sooner justice had with valour arm'd
    Compell'd these skipping kerns to trust their heels,
    But the Norweyan lord surveying vantage,
    With furbish'd arms and new supplies of men
    Began a fresh assault.
  36. lechery
    unrestrained indulgence in sexual activity
    Lechery, sir, it provokes, and unprovokes;
    it provokes the desire, but it takes
    away the performance: therefore, much drink
    may be said to be an equivocator with lechery:
    it makes him, and it mars him; it sets
    him on, and it takes him off; it persuades him,
    and disheartens him; makes him stand to, and
    not stand to; in conclusion, equivocates him
    in a sleep, and, giving him the lie, leaves him.
  37. swearer
    someone who uses profanity
    Son
    Then the liars and swearers are fools,
    for there are liars and swearers enow to beat
    the honest men and hang up them.
  38. knock
    deliver a sharp blow or push :"He knocked the glass clear across the room"
    I am thane of Cawdor:
    If good, why do I yield to that suggestion
    Whose horrid image doth unfix my hair
    And make my seated heart knock at my ribs,
    Against the use of nature?
  39. ulcerous
    having an ulcer or canker
    How he solicits heaven,
    Himself best knows: but strangely-visited people,
    All swoln and ulcerous, pitiful to the eye,
    The mere despair of surgery, he cures,
    Hanging a golden stamp about their necks,
    Put on with holy prayers: and 'tis spoken,
    To the succeeding royalty he leaves
    The healing benediction.
  40. Doctor
    (Roman Catholic Church) a title conferred on 33 saints who distinguished themselves through the orthodoxy of their theological teaching
    Enter a Doctor

    MALCOLM
    Well; more anon.--Comes
  41. scone
    small biscuit (rich with cream and eggs) cut into diamonds or sticks and baked in an oven or (especially originally) on a griddle
    MACDUFF
    He is already named, and gone to Scone
    To be invested.
  42. highness
    the quality of being high or lofty
    But I have spoke
    With one that saw him die: who did report
    That very frankly he confess'd his treasons,
    Implored your highness' pardon and set forth
    A deep repentance: nothing in his life
    Became him like the leaving it; he died
    As one that had been studied in his death
    To throw away the dearest thing he owed,
    As 'twere a careless trifle.
  43. tyrant
    a cruel and oppressive dictator
    But, peace! for from broad words and 'cause he fail'd
    His presence at the tyrant's feast, I hear
    Macduff lives in disgrace: sir, can you tell
    Where he bestows himself?
  44. play false
    conceal one's true motives from especially by elaborately feigning good intentions so as to gain an end
    Glamis thou art, and Cawdor; and shalt be
    What thou art promised: yet do I fear thy nature;
    It is too full o' the milk of human kindness
    To catch the nearest way: thou wouldst be great;
    Art not without ambition, but without
    The illness should attend it: what thou wouldst highly,
    That wouldst thou holily; wouldst not play false,
    And yet wouldst wrongly win: thou'ldst have, great Glamis,
    That which cries 'Thus thou must do, if thou have it;
    And that which rather thou dost fear ...
  45. cyme
    more or less flat-topped cluster of flowers in which the central or terminal flower opens first
    What rhubarb, cyme, or what purgative drug,
    Would scour these English hence?
  46. hail
    precipitation of ice pellets
    Hail, brave friend!
  47. seel
    sew up the eyelids of hawks and falcons
    Come, seeling night,
    Scarf up the tender eye of pitiful day;
    And with thy bloody and invisible hand
    Cancel and tear to pieces that great bond
    Which keeps me pale!
  48. bloody
    having or covered with or accompanied by blood
    Enter DUNCAN, MALCOLM, DONALBAIN, LENNOX, with Attendants, meeting a bleeding Sergeant
    DUNCAN
    What bloody man is that?
  49. dagger
    a short knife with a pointed blade
    Will it not be received,
    When we have mark'd with blood those sleepy two
    Of his own chamber and used their very daggers,
    That they have done't?
  50. overbold
    improperly forward or bold
    HECATE
    Have I not reason, beldams as you are,
    Saucy and overbold?
  51. apparition
    a ghostly appearing figure
    First Apparition: an armed Head

    MACBETH
    Tell me, thou unknown power,--

    First Witch
    He knows thy thought:
    Hear his speech, but say thou nought.
  52. end-all
    the ultimate goal
    Then enter MACBETH
    MACBETH
    If it were done when 'tis done, then 'twere well
    It were done quickly: if the assassination
    Could trammel up the consequence, and catch
    With his surcease success; that but this blow
    Might be the be-all and the end-all here,
    But here, upon this bank and shoal of time,
    We'ld jump the life to come.
  53. treasonous
    constituting or having the characteristic of betrayal
    Fears and scruples shake us:
    In the great hand of God I stand; and thence
    Against the undivulged pretence I fight
    Of treasonous malice.
  54. anon
    (old-fashioned or informal) in a little while
    Third Witch
    Anon.
  55. Son
    the divine word of God; the second person in the Trinity
    Enter LADY MACDUFF, her Son, and ROSS
    LADY MACDUFF
    What had he done, to make him fly the land?
  56. soldiership
    skills that are required for the life of soldier
    MACDUFF
    Let our just censures
    Attend the true event, and put we on
    Industrious soldiership.
  57. hark
    listen; used mostly in the imperative
    Hark!
  58. false face
    a mask worn as part of a masquerade costume
    Away, and mock the time with fairest show:
    False face must hide what the false heart doth know.
  59. enrage
    make someone extremely or violently angry
    LADY MACBETH
    I pray you, speak not; he grows worse and worse;
    Question enrages him.
  60. assailable
    vulnerable to attack
    MACBETH
    There's comfort yet; they are assailable;
    Then be thou jocund: ere the bat hath flown
    His cloister'd flight, ere to black Hecate's summons
    The shard-borne beetle with his drowsy hums
    Hath rung night's yawning peal, there shall be done
    A deed of dreadful note.
  61. prattler
    someone who speaks in a childish way
    LADY MACDUFF
    Poor prattler, how thou talk'st!
  62. king
    a male sovereign; ruler of a kingdom
    Say to the king the knowledge of the broil
    As thou didst leave it.
  63. owlet
    young owl
    Second Witch
    Fillet of a fenny snake,
    In the cauldron boil and bake;
    Eye of newt and toe of frog,
    Wool of bat and tongue of dog,
    Adder's fork and blind-worm's sting,
    Lizard's leg and owlet's wing,
    For a charm of powerful trouble,
    Like a hell-broth boil and bubble.
  64. deed
    a legal document to effect a transfer of property
    He's here in double trust;
    First, as I am his kinsman and his subject,
    Strong both against the deed; then, as his host,
    Who should against his murderer shut the door,
    Not bear the knife myself.
  65. aweary
    physically and mentally fatigued
    I gin to be aweary of the sun,
    And wish the estate o' the world were now undone.
  66. pride of place
    the first or highest or most important or most ostentatious place
    On Tuesday last,
    A falcon, towering in her pride of place,
    Was by a mousing owl hawk'd at and kill'd.
  67. unsanctified
    not holy because unconsecrated or impure or defiled
    LADY MACDUFF
    I hope, in no place so unsanctified
    Where such as thou mayst find him.
  68. afeard
    a pronunciation of afraid
    Enter ROSS and ANGUS

    ROSS
    The king hath happily received, Macbeth,
    The news of thy success; and when he reads
    Thy personal venture in the rebels' fight,
    His wonders and his praises do contend
    Which should be thine or his: silenced with that,
    In viewing o'er the rest o' the selfsame day,
    He finds thee in the stout Norweyan ranks,
    Nothing afeard of what thyself didst make,
    Strange images of death.
  69. give suck
    give suck to
    I have given suck, and know
    How tender 'tis to love the babe that milks me:
    I would, while it was smiling in my face,
    Have pluck'd my nipple from his boneless gums,
    And dash'd the brains out, had I so sworn as you
    Have done to this.
  70. fear
    an emotion in anticipation of some specific pain or danger
    BANQUO
    Good sir, why do you start; and seem to fear
    Things that do sound so fair?
  71. gash
    cut open
    But I am faint, my gashes cry for help.
  72. chough
    a European corvine bird of small or medium size with red legs and glossy black plumage
    Exeunt all but MACBETH and LADY MACBETH

    MACBETH
    It will have blood; they say, blood will have blood:
    Stones have been known to move and trees to speak;
    Augurs and understood relations have
    By magot-pies and choughs and rooks brought forth
    The secret'st man of blood.
  73. unshrinking
    not shrinking from danger
    ROSS
    Your son, my lord, has paid a soldier's debt:
    He only lived but till he was a man;
    The which no sooner had his prowess confirm'd
    In the unshrinking station where he fought,
    But like a man he died.
  74. knell
    the sound of a bell rung slowly to announce a death
    Hear it not, Duncan; for it is a knell
    That summons thee to heaven or to hell.
  75. bleed
    lose blood from one's body
    Enter DUNCAN, MALCOLM, DONALBAIN, LENNOX, with Attendants, meeting a bleeding Sergeant
    DUNCAN
    What bloody man is that?
  76. blaspheme
    speak of in an irreverent or impious manner
    Third Witch
    Scale of dragon, tooth of wolf,
    Witches' mummy, maw and gulf
    Of the ravin'd salt-sea shark,
    Root of hemlock digg'd i' the dark,
    Liver of blaspheming Jew,
    Gall of goat, and slips of yew
    Silver'd in the moon's eclipse,
    Nose of Turk and Tartar's lips,
    Finger of birth-strangled babe
    Ditch-deliver'd by a drab,
    Make the gruel thick and slab:
    Add thereto a tiger's chaudron,
    For the ingredients of our cauldron.
  77. enkindle
    cause to start burning
    BANQUO
    That trusted home
    Might yet enkindle you unto the crown,
    Besides the thane of Cawdor.
  78. scene
    the place where some action occurs
    ACT I
    SCENE I. A desert place.
  79. crack of doom
    (New Testament) day at the end of time following Armageddon when God will decree the fates of all individual humans according to the good and evil of their earthly lives
    What, will the line stretch out to the crack of doom?
  80. selfsame
    being the exact same one; not any other:
    BANQUO
    To the selfsame tune and words.
  81. unsex
    remove the qualities typical of one's sex
    Come, you spirits
    That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here,
    And fill me from the crown to the toe top-full
    Of direst cruelty! make thick my blood;
    Stop up the access and passage to remorse,
    That no compunctious visitings of nature
    Shake my fell purpose, nor keep peace between
    The effect and it!
  82. attendant
    a person who is present and participates in a meeting
    Enter DUNCAN, MALCOLM, DONALBAIN, LENNOX, with Attendants, meeting a bleeding Sergeant
    DUNCAN
    What bloody man is that?
  83. not
    negation of a word or group of words
    DUNCAN
    Dismay'd not this
    Our captains, Macbeth and Banquo?
  84. charnel house
    a vault or building where corpses or bones are deposited
    If charnel-houses and our graves must send
    Those that we bury back, our monuments
    Shall be the maws of kites.
  85. yet
    up to the present time
    I will drain him dry as hay:
    Sleep shall neither night nor day
    Hang upon his pent-house lid;
    He shall live a man forbid:
    Weary se'nnights nine times nine
    Shall he dwindle, peak and pine:
    Though his bark cannot be lost,
    Yet it shall be tempest-tost.
  86. sprite
    a small, playful being that has magical powers
    As from your graves rise up, and walk like sprites,
    To countenance this horror!
  87. liege
    a feudal lord entitled to allegiance and service
    MALCOLM
    My liege,
    They are not yet come back.
  88. worthy
    an important, honorable person
    The merciless Macdonwald--
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villanies of nature
    Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
    Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
    For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--
    Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like valour's minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave;
    Which...
  89. boneless
    being without a bone or bones
    I have given suck, and know
    How tender 'tis to love the babe that milks me:
    I would, while it was smiling in my face,
    Have pluck'd my nipple from his boneless gums,
    And dash'd the brains out, had I so sworn as you
    Have done to this.
  90. fantastical
    existing in fancy only
    I' the name of truth,
    Are ye fantastical, or that indeed
    Which outwardly ye show?
  91. sleep
    a natural and periodic state of rest
    I will drain him dry as hay:
    Sleep shall neither night nor day
    Hang upon his pent-house lid;
    He shall live a man forbid:
    Weary se'nnights nine times nine
    Shall he dwindle, peak and pine:
    Though his bark cannot be lost,
    Yet it shall be tempest-tost.
  92. self-abuse
    manual stimulation of your own genital organ for sexual pleasure
    My strange and self-abuse
    Is the initiate fear that wants hard use:
    We are yet but young in deed.
  93. rawness
    a chilly dampness
    Why in that rawness left you wife and child,
    Those precious motives, those strong knots of love,
    Without leave-taking?
  94. castle
    a large building formerly occupied by a ruler and fortified against attack
    Macbeth's castle.
  95. swinish
    resembling swine; coarsely gluttonous or greedy
    When Duncan is asleep--
    Whereto the rather shall his day's hard journey
    Soundly invite him--his two chamberlains
    Will I with wine and wassail so convince
    That memory, the warder of the brain,
    Shall be a fume, and the receipt of reason
    A limbeck only: when in swinish sleep
    Their drenched natures lie as in a death,
    What cannot you and I perform upon
    The unguarded Duncan? what not put upon
    His spongy officers, who shall bear the guilt
    Of our great quell?
  96. Scotland
    one of the four countries that make up the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; located on the northern part of the island of Great Britain; famous for bagpipes and plaids and kilts
    Mark, king of Scotland, mark:
    No sooner justice had with valour arm'd
    Compell'd these skipping kerns to trust their heels,
    But the Norweyan lord surveying vantage,
    With furbish'd arms and new supplies of men
    Began a fresh assault.
  97. coign
    the keystone of an arch
    BANQUO
    This guest of summer,
    The temple-haunting martlet, does approve,
    By his loved mansionry, that the heaven's breath
    Smells wooingly here: no jutty, frieze,
    Buttress, nor coign of vantage, but this bird
    Hath made his pendent bed and procreant cradle:
    Where they most breed and haunt, I have observed,
    The air is delicate.
  98. beldam
    a woman of advanced age
    HECATE
    Have I not reason, beldams as you are,
    Saucy and overbold?
  99. sightless
    lacking sight
    Come to my woman's breasts,
    And take my milk for gall, you murdering ministers,
    Wherever in your sightless substances
    You wait on nature's mischief!
  100. strangles
    an acute bacterial disease of horses characterized by inflammation of the mucous membranes
    ROSS
    Ah, good father,
    Thou seest, the heavens, as troubled with man's act,
    Threaten his bloody stage: by the clock, 'tis day,
    And yet dark night strangles the travelling lamp:
    Is't night's predominance, or the day's shame,
    That darkness does the face of earth entomb,
    When living light should kiss it?
  101. have words
    censure severely or angrily
    But I have words
    That would be howl'd out in the desert air,
    Where hearing should not latch them.
  102. traitor
    a person who says one thing and does another
    Norway himself,
    With terrible numbers,
    Assisted by that most disloyal traitor
    The thane of Cawdor, began a dismal conflict;
    Till that Bellona's bridegroom, lapp'd in proof,
    Confronted him with self-comparisons,
    Point against point rebellious, arm 'gainst arm.
  103. mine
    excavation from which ores and minerals are extracted
    ALL
    The weird sisters, hand in hand,
    Posters of the sea and land,
    Thus do go about, about:
    Thrice to thine and thrice to mine
    And thrice again, to make up nine.
  104. benison
    a spoken blessing
    Old Man
    God's benison go with you; and with those
    That would make good of bad, and friends of foes!
  105. drowse
    sleep lightly or for a short period of time
    Light thickens; and the crow
    Makes wing to the rooky wood:
    Good things of day begin to droop and drowse;
    While night's black agents to their preys do rouse.
  106. weird
    strikingly odd or unusual
    ALL
    The weird sisters, hand in hand,
    Posters of the sea and land,
    Thus do go about, about:
    Thrice to thine and thrice to mine
    And thrice again, to make up nine.
  107. messenger
    a person who carries a communication to a recipient
    Enter a Messenger

    What is your tidings?
  108. leave-taking
    the act of departing politely
    Therefore, to horse;
    And let us not be dainty of leave-taking,
    But shift away: there's warrant in that theft
    Which steals itself, when there's no mercy left.
  109. withal
    together with this
    My noble partner
    You greet with present grace and great prediction
    Of noble having and of royal hope,
    That he seems rapt withal: to me you speak not.
  110. nightgown
    lingerie consisting of a loose dress designed to be worn in bed by women
    Get on your nightgown, lest occasion call us,
    And show us to be watchers.
  111. sirrah
    formerly a contemptuous term of address to an inferior man or boy; often used in anger
    Exeunt all but MACBETH, and an attendant

    Sirrah, a word with you: attend those men
    Our pleasure?
  112. palter
    be deliberately ambiguous or unclear in order to mislead
    And be these juggling fiends no more believed,
    That palter with us in a double sense;
    That keep the word of promise to our ear,
    And break it to our hope.
  113. sir
    term of address for a man
    BANQUO
    Good sir, why do you start; and seem to fear
    Things that do sound so fair?
  114. valour
    the qualities of a hero or heroine
    The merciless Macdonwald--
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villanies of nature
    Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
    Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
    For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--
    Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like valour's minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave;
    Which...
  115. transpose
    change the order or arrangement of
    But I shall crave
    your pardon;
    That which you are my thoughts cannot transpose:
    Angels are bright still, though the brightest fell;
    Though all things foul would wear the brows of grace,
    Yet grace must still look so.
  116. bellman
    someone employed as an errand boy and luggage carrier around hotels
    It was the owl that shriek'd, the fatal bellman,
    Which gives the stern'st good-night.
  117. nonpareil
    model of excellence or perfection of a kind
    MACBETH
    Thou art the best o' the cut-throats: yet he's good
    That did the like for Fleance: if thou didst it,
    Thou art the nonpareil.
  118. overcharge
    rip off; ask an unreasonable price
    If I say sooth, I must report they were
    As cannons overcharged with double cracks, so they
    Doubly redoubled strokes upon the foe:
    Except they meant to bathe in reeking wounds,
    Or memorise another Golgotha,
    I cannot tell.
  119. dolour
    (poetry) painful grief
    MACDUFF
    Let us rather
    Hold fast the mortal sword, and like good men
    Bestride our down-fall'n birthdom: each new morn
    New widows howl, new orphans cry, new sorrows
    Strike heaven on the face, that it resounds
    As if it felt with Scotland and yell'd out
    Like syllable of dolour.
  120. vantage
    place or situation affording some benefit
    Mark, king of Scotland, mark:
    No sooner justice had with valour arm'd
    Compell'd these skipping kerns to trust their heels,
    But the Norweyan lord surveying vantage,
    With furbish'd arms and new supplies of men
    Began a fresh assault.
  121. disburse
    expend, as from a fund
    ROSS
    That now
    Sweno, the Norways' king, craves composition:
    Nor would we deign him burial of his men
    Till he disbursed at Saint Colme's inch
    Ten thousand dollars to our general use.
  122. Porter
    United States composer and lyricist of musical comedies
    Enter a Porter
    Porter
    Here's a knocking indeed!
  123. night
    the time after sunset and before sunrise while it is dark outside
    I will drain him dry as hay:
    Sleep shall neither night nor day
    Hang upon his pent-house lid;
    He shall live a man forbid:
    Weary se'nnights nine times nine
    Shall he dwindle, peak and pine:
    Though his bark cannot be lost,
    Yet it shall be tempest-tost.
  124. blood
    the fluid that is pumped through the body by the heart
    Come, you spirits
    That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here,
    And fill me from the crown to the toe top-full
    Of direst cruelty! make thick my blood;
    Stop up the access and passage to remorse,
    That no compunctious visitings of nature
    Shake my fell purpose, nor keep peace between
    The effect and it!
  125. done
    having finished or arrived at completion
    Second Witch
    When the hurlyburly's done,
    When the battle's lost and won.
  126. thriftless
    wasteful or extravagant with money or resources
    Thriftless ambition, that wilt ravin up
    Thine own life's means!
  127. all
    to a complete degree or to the full or entire extent
    ALL
    Fair is foul, and foul is fair:
    Hover through the fog and filthy air.
  128. babe
    a very young child who has not yet begun to walk or talk
    Besides, this Duncan
    Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been
    So clear in his great office, that his virtues
    Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against
    The deep damnation of his taking-off;
    And pity, like a naked new-born babe,
    Striding the blast, or heaven's cherubim, horsed
    Upon the sightless couriers of the air,
    Shall blow the horrid deed in every eye,
    That tears shall drown the wind.
  129. accursed
    under or as if under an evil spell
    Some holy angel
    Fly to the court of England and unfold
    His message ere he come, that a swift blessing
    May soon return to this our suffering country
    Under a hand accursed!
  130. good night
    a conventional expression of farewell
    At once, good night:
    Stand not upon the order of your going,
    But go at once.
  131. untitled
    not of the nobility
    O nation miserable,
    With an untitled tyrant bloody-scepter'd,
    When shalt thou see thy wholesome days again,
    Since that the truest issue of thy throne
    By his own interdiction stands accursed,
    And does blaspheme his breed?
  132. Acheron
    (Greek mythology) a river in Hades across which the souls of the dead were carried by Charon
    But make amends now: get you gone,
    And at the pit of Acheron
    Meet me i' the morning: thither he
    Will come to know his destiny:
    Your vessels and your spells provide,
    Your charms and every thing beside.
  133. come
    move toward, travel toward
    First Witch
    I come, Graymalkin!
  134. sheathe
    enclose with a protective covering
    I cannot strike at wretched kerns, whose arms
    Are hired to bear their staves: either thou, Macbeth,
    Or else my sword with an unbatter'd edge
    I sheathe again undeeded.
  135. therewithal
    together with all that; besides
    MACBETH
    We hear, our bloody cousins are bestow'd
    In England and in Ireland, not confessing
    Their cruel parricide, filling their hearers
    With strange invention: but of that to-morrow,
    When therewithal we shall have cause of state
    Craving us jointly.
  136. drum
    a musical percussion instrument
    Drum within

    Third Witch
    A drum, a drum!
  137. harbinger
    something indicating the approach of something or someone
    MACBETH
    The rest is labour, which is not used for you:
    I'll be myself the harbinger and make joyful
    The hearing of my wife with your approach;
    So humbly take my leave.
  138. rapt
    feeling great delight and interest
    My noble partner
    You greet with present grace and great prediction
    Of noble having and of royal hope,
    That he seems rapt withal: to me you speak not.
  139. pray
    address a deity, a prophet, a saint or an object of worship
    Cousins, a word, I pray you.
  140. speak
    use language
    So should he look
    That seems to speak things strange.
  141. sword
    a cutting or thrusting weapon that has a long metal blade and a hilt with a hand guard
    BANQUO
    Hold, take my sword.
  142. but
    and nothing more
    The merciless Macdonwald--
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villanies of nature
    Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
    Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
    For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--
    Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like valour's minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave;
    Which...
  143. third
    one of three equal parts of a divisible whole
    Third Witch
    That will be ere the set of sun.
  144. pronounce
    speak or utter in a certain way
    DUNCAN
    No more that thane of Cawdor shall deceive
    Our bosom interest: go pronounce his present death,
    And with his former title greet Macbeth.
  145. Golgotha
    a hill near Jerusalem where Jesus was crucified
    If I say sooth, I must report they were
    As cannons overcharged with double cracks, so they
    Doubly redoubled strokes upon the foe:
    Except they meant to bathe in reeking wounds,
    Or memorise another Golgotha,
    I cannot tell.
  146. grace
    elegance and beauty of movement or expression
    My noble partner
    You greet with present grace and great prediction
    Of noble having and of royal hope,
    That he seems rapt withal: to me you speak not.
  147. hell
    any place of pain and turmoil
    Come, thick night,
    And pall thee in the dunnest smoke of hell,
    That my keen knife see not the wound it makes,
    Nor heaven peep through the blanket of the dark,
    To cry 'Hold, hold!'
  148. thrice
    three times
    ALL
    The weird sisters, hand in hand,
    Posters of the sea and land,
    Thus do go about, about:
    Thrice to thine and thrice to mine
    And thrice again, to make up nine.
  149. surcease
    a stopping
    Then enter MACBETH
    MACBETH
    If it were done when 'tis done, then 'twere well
    It were done quickly: if the assassination
    Could trammel up the consequence, and catch
    With his surcease success; that but this blow
    Might be the be-all and the end-all here,
    But here, upon this bank and shoal of time,
    We'ld jump the life to come.
  150. first
    preceding all others in time or space or degree
    Enter three Witches
    First Witch
    When shall we three meet again
    In thunder, lightning, or in rain?
  151. hie
    move fast
    Hie thee hither,
    That I may pour my spirits in thine ear;
    And chastise with the valour of my tongue
    All that impedes thee from the golden round,
    Which fate and metaphysical aid doth seem
    To have thee crown'd withal.
  152. within
    on the inside
    Alarum within.
  153. thunder
    a booming or crashing noise along the path of lightning
    Thunder and lightning.
  154. bubble
    a hollow globule of gas (e.g., air or carbon dioxide)
    Witches vanish

    BANQUO
    The earth hath bubbles, as the water has,
    And these are of them.
  155. contriver
    a person who makes plans
    How did you dare
    To trade and traffic with Macbeth
    In riddles and affairs of death;
    And I, the mistress of your charms,
    The close contriver of all harms,
    Was never call'd to bear my part,
    Or show the glory of our art?
  156. maw
    the mouth, jaws, or throat
    If charnel-houses and our graves must send
    Those that we bury back, our monuments
    Shall be the maws of kites.
  157. second
    coming next after the first in position in space or time
    Second Witch
    When the hurlyburly's done,
    When the battle's lost and won.
  158. minion
    a servile or fawning dependent
    The merciless Macdonwald--
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villanies of nature
    Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
    Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
    For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--
    Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like valour's minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave;
    Which...
  159. good
    having desirable or positive qualities
    MALCOLM
    This is the sergeant
    Who like a good and hardy soldier fought
    'Gainst my captivity.
  160. gracious
    characterized by kindness and warm courtesy
    If 't be so,
    For Banquo's issue have I filed my mind;
    For them the gracious Duncan have I murder'd;
    Put rancours in the vessel of my peace
    Only for them; and mine eternal jewel
    Given to the common enemy of man,
    To make them kings, the seed of Banquo kings!
  161. no more
    referring to the degree to which a certain quality is present
    DUNCAN
    No more that thane of Cawdor shall deceive
    Our bosom interest: go pronounce his present death,
    And with his former title greet Macbeth.
  162. nature
    the physical world including plants and animals
    The merciless Macdonwald--
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villanies of nature
    Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
    Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
    For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--
    Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like valour's minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave;
    Which...
  163. will
    the capability of conscious choice and decision
    Third Witch
    That will be ere the set of sun.
  164. carve out
    remove from a larger whole
    The merciless Macdonwald--
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villanies of nature
    Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
    Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
    For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--
    Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like valour's minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave;
    Which...
  165. dwarfish
    atypically small
    ANGUS
    Now does he feel
    His secret murders sticking on his hands;
    Now minutely revolts upbraid his faith-breach;
    Those he commands move only in command,
    Nothing in love: now does he feel his title
    Hang loose about him, like a giant's robe
    Upon a dwarfish thief.
  166. whetstone
    a flat stone for sharpening edged tools or knives
    MALCOLM
    Be this the whetstone of your sword: let grief
    Convert to anger; blunt not the heart, enrage it.
  167. fiend
    an evil supernatural being
    But, gentle heavens,
    Cut short all intermission; front to front
    Bring thou this fiend of Scotland and myself;
    Within my sword's length set him; if he 'scape,
    Heaven forgive him too!
  168. hostess
    a woman host
    Enter LADY MACBETH

    DUNCAN
    See, see, our honour'd hostess!
  169. why
    the cause or intention underlying an action or situation, especially in the phrase `the whys and wherefores'
    BANQUO
    Good sir, why do you start; and seem to fear
    Things that do sound so fair?
  170. purge
    rid of impurities
    MACBETH
    Blood hath been shed ere now, i' the olden time,
    Ere human statute purged the gentle weal;
    Ay, and since too, murders have been perform'd
    Too terrible for the ear: the times have been,
    That, when the brains were out, the man would die,
    And there an end; but now they rise again,
    With twenty mortal murders on their crowns,
    And push us from our stools: this is more strange
    Than such a murder is.
  171. dare
    a challenge to do something dangerous or foolhardy
    Wouldst thou have that
    Which thou esteem'st the ornament of life,
    And live a coward in thine own esteem,
    Letting 'I dare not' wait upon 'I would,'
    Like the poor cat i' the adage?
  172. welcome
    the state of being received with pleasure
    DUNCAN
    Welcome hither:
    I have begun to plant thee, and will labour
    To make thee full of growing.
  173. heaven
    any place of complete bliss and delight and peace
    Come, thick night,
    And pall thee in the dunnest smoke of hell,
    That my keen knife see not the wound it makes,
    Nor heaven peep through the blanket of the dark,
    To cry 'Hold, hold!'
  174. hence
    from that fact or reason or as a result
    From hence to Inverness,
    And bind us further to you.
  175. interdiction
    authoritative prohibition
    O nation miserable,
    With an untitled tyrant bloody-scepter'd,
    When shalt thou see thy wholesome days again,
    Since that the truest issue of thy throne
    By his own interdiction stands accursed,
    And does blaspheme his breed?
  176. niggard
    a selfish person who is unwilling to give or spend
    MACDUFF
    But not a niggard of your speech: how goes't?
  177. tongue
    a mobile mass of muscular tissue located in the oral cavity
    Hie thee hither,
    That I may pour my spirits in thine ear;
    And chastise with the valour of my tongue
    All that impedes thee from the golden round,
    Which fate and metaphysical aid doth seem
    To have thee crown'd withal.
  178. bear
    be pregnant with
    As thick as hail
    Came post with post; and every one did bear
    Thy praises in his kingdom's great defence,
    And pour'd them down before him.
  179. honour
    the quality of being honorable and having a good name
    DUNCAN
    So well thy words become thee as thy wounds;
    They smack of honour both.
  180. lowliness
    the state of being humble and unimportant
    MALCOLM
    But I have none: the king-becoming graces,
    As justice, verity, temperance, stableness,
    Bounty, perseverance, mercy, lowliness,
    Devotion, patience, courage, fortitude,
    I have no relish of them, but abound
    In the division of each several crime,
    Acting it many ways.
  181. amaze
    affect with wonder
    MACBETH
    Who can be wise, amazed, temperate and furious,
    Loyal and neutral, in a moment?
  182. arbitrate
    act between parties with a view to reconciling differences
    Thoughts speculative their unsure hopes relate,
    But certain issue strokes must arbitrate:
    Towards which advance the war.
  183. servant
    a person working in the service of another
    Your highness' part
    Is to receive our duties; and our duties
    Are to your throne and state children and servants,
    Which do but what they should, by doing every thing
    Safe toward your love and honour.
  184. doff
    remove
    ROSS
    When I came hither to transport the tidings,
    Which I have heavily borne, there ran a rumour
    Of many worthy fellows that were out;
    Which was to my belief witness'd the rather,
    For that I saw the tyrant's power a-foot:
    Now is the time of help; your eye in Scotland
    Would create soldiers, make our women fight,
    To doff their dire distresses.
  185. bid
    propose a payment
    The merciless Macdonwald--
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villanies of nature
    Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
    Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
    For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--
    Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like valour's minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave;
    Which ne'er ...
  186. strangle
    kill by squeezing the throat of so as to cut off the air
    ROSS
    Ah, good father,
    Thou seest, the heavens, as troubled with man's act,
    Threaten his bloody stage: by the clock, 'tis day,
    And yet dark night strangles the travelling lamp:
    Is't night's predominance, or the day's shame,
    That darkness does the face of earth entomb,
    When living light should kiss it?
  187. wassail
    a punch made of sweetened ale or wine heated with spices and roasted apples; especially at Christmas
    When Duncan is asleep--
    Whereto the rather shall his day's hard journey
    Soundly invite him--his two chamberlains
    Will I with wine and wassail so convince
    That memory, the warder of the brain,
    Shall be a fume, and the receipt of reason
    A limbeck only: when in swinish sleep
    Their drenched natures lie as in a death,
    What cannot you and I perform upon
    The unguarded Duncan? what not put upon
    His spongy officers, who shall bear the guilt
    Of our great quell?
  188. warder
    a person who works in a prison and is in charge of prisoners
    When Duncan is asleep--
    Whereto the rather shall his day's hard journey
    Soundly invite him--his two chamberlains
    Will I with wine and wassail so convince
    That memory, the warder of the brain,
    Shall be a fume, and the receipt of reason
    A limbeck only: when in swinish sleep
    Their drenched natures lie as in a death,
    What cannot you and I perform upon
    The unguarded Duncan? what not put upon
    His spongy officers, who shall bear the guilt
    Of our great quell?
  189. treason
    a crime that undermines the offender's government
    Whether he was combined
    With those of Norway, or did line the rebel
    With hidden help and vantage, or that with both
    He labour'd in his country's wreck, I know not;
    But treasons capital, confess'd and proved,
    Have overthrown him.
  190. colours
    a distinguishing emblem
    Here lay Duncan,
    His silver skin laced with his golden blood;
    And his gash'd stabs look'd like a breach in nature
    For ruin's wasteful entrance: there, the murderers,
    Steep'd in the colours of their trade, their daggers
    Unmannerly breech'd with gore: who could refrain,
    That had a heart to love, and in that heart
    Courage to make 's love kno wn?
  191. unmannerly
    socially incorrect in behavior
    Here lay Duncan,
    His silver skin laced with his golden blood;
    And his gash'd stabs look'd like a breach in nature
    For ruin's wasteful entrance: there, the murderers,
    Steep'd in the colours of their trade, their daggers
    Unmannerly breech'd with gore: who could refrain,
    That had a heart to love, and in that heart
    Courage to make 's love kno wn?
  192. kinsman
    a male relative
    Sons, kinsmen, thanes,
    And you whose places are the nearest, know
    We will establish our estate upon
    Our eldest, Malcolm, whom we name hereafter
    The Prince of Cumberland; which honour must
    Not unaccompanied invest him only,
    But signs of nobleness, like stars, shall shine
    On all deservers.
  193. here
    in or at this place; where the speaker or writer is
    Exit Sergeant, attended

    Who comes here?
  194. cool it
    become quiet or calm, especially after a state of agitation
    Second Witch
    Cool it with a baboon's blood,
    Then the charm is firm and good.
  195. barefaced
    with no effort to conceal
    MACBETH
    So is he mine; and in such bloody distance,
    That every minute of his being thrusts
    Against my near'st of life: and though I could
    With barefaced power sweep him from my sight
    And bid my will avouch it, yet I must not,
    For certain friends that are both his and mine,
    Whose loves I may not drop, but wail his fall
    Who I myself struck down; and thence it is,
    That I to your assistance do make love,
    Masking the business from the common eye
    For sundry weighty reasons.
  196. livelong
    (of time) constituting the full extent or duration
    LENNOX
    The night has been unruly: where we lay,
    Our chimneys were blown down; and, as they say,
    Lamentings heard i' the air; strange screams of death,
    And prophesying with accents terrible
    Of dire combustion and confused events
    New hatch'd to the woeful time: the obscure bird
    Clamour'd the livelong night: some say, the earth
    Was feverous and did shake.
  197. now
    at the present moment
    ROSS
    That now
    Sweno, the Norways' king, craves composition:
    Nor would we deign him burial of his men
    Till he disbursed at Saint Colme's inch
    Ten thousand dollars to our general use.
  198. wear upon
    exhaust or get tired through overuse or great strain or stress
    Third Apparition: a Child crowned, with a tree in his hand

    What is this
    That rises like the issue of a king,
    And wears upon his baby-brow the round
    And top of sovereignty?
  199. posset
    sweet spiced hot milk curdled with ale or beer
    He is about it:
    The doors are open; and the surfeited grooms
    Do mock their charge with snores: I have drugg'd
    their possets,
    That death and nature do contend about them,
    Whether they live or die.
  200. double
    consisting of or involving two parts or components usually in pairs
    If I say sooth, I must report they were
    As cannons overcharged with double cracks, so they
    Doubly redoubled strokes upon the foe:
    Except they meant to bathe in reeking wounds,
    Or memorise another Golgotha,
    I cannot tell.
  201. vaporous
    resembling or characteristic of vapor
    I am for the air; this night I'll spend
    Unto a dismal and a fatal end:
    Great business must be wrought ere noon:
    Upon the corner of the moon
    There hangs a vaporous drop profound;
    I'll catch it ere it come to ground:
    And that distill'd by magic sleights
    Shall raise such artificial sprites
    As by the strength of their illusion
    Shall draw him on to his confusion:
    He shall spurn fate, scorn death, and bear
    He hopes 'bove wisdom, grace and fear:
    And you all know, security
    Is mor...
  202. Mark Antony
    Roman general under Julius Caesar in the Gallic wars
    There is none but he
    Whose being I do fear: and, under him,
    My Genius is rebuked; as, it is said,
    Mark Antony's was by Caesar.
  203. aside
    on or to one side
    MACBETH
    [ Aside] Glamis, and thane of Cawdor!
  204. noble
    of or belonging to hereditary aristocracy
    DUNCAN
    What he hath lost noble Macbeth hath won.
  205. purgative
    strongly laxative
    What rhubarb, cyme, or what purgative drug,
    Would scour these English hence?
  206. bed
    a piece of furniture that provides a place to sleep
    BANQUO
    This guest of summer,
    The temple-haunting martlet, does approve,
    By his loved mansionry, that the heaven's breath
    Smells wooingly here: no jutty, frieze,
    Buttress, nor coign of vantage, but this bird
    Hath made his pendent bed and procreant cradle:
    Where they most breed and haunt, I have observed,
    The air is delicate.
  207. weal
    a raised mark on the skin
    MACBETH
    Blood hath been shed ere now, i' the olden time,
    Ere human statute purged the gentle weal;
    Ay, and since too, murders have been perform'd
    Too terrible for the ear: the times have been,
    That, when the brains were out, the man would die,
    And there an end; but now they rise again,
    With twenty mortal murders on their crowns,
    And push us from our stools: this is more strange
    Than such a murder is.
  208. carousing
    used of riotously drunken merrymaking
    Porter
    'Faith sir, we were carousing till the
    second cock: and drink, sir, is a great
    provoker of three things.
  209. valiant
    having or showing heroism or courage
    DUNCAN
    O valiant cousin! worthy gentleman!
  210. heath
    a low evergreen shrub of the family Ericaceae
    Second Witch
    Upon the heath.
  211. thanks
    an acknowledgment of appreciation
    ANGUS
    We are sent
    To give thee from our royal master thanks;
    Only to herald thee into his sight,
    Not pay thee.
  212. torch
    a light usually carried in the hand
    Hautboys and torches.
  213. strange
    unusual or out of the ordinary
    So should he look
    That seems to speak things strange.
  214. carouse
    engage in boisterous, drunken merrymaking
    Porter
    'Faith sir, we were carousing till the
    second cock: and drink, sir, is a great
    provoker of three things.
  215. masking
    the act of concealing the existence of something by obstructing the view of it
    MACBETH
    So is he mine; and in such bloody distance,
    That every minute of his being thrusts
    Against my near'st of life: and though I could
    With barefaced power sweep him from my sight
    And bid my will avouch it, yet I must not,
    For certain friends that are both his and mine,
    Whose loves I may not drop, but wail his fall
    Who I myself struck down; and thence it is,
    That I to your assistance do make love,
    Masking the business from the common eye
    For sundry weighty reasons.
  216. palace
    the official home of a king, queen, or other exalted person
    The palace.
  217. voluptuousness
    the property of being lush and abundant and a pleasure to the senses
    MALCOLM
    I grant him bloody,
    Luxurious, avaricious, false, deceitful,
    Sudden, malicious, smacking of every sin
    That has a name: but there's no bottom, none,
    In my voluptuousness: your wives, your daughters,
    Your matrons and your maids, could not fill up
    The cistern of my lust, and my desire
    All continent impediments would o'erbear
    That did oppose my will: better Macbeth
    Than such an one to reign.
  218. make
    perform or carry out
    ALL
    The weird sisters, hand in hand,
    Posters of the sea and land,
    Thus do go about, about:
    Thrice to thine and thrice to mine
    And thrice again, to make up nine.
  219. equivocation
    intentional vagueness or ambiguity
    I pull in resolution, and begin
    To doubt the equivocation of the fiend
    That lies like truth: 'Fear not, till Birnam wood
    Do come to Dunsinane:' and now a wood
    Comes toward Dunsinane.
  220. for certain
    definitely or positively
    MACBETH
    So is he mine; and in such bloody distance,
    That every minute of his being thrusts
    Against my near'st of life: and though I could
    With barefaced power sweep him from my sight
    And bid my will avouch it, yet I must not,
    For certain friends that are both his and mine,
    Whose loves I may not drop, but wail his fall
    Who I myself struck down; and thence it is,
    That I to your assistance do make love,
    Masking the business from the common eye
    For sundry weighty reasons.
  221. eat on
    worry or cause anxiety in a persistent way
    Or have we eaten on the insane root
    That takes the reason prisoner?
  222. morrow
    the next day
    MACBETH
    To- morrow, as he purposes.
  223. two-fold
    having more than one decidedly dissimilar aspects or qualities
    I'll see no more:
    And yet the eighth appears, who bears a glass
    Which shows me many more; and some I see
    That two-fold balls and treble scepters carry:
    Horrible sight!
  224. owl
    nocturnal bird of prey with hawk-like beak and claws and large head with front-facing eyes
    It was the owl that shriek'd, the fatal bellman,
    Which gives the stern'st good-night.
  225. venom
    toxin secreted by animals
    MACBETH
    Thanks for that:
    There the grown serpent lies; the worm that's fled
    Hath nature that in time will venom breed,
    No teeth for the present.
  226. verity
    conformity to reality or actuality
    If there come truth from them--
    As upon thee, Macbeth, their speeches shine--
    Why, by the verities on thee made good,
    May they not be my oracles as well,
    And set me up in hope?
  227. murder
    unlawful premeditated killing of a human being
    Present fears
    Are less than horrible imaginings:
    My thought, whose murder yet is but fantastical,
    Shakes so my single state of man that function
    Is smother'd in surmise, and nothing is
    But what is not.
  228. till
    work land as by ploughing to make it ready for cultivation
    The merciless Macdonwald--
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villanies of nature
    Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
    Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
    For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--
    Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like valour's minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave;
    Which...
  229. devil
    an evil supernatural being
    BANQUO
    What, can the devil speak true?
  230. charnel
    gruesomely indicative of death or the dead
    If charnel-houses and our graves must send
    Those that we bury back, our monuments
    Shall be the maws of kites.
  231. auger
    a hand tool used to bore holes
    DONALBAIN
    [Aside to MALCOLM] What should be spoken here,
    where our fate,
    Hid in an auger-hole, may rush, and seize us?
  232. sooth
    truth or reality
    If I say sooth, I must report they were
    As cannons overcharged with double cracks, so they
    Doubly redoubled strokes upon the foe:
    Except they meant to bathe in reeking wounds,
    Or memorise another Golgotha,
    I cannot tell.
  233. into the wind
    in the direction opposite to the direction the wind is blowing
    MACBETH
    Into the air; and what seem'd corporal melted
    As breath into the wind.
  234. dudgeon
    a feeling of intense righteous anger
    Mine eyes are made the fools o' the other senses,
    Or else worth all the rest; I see thee still,
    And on thy blade and dudgeon gouts of blood,
    Which was not so before.
  235. to each one
    to or from every one of two or more
    What's more to do,
    Which would be planted newly with the time,
    As calling home our exiled friends abroad
    That fled the snares of watchful tyranny;
    Producing forth the cruel ministers
    Of this dead butcher and his fiend-like queen,
    Who, as 'tis thought, by self and violent hands
    Took off her life; this, and what needful else
    That calls upon us, by the grace of Grace,
    We will perform in measure, time and place:
    So, thanks to all at once and to each one,
    Whom we invite to see u...
  236. undone
    not fastened or tied or secured
    Glamis thou art, and Cawdor; and shalt be
    What thou art promised: yet do I fear thy nature;
    It is too full o' the milk of human kindness
    To catch the nearest way: thou wouldst be great;
    Art not without ambition, but without
    The illness should attend it: what thou wouldst highly,
    That wouldst thou holily; wouldst not play false,
    And yet wouldst wrongly win: thou'ldst have, great Glamis,
    That which cries 'Thus thou must do, if thou have it;
    And that which rather thou dost fear to do
    ...
  237. bladed
    having a blade or blades; often used in combination
    MACBETH
    I conjure you, by that which you profess,
    Howe'er you come to know it, answer me:
    Though you untie the winds and let them fight
    Against the churches; though the yesty waves
    Confound and swallow navigation up;
    Though bladed corn be lodged and trees blown down;
    Though castles topple on their warders' heads;
    Though palaces and pyramids do slope
    Their heads to their foundations; though the treasure
    Of nature's germens tumble all together,
    Even till destruction sicken; ...
  238. hither
    to this place
    DUNCAN
    Welcome hither:
    I have begun to plant thee, and will labour
    To make thee full of growing.
  239. foully
    in a wicked and shameful manner
    Enter BANQUO
    BANQUO
    Thou hast it now: king, Cawdor, Glamis, all,
    As the weird women promised, and, I fear,
    Thou play'dst most foully for't: yet it was said
    It should not stand in thy posterity,
    But that myself should be the root and father
    Of many kings.
  240. mortal
    subject to death
    Enter LADY MACBETH, reading a letter
    LADY MACBETH
    'They met me in the day of success: and I have
    learned by the perfectest report, they have more in
    them than mortal knowledge.
  241. saucy
    improperly forward or bold
    MACBETH
    Then comes my fit again: I had else been perfect,
    Whole as the marble, founded as the rock,
    As broad and general as the casing air:
    But now I am cabin'd, cribb'd, confined, bound in
    To saucy doubts and fears.
  242. filthy
    disgustingly dirty
    ALL
    Fair is foul, and foul is fair:
    Hover through the fog and filthy air.
  243. redouble
    double again
    If I say sooth, I must report they were
    As cannons overcharged with double cracks, so they
    Doubly redoubled strokes upon the foe:
    Except they meant to bathe in reeking wounds,
    Or memorise another Golgotha,
    I cannot tell.
  244. heart
    the hollow muscular organ located behind the sternum
    I am thane of Cawdor:
    If good, why do I yield to that suggestion
    Whose horrid image doth unfix my hair
    And make my seated heart knock at my ribs,
    Against the use of nature?
  245. juggle
    keep many objects in the air at the same time
    And be these juggling fiends no more believed,
    That palter with us in a double sense;
    That keep the word of promise to our ear,
    And break it to our hope.
  246. betimes
    in good time
    I will to-morrow,
    And betimes I will, to the weird sisters:
    More shall they speak; for now I am bent to know,
    By the worst means, the worst.
  247. sergeant
    a noncommissioned officer ranking above a corporal
    Enter DUNCAN, MALCOLM, DONALBAIN, LENNOX, with Attendants, meeting a bleeding Sergeant
    DUNCAN
    What bloody man is that?
  248. shard
    a broken piece of a brittle artifact
    MACBETH
    There's comfort yet; they are assailable;
    Then be thou jocund: ere the bat hath flown
    His cloister'd flight, ere to black Hecate's summons
    The shard-borne beetle with his drowsy hums
    Hath rung night's yawning peal, there shall be done
    A deed of dreadful note.
  249. largess
    liberality in bestowing gifts
    The king's a-bed:
    He hath been in unusual pleasure, and
    Sent forth great largess to your offices.
  250. sorrow
    an emotion of great sadness associated with loss
    DUNCAN
    My plenteous joys,
    Wanton in fulness, seek to hide themselves
    In drops of sorrow.
  251. hand
    the (prehensile) extremity of the superior limb
    The merciless Macdonwald--
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villanies of nature
    Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
    Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
    For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--
    Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like valour's minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave;
    Which ne'er ...
  252. foul
    highly offensive; arousing aversion or disgust
    ALL
    Fair is foul, and foul is fair:
    Hover through the fog and filthy air.
  253. art
    the creation of beautiful or significant things
    Sergeant
    Doubtful it stood;
    As two spent swimmers, that do cling together
    And choke their art.
  254. false
    not in accordance with the fact or reality or actuality
    Glamis thou art, and Cawdor; and shalt be
    What thou art promised: yet do I fear thy nature;
    It is too full o' the milk of human kindness
    To catch the nearest way: thou wouldst be great;
    Art not without ambition, but without
    The illness should attend it: what thou wouldst highly,
    That wouldst thou holily; wouldst not play false,
    And yet wouldst wrongly win: thou'ldst have, great Glamis,
    That which cries 'Thus thou must do, if thou have it;
    And that which rather thou dost fear ...
  255. untimely
    badly scheduled
    MACDUFF
    Boundless intemperance
    In nature is a tyranny; it hath been
    The untimely emptying of the happy throne
    And fall of many kings.
  256. know
    be cognizant or aware of a fact or a piece of information
    First Witch
    I myself have all the other,
    And the very ports they blow,
    All the quarters that they know
    I' the shipman's card.
  257. sundry
    consisting of a haphazard assortment of different kinds
    MACBETH
    So is he mine; and in such bloody distance,
    That every minute of his being thrusts
    Against my near'st of life: and though I could
    With barefaced power sweep him from my sight
    And bid my will avouch it, yet I must not,
    For certain friends that are both his and mine,
    Whose loves I may not drop, but wail his fall
    Who I myself struck down; and thence it is,
    That I to your assistance do make love,
    Masking the business from the common eye
    For sundry weighty reasons.
  258. cousin
    the child of your aunt or uncle
    DUNCAN
    O valiant cousin! worthy gentleman!
  259. fly
    travel through the air; be airborne
    MACBETH
    There's comfort yet; they are assailable;
    Then be thou jocund: ere the bat hath flown
    His cloister'd flight, ere to black Hecate's summons
    The shard-borne beetle with his drowsy hums
    Hath rung night's yawning peal, there shall be done
    A deed of dreadful note.
  260. plenteous
    affording an abundant supply
    DUNCAN
    My plenteous joys,
    Wanton in fulness, seek to hide themselves
    In drops of sorrow.
  261. unmake
    deprive of certain characteristics
    Nor time nor place
    Did then adhere, and yet you would make both:
    They have made themselves, and that their fitness now
    Does unmake you.
  262. bruit
    tell or spread rumors
    There thou shouldst be;
    By this great clatter, one of greatest note
    Seems bruited.
  263. hag
    an ugly evil-looking old woman
    Enter MACBETH

    MACBETH
    How now, you secret, black, and midnight hags!
  264. time
    the continuum of experience in which events pass to the past
    I will drain him dry as hay:
    Sleep shall neither night nor day
    Hang upon his pent-house lid;
    He shall live a man forbid:
    Weary se'nnights nine times nine
    Shall he dwindle, peak and pine:
    Though his bark cannot be lost,
    Yet it shall be tempest-tost.
  265. unsure
    lacking self-confidence
    Thoughts speculative their unsure hopes relate,
    But certain issue strokes must arbitrate:
    Towards which advance the war.
  266. jocund
    full of or showing high-spirited merriment
    MACBETH
    There's comfort yet; they are assailable;
    Then be thou jocund: ere the bat hath flown
    His cloister'd flight, ere to black Hecate's summons
    The shard-borne beetle with his drowsy hums
    Hath rung night's yawning peal, there shall be done
    A deed of dreadful note.
  267. must
    a necessary or essential thing
    If I say sooth, I must report they were
    As cannons overcharged with double cracks, so they
    Doubly redoubled strokes upon the foe:
    Except they meant to bathe in reeking wounds,
    Or memorise another Golgotha,
    I cannot tell.
  268. whey
    the watery part of milk that separates from cheese curds
    What soldiers, whey-face?
  269. soldier
    an enlisted man or woman who serves in an army
    MALCOLM
    This is the sergeant
    Who like a good and hardy soldier fought
    'Gainst my captivity.
  270. die
    lose all bodily functions necessary to sustain life
    But I have spoke
    With one that saw him die: who did report
    That very frankly he confess'd his treasons,
    Implored your highness' pardon and set forth
    A deep repentance: nothing in his life
    Became him like the leaving it; he died
    As one that had been studied in his death
    To throw away the dearest thing he owed,
    As 'twere a careless trifle.
  271. battlement
    a notched wall around the top of a castle for protection
    The merciless Macdonwald--
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villanies of nature
    Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
    Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
    For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--
    Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like valour's minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave;
    Which ne'er ...
  272. parricide
    the murder of your own father or mother
    MACBETH
    We hear, our bloody cousins are bestow'd
    In England and in Ireland, not confessing
    Their cruel parricide, filling their hearers
    With strange invention: but of that to-morrow,
    When therewithal we shall have cause of state
    Craving us jointly.
  273. dearest
    a beloved person; used as terms of endearment
    But I have spoke
    With one that saw him die: who did report
    That very frankly he confess'd his treasons,
    Implored your highness' pardon and set forth
    A deep repentance: nothing in his life
    Became him like the leaving it; he died
    As one that had been studied in his death
    To throw away the dearest thing he owed,
    As 'twere a careless trifle.
  274. provoke
    provide the needed stimulus for
    MACDUFF
    What three things does drink especially provoke?
  275. detraction
    a petty disparagement
    Devilish Macbeth
    By many of these trains hath sought to win me
    Into his power, and modest wisdom plucks me
    From over-credulous haste: but God above
    Deal between thee and me! for even now
    I put myself to thy direction, and
    Unspeak mine own detraction, here abjure
    The taints and blames I laid upon myself,
    For strangers to my nature.
  276. ghost
    the visible disembodied soul of a dead person
    With Tarquin's ravishing strides, towards his design
    Moves like a ghost.
  277. Beelzebub
    chief spirit of evil and adversary of God
    Who's there, i' the name of
    Beelzebub?
  278. measureless
    without limits in extent or size or quantity
    This diamond he greets your wife withal,
    By the name of most kind hostess; and shut up
    In measureless content.
  279. thank
    express gratitude or show appreciation to
    ANGUS
    We are sent
    To give thee from our royal master thanks;
    Only to herald thee into his sight,
    Not pay thee.
  280. entomb
    place in a grave or tomb
    ROSS
    Ah, good father,
    Thou seest, the heavens, as troubled with man's act,
    Threaten his bloody stage: by the clock, 'tis day,
    And yet dark night strangles the travelling lamp:
    Is't night's predominance, or the day's shame,
    That darkness does the face of earth entomb,
    When living light should kiss it?
  281. death
    the permanent end of all life functions in an organism
    DUNCAN
    No more that thane of Cawdor shall deceive
    Our bosom interest: go pronounce his present death,
    And with his former title greet Macbeth.
  282. direful
    causing fear or dread or terror
    Sergeant
    As whence the sun 'gins his reflection
    Shipwrecking storms and direful thunders break,
    So from that spring whence comfort seem'd to come
    Discomfort swells.
  283. harm
    any physical damage to the body caused by violence or accident or fracture etc.
    But 'tis strange:
    And oftentimes, to win us to our harm,
    The instruments of darkness tell us truths,
    Win us with honest trifles, to betray's
    In deepest consequence.
  284. owe
    be obliged to pay or repay
    Say from whence
    You owe this strange intelligence? or why
    Upon this blasted heath you stop our way
    With such prophetic greeting?
  285. lie
    be prostrate; be in a horizontal position
    MACBETH
    [Aside] The Prince of Cumberland! that is a step
    On which I must fall down, or else o'erleap,
    For in my way it lies.
  286. like
    having the same or similar characteristics
    MALCOLM
    This is the sergeant
    Who like a good and hardy soldier fought
    'Gainst my captivity.
  287. dire
    fraught with extreme danger; nearly hopeless
    Come, you spirits
    That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here,
    And fill me from the crown to the toe top-full
    Of direst cruelty! make thick my blood;
    Stop up the access and passage to remorse,
    That no compunctious visitings of nature
    Shake my fell purpose, nor keep peace between
    The effect and it!
  288. sometime
    at some indefinite or unstated time
    The love that follows us sometime is our trouble,
    Which still we thank as love.
  289. indissoluble
    incapable of being broken up
    BANQUO
    Let your highness
    Command upon me; to the which my duties
    Are with a most indissoluble tie
    For ever knit.
  290. hear
    perceive (sound) via the auditory sense
    MACBETH
    The rest is labour, which is not used for you:
    I'll be myself the harbinger and make joyful
    The hearing of my wife with your approach;
    So humbly take my leave.
  291. hang
    cause to be hanging or suspended
    I will drain him dry as hay:
    Sleep shall neither night nor day
    Hang upon his pent-house lid;
    He shall live a man forbid:
    Weary se'nnights nine times nine
    Shall he dwindle, peak and pine:
    Though his bark cannot be lost,
    Yet it shall be tempest-tost.
  292. smacking
    the act of smacking something
    MALCOLM
    I grant him bloody,
    Luxurious, avaricious, false, deceitful,
    Sudden, malicious, smacking of every sin
    That has a name: but there's no bottom, none,
    In my voluptuousness: your wives, your daughters,
    Your matrons and your maids, could not fill up
    The cistern of my lust, and my desire
    All continent impediments would o'erbear
    That did oppose my will: better Macbeth
    Than such an one to reign.
  293. bestride
    get up on the back of
    MACDUFF
    Let us rather
    Hold fast the mortal sword, and like good men
    Bestride our down-fall'n birthdom: each new morn
    New widows howl, new orphans cry, new sorrows
    Strike heaven on the face, that it resounds
    As if it felt with Scotland and yell'd out
    Like syllable of dolour.
  294. Gorgon
    (Greek mythology) any of three winged sister monsters and the mortal Medusa who had live snakes for hair; a glance at Medusa turned the beholder to stone
    MACDUFF
    Approach the chamber, and destroy your sight
    With a new Gorgon: do not bid me speak;
    See, and then speak yourselves.
  295. ten thousand
    the cardinal number that is the product of ten and one thousand
    ROSS
    That now
    Sweno, the Norways' king, craves composition:
    Nor would we deign him burial of his men
    Till he disbursed at Saint Colme's inch
    Ten thousand dollars to our general use.
  296. braggart
    a very boastful and talkative person
    MACDUFF
    O, I could play the woman with mine eyes
    And braggart with my tongue!
  297. liar
    a person who does not tell the truth
    Son
    Then the liars and swearers are fools,
    for there are liars and swearers enow to beat
    the honest men and hang up them.
  298. scepter
    a ceremonial or emblematic staff
    I'll see no more:
    And yet the eighth appears, who bears a glass
    Which shows me many more; and some I see
    That two-fold balls and treble scepters carry:
    Horrible sight!
  299. abjure
    formally reject or disavow a formerly held belief
    Devilish Macbeth
    By many of these trains hath sought to win me
    Into his power, and modest wisdom plucks me
    From over-credulous haste: but God above
    Deal between thee and me! for even now
    I put myself to thy direction, and
    Unspeak mine own detraction, here abjure
    The taints and blames I laid upon myself,
    For strangers to my nature.
  300. stop up
    fill or close tightly with or as if with a plug
    Come, you spirits
    That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here,
    And fill me from the crown to the toe top-full
    Of direst cruelty! make thick my blood;
    Stop up the access and passage to remorse,
    That no compunctious visitings of nature
    Shake my fell purpose, nor keep peace between
    The effect and it!
  301. flighty
    guided by whim and fancy
    MACBETH
    Time, thou anticipatest my dread exploits:
    The flighty purpose never is o'ertook
    Unless the deed go with it; from this moment
    The very firstlings of my heart shall be
    The firstlings of my hand.
  302. hoodwink
    conceal one's true motives from
    But fear not yet
    To take upon you what is yours: you may
    Convey your pleasures in a spacious plenty,
    And yet seem cold, the time you may so hoodwink.
  303. bosom
    breast
    DUNCAN
    No more that thane of Cawdor shall deceive
    Our bosom interest: go pronounce his present death,
    And with his former title greet Macbeth.
  304. exasperate
    make furious
    Lord
    The son of Duncan,
    From whom this tyrant holds the due of birth
    Lives in the English court, and is received
    Of the most pious Edward with such grace
    That the malevolence of fortune nothing
    Takes from his high respect: thither Macduff
    Is gone to pray the holy king, upon his aid
    To wake Northumberland and warlike Siward:
    That, by the help of these--with Him above
    To ratify the work--we may again
    Give to our tables meat, sleep to our nights,
    Free from our feasts and banquets b...
  305. villain
    someone who does evil deliberately
    Son
    Thou liest, thou shag-hair'd villain!
  306. more
    greater in size or amount or extent or degree
    DUNCAN
    No more that thane of Cawdor shall deceive
    Our bosom interest: go pronounce his present death,
    And with his former title greet Macbeth.
  307. pendent
    an adornment that hangs from a piece of jewelry
    BANQUO
    This guest of summer,
    The temple-haunting martlet, does approve,
    By his loved mansionry, that the heaven's breath
    Smells wooingly here: no jutty, frieze,
    Buttress, nor coign of vantage, but this bird
    Hath made his pendent bed and procreant cradle:
    Where they most breed and haunt, I have observed,
    The air is delicate.
  308. man
    an adult person who is male (as opposed to a woman)
    Enter DUNCAN, MALCOLM, DONALBAIN, LENNOX, with Attendants, meeting a bleeding Sergeant
    DUNCAN
    What bloody man is that?
  309. prick
    make a small hole into, as with a needle or a thorn
    I have no spur
    To prick the sides of my intent, but only
    Vaulting ambition, which o'erleaps itself
    And falls on the other.
  310. things
    any movable possession (especially articles of clothing)
    So should he look
    That seems to speak things strange.
  311. thither
    to or toward that place; away from the speaker
    Her husband's to Aleppo gone, master o' the Tiger:
    But in a sieve I'll thither sail,
    And, like a rat without a tail,
    I'll do, I'll do, and I'll do.
  312. there
    in or at that place
    Third Witch
    There to meet with Macbeth.
  313. physic
    a purging medicine
    MACBETH
    The labour we delight in physics pain.
  314. o'er
    throughout a period of time
    Enter ROSS and ANGUS

    ROSS
    The king hath happily received, Macbeth,
    The news of thy success; and when he reads
    Thy personal venture in the rebels' fight,
    His wonders and his praises do contend
    Which should be thine or his: silenced with that,
    In viewing o'er the rest o' the selfsame day,
    He finds thee in the stout Norweyan ranks,
    Nothing afeard of what thyself didst make,
    Strange images of death.
  315. thing
    a separate and self-contained entity
    So should he look
    That seems to speak things strange.
  316. give
    transfer possession of something concrete or abstract
    Second Witch
    I'll give thee a wind.
  317. well
    in a good or satisfactory manner or to a high standard
    The merciless Macdonwald--
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villanies of nature
    Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
    Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
    For brave Macbeth-- well he deserves that name--
    Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like valour's minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave;
    Which...
  318. ne'er
    not ever; at no time in the past or future
    The merciless Macdonwald--
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villanies of nature
    Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
    Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
    For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--
    Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like valour's minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave;
    Which ne'...
  319. hereafter
    following this in time or order or place; after this
    Third Witch
    All hail, Macbeth, thou shalt be king hereafter!
  320. breed
    cause to procreate (animals)
    BANQUO
    This guest of summer,
    The temple-haunting martlet, does approve,
    By his loved mansionry, that the heaven's breath
    Smells wooingly here: no jutty, frieze,
    Buttress, nor coign of vantage, but this bird
    Hath made his pendent bed and procreant cradle:
    Where they most breed and haunt, I have observed,
    The air is delicate.
  321. flourish
    grow vigorously
    Flourish.
  322. none
    not at all or in no way
    Third Witch
    Thou shalt get kings, though thou be none:
    So all hail, Macbeth and Banquo!
  323. lees
    the sediment from fermentation of an alcoholic beverage
    Re-enter MACBETH and LENNOX, with ROSS

    MACBETH
    Had I but died an hour before this chance,
    I had lived a blessed time; for, from this instant,
    There 's nothing serious in mortality:
    All is but toys: renown and grace is dead;
    The wine of life is drawn, and the mere lees
    Is left this vault to brag of.
  324. assay
    a test of a substance to determine its components
    Doctor
    Ay, sir; there are a crew of wretched souls
    That stay his cure: their malady convinces
    The great assay of art; but at his touch--
    Such sanctity hath heaven given his hand--
    They presently amend.
  325. feast
    a ceremonial dinner party for many people
    Macbeth does murder sleep', the innocent sleep,
    Sleep that knits up the ravell'd sleeve of care,
    The death of each day's life, sore labour's bath,
    Balm of hurt minds, great nature's second course,
    Chief nourisher in life's feast,--

    LADY MACBETH
    What do you mean?
  326. horror
    intense and profound fear
    BANQUO
    New horrors come upon him,
    Like our strange garments, cleave not to their mould
    But with the aid of use.
  327. or else
    in place of, or as an alternative to
    MACBETH
    [Aside] The Prince of Cumberland! that is a step
    On which I must fall down, or else o'erleap,
    For in my way it lies.
  328. mated
    mated sexually
    So, good night:
    My mind she has mated, and amazed my sight.
  329. vanish
    become invisible or unnoticeable
    Witches vanish

    BANQUO
    The earth hath bubbles, as the water has,
    And these are of them.
  330. trammel
    place limits on extent or access
    Then enter MACBETH
    MACBETH
    If it were done when 'tis done, then 'twere well
    It were done quickly: if the assassination
    Could trammel up the consequence, and catch
    With his surcease success; that but this blow
    Might be the be-all and the end-all here,
    But here, upon this bank and shoal of time,
    We'ld jump the life to come.
  331. life
    the organic phenomenon that distinguishes living organisms
    MACBETH
    Stay, you imperfect speakers, tell me more:
    By Sinel's death I know I am thane of Glamis;
    But how of Cawdor? the thane of Cawdor lives,
    A prosperous gentleman; and to be king
    Stands not within the prospect of belief,
    No more than to be Cawdor.
  332. sights
    an optical instrument for aiding the eye in aiming, as on a firearm or surveying instrument
    You make me strange
    Even to the disposition that I owe,
    When now I think you can behold such sights,
    And keep the natural ruby of your cheeks,
    When mine is blanched with fear.
  333. curse
    an appeal to some supernatural power to inflict evil
    A heavy summons lies like lead upon me,
    And yet I would not sleep: merciful powers,
    Restrain in me the cursed thoughts that nature
    Gives way to in repose!
  334. farrow
    the production of a litter of pigs
    First Witch
    Pour in sow's blood, that hath eaten
    Her nine farrow; grease that's sweaten
    From the murderer's gibbet throw
    Into the flame.
  335. thence
    from that place or from there
    Most sacrilegious murder hath broke ope
    The Lord's anointed temple, and stole thence
    The life o' the building!
  336. botch
    make a mess of, destroy, or ruin
    Within this hour at most
    I will advise you where to plant yourselves;
    Acquaint you with the perfect spy o' the time,
    The moment on't; for't must be done to-night,
    And something from the palace; always thought
    That I require a clearness: and with him--
    To leave no rubs nor botches in the work--
    Fleance his son, that keeps him company,
    Whose absence is no less material to me
    Than is his father's, must embrace the fate
    Of that dark hour.
  337. rancour
    a feeling of deep and bitter anger and ill-will
    If 't be so,
    For Banquo's issue have I filed my mind;
    For them the gracious Duncan have I murder'd;
    Put rancours in the vessel of my peace
    Only for them; and mine eternal jewel
    Given to the common enemy of man,
    To make them kings, the seed of Banquo kings!
  338. spongy
    easily squashed
    When Duncan is asleep--
    Whereto the rather shall his day's hard journey
    Soundly invite him--his two chamberlains
    Will I with wine and wassail so convince
    That memory, the warder of the brain,
    Shall be a fume, and the receipt of reason
    A limbeck only: when in swinish sleep
    Their drenched natures lie as in a death,
    What cannot you and I perform upon
    The unguarded Duncan? what not put upon
    His spongy officers, who shall bear the guilt
    Of our great quell?
  339. love
    a strong positive emotion of regard and affection
    Your highness' part
    Is to receive our duties; and our duties
    Are to your throne and state children and servants,
    Which do but what they should, by doing every thing
    Safe toward your love and honour.
  340. wisdom
    accumulated knowledge or erudition or enlightenment
    fears in Banquo
    Stick deep; and in his royalty of nature
    Reigns that which would be fear'd: 'tis much he dares;
    And, to that dauntless temper of his mind,
    He hath a wisdom that doth guide his valour
    To act in safety.
  341. whence
    from what place, source, or cause
    Sergeant
    As whence the sun 'gins his reflection
    Shipwrecking storms and direful thunders break,
    So from that spring whence comfort seem'd to come
    Discomfort swells.
  342. wren
    a small active brown bird of the northern hemisphere
    He loves us not;
    He wants the natural touch: for the poor wren,
    The most diminutive of birds, will fight,
    Her young ones in her nest, against the owl.
  343. curbing
    an edge between a sidewalk and a roadway consisting of a line of curbstones (usually forming part of a gutter)
    Curbing his lavish spirit: and, to conclude,
    The victory fell on us.
  344. epicure
    a person devoted to refined sensuous enjoyment
    Then fly,
    false thanes,
    And mingle with the English epicures:
    The mind I sway by and the heart I bear
    Shall never sag with doubt nor shake with fear.
  345. honours
    a university degree with honors
    LADY MACBETH
    All our service
    In every point twice done and then done double
    Were poor and single business to contend
    Against those honours deep and broad wherewith
    Your majesty loads our house: for those of old,
    And the late dignities heap'd up to them,
    We rest your hermits.
  346. warlike
    disposed to warfare or hard-line policies
    Lord
    The son of Duncan,
    From whom this tyrant holds the due of birth
    Lives in the English court, and is received
    Of the most pious Edward with such grace
    That the malevolence of fortune nothing
    Takes from his high respect: thither Macduff
    Is gone to pray the holy king, upon his aid
    To wake Northumberland and warlike Siward:
    That, by the help of these--with Him above
    To ratify the work--we may again
    Give to our tables meat, sleep to our nights,
    Free from our feasts and ban...
  347. wood
    the hard fibrous lignified substance under the bark of trees
    Light thickens; and the crow
    Makes wing to the rooky wood:
    Good things of day begin to droop and drowse;
    While night's black agents to their preys do rouse.
  348. sainted
    marked by utter benignity
    Thy royal father
    Was a most sainted king: the queen that bore thee,
    Oftener upon her knees than on her feet,
    Died every day she lived.
  349. shag
    a matted tangle of hair or fiber
    Son
    Thou liest, thou shag-hair'd villain!
  350. Bounty
    a ship of the British navy
    MALCOLM
    But I have none: the king-becoming graces,
    As justice, verity, temperance, stableness,
    Bounty, perseverance, mercy, lowliness,
    Devotion, patience, courage, fortitude,
    I have no relish of them, but abound
    In the division of each several crime,
    Acting it many ways.
  351. unaccompanied
    being without an escort
    Sons, kinsmen, thanes,
    And you whose places are the nearest, know
    We will establish our estate upon
    Our eldest, Malcolm, whom we name hereafter
    The Prince of Cumberland; which honour must
    Not unaccompanied invest him only,
    But signs of nobleness, like stars, shall shine
    On all deservers.
  352. requite
    make repayment for or return something
    Porter
    That it did, sir, i' the very throat on
    me: but I requited him for his lie; and, I
    think, being too strong for him, though he took
    up my legs sometime, yet I made a shift to cast
    him.
  353. cry
    shed tears because of sadness, rage, or pain
    But I am faint, my gashes cry for help.
  354. wrack
    the destruction or collapse of something
    Blow, wind! come, wrack!
  355. flee
    run away quickly
    MACDUFF
    They were suborn'd:
    Malcolm and Donalbain, the king's two sons,
    Are stol'n away and fled; which puts upon them
    Suspicion of the deed.
  356. bounteous
    given or giving freely
    MACBETH
    Ay, in the catalogue ye go for men;
    As hounds and greyhounds, mongrels, spaniels, curs,
    Shoughs, water-rugs and demi-wolves, are clept
    All by the name of dogs: the valued file
    Distinguishes the swift, the slow, the subtle,
    The housekeeper, the hunter, every one
    According to the gift which bounteous nature
    Hath in him closed; whereby he does receive
    Particular addition. from the bill
    That writes them all alike: and so of men.
  357. dead
    no longer having or seeming to have or expecting to have life
    Messenger
    So please you, it is true: our thane is coming:
    One of my fellows had the speed of him,
    Who, almost dead for breath, had scarcely more
    Than would make up his message.
  358. Aleppo
    a city in northwestern Syria
    Her husband's to Aleppo gone, master o' the Tiger:
    But in a sieve I'll thither sail,
    And, like a rat without a tail,
    I'll do, I'll do, and I'll do.
  359. kite
    plaything consisting of a light frame covered with tissue paper; flown in wind at end of a string
    If charnel-houses and our graves must send
    Those that we bury back, our monuments
    Shall be the maws of kites.
  360. charm
    attractiveness that interests or pleases or stimulates
    Peace! the charm's wound up.
  361. unnatural
    not in accordance with or determined by nature
    Old Man
    'Tis unnatural,
    Even like the deed that's done.
  362. sleight
    adroitness in using the hands
    I am for the air; this night I'll spend
    Unto a dismal and a fatal end:
    Great business must be wrought ere noon:
    Upon the corner of the moon
    There hangs a vaporous drop profound;
    I'll catch it ere it come to ground:
    And that distill'd by magic sleights
    Shall raise such artificial sprites
    As by the strength of their illusion
    Shall draw him on to his confusion:
    He shall spurn fate, scorn death, and bear
    He hopes 'bove wisdom, grace and fear:
    And you all know, security
    Is mor...
  363. Tarquin
    according to legend, the seventh and last Etruscan king of Rome who was expelled for his cruelty (reigned from 534 to 510 BC)
    With Tarquin's ravishing strides, towards his design
    Moves like a ghost.
  364. receive
    get something; come into possession of
    Enter ROSS and ANGUS

    ROSS
    The king hath happily received, Macbeth,
    The news of thy success; and when he reads
    Thy personal venture in the rebels' fight,
    His wonders and his praises do contend
    Which should be thine or his: silenced with that,
    In viewing o'er the rest o' the selfsame day,
    He finds thee in the stout Norweyan ranks,
    Nothing afeard of what thyself didst make,
    Strange images of death.
  365. swift
    moving very fast
    The sin of my ingratitude even now
    Was heavy on me: thou art so far before
    That swiftest wing of recompense is slow
    To overtake thee.
  366. crown
    an ornamental jeweled headdress signifying sovereignty
    BANQUO
    That trusted home
    Might yet enkindle you unto the crown,
    Besides the thane of Cawdor.
  367. fight
    be engaged in a contest or struggle
    MALCOLM
    This is the sergeant
    Who like a good and hardy soldier fought
    'Gainst my captivity.
  368. fill up
    become full
    BANQUO
    As far, my lord, as will fill up the time
    'Twixt this and supper: go not my horse the better,
    I must become a borrower of the night
    For a dark hour or twain.
  369. see
    perceive by sight or have the power to perceive by sight
    ROSS
    I'll see it done.
  370. juggling
    throwing and catching several objects simultaneously
    And be these juggling fiends no more believed,
    That palter with us in a double sense;
    That keep the word of promise to our ear,
    And break it to our hope.
  371. timely
    done or happening at the appropriate moment
    MACDUFF
    He did command me to call timely on him:
    I have almost slipp'd the hour.
  372. pernicious
    exceedingly harmful
    Let this pernicious hour
    Stand aye accursed in the calendar!
  373. great
    a person who has achieved distinction in some field
    ROSS
    From Fife, great king;
    Where the Norweyan banners flout the sky
    And fan our people cold.
  374. threescore
    being ten more than fifty
    Enter ROSS and an old Man
    Old Man
    Threescore and ten I can remember well:
    Within the volume of which time I have seen
    Hours dreadful and things strange; but this sore night
    Hath trifled former knowings.
  375. adder
    a person who adds numbers
    Second Witch
    Fillet of a fenny snake,
    In the cauldron boil and bake;
    Eye of newt and toe of frog,
    Wool of bat and tongue of dog,
    Adder's fork and blind-worm's sting,
    Lizard's leg and owlet's wing,
    For a charm of powerful trouble,
    Like a hell-broth boil and bubble.
  376. vaulting
    (architecture) a vaulted structure
    I have no spur
    To prick the sides of my intent, but only
    Vaulting ambition, which o'erleaps itself
    And falls on the other.
  377. at the worst
    under the worst of conditions
    I take my leave of you:
    Shall not be long but I'll be here again:
    Things at the worst will cease, or else climb upward
    To what they were before.
  378. bring forth
    bring into existence
    MACBETH
    Bring forth men-children only;
    For thy undaunted mettle should compose
    Nothing but males.
  379. dismal
    causing dejection
    Norway himself,
    With terrible numbers,
    Assisted by that most disloyal traitor
    The thane of Cawdor, began a dismal conflict;
    Till that Bellona's bridegroom, lapp'd in proof,
    Confronted him with self-comparisons,
    Point against point rebellious, arm 'gainst arm.
  380. gory
    covered with blood
    MACBETH
    Thou canst not say I did it: never shake
    Thy gory locks at me.
  381. poor
    having little money or few possessions
    LADY MACBETH
    All our service
    In every point twice done and then done double
    Were poor and single business to contend
    Against those honours deep and broad wherewith
    Your majesty loads our house: for those of old,
    And the late dignities heap'd up to them,
    We rest your hermits.
  382. thought
    the content of cognition
    Present fears
    Are less than horrible imaginings:
    My thought, whose murder yet is but fantastical,
    Shakes so my single state of man that function
    Is smother'd in surmise, and nothing is
    But what is not.
  383. too
    to a degree exceeding normal or proper limits
    The merciless Macdonwald--
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villanies of nature
    Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
    Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
    For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--
    Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like valour's minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave;
    Which...
  384. malice
    the desire to see others suffer
    Fears and scruples shake us:
    In the great hand of God I stand; and thence
    Against the undivulged pretence I fight
    Of treasonous malice.
  385. groom
    someone employed in a stable to take care of the horses
    He is about it:
    The doors are open; and the surfeited grooms
    Do mock their charge with snores: I have drugg'd
    their possets,
    That death and nature do contend about them,
    Whether they live or die.
  386. malevolence
    wishing evil to others
    Lord
    The son of Duncan,
    From whom this tyrant holds the due of birth
    Lives in the English court, and is received
    Of the most pious Edward with such grace
    That the malevolence of fortune nothing
    Takes from his high respect: thither Macduff
    Is gone to pray the holy king, upon his aid
    To wake Northumberland and warlike Siward:
    That, by the help of these--with Him above
    To ratify the work--we may again
    Give to our tables meat, sleep to our nights,
    Free from our feasts and ban...
  387. armour
    protective covering made of metal and used in combat
    Give me my armour.
  388. royal
    of or relating to a king, queen, or other monarch
    My noble partner
    You greet with present grace and great prediction
    Of noble having and of royal hope,
    That he seems rapt withal: to me you speak not.
  389. both
    (used with count nouns) two considered together; the two
    DUNCAN
    So well thy words become thee as thy wounds;
    They smack of honour both.
  390. deserve
    be worthy
    The merciless Macdonwald--
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villanies of nature
    Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
    Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
    For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--
    Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like valour's minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave;
    Which...
  391. rhubarb
    plants having long green or reddish acidic leafstalks growing in basal clumps; stems (and only the stems) are edible when cooked; leaves are poisonous
    What rhubarb, cyme, or what purgative drug,
    Would scour these English hence?
  392. nipple
    the small projection of a mammary gland
    I have given suck, and know
    How tender 'tis to love the babe that milks me:
    I would, while it was smiling in my face,
    Have pluck'd my nipple from his boneless gums,
    And dash'd the brains out, had I so sworn as you
    Have done to this.
  393. then
    at that time
    If you can look into the seeds of time,
    And say which grain will grow and which will not,
    Speak then to me, who neither beg nor fear
    Your favours nor your hate.
  394. grief
    intense sorrow caused by loss of a loved one
    LADY MACBETH
    Who dares receive it other,
    As we shall make our griefs and clamour roar
    Upon his death?
  395. applaud
    clap one's hands or shout to indicate approval
    MACBETH
    Be innocent of the knowledge, dearest chuck,
    Till thou applaud the deed.
  396. make good
    act as promised
    Old Man
    God's benison go with you; and with those
    That would make good of bad, and friends of foes!
  397. summons
    a request to be present
    A heavy summons lies like lead upon me,
    And yet I would not sleep: merciful powers,
    Restrain in me the cursed thoughts that nature
    Gives way to in repose!
  398. sight
    the ability to see; the visual faculty
    ANGUS
    We are sent
    To give thee from our royal master thanks;
    Only to herald thee into his sight,
    Not pay thee.
  399. unattended
    not watched
    Your constancy
    Hath left you unattended.
  400. ravishing
    stunningly beautiful
    With Tarquin's ravishing strides, towards his design
    Moves like a ghost.
  401. Here
    queen of the Olympian gods in ancient Greek mythology
    First Witch
    Here I have a pilot's thumb,
    Wreck'd as homeward he did come.
  402. commend
    present as worthy of regard, kindness, or confidence
    But in these cases
    We still have judgment here; that we but teach
    Bloody instructions, which, being taught, return
    To plague the inventor: this even-handed justice
    Commends the ingredients of our poison'd chalice
    To our own lips.
  403. forswear
    formally reject or disavow
    I am yet
    Unknown to woman, never was forsworn,
    Scarcely have coveted what was mine own,
    At no time broke my faith, would not betray
    The devil to his fellow and delight
    No less in truth than life: my first false speaking
    Was this upon myself: what I am truly,
    Is thine and my poor country's to command:
    Whither indeed, before thy here-approach,
    Old Siward, with ten thousand warlike men,
    Already at a point, was setting forth.
  404. trouble
    a source of difficulty
    The love that follows us sometime is our trouble,
    Which still we thank as love.
  405. More
    English statesman who opposed Henry VIII's divorce from Catherine of Aragon and was imprisoned and beheaded; recalled for his concept of Utopia, the ideal state
    Would thou hadst less deserved,
    That the proportion both of thanks and payment
    Might have been mine! only I have left to say,
    More is thy due than more than all can pay.
  406. crave
    have an appetite or great desire for
    ROSS
    That now
    Sweno, the Norways' king, craves composition:
    Nor would we deign him burial of his men
    Till he disbursed at Saint Colme's inch
    Ten thousand dollars to our general use.
  407. elves
    an acronym for emissions of light and very low frequency perturbations due to electromagnetic pulse sources; extremely bright extremely short (less than a msec) electrical flashes forming a huge ring (up to 400 km diameter) in the ionosphere
    I commend your pains;
    And every one shall share i' the gains;
    And now about the cauldron sing,
    Live elves and fairies in a ring,
    Enchanting all that you put in.
  408. dwindle
    become smaller or lose substance
    I will drain him dry as hay:
    Sleep shall neither night nor day
    Hang upon his pent-house lid;
    He shall live a man forbid:
    Weary se'nnights nine times nine
    Shall he dwindle, peak and pine:
    Though his bark cannot be lost,
    Yet it shall be tempest-tost.
  409. eye
    the organ of sight
    LENNOX
    What a haste looks through his eyes!
  410. displace
    cause to move, usually with force or pressure
    LADY MACBETH
    You have displaced the mirth, broke the good meeting,
    With most admired disorder.
  411. avarice
    reprehensible acquisitiveness; insatiable desire for wealth
    MALCOLM
    With this there grows
    In my most ill-composed affection such
    A stanchless avarice that, were I king,
    I should cut off the nobles for their lands,
    Desire his jewels and this other's house:
    And my more-having would be as a sauce
    To make me hunger more; that I should forge
    Quarrels unjust against the good and loyal,
    Destroying them for wealth.
  412. air
    a mixture of gases required for breathing
    ALL
    Fair is foul, and foul is fair:
    Hover through the fog and filthy air.
  413. pristine
    immaculately clean and unused
    If thou couldst, doctor, cast
    The water of my land, find her disease,
    And purge it to a sound and pristine health,
    I would applaud thee to the very echo,
    That should applaud again.--Pull't
  414. adage
    a condensed but memorable saying embodying an important fact
    Wouldst thou have that
    Which thou esteem'st the ornament of life,
    And live a coward in thine own esteem,
    Letting 'I dare not' wait upon 'I would,'
    Like the poor cat i' the adage?
  415. fatherless
    having no living male parent
    LADY MACDUFF
    Father'd he is, and yet he's fatherless.
  416. undo
    cancel, annul, or reverse an action or its effect
    Glamis thou art, and Cawdor; and shalt be
    What thou art promised: yet do I fear thy nature;
    It is too full o' the milk of human kindness
    To catch the nearest way: thou wouldst be great;
    Art not without ambition, but without
    The illness should attend it: what thou wouldst highly,
    That wouldst thou holily; wouldst not play false,
    And yet wouldst wrongly win: thou'ldst have, great Glamis,
    That which cries 'Thus thou must do, if thou have it;
    And that which rather thou dost fear to do
    ...
  417. sacrilegious
    grossly irreverent toward what is considered holy
    Most sacrilegious murder hath broke ope
    The Lord's anointed temple, and stole thence
    The life o' the building!
  418. predominance
    the quality of being more noticeable than anything else
    ROSS
    Ah, good father,
    Thou seest, the heavens, as troubled with man's act,
    Threaten his bloody stage: by the clock, 'tis day,
    And yet dark night strangles the travelling lamp:
    Is't night's predominance, or the day's shame,
    That darkness does the face of earth entomb,
    When living light should kiss it?
  419. demerit
    a quality or feature deserving censure
    Sinful Macduff,
    They were all struck for thee! naught that I am,
    Not for their own demerits, but for mine,
    Fell slaughter on their souls.
  420. unkindness
    lack of sympathy
    The GHOST OF BANQUO enters, and sits in MACBETH's place

    MACBETH
    Here had we now our country's honour roof'd,
    Were the graced person of our Banquo present;
    Who may I rather challenge for unkindness
    Than pity for mischance!
  421. scruples
    motivation deriving from ethical or moral principles
    Fears and scruples shake us:
    In the great hand of God I stand; and thence
    Against the undivulged pretence I fight
    Of treasonous malice.
  422. wrought
    shaped to fit by altering the contours of a pliable mass
    MACBETH
    Give me your favour: my dull brain was wrought
    With things forgotten.
  423. shake
    move or cause to move back and forth
    The merciless Macdonwald--
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villanies of nature
    Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
    Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
    For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--
    Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like valour's minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave;
    Which ne'er ...
  424. damned
    people who are condemned to eternal punishment
    The merciless Macdonwald--
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villanies of nature
    Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
    Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
    For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--
    Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like valour's minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave;
    Which...
  425. ring
    a toroidal shape
    A bell rings

    I go, and it is done; the bell invites me.
  426. mingle
    bring or combine together or with something else
    MACBETH
    Ourself will mingle with society,
    And play the humble host.
  427. casing
    the housing or outer covering of something
    MACBETH
    Then comes my fit again: I had else been perfect,
    Whole as the marble, founded as the rock,
    As broad and general as the casing air:
    But now I am cabin'd, cribb'd, confined, bound in
    To saucy doubts and fears.
  428. horrid
    grossly offensive to decency or morality
    I am thane of Cawdor:
    If good, why do I yield to that suggestion
    Whose horrid image doth unfix my hair
    And make my seated heart knock at my ribs,
    Against the use of nature?
  429. purveyor
    someone who supplies provisions, especially food
    We coursed him at the heels, and had a purpose
    To be his purveyor: but he rides well;
    And his great love, sharp as his spur, hath holp him
    To his home before us.
  430. nine times
    by a factor of nine
    I will drain him dry as hay:
    Sleep shall neither night nor day
    Hang upon his pent-house lid;
    He shall live a man forbid:
    Weary se'nnights nine times nine
    Shall he dwindle, peak and pine:
    Though his bark cannot be lost,
    Yet it shall be tempest-tost.
  431. sickly
    somewhat ill or prone to illness
    Now, if you have a station in the file,
    Not i' the worst rank of manhood, say 't;
    And I will put that business in your bosoms,
    Whose execution takes your enemy off,
    Grapples you to the heart and love of us,
    Who wear our health but sickly in his life,
    Which in his death were perfect.
  432. at odds
    in disagreement
    LADY MACBETH
    Almost at odds with morning, which is which.
  433. surfeit
    indulge (one's appetite) to satiety
    He is about it:
    The doors are open; and the surfeited grooms
    Do mock their charge with snores: I have drugg'd
    their possets,
    That death and nature do contend about them,
    Whether they live or die.
  434. mongrel
    derogatory term for a variation that is not genuine
    MACBETH
    Ay, in the catalogue ye go for men;
    As hounds and greyhounds, mongrels, spaniels, curs,
    Shoughs, water-rugs and demi-wolves, are clept
    All by the name of dogs: the valued file
    Distinguishes the swift, the slow, the subtle,
    The housekeeper, the hunter, every one
    According to the gift which bounteous nature
    Hath in him closed; whereby he does receive
    Particular addition. from the bill
    That writes them all alike: and so of men.
  435. stabbing
    painful as if caused by a sharp instrument
    Stabbing him

    Young fry of treachery!
  436. peace
    the state prevailing during the absence of war
    Peace! the charm's wound up.
  437. topple
    fall down, as if collapsing
    MACBETH
    I conjure you, by that which you profess,
    Howe'er you come to know it, answer me:
    Though you untie the winds and let them fight
    Against the churches; though the yesty waves
    Confound and swallow navigation up;
    Though bladed corn be lodged and trees blown down;
    Though castles topple on their warders' heads;
    Though palaces and pyramids do slope
    Their heads to their foundations; though the treasure
    Of nature's germens tumble all together,
    Even till destruction sicken; ...
  438. the devil
    something difficult or awkward to do or deal with
    BANQUO
    What, can the devil speak true?
  439. breath
    the process of taking in and expelling air during breathing
    MACBETH
    Into the air; and what seem'd corporal melted
    As breath into the wind.
  440. untie
    cause to become loose
    MACBETH
    I conjure you, by that which you profess,
    Howe'er you come to know it, answer me:
    Though you untie the winds and let them fight
    Against the churches; though the yesty waves
    Confound and swallow navigation up;
    Though bladed corn be lodged and trees blown down;
    Though castles topple on their warders' heads;
    Though palaces and pyramids do slope
    Their heads to their foundations; though the treasure
    Of nature's germens tumble all together,
    Even till destruction sicken; ...
  441. show
    make visible or noticeable
    Second Witch
    Show me, show me.
  442. pricking
    the act of puncturing with a small point
    Music and a song: 'Black spirits,' & c

    HECATE retires

    Second Witch
    By the pricking of my thumbs,
    Something wicked this way comes.
  443. chamber
    a natural or artificial enclosed space
    LADY MACBETH
    He has almost supp'd: why have you left the chamber?
  444. paddock
    a pen for horses
    Second Witch
    Paddock calls.
  445. stand
    be standing; be upright
    Sergeant
    Doubtful it stood;
    As two spent swimmers, that do cling together
    And choke their art.
  446. taint
    place under suspicion or cast doubt upon
    Devilish Macbeth
    By many of these trains hath sought to win me
    Into his power, and modest wisdom plucks me
    From over-credulous haste: but God above
    Deal between thee and me! for even now
    I put myself to thy direction, and
    Unspeak mine own detraction, here abjure
    The taints and blames I laid upon myself,
    For strangers to my nature.
  447. enfold
    wrap or surround completely with or as if with a covering
    Noble Banquo,
    That hast no less deserved, nor must be known
    No less to have done so, let me enfold thee
    And hold thee to my heart.
  448. downy
    soft and fluffy, like small feathers
    Shake off this downy sleep, death's counterfeit,
    And look on death itself! up, up, and see
    The great doom's image!
  449. disjoint
    having no elements in common
    But let the frame of things disjoint, both the
    worlds suffer,
    Ere we will eat our meal in fear and sleep
    In the affliction of these terrible dreams
    That shake us nightly: better be with the dead,
    Whom we, to gain our peace, have sent to peace,
    Than on the torture of the mind to lie
    In restless ecstasy.
  450. may
    thorny shrub of a small tree having white to scarlet flowers
    Live you? or are you aught
    That man may question?
  451. cistern
    a sac or cavity containing fluid
    MALCOLM
    I grant him bloody,
    Luxurious, avaricious, false, deceitful,
    Sudden, malicious, smacking of every sin
    That has a name: but there's no bottom, none,
    In my voluptuousness: your wives, your daughters,
    Your matrons and your maids, could not fill up
    The cistern of my lust, and my desire
    All continent impediments would o'erbear
    That did oppose my will: better Macbeth
    Than such an one to reign.
  452. pains
    an effortful attempt to attain a goal
    To ROSS and ANGUS

    Thanks for your pains.
  453. recoil
    spring back; spring away from an impact
    A good and virtuous nature may recoil
    In an imperial charge.
  454. slain
    killed; `slain' is formal or literary as in "slain warriors"
    MACDUFF
    Those that Macbeth hath slain.
  455. contend
    compete for something
    Enter ROSS and ANGUS

    ROSS
    The king hath happily received, Macbeth,
    The news of thy success; and when he reads
    Thy personal venture in the rebels' fight,
    His wonders and his praises do contend
    Which should be thine or his: silenced with that,
    In viewing o'er the rest o' the selfsame day,
    He finds thee in the stout Norweyan ranks,
    Nothing afeard of what thyself didst make,
    Strange images of death.
  456. gentle
    soft and mild; not harsh or stern or severe
    Enter DUNCAN, MALCOLM, DONALBAIN, BANQUO, LENNOX, MACDUFF, ROSS, ANGUS, and Attendants
    DUNCAN
    This castle hath a pleasant seat; the air
    Nimbly and sweetly recommends itself
    Unto our gentle senses.
  457. scorn
    lack of respect accompanied by a feeling of intense dislike
    I am for the air; this night I'll spend
    Unto a dismal and a fatal end:
    Great business must be wrought ere noon:
    Upon the corner of the moon
    There hangs a vaporous drop profound;
    I'll catch it ere it come to ground:
    And that distill'd by magic sleights
    Shall raise such artificial sprites
    As by the strength of their illusion
    Shall draw him on to his confusion:
    He shall spurn fate, scorn death, and bear
    He hopes 'bove wisdom, grace and fear:
    And you all know, security
    Is mor...
  458. cast aside
    throw or cast away
    MACBETH
    We will proceed no further in this business:
    He hath honour'd me of late; and I have bought
    Golden opinions from all sorts of people,
    Which would be worn now in their newest gloss,
    Not cast aside so soon.
  459. prate
    speak about unimportant matters rapidly and incessantly
    Thou sure and firm-set earth,
    Hear not my steps, which way they walk, for fear
    Thy very stones prate of my whereabout,
    And take the present horror from the time,
    Which now suits with it.
  460. leave
    go away from a place
    Say to the king the knowledge of the broil
    As thou didst leave it.
  461. banquet
    a ceremonial dinner party for many people
    Exit

    DUNCAN
    True, worthy Banquo; he is full so valiant,
    And in his commendations I am fed;
    It is a banquet to me.
  462. outrun
    run faster than
    No man:
    The expedition my violent love
    Outrun the pauser, reason.
  463. bell
    a hollow metal device that makes a ringing sound when struck
    Exeunt BANQUO and FLEANCE

    MACBETH
    Go bid thy mistress, when my drink is ready,
    She strike upon the bell.
  464. baboon
    large terrestrial monkeys having doglike muzzles
    Second Witch
    Cool it with a baboon's blood,
    Then the charm is firm and good.
  465. damn
    something of little value
    The merciless Macdonwald--
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villanies of nature
    Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
    Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
    For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--
    Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like valour's minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave;
    Which...
  466. mischance
    an unpredictable outcome that is unfortunate
    The GHOST OF BANQUO enters, and sits in MACBETH's place

    MACBETH
    Here had we now our country's honour roof'd,
    Were the graced person of our Banquo present;
    Who may I rather challenge for unkindness
    Than pity for mischance!
  467. porter
    a person employed to carry luggage and supplies
    If a
    man were porter of hell-gate, he should have
    old turning the key.
  468. drink
    take in liquids
    LADY MACBETH
    Was the hope drunk
    Wherein you dress'd yourself? hath it slept since?
  469. look
    perceive with attention; direct one's gaze towards
    LENNOX
    What a haste looks through his eyes!
  470. gruel
    a thin porridge
    Third Witch
    Scale of dragon, tooth of wolf,
    Witches' mummy, maw and gulf
    Of the ravin'd salt-sea shark,
    Root of hemlock digg'd i' the dark,
    Liver of blaspheming Jew,
    Gall of goat, and slips of yew
    Silver'd in the moon's eclipse,
    Nose of Turk and Tartar's lips,
    Finger of birth-strangled babe
    Ditch-deliver'd by a drab,
    Make the gruel thick and slab:
    Add thereto a tiger's chaudron,
    For the ingredients of our cauldron.
  471. woeful
    affected by or full of grief or sadness
    LENNOX
    The night has been unruly: where we lay,
    Our chimneys were blown down; and, as they say,
    Lamentings heard i' the air; strange screams of death,
    And prophesying with accents terrible
    Of dire combustion and confused events
    New hatch'd to the woeful time: the obscure bird
    Clamour'd the livelong night: some say, the earth
    Was feverous and did shake.
  472. Cumberland
    English general
    Sons, kinsmen, thanes,
    And you whose places are the nearest, know
    We will establish our estate upon
    Our eldest, Malcolm, whom we name hereafter
    The Prince of Cumberland; which honour must
    Not unaccompanied invest him only,
    But signs of nobleness, like stars, shall shine
    On all deservers.
  473. say
    utter aloud
    Say to the king the knowledge of the broil
    As thou didst leave it.
  474. infected
    containing or resulting from disease-causing organisms
    MACBETH
    Infected be the air whereon they ride;
    And damn'd all those that trust them!
  475. tyranny
    government in which the ruler is an absolute dictator
    Great tyranny! lay thou thy basis sure,
    For goodness dare not cheque thee: wear thou
    thy wrongs;
    The title is affeer'd!
  476. avaricious
    immoderately desirous of acquiring something
    MALCOLM
    I grant him bloody,
    Luxurious, avaricious, false, deceitful,
    Sudden, malicious, smacking of every sin
    That has a name: but there's no bottom, none,
    In my voluptuousness: your wives, your daughters,
    Your matrons and your maids, could not fill up
    The cistern of my lust, and my desire
    All continent impediments would o'erbear
    That did oppose my will: better Macbeth
    Than such an one to reign.
  477. again
    anew
    Enter three Witches
    First Witch
    When shall we three meet again
    In thunder, lightning, or in rain?
  478. smack
    a blow from a flat object (as an open hand)
    DUNCAN
    So well thy words become thee as thy wounds;
    They smack of honour both.
  479. nobleness
    the quality of elevation of mind and exaltation of character or ideals or conduct
    Sons, kinsmen, thanes,
    And you whose places are the nearest, know
    We will establish our estate upon
    Our eldest, Malcolm, whom we name hereafter
    The Prince of Cumberland; which honour must
    Not unaccompanied invest him only,
    But signs of nobleness, like stars, shall shine
    On all deservers.
  480. look on
    observe with attention
    Looking on his hands

    LADY MACBETH
    A foolish thought, to say a sorry sight.
  481. sear
    become superficially burned (also figurative)
    Thy crown does sear mine eye-balls.
  482. born
    brought into existence
    Besides, this Duncan
    Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been
    So clear in his great office, that his virtues
    Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against
    The deep damnation of his taking-off;
    And pity, like a naked new- born babe,
    Striding the blast, or heaven's cherubim, horsed
    Upon the sightless couriers of the air,
    Shall blow the horrid deed in every eye,
    That tears shall drown the wind.
  483. loon
    large somewhat primitive fish-eating diving bird of the northern hemisphere having webbed feet placed far back; related to the grebes
    Enter a Servant

    The devil damn thee black, thou cream-faced loon!
  484. awake
    not in a state of sleep; completely conscious
    LADY MACBETH
    Alack, I am afraid they have awaked,
    And 'tis not done.
  485. farewell
    an acknowledgment or expression of goodwill at parting
    The merciless Macdonwald--
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villanies of nature
    Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
    Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
    For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--
    Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like valour's minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave;
    Which ne'er ...
  486. chastise
    scold or criticize severely
    Hie thee hither,
    That I may pour my spirits in thine ear;
    And chastise with the valour of my tongue
    All that impedes thee from the golden round,
    Which fate and metaphysical aid doth seem
    To have thee crown'd withal.
  487. invite
    ask someone in a friendly way to do something
    When Duncan is asleep--
    Whereto the rather shall his day's hard journey
    Soundly invite him--his two chamberlains
    Will I with wine and wassail so convince
    That memory, the warder of the brain,
    Shall be a fume, and the receipt of reason
    A limbeck only: when in swinish sleep
    Their drenched natures lie as in a death,
    What cannot you and I perform upon
    The unguarded Duncan? what not put upon
    His spongy officers, who shall bear the guilt
    Of our great quell?
  488. root
    underground plant organ that lacks buds or leaves or nodes
    Or have we eaten on the insane root
    That takes the reason prisoner?
  489. frieze
    an ornament consisting of a horizontal sculptured band
    BANQUO
    This guest of summer,
    The temple-haunting martlet, does approve,
    By his loved mansionry, that the heaven's breath
    Smells wooingly here: no jutty, frieze,
    Buttress, nor coign of vantage, but this bird
    Hath made his pendent bed and procreant cradle:
    Where they most breed and haunt, I have observed,
    The air is delicate.
  490. reconcile
    come to terms
    MALCOLM
    Macduff, this noble passion,
    Child of integrity, hath from my soul
    Wiped the black scruples, reconciled my thoughts
    To thy good truth and honour.
  491. sicken
    make ill
    MACBETH
    I conjure you, by that which you profess,
    Howe'er you come to know it, answer me:
    Though you untie the winds and let them fight
    Against the churches; though the yesty waves
    Confound and swallow navigation up;
    Though bladed corn be lodged and trees blown down;
    Though castles topple on their warders' heads;
    Though palaces and pyramids do slope
    Their heads to their foundations; though the treasure
    Of nature's germens tumble all together,
    Even till destruction sicken; ...
  492. bring off
    be successful; achieve a goal
    ROSS
    Ay, and brought off the field: your cause of sorrow
    Must not be measured by his worth, for then
    It hath no end.
  493. wife
    a married woman; a partner in marriage
    First Witch
    A sailor's wife had chestnuts in her lap,
    And munch'd, and munch'd, and munch'd:--
    'Give me,' quoth I:
    'Aroint thee, witch!' the rump-fed ronyon cries.
  494. entrails
    internal organs collectively
    First Witch
    Round about the cauldron go;
    In the poison'd entrails throw.
  495. III
    the cardinal number that is the sum of one and one and one
    Exeunt

    SCENE III. A heath near Forres.
  496. this night
    during the night of the present day
    He that's coming
    Must be provided for: and you shall put
    This night's great business into my dispatch;
    Which shall to all our nights and days to come
    Give solely sovereign sway and masterdom.
  497. innocent
    free from sin
    To beguile the time,
    Look like the time; bear welcome in your eye,
    Your hand, your tongue: look like the innocent flower,
    But be the serpent under't.
  498. further
    to or at a greater extent or degree or a more advanced stage
    From hence to Inverness,
    And bind us further to you.
  499. bring
    take something or somebody with oneself somewhere
    LADY MACBETH
    Give him tending;
    He brings great news.
  500. beguile
    attract; cause to be enamored
    To beguile the time,
    Look like the time; bear welcome in your eye,
    Your hand, your tongue: look like the innocent flower,
    But be the serpent under't.
  501. remembrance
    the ability to recall past occurrences
    LENNOX
    My young remembrance cannot parallel
    A fellow to it.
  502. pluck
    pull lightly but sharply
    What hands are here? ha! they pluck out mine eyes.
  503. most
    quantifier meaning the greatest in number
    Norway himself,
    With terrible numbers,
    Assisted by that most disloyal traitor
    The thane of Cawdor, began a dismal conflict;
    Till that Bellona's bridegroom, lapp'd in proof,
    Confronted him with self-comparisons,
    Point against point rebellious, arm 'gainst arm.
  504. raze
    tear down so as to make flat with the ground
    Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased,
    Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow,
    Raze out the written troubles of the brain
    And with some sweet oblivious antidote
    Cleanse the stuff'd bosom of that perilous stuff
    Which weighs upon the heart?
  505. marching
    the act of marching; walking with regular steps
    Exeunt, marching

    SCENE III. Dunsinane.
  506. disloyal
    deserting your allegiance to some person or principle
    Norway himself,
    With terrible numbers,
    Assisted by that most disloyal traitor
    The thane of Cawdor, began a dismal conflict;
    Till that Bellona's bridegroom, lapp'd in proof,
    Confronted him with self-comparisons,
    Point against point rebellious, arm 'gainst arm.
  507. report
    to give an account or representation of in words
    He can report,
    As seemeth by his plight, of the revolt
    The newest state.
  508. meet
    come together
    Enter three Witches
    First Witch
    When shall we three meet again
    In thunder, lightning, or in rain?
  509. colour
    a visual attribute of things from the light they emit
    Re-enter LADY MACBETH

    LADY MACBETH
    My hands are of your colour; but I shame
    To wear a heart so white.
  510. chalice
    a bowl-shaped drinking vessel
    But in these cases
    We still have judgment here; that we but teach
    Bloody instructions, which, being taught, return
    To plague the inventor: this even-handed justice
    Commends the ingredients of our poison'd chalice
    To our own lips.
  511. worm
    any of numerous relatively small elongated soft-bodied animals especially of the phyla Annelida and Chaetognatha and Nematoda and Nemertea and Platyhelminthes; also many insect larvae
    MACBETH
    Thanks for that:
    There the grown serpent lies; the worm that's fled
    Hath nature that in time will venom breed,
    No teeth for the present.
  512. nimbly
    in a nimble or agile manner
    Enter DUNCAN, MALCOLM, DONALBAIN, BANQUO, LENNOX, MACDUFF, ROSS, ANGUS, and Attendants
    DUNCAN
    This castle hath a pleasant seat; the air
    Nimbly and sweetly recommends itself
    Unto our gentle senses.
  513. father
    a male parent
    Had he not resembled
    My father as he slept, I had done't.
  514. desire
    the feeling that accompanies an unsatisfied state
    Stars, hide your fires;
    Let not light see my black and deep desires:
    The eye wink at the hand; yet let that be,
    Which the eye fears, when it is done, to see.
  515. wherefore
    the cause or intention underlying an action or situation
    MACBETH
    But wherefore could not I pronounce 'Amen'?
  516. before
    at or in the front
    As thick as hail
    Came post with post; and every one did bear
    Thy praises in his kingdom's great defence,
    And pour'd them down before him.
  517. multitudinous
    too numerous to be counted
    No, this my hand will rather
    The multitudinous seas in incarnadine,
    Making the green one red.
  518. gall
    a digestive juice secreted by the liver
    Come to my woman's breasts,
    And take my milk for gall, you murdering ministers,
    Wherever in your sightless substances
    You wait on nature's mischief!
  519. emptying
    the act of removing the contents of something
    MACDUFF
    Boundless intemperance
    In nature is a tyranny; it hath been
    The untimely emptying of the happy throne
    And fall of many kings.
  520. confound
    be confusing or perplexing to
    The attempt and not the deed
    Confounds us.
  521. thirty-one
    being one more than thirty
    Toad, that under cold stone
    Days and nights has thirty-one
    Swelter'd venom sleeping got,
    Boil thou first i' the charmed pot.
  522. mettle
    the courage to carry on
    MACBETH
    Bring forth men-children only;
    For thy undaunted mettle should compose
    Nothing but males.
  523. grave
    a place for the burial of a corpse
    As from your graves rise up, and walk like sprites,
    To countenance this horror!
  524. fool
    a person who lacks good judgment
    Mine eyes are made the fools o' the other senses,
    Or else worth all the rest; I see thee still,
    And on thy blade and dudgeon gouts of blood,
    Which was not so before.
  525. compose
    form the substance of
    MACBETH
    Bring forth men-children only;
    For thy undaunted mettle should compose
    Nothing but males.
  526. bless
    make the sign of the cross to call on God for protection
    MACBETH
    One cried 'God bless us!' and 'Amen' the other;
    As they had seen me with these hangman's hands.
  527. goose
    web-footed long-necked typically gregarious migratory aquatic birds usually larger and less aquatic than ducks
    Faith, here's an
    English tailor come hither, for stealing out of
    a French hose: come in, tailor; here you may
    roast your goose.
  528. sticking
    extending out above or beyond a surface or boundary
    But screw your courage to the sticking-place,
    And we'll not fail.
  529. perchance
    through chance
    What you have spoke, it may be so perchance.
  530. beware
    be on one's guard; be cautious or wary about; be alert to
    Macbeth! beware Macduff;
    Beware the thane of Fife.
  531. pitfall
    an unforeseen or unexpected or surprising difficulty
    LADY MACDUFF
    Poor bird! thou'ldst never fear the net nor lime,
    The pitfall nor the gin.
  532. hum
    sing with closed lips
    MACBETH
    There's comfort yet; they are assailable;
    Then be thou jocund: ere the bat hath flown
    His cloister'd flight, ere to black Hecate's summons
    The shard-borne beetle with his drowsy hums
    Hath rung night's yawning peal, there shall be done
    A deed of dreadful note.
  533. spaniel
    any of several breeds of small to medium-sized gun dogs with a long silky coat and long frilled ears
    MACBETH
    Ay, in the catalogue ye go for men;
    As hounds and greyhounds, mongrels, spaniels, curs,
    Shoughs, water-rugs and demi-wolves, are clept
    All by the name of dogs: the valued file
    Distinguishes the swift, the slow, the subtle,
    The housekeeper, the hunter, every one
    According to the gift which bounteous nature
    Hath in him closed; whereby he does receive
    Particular addition. from the bill
    That writes them all alike: and so of men.
  534. discomfort
    the state of being tense and feeling pain
    Sergeant
    As whence the sun 'gins his reflection
    Shipwrecking storms and direful thunders break,
    So from that spring whence comfort seem'd to come
    Discomfort swells.
  535. face
    the front of the human head from the forehead to the chin
    The merciless Macdonwald--
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villanies of nature
    Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
    Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
    For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--
    Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like valour's minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave;
    Which...
  536. reeking
    giving off a strong unpleasant smell
    If I say sooth, I must report they were
    As cannons overcharged with double cracks, so they
    Doubly redoubled strokes upon the foe:
    Except they meant to bathe in reeking wounds,
    Or memorise another Golgotha,
    I cannot tell.
  537. trumpet
    a brass musical instrument with a brilliant tone
    Besides, this Duncan
    Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been
    So clear in his great office, that his virtues
    Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against
    The deep damnation of his taking-off;
    And pity, like a naked new-born babe,
    Striding the blast, or heaven's cherubim, horsed
    Upon the sightless couriers of the air,
    Shall blow the horrid deed in every eye,
    That tears shall drown the wind.
  538. gibbet
    an instrument of public execution
    First Witch
    Pour in sow's blood, that hath eaten
    Her nine farrow; grease that's sweaten
    From the murderer's gibbet throw
    Into the flame.
  539. sens
    street names for marijuana
    Enter DUNCAN, MALCOLM, DONALBAIN, BANQUO, LENNOX, MACDUFF, ROSS, ANGUS, and Attendants
    DUNCAN
    This castle hath a pleasant seat; the air
    Nimbly and sweetly recommends itself
    Unto our gentle senses.
  540. scorpion
    arachnid of warm dry regions having a long segmented tail ending in a venomous stinger
    MACBETH
    O, full of scorpions is my mind, dear wife!
  541. flout
    treat with contemptuous disregard
    ROSS
    From Fife, great king;
    Where the Norweyan banners flout the sky
    And fan our people cold.
  542. day
    time for Earth to make a complete rotation on its axis
    I will drain him dry as hay:
    Sleep shall neither night nor day
    Hang upon his pent-house lid;
    He shall live a man forbid:
    Weary se'nnights nine times nine
    Shall he dwindle, peak and pine:
    Though his bark cannot be lost,
    Yet it shall be tempest-tost.
  543. nought
    a mathematical element that when added to another number yields the same number
    Exit

    LADY MACBETH
    Nought's had, all's spent,
    Where our desire is got without content:
    'Tis safer to be that which we destroy
    Than by destruction dwell in doubtful joy.
  544. live
    have life, be alive
    I will drain him dry as hay:
    Sleep shall neither night nor day
    Hang upon his pent-house lid;
    He shall live a man forbid:
    Weary se'nnights nine times nine
    Shall he dwindle, peak and pine:
    Though his bark cannot be lost,
    Yet it shall be tempest-tost.
  545. to boot
    in addition, by way of addition; furthermore
    Fare thee well, lord:
    I would not be the villain that thou think'st
    For the whole space that's in the tyrant's grasp,
    And the rich East to boot.
  546. son
    a male human offspring
    Sons, kinsmen, thanes,
    And you whose places are the nearest, know
    We will establish our estate upon
    Our eldest, Malcolm, whom we name hereafter
    The Prince of Cumberland; which honour must
    Not unaccompanied invest him only,
    But signs of nobleness, like stars, shall shine
    On all deservers.
  547. missive
    a written message addressed to a person or organization
    Whiles I stood rapt in
    the wonder of it, came missives from the king, who
    all-hailed me 'Thane of Cawdor;' by which title,
    before, these weird sisters saluted me, and referred
    me to the coming on of time, with 'Hail, king that
    shalt be!'
  548. grieve
    feel intense sorrow, especially due to a loss
    How it did grieve Macbeth! did he not straight
    In pious rage the two delinquents tear,
    That were the slaves of drink and thralls of sleep?
  549. clamorous
    conspicuously and offensively loud
    MACDUFF
    Make all our trumpets speak; give them all breath,
    Those clamorous harbingers of blood and death.
  550. blanched
    developed without chlorophyll by being deprived of light
    You make me strange
    Even to the disposition that I owe,
    When now I think you can behold such sights,
    And keep the natural ruby of your cheeks,
    When mine is blanched with fear.
  551. think
    judge or regard; look upon; judge
    Present fears
    Are less than horrible imaginings:
    My thought, whose murder yet is but fantastical,
    Shakes so my single state of man that function
    Is smother'd in surmise, and nothing is
    But what is not.
  552. such
    of so extreme a degree or extent
    Say from whence
    You owe this strange intelligence? or why
    Upon this blasted heath you stop our way
    With such prophetic greeting?
  553. first and last
    taking everything together
    Enter MACBETH, LADY MACBETH, ROSS, LENNOX, Lords, and Attendants
    MACBETH
    You know your own degrees; sit down: at first
    And last
    the hearty welcome.
  554. labour
    productive work (especially physical work done for wages)
    DUNCAN
    Welcome hither:
    I have begun to plant thee, and will labour
    To make thee full of growing.
  555. truth
    a factual statement
    I' the name of truth,
    Are ye fantastical, or that indeed
    Which outwardly ye show?
  556. tongued
    provided with or resembling a tongue
    Besides, this Duncan
    Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been
    So clear in his great office, that his virtues
    Will plead like angels, trumpet- tongued, against
    The deep damnation of his taking-off;
    And pity, like a naked new-born babe,
    Striding the blast, or heaven's cherubim, horsed
    Upon the sightless couriers of the air,
    Shall blow the horrid deed in every eye,
    That tears shall drown the wind.
  557. put
    cause to be in a certain state
    He that's coming
    Must be provided for: and you shall put
    This night's great business into my dispatch;
    Which shall to all our nights and days to come
    Give solely sovereign sway and masterdom.
  558. creeps
    a feeling of fear and revulsion
    To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow,
    Creeps in this petty pace from day to day
    To the last syllable of recorded time,
    And all our yesterdays have lighted fools
    The way to dusty death.
  559. still
    not in physical motion
    The love that follows us sometime is our trouble,
    Which still we thank as love.
  560. forth
    forward in time, order, or degree
    But I have spoke
    With one that saw him die: who did report
    That very frankly he confess'd his treasons,
    Implored your highness' pardon and set forth
    A deep repentance: nothing in his life
    Became him like the leaving it; he died
    As one that had been studied in his death
    To throw away the dearest thing he owed,
    As 'twere a careless trifle.
  561. greatness
    unusual largeness in size or extent or number
    This have I thought good to deliver
    thee, my dearest partner of greatness, that thou
    mightst not lose the dues of rejoicing, by being
    ignorant of what greatness is promised thee.
  562. rump
    fleshy hindquarters; behind the loin and above the round
    First Witch
    A sailor's wife had chestnuts in her lap,
    And munch'd, and munch'd, and munch'd:--
    'Give me,' quoth I:
    'Aroint thee, witch!' the rump-fed ronyon cries.
  563. alas
    by bad luck
    LADY MACBETH
    Woe, alas!
  564. charmed
    filled with wonder and delight
    Toad, that under cold stone
    Days and nights has thirty-one
    Swelter'd venom sleeping got,
    Boil thou first i' the charmed pot.
  565. pitiful
    deserving or inciting compassion
    Come, seeling night,
    Scarf up the tender eye of pitiful day;
    And with thy bloody and invisible hand
    Cancel and tear to pieces that great bond
    Which keeps me pale!
  566. joyful
    full of or producing great happiness
    MACBETH
    The rest is labour, which is not used for you:
    I'll be myself the harbinger and make joyful
    The hearing of my wife with your approach;
    So humbly take my leave.
  567. piece of work
    a product produced or accomplished through the effort or activity or agency of a person or thing
    BANQUO
    Look to the lady:

    LADY MACBETH is carried out

    And when we have our naked frailties hid,
    That suffer in exposure, let us meet,
    And question this most bloody piece of work,
    To know it further.
  568. ague
    chills and fever that are symptomatic of malaria
    Enter MACBETH, SEYTON, and Soldiers, with drum and colours
    MACBETH
    Hang out our banners on the outward walls;
    The cry is still 'They come:' our castle's strength
    Will laugh a siege to scorn: here let them lie
    Till famine and the ague eat them up:
    Were they not forced with those that should be ours,
    We might have met them dareful, beard to beard,
    And beat them backward home.
  569. name
    a language unit by which a person or thing is known
    The merciless Macdonwald--
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villanies of nature
    Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
    Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
    For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--
    Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like valour's minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave;
    Which...
  570. thrall
    the state of being under the control of another person
    How it did grieve Macbeth! did he not straight
    In pious rage the two delinquents tear,
    That were the slaves of drink and thralls of sleep?
  571. hands
    guardianship over
    The merciless Macdonwald--
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villanies of nature
    Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
    Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
    For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--
    Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like valour's minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave;
    Which ne'er ...
  572. wilt
    become limp
    Thriftless ambition, that wilt ravin up
    Thine own life's means!
  573. infect
    contaminate with a disease
    MACBETH
    Infected be the air whereon they ride;
    And damn'd all those that trust them!
  574. comfort
    a state of being relaxed and feeling no pain
    Sergeant
    As whence the sun 'gins his reflection
    Shipwrecking storms and direful thunders break,
    So from that spring whence comfort seem'd to come
    Discomfort swells.
  575. can
    airtight sealed metal container for food or drink, etc.
    He can report,
    As seemeth by his plight, of the revolt
    The newest state.
  576. creep in
    enter surreptitiously
    To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow,
    Creeps in this petty pace from day to day
    To the last syllable of recorded time,
    And all our yesterdays have lighted fools
    The way to dusty death.
  577. brain
    the organ that is the center of the nervous system
    MACBETH
    Give me your favour: my dull brain was wrought
    With things forgotten.
  578. fortune
    your overall circumstances or condition in life
    The merciless Macdonwald--
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villanies of nature
    Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
    Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
    For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--
    Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like valour's minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave;
    Which...
  579. nothing
    in no respect; to no degree
    Enter ROSS and ANGUS

    ROSS
    The king hath happily received, Macbeth,
    The news of thy success; and when he reads
    Thy personal venture in the rebels' fight,
    His wonders and his praises do contend
    Which should be thine or his: silenced with that,
    In viewing o'er the rest o' the selfsame day,
    He finds thee in the stout Norweyan ranks,
    Nothing afeard of what thyself didst make,
    Strange images of death.
  580. perturbation
    the act of causing disorder
    Doctor
    A great perturbation in nature, to receive at once
    the benefit of sleep, and do the effects of
    watching!
  581. impede
    be a hindrance or obstacle to
    Hie thee hither,
    That I may pour my spirits in thine ear;
    And chastise with the valour of my tongue
    All that impedes thee from the golden round,
    Which fate and metaphysical aid doth seem
    To have thee crown'd withal.
  582. husbandry
    the practice of cultivating the land or raising stock
    There's husbandry in heaven;
    Their candles are all out.
  583. pull in
    get or bring together
    I pull in resolution, and begin
    To doubt the equivocation of the fiend
    That lies like truth: 'Fear not, till Birnam wood
    Do come to Dunsinane:' and now a wood
    Comes toward Dunsinane.
  584. unbecoming
    not in keeping with accepted standards of what is proper
    LADY MACBETH
    If he had been forgotten,
    It had been as a gap in our great feast,
    And all-thing unbecoming.
  585. title
    the name of a work of art or literary composition
    DUNCAN
    No more that thane of Cawdor shall deceive
    Our bosom interest: go pronounce his present death,
    And with his former title greet Macbeth.
  586. apace
    rapidly; in a speedy manner
    The west yet glimmers with some streaks of day:
    Now spurs the lated traveller apace
    To gain the timely inn; and near approaches
    The subject of our watch.
  587. though
    (postpositive) however
    I will drain him dry as hay:
    Sleep shall neither night nor day
    Hang upon his pent-house lid;
    He shall live a man forbid:
    Weary se'nnights nine times nine
    Shall he dwindle, peak and pine:
    Though his bark cannot be lost,
    Yet it shall be tempest-tost.
  588. fatal
    bringing death
    Exit Messenger

    The raven himself is hoarse
    That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan
    Under my battlements.
  589. hangman
    an executioner who hangs the condemned person
    MACBETH
    One cried 'God bless us!' and 'Amen' the other;
    As they had seen me with these hangman's hands.
  590. rouse
    cause to become awake or conscious
    Light thickens; and the crow
    Makes wing to the rooky wood:
    Good things of day begin to droop and drowse;
    While night's black agents to their preys do rouse.
  591. leisure
    time available for ease and relaxation
    BANQUO
    Worthy Macbeth, we stay upon your leisure.
  592. file
    record in a public office or in a court of law
    If 't be so,
    For Banquo's issue have I filed my mind;
    For them the gracious Duncan have I murder'd;
    Put rancours in the vessel of my peace
    Only for them; and mine eternal jewel
    Given to the common enemy of man,
    To make them kings, the seed of Banquo kings!
  593. way
    how something is done or how it happens
    Say from whence
    You owe this strange intelligence? or why
    Upon this blasted heath you stop our way
    With such prophetic greeting?
  594. woman
    an adult female person
    You seem to understand me,
    By each at once her chappy finger laying
    Upon her skinny lips: you should be women,
    And yet your beards forbid me to interpret
    That you are so.
  595. peerless
    eminent beyond or above comparison
    Let's after him,
    Whose care is gone before to bid us welcome:
    It is a peerless kinsman.
  596. intemperance
    excess in action and immoderate indulgence of appetites
    MACDUFF
    Boundless intemperance
    In nature is a tyranny; it hath been
    The untimely emptying of the happy throne
    And fall of many kings.
  597. crazed
    driven insane
    Know
    That it was he in the times past which held you
    So under fortune, which you thought had been
    Our innocent self: this I made good to you
    In our last conference, pass'd in probation with you,
    How you were borne in hand, how cross'd,
    the instruments,
    Who wrought with them, and all things else that might
    To half a soul and to a notion crazed
    Say 'Thus did Banquo.'
  598. ecstasy
    a state of elated bliss
    But let the frame of things disjoint, both the
    worlds suffer,
    Ere we will eat our meal in fear and sleep
    In the affliction of these terrible dreams
    That shake us nightly: better be with the dead,
    Whom we, to gain our peace, have sent to peace,
    Than on the torture of the mind to lie
    In restless ecstasy.
  599. Sweet
    English phonetician; one of the founders of modern phonetics
    MACBETH
    Sweet remembrancer!
  600. blessing
    a ceremonial prayer invoking divine protection
    I had most need of blessing, and 'Amen'
    Stuck in my throat.
  601. wrathful
    filled with or characterized by extreme anger
    And, which is worse, all you have done
    Hath been but for a wayward son,
    Spiteful and wrathful, who, as others do,
    Loves for his own ends, not for you.
  602. fillet
    a longitudinal slice or boned side of a fish
    Second Witch
    Fillet of a fenny snake,
    In the cauldron boil and bake;
    Eye of newt and toe of frog,
    Wool of bat and tongue of dog,
    Adder's fork and blind-worm's sting,
    Lizard's leg and owlet's wing,
    For a charm of powerful trouble,
    Like a hell-broth boil and bubble.
  603. approach
    move towards
    MACBETH
    The rest is labour, which is not used for you:
    I'll be myself the harbinger and make joyful
    The hearing of my wife with your approach;
    So humbly take my leave.
  604. adieu
    a farewell remark
    MACDUFF
    Well, may you see things well done there: adieu!
  605. rhinoceros
    massive powerful herbivorous odd-toed ungulate of southeast Asia and Africa having very thick skin and one or two horns on the snout
    MACBETH
    What man dare, I dare:
    Approach thou like the rugged Russian bear,
    The arm'd rhinoceros, or the Hyrcan tiger;
    Take any shape but that, and my firm nerves
    Shall never tremble: or be alive again,
    And dare me to the desert with thy sword;
    If trembling I inhabit then, protest me
    The baby of a girl.
  606. wasteful
    tending to squander
    Here lay Duncan,
    His silver skin laced with his golden blood;
    And his gash'd stabs look'd like a breach in nature
    For ruin's wasteful entrance: there, the murderers,
    Steep'd in the colours of their trade, their daggers
    Unmannerly breech'd with gore: who could refrain,
    That had a heart to love, and in that heart
    Courage to make 's love kno wn?
  607. old man
    a man who is very old
    Enter ROSS and an old Man
    Old Man
    Threescore and ten I can remember well:
    Within the volume of which time I have seen
    Hours dreadful and things strange; but this sore night
    Hath trifled former knowings.
  608. fall
    descend freely under the influence of gravity
    Curbing his lavish spirit: and, to conclude,
    The victory fell on us.
  609. fate
    the ultimate agency predetermining the course of events
    Hie thee hither,
    That I may pour my spirits in thine ear;
    And chastise with the valour of my tongue
    All that impedes thee from the golden round,
    Which fate and metaphysical aid doth seem
    To have thee crown'd withal.
  610. augur
    predict from an omen
    Exeunt all but MACBETH and LADY MACBETH

    MACBETH
    It will have blood; they say, blood will have blood:
    Stones have been known to move and trees to speak;
    Augurs and understood relations have
    By magot-pies and choughs and rooks brought forth
    The secret'st man of blood.
  611. wait on
    work for or be a servant to
    Come to my woman's breasts,
    And take my milk for gall, you murdering ministers,
    Wherever in your sightless substances
    You wait on nature's mischief!
  612. act
    behave in a certain manner
    ACT I
    SCENE I. A desert place.
  613. lave
    wash or flow against
    MACBETH
    So shall I, love; and so, I pray, be you:
    Let your remembrance apply to Banquo;
    Present him eminence, both with eye and tongue:
    Unsafe the while, that we
    Must lave our honours in these flattering streams,
    And make our faces vizards to our hearts,
    Disguising what they are.
  614. unbend
    straighten up or out; make straight
    Why, worthy thane,
    You do unbend your noble strength, to think
    So brainsickly of things.
  615. spiteful
    showing malicious ill will and a desire to hurt
    And, which is worse, all you have done
    Hath been but for a wayward son,
    Spiteful and wrathful, who, as others do,
    Loves for his own ends, not for you.
  616. rebel
    someone who exhibits independence in thought and action
    The merciless Macdonwald--
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villanies of nature
    Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
    Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
    For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--
    Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like valour's minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave;
    Which...
  617. noise
    sound of any kind
    Didst thou not hear a noise?
  618. sister
    a female person who has the same parents as another person
    Enter the three Witches
    First Witch
    Where hast thou been, sister?
  619. frailty
    the state of being weak in health or body
    BANQUO
    Look to the lady:

    LADY MACBETH is carried out

    And when we have our naked frailties hid,
    That suffer in exposure, let us meet,
    And question this most bloody piece of work,
    To know it further.
  620. borrower
    someone who receives something on the promise to return it or its equivalent
    BANQUO
    As far, my lord, as will fill up the time
    'Twixt this and supper: go not my horse the better,
    I must become a borrower of the night
    For a dark hour or twain.
  621. cleave
    separate or cut with a tool, such as a sharp instrument
    BANQUO
    New horrors come upon him,
    Like our strange garments, cleave not to their mould
    But with the aid of use.
  622. whore
    a woman who engages in sexual intercourse for money
    The merciless Macdonwald--
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villanies of nature
    Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
    Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
    For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--
    Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like valour's minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave;
    Which...
  623. stick on
    attach to
    ANGUS
    Now does he feel
    His secret murders sticking on his hands;
    Now minutely revolts upbraid his faith-breach;
    Those he commands move only in command,
    Nothing in love: now does he feel his title
    Hang loose about him, like a giant's robe
    Upon a dwarfish thief.
  624. dauntless
    invulnerable to fear or intimidation
    fears in Banquo
    Stick deep; and in his royalty of nature
    Reigns that which would be fear'd: 'tis much he dares;
    And, to that dauntless temper of his mind,
    He hath a wisdom that doth guide his valour
    To act in safety.
  625. foggy
    filled or abounding with fog or mist
    I am call'd; my little spirit, see,
    Sits in a foggy cloud, and stays for me.
  626. ala
    a flat wing-shaped process or winglike part of an organism
    LADY MACBETH
    Woe, alas!
  627. hemlock
    branching biennial herb with large leaves and white flowers
    Third Witch
    Scale of dragon, tooth of wolf,
    Witches' mummy, maw and gulf
    Of the ravin'd salt-sea shark,
    Root of hemlock digg'd i' the dark,
    Liver of blaspheming Jew,
    Gall of goat, and slips of yew
    Silver'd in the moon's eclipse,
    Nose of Turk and Tartar's lips,
    Finger of birth-strangled babe
    Ditch-deliver'd by a drab,
    Make the gruel thick and slab:
    Add thereto a tiger's chaudron,
    For the ingredients of our cauldron.
  628. keep
    continue a certain state, condition, or activity
    Come, you spirits
    That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here,
    And fill me from the crown to the toe top-full
    Of direst cruelty! make thick my blood;
    Stop up the access and passage to remorse,
    That no compunctious visitings of nature
    Shake my fell purpose, nor keep peace between
    The effect and it!
  629. rumour
    gossip passed around by word of mouth
    I dare not speak
    much further;
    But cruel are the times, when we are traitors
    And do not know ourselves, when we hold rumour
    From what we fear, yet know not what we fear,
    But float upon a wild and violent sea
    Each way and move.
  630. Lent
    a period of 40 weekdays from Ash Wednesday to Holy Saturday
    MALCOLM
    Be't their comfort
    We are coming thither: gracious England hath
    Lent us good Siward and ten thousand men;
    An older and a better soldier none
    That Christendom gives out.
  631. the like
    a similar kind
    BANQUO
    Thanks, sir: the like to you!
  632. rook
    a common bird about the size and color of a crow
    Exeunt all but MACBETH and LADY MACBETH

    MACBETH
    It will have blood; they say, blood will have blood:
    Stones have been known to move and trees to speak;
    Augurs and understood relations have
    By magot-pies and choughs and rooks brought forth
    The secret'st man of blood.
  633. spirits
    an alcoholic beverage that is distilled rather than fermented
    Hie thee hither,
    That I may pour my spirits in thine ear;
    And chastise with the valour of my tongue
    All that impedes thee from the golden round,
    Which fate and metaphysical aid doth seem
    To have thee crown'd withal.
  634. friend
    a person you know well and regard with affection and trust
    Hail, brave friend!
  635. tiger
    large feline of forests in most of Asia having a tawny coat with black stripes; endangered
    Her husband's to Aleppo gone, master o' the Tiger:
    But in a sieve I'll thither sail,
    And, like a rat without a tail,
    I'll do, I'll do, and I'll do.
  636. worst
    the least favorable outcome
    Now, if you have a station in the file,
    Not i' the worst rank of manhood, say 't;
    And I will put that business in your bosoms,
    Whose execution takes your enemy off,
    Grapples you to the heart and love of us,
    Who wear our health but sickly in his life,
    Which in his death were perfect.
  637. spur
    a prod on a rider's heel used to urge a horse onward
    We coursed him at the heels, and had a purpose
    To be his purveyor: but he rides well;
    And his great love, sharp as his spur, hath holp him
    To his home before us.
  638. unguarded
    displaying or feeling no wariness
    When Duncan is asleep--
    Whereto the rather shall his day's hard journey
    Soundly invite him--his two chamberlains
    Will I with wine and wassail so convince
    That memory, the warder of the brain,
    Shall be a fume, and the receipt of reason
    A limbeck only: when in swinish sleep
    Their drenched natures lie as in a death,
    What cannot you and I perform upon
    The unguarded Duncan? what not put upon
    His spongy officers, who shall bear the guilt
    Of our great quell?
  639. intermission
    a break during which an activity or event is paused
    But, gentle heavens,
    Cut short all intermission; front to front
    Bring thou this fiend of Scotland and myself;
    Within my sword's length set him; if he 'scape,
    Heaven forgive him too!
  640. fret
    be agitated or irritated
    Third Apparition
    Be lion-mettled, proud; and take no care
    Who chafes, who frets, or where conspirers are:
    Macbeth shall never vanquish'd be until
    Great Birnam wood to high Dunsinane hill
    Shall come against him.
  641. ingredient
    a component of a mixture or compound
    But in these cases
    We still have judgment here; that we but teach
    Bloody instructions, which, being taught, return
    To plague the inventor: this even-handed justice
    Commends the ingredients of our poison'd chalice
    To our own lips.
  642. safe
    free from danger or the risk of harm
    Your highness' part
    Is to receive our duties; and our duties
    Are to your throne and state children and servants,
    Which do but what they should, by doing every thing
    Safe toward your love and honour.
  643. trifle
    a detail that is considered insignificant
    But 'tis strange:
    And oftentimes, to win us to our harm,
    The instruments of darkness tell us truths,
    Win us with honest trifles, to betray's
    In deepest consequence.
  644. royalty
    royal persons collectively
    fears in Banquo
    Stick deep; and in his royalty of nature
    Reigns that which would be fear'd: 'tis much he dares;
    And, to that dauntless temper of his mind,
    He hath a wisdom that doth guide his valour
    To act in safety.
  645. infirm
    lacking bodily or muscular strength or vitality
    LADY MACBETH
    Infirm of purpose!
  646. take
    get into one's hands
    Or have we eaten on the insane root
    That takes the reason prisoner?
  647. cleanse
    clean one's body or parts thereof, as by washing
    Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased,
    Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow,
    Raze out the written troubles of the brain
    And with some sweet oblivious antidote
    Cleanse the stuff'd bosom of that perilous stuff
    Which weighs upon the heart?
  648. God
    the supernatural being conceived as the perfect and omnipotent and omniscient originator and ruler of the universe; the object of worship in monotheistic religions
    ROSS
    God save the king!
  649. brow
    the part of the face above the eyes
    Third Apparition: a Child crowned, with a tree in his hand

    What is this
    That rises like the issue of a king,
    And wears upon his baby- brow the round
    And top of sovereignty?
  650. gin
    strong liquor flavored with juniper berries
    LADY MACDUFF
    Poor bird! thou'ldst never fear the net nor lime,
    The pitfall nor the gin.
  651. sleepy
    ready to fall asleep
    Will it not be received,
    When we have mark'd with blood those sleepy two
    Of his own chamber and used their very daggers,
    That they have done't?
  652. obedience
    the trait of being willing to follow commands or guidance
    ROSS
    And Duncan's horses--a thing most strange and certain--
    Beauteous and swift, the minions of their race,
    Turn'd wild in nature, broke their stalls, flung out,
    Contending 'gainst obedience, as they would make
    War with mankind.
  653. swear in
    administer on oath to
    Faith, here's an equivocator, that could
    swear in both the scales against either scale;
    who committed treason enough for God's sake,
    yet could not equivocate to heaven: O, come
    in, equivocator.
  654. damnation
    the state of being condemned to eternal punishment in Hell
    Besides, this Duncan
    Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been
    So clear in his great office, that his virtues
    Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against
    The deep damnation of his taking-off;
    And pity, like a naked new-born babe,
    Striding the blast, or heaven's cherubim, horsed
    Upon the sightless couriers of the air,
    Shall blow the horrid deed in every eye,
    That tears shall drown the wind.
  655. word
    a unit of language that native speakers can identify
    DUNCAN
    So well thy words become thee as thy wounds;
    They smack of honour both.
  656. near
    near in time or place or relationship
    Exeunt

    SCENE II. A camp near Forres.
  657. murky
    cloudy, dirty, and difficult to see through
    is murky!--Fie,
  658. bane
    something causing misery or death
    I will not be afraid of death and bane,
    Till Birnam forest come to Dunsinane.
  659. greyhound
    a tall slender dog of an ancient breed noted for swiftness and keen sight; used as a racing dog
    MACBETH
    Ay, in the catalogue ye go for men;
    As hounds and greyhounds, mongrels, spaniels, curs,
    Shoughs, water-rugs and demi-wolves, are clept
    All by the name of dogs: the valued file
    Distinguishes the swift, the slow, the subtle,
    The housekeeper, the hunter, every one
    According to the gift which bounteous nature
    Hath in him closed; whereby he does receive
    Particular addition. from the bill
    That writes them all alike: and so of men.
  660. honest
    marked by truth
    But 'tis strange:
    And oftentimes, to win us to our harm,
    The instruments of darkness tell us truths,
    Win us with honest trifles, to betray's
    In deepest consequence.
  661. stool
    a simple seat without a back or arms
    When all's done,
    You look but on a stool.
  662. bad
    having undesirable or negative qualities
    Old Man
    God's benison go with you; and with those
    That would make good of bad, and friends of foes!
  663. audit
    examine carefully for accuracy
    LADY MACBETH
    Your servants ever
    Have theirs, themselves and what is theirs, in compt,
    To make their audit at your highness' pleasure,
    Still to return your own.
  664. look to
    turn one's interests or expectations towards
    MACDUFF
    Look to the lady.
  665. cling
    hold on tightly or tenaciously
    Sergeant
    Doubtful it stood;
    As two spent swimmers, that do cling together
    And choke their art.
  666. concord
    a harmonious state of things and of their properties
    Nay, had I power, I should
    Pour the sweet milk of concord into hell,
    Uproar the universal peace, confound
    All unity on earth.
  667. hide
    prevent from being seen or discovered
    Whether he was combined
    With those of Norway, or did line the rebel
    With hidden help and vantage, or that with both
    He labour'd in his country's wreck, I know not;
    But treasons capital, confess'd and proved,
    Have overthrown him.
  668. speech
    communication by word of mouth
    If there come truth from them--
    As upon thee, Macbeth, their speeches shine--
    Why, by the verities on thee made good,
    May they not be my oracles as well,
    And set me up in hope?
  669. cheaply
    in a cheap manner
    SIWARD
    Some must go off: and yet, by these I see,
    So great a day as this is cheaply bought.
  670. hope
    the general feeling that some desire will be fulfilled
    My noble partner
    You greet with present grace and great prediction
    Of noble having and of royal hope,
    That he seems rapt withal: to me you speak not.
  671. Norway
    a constitutional monarchy in northern Europe on the western side of the Scandinavian Peninsula; achieved independence from Sweden in 1905
    Norway himself,
    With terrible numbers,
    Assisted by that most disloyal traitor
    The thane of Cawdor, began a dismal conflict;
    Till that Bellona's bridegroom, lapp'd in proof,
    Confronted him with self-comparisons,
    Point against point rebellious, arm 'gainst arm.
  672. grapple
    work hard to come to terms with or deal with something
    Now, if you have a station in the file,
    Not i' the worst rank of manhood, say 't;
    And I will put that business in your bosoms,
    Whose execution takes your enemy off,
    Grapples you to the heart and love of us,
    Who wear our health but sickly in his life,
    Which in his death were perfect.
  673. dedicate
    give entirely to a specific person, activity, or cause
    We have willing dames enough: there cannot be
    That vulture in you, to devour so many
    As will to greatness dedicate themselves,
    Finding it so inclined.
  674. initiate
    set in motion, start an event or prepare the way for
    My strange and self-abuse
    Is the initiate fear that wants hard use:
    We are yet but young in deed.
  675. probation
    a trial period during which one's abilities are tested
    Know
    That it was he in the times past which held you
    So under fortune, which you thought had been
    Our innocent self: this I made good to you
    In our last conference, pass'd in probation with you,
    How you were borne in hand, how cross'd,
    the instruments,
    Who wrought with them, and all things else that might
    To half a soul and to a notion crazed
    Say 'Thus did Banquo.'
  676. greet
    express greetings upon meeting someone
    DUNCAN
    No more that thane of Cawdor shall deceive
    Our bosom interest: go pronounce his present death,
    And with his former title greet Macbeth.
  677. newt
    small and usually brightly colored amphibian
    Second Witch
    Fillet of a fenny snake,
    In the cauldron boil and bake;
    Eye of newt and toe of frog,
    Wool of bat and tongue of dog,
    Adder's fork and blind-worm's sting,
    Lizard's leg and owlet's wing,
    For a charm of powerful trouble,
    Like a hell-broth boil and bubble.
  678. scruple
    an ethical or moral principle that inhibits action
    Fears and scruples shake us:
    In the great hand of God I stand; and thence
    Against the undivulged pretence I fight
    Of treasonous malice.
  679. stab
    poke or thrust abruptly
    Here lay Duncan,
    His silver skin laced with his golden blood;
    And his gash'd stabs look'd like a breach in nature
    For ruin's wasteful entrance: there, the murderers,
    Steep'd in the colours of their trade, their daggers
    Unmannerly breech'd with gore: who could refrain,
    That had a heart to love, and in that heart
    Courage to make 's love kno wn?
  680. ear
    the sense organ for hearing and equilibrium
    Hie thee hither,
    That I may pour my spirits in thine ear;
    And chastise with the valour of my tongue
    All that impedes thee from the golden round,
    Which fate and metaphysical aid doth seem
    To have thee crown'd withal.
  681. thick
    not thin
    As thick as hail
    Came post with post; and every one did bear
    Thy praises in his kingdom's great defence,
    And pour'd them down before him.
  682. mirth
    great merriment
    Both sides are even: here I'll sit i' the midst:
    Be large in mirth; anon we'll drink a measure
    The table round.
  683. unsafe
    lacking in security or safety
    MACBETH
    So shall I, love; and so, I pray, be you:
    Let your remembrance apply to Banquo;
    Present him eminence, both with eye and tongue:
    Unsafe the while, that we
    Must lave our honours in these flattering streams,
    And make our faces vizards to our hearts,
    Disguising what they are.
  684. bold
    fearless and daring
    Enter LADY MACBETH
    LADY MACBETH
    That which hath made them drunk hath made me bold;
    What hath quench'd them hath given me fire.
  685. lust
    a strong sexual desire
    MALCOLM
    I grant him bloody,
    Luxurious, avaricious, false, deceitful,
    Sudden, malicious, smacking of every sin
    That has a name: but there's no bottom, none,
    In my voluptuousness: your wives, your daughters,
    Your matrons and your maids, could not fill up
    The cistern of my lust, and my desire
    All continent impediments would o'erbear
    That did oppose my will: better Macbeth
    Than such an one to reign.
  686. one
    smallest whole number or a numeral representing this number
    As thick as hail
    Came post with post; and every one did bear
    Thy praises in his kingdom's great defence,
    And pour'd them down before him.
  687. in conclusion
    the item at the end
    Lechery, sir, it provokes, and unprovokes;
    it provokes the desire, but it takes
    away the performance: therefore, much drink
    may be said to be an equivocator with lechery:
    it makes him, and it mars him; it sets
    him on, and it takes him off; it persuades him,
    and disheartens him; makes him stand to, and
    not stand to; in conclusion, equivocates him
    in a sleep, and, giving him the lie, leaves him.
  688. violent
    acting with great force or energy or emotional intensity
    No man:
    The expedition my violent love
    Outrun the pauser, reason.
  689. cherub
    an angel portrayed as a winged child
    Besides, this Duncan
    Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been
    So clear in his great office, that his virtues
    Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against
    The deep damnation of his taking-off;
    And pity, like a naked new-born babe,
    Striding the blast, or heaven's cherubim, horsed
    Upon the sightless couriers of the air,
    Shall blow the horrid deed in every eye,
    That tears shall drown the wind.
  690. delinquent
    a young offender
    How it did grieve Macbeth! did he not straight
    In pious rage the two delinquents tear,
    That were the slaves of drink and thralls of sleep?
  691. set down
    put or settle into a position
    Doctor
    Hark! she speaks: I will set down what comes from
    her, to satisfy my remembrance the more strongly.
  692. merciful
    showing or giving forgiveness
    A heavy summons lies like lead upon me,
    And yet I would not sleep: merciful powers,
    Restrain in me the cursed thoughts that nature
    Gives way to in repose!
  693. credulous
    showing a lack of judgment or experience
    Devilish Macbeth
    By many of these trains hath sought to win me
    Into his power, and modest wisdom plucks me
    From over- credulous haste: but God above
    Deal between thee and me! for even now
    I put myself to thy direction, and
    Unspeak mine own detraction, here abjure
    The taints and blames I laid upon myself,
    For strangers to my nature.
  694. slay
    kill intentionally and with premeditation
    MACDUFF
    Those that Macbeth hath slain.
  695. horse
    solid-hoofed herbivorous quadruped domesticated since prehistoric times
    Besides, this Duncan
    Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been
    So clear in his great office, that his virtues
    Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against
    The deep damnation of his taking-off;
    And pity, like a naked new-born babe,
    Striding the blast, or heaven's cherubim, horsed
    Upon the sightless couriers of the air,
    Shall blow the horrid deed in every eye,
    That tears shall drown the wind.
  696. wink at
    give one's silent approval to
    Stars, hide your fires;
    Let not light see my black and deep desires:
    The eye wink at the hand; yet let that be,
    Which the eye fears, when it is done, to see.
  697. men
    the force of workers available
    Mark, king of Scotland, mark:
    No sooner justice had with valour arm'd
    Compell'd these skipping kerns to trust their heels,
    But the Norweyan lord surveying vantage,
    With furbish'd arms and new supplies of men
    Began a fresh assault.
  698. gripe
    complain
    He chid the sisters
    When first they put the name of king upon me,
    And bade them speak to him: then prophet-like
    They hail'd him father to a line of kings:
    Upon my head they placed a fruitless crown,
    And put a barren sceptre in my gripe,
    Thence to be wrench'd with an unlineal hand,
    No son of mine succeeding.
  699. issue
    some situation or event that is thought about
    If 't be so,
    For Banquo's issue have I filed my mind;
    For them the gracious Duncan have I murder'd;
    Put rancours in the vessel of my peace
    Only for them; and mine eternal jewel
    Given to the common enemy of man,
    To make them kings, the seed of Banquo kings!
  700. revenge
    action taken in return for an injury or offense
    Thou mayst revenge.
  701. sway
    move back and forth
    He that's coming
    Must be provided for: and you shall put
    This night's great business into my dispatch;
    Which shall to all our nights and days to come
    Give solely sovereign sway and masterdom.
  702. out
    moving or appearing to move away from a place, especially one that is enclosed or hidden
    The merciless Macdonwald--
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villanies of nature
    Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
    Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
    For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--
    Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like valour's minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave;
    Which...
  703. throat
    the passage to the stomach and lungs
    I had most need of blessing, and 'Amen'
    Stuck in my throat.
  704. amend
    make revisions to
    But make amends now: get you gone,
    And at the pit of Acheron
    Meet me i' the morning: thither he
    Will come to know his destiny:
    Your vessels and your spells provide,
    Your charms and every thing beside.
  705. bleeding
    the flow of blood from a ruptured blood vessel
    Enter DUNCAN, MALCOLM, DONALBAIN, LENNOX, with Attendants, meeting a bleeding Sergeant
    DUNCAN
    What bloody man is that?
  706. oftentimes
    many times at short intervals
    But 'tis strange:
    And oftentimes, to win us to our harm,
    The instruments of darkness tell us truths,
    Win us with honest trifles, to betray's
    In deepest consequence.
  707. promise
    a verbal commitment agreeing to do something in the future
    To BANQUO

    Do you not hope your children shall be kings,
    When those that gave the thane of Cawdor to me
    Promised no less to them?
  708. attend
    be present
    Exit Sergeant, attended

    Who comes here?
  709. put on
    put clothing on one's body
    MACBETH
    Let's briefly put on manly readiness,
    And meet i' the hall together.
  710. unruly
    unable to be governed or controlled
    LENNOX
    The night has been unruly: where we lay,
    Our chimneys were blown down; and, as they say,
    Lamentings heard i' the air; strange screams of death,
    And prophesying with accents terrible
    Of dire combustion and confused events
    New hatch'd to the woeful time: the obscure bird
    Clamour'd the livelong night: some say, the earth
    Was feverous and did shake.
  711. power
    possession of the qualities required to do something
    A heavy summons lies like lead upon me,
    And yet I would not sleep: merciful powers,
    Restrain in me the cursed thoughts that nature
    Gives way to in repose!
  712. cruel
    able or disposed to inflict pain or suffering
    BANQUO
    Too cruel any where.
  713. England
    a division of the United Kingdom
    I'll to England.
  714. fare
    the sum charged for riding in a public conveyance
    Fare thee well, lord:
    I would not be the villain that thou think'st
    For the whole space that's in the tyrant's grasp,
    And the rich East to boot.
  715. fitful
    occurring in spells and often abruptly
    Duncan is in his grave;
    After life's fitful fever he sleeps well;
    Treason has done his worst: nor steel, nor poison,
    Malice domestic, foreign levy, nothing,
    Can touch him further.
  716. shame
    a painful feeling of embarrassment or inadequacy
    Re-enter LADY MACBETH

    LADY MACBETH
    My hands are of your colour; but I shame
    To wear a heart so white.
  717. stealthy
    marked by quiet and caution and secrecy
    Now o'er the one halfworld
    Nature seems dead, and wicked dreams abuse
    The curtain'd sleep; witchcraft celebrates
    Pale Hecate's offerings, and wither'd murder,
    Alarum'd by his sentinel, the wolf,
    Whose howl's his watch, thus with his stealthy pace.
  718. cure
    a medicine or therapy that treats disease or relieves pain
    Doctor
    Ay, sir; there are a crew of wretched souls
    That stay his cure: their malady convinces
    The great assay of art; but at his touch--
    Such sanctity hath heaven given his hand--
    They presently amend.
  719. corporal
    affecting the body as opposed to the mind or spirit
    MACBETH
    Into the air; and what seem'd corporal melted
    As breath into the wind.
  720. antidote
    a remedy that stops or controls the effects of a poison
    Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased,
    Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow,
    Raze out the written troubles of the brain
    And with some sweet oblivious antidote
    Cleanse the stuff'd bosom of that perilous stuff
    Which weighs upon the heart?
  721. famine
    a severe shortage of food resulting in starvation and death
    Enter MACBETH, SEYTON, and Soldiers, with drum and colours
    MACBETH
    Hang out our banners on the outward walls;
    The cry is still 'They come:' our castle's strength
    Will laugh a siege to scorn: here let them lie
    Till famine and the ague eat them up:
    Were they not forced with those that should be ours,
    We might have met them dareful, beard to beard,
    And beat them backward home.
  722. revolt
    rise up against an authority
    He can report,
    As seemeth by his plight, of the revolt
    The newest state.
  723. syllable
    a unit of spoken language larger than a phoneme
    MACDUFF
    Let us rather
    Hold fast the mortal sword, and like good men
    Bestride our down-fall'n birthdom: each new morn
    New widows howl, new orphans cry, new sorrows
    Strike heaven on the face, that it resounds
    As if it felt with Scotland and yell'd out
    Like syllable of dolour.
  724. usurper
    one who wrongfully seizes and holds the place of another
    Re-enter MACDUFF, with MACBETH's head

    MACDUFF
    Hail, king! for so thou art: behold, where stands
    The usurper's cursed head: the time is free:
    I see thee compass'd with thy kingdom's pearl,
    That speak my salutation in their minds;
    Whose voices I desire aloud with mine:
    Hail, King of Scotland!
  725. combustion
    a reaction of a substance with oxygen to give heat and light
    LENNOX
    The night has been unruly: where we lay,
    Our chimneys were blown down; and, as they say,
    Lamentings heard i' the air; strange screams of death,
    And prophesying with accents terrible
    Of dire combustion and confused events
    New hatch'd to the woeful time: the obscure bird
    Clamour'd the livelong night: some say, the earth
    Was feverous and did shake.
  726. upbraid
    express criticism towards
    ANGUS
    Now does he feel
    His secret murders sticking on his hands;
    Now minutely revolts upbraid his faith-breach;
    Those he commands move only in command,
    Nothing in love: now does he feel his title
    Hang loose about him, like a giant's robe
    Upon a dwarfish thief.
  727. appal
    strike with disgust or revulsion
    How is't with me, when every noise appals me?
  728. blow
    be in motion due to some air or water current
    First Witch
    I myself have all the other,
    And the very ports they blow,
    All the quarters that they know
    I' the shipman's card.
  729. Old
    of a very early stage in development
    Enter ROSS and an old Man
    Old Man
    Threescore and ten I can remember well:
    Within the volume of which time I have seen
    Hours dreadful and things strange; but this sore night
    Hath trifled former knowings.
  730. laudable
    worthy of high praise
    But I remember now
    I am in this earthly world; where to do harm
    Is often laudable, to do good sometime
    Accounted dangerous folly: why then, alas,
    Do I put up that womanly defence,
    To say I have done no harm?
  731. chamberlain
    an officer who manages the household of a king or nobleman
    When Duncan is asleep--
    Whereto the rather shall his day's hard journey
    Soundly invite him--his two chamberlains
    Will I with wine and wassail so convince
    That memory, the warder of the brain,
    Shall be a fume, and the receipt of reason
    A limbeck only: when in swinish sleep
    Their drenched natures lie as in a death,
    What cannot you and I perform upon
    The unguarded Duncan? what not put upon
    His spongy officers, who shall bear the guilt
    Of our great quell?
  732. madam
    a woman of refinement
    Servant
    Ay, madam, but returns again to-night.
  733. duff
    a stiff flour pudding steamed or boiled usually and containing e.g. currants and raisins and citron
    Dear Duff, I prithee, contradict thyself,
    And say it is not so.
  734. deeds
    performance of moral or religious acts
    Whiles I threat, he lives:
    Words to the heat of deeds too cold breath gives.
  735. Northumberland
    the northernmost county of England; has many Roman remains
    Lord
    The son of Duncan,
    From whom this tyrant holds the due of birth
    Lives in the English court, and is received
    Of the most pious Edward with such grace
    That the malevolence of fortune nothing
    Takes from his high respect: thither Macduff
    Is gone to pray the holy king, upon his aid
    To wake Northumberland and warlike Siward:
    That, by the help of these--with Him above
    To ratify the work--we may again
    Give to our tables meat, sleep to our nights,
    Free from our feasts and ban...
  736. treachery
    an act of deliberate betrayal
    They set upon BANQUO

    BANQUO
    O, treachery!
  737. deceitful
    marked by deliberate deceptiveness
    MALCOLM
    I grant him bloody,
    Luxurious, avaricious, false, deceitful,
    Sudden, malicious, smacking of every sin
    That has a name: but there's no bottom, none,
    In my voluptuousness: your wives, your daughters,
    Your matrons and your maids, could not fill up
    The cistern of my lust, and my desire
    All continent impediments would o'erbear
    That did oppose my will: better Macbeth
    Than such an one to reign.
  738. pale
    very light in color or highly diluted with white
    And wakes it now, to look so green and pale
    At what it did so freely?
  739. fury
    the property of being wild or turbulent
    MACBETH
    O, yet I do repent me of my fury,
    That I did kill them.
  740. throne
    the chair of state for a monarch, bishop, etc.
    Your highness' part
    Is to receive our duties; and our duties
    Are to your throne and state children and servants,
    Which do but what they should, by doing every thing
    Safe toward your love and honour.
  741. wolf
    any of various predatory carnivorous canine mammals of North America and Eurasia that usually hunt in packs
    Now o'er the one halfworld
    Nature seems dead, and wicked dreams abuse
    The curtain'd sleep; witchcraft celebrates
    Pale Hecate's offerings, and wither'd murder,
    Alarum'd by his sentinel, the wolf,
    Whose howl's his watch, thus with his stealthy pace.
  742. yew
    evergreen tree or shrub having red cup-shaped berries
    Third Witch
    Scale of dragon, tooth of wolf,
    Witches' mummy, maw and gulf
    Of the ravin'd salt-sea shark,
    Root of hemlock digg'd i' the dark,
    Liver of blaspheming Jew,
    Gall of goat, and slips of yew
    Silver'd in the moon's eclipse,
    Nose of Turk and Tartar's lips,
    Finger of birth-strangled babe
    Ditch-deliver'd by a drab,
    Make the gruel thick and slab:
    Add thereto a tiger's chaudron,
    For the ingredients of our cauldron.
  743. thus
    from that fact or reason or as a result
    ALL
    The weird sisters, hand in hand,
    Posters of the sea and land,
    Thus do go about, about:
    Thrice to thine and thrice to mine
    And thrice again, to make up nine.
  744. every
    (used of count nouns) each and all of the members of a group considered singly and without exception
    As thick as hail
    Came post with post; and every one did bear
    Thy praises in his kingdom's great defence,
    And pour'd them down before him.
  745. hour
    a period of time equal to 1/24th of a day
    MACBETH
    [Aside] Come what come may,
    Time and the hour runs through the roughest day.
  746. glass in
    enclose with glass
    A show of Eight Kings, the last with a glass in his hand; GHOST OF BANQUO following

    MACBETH
    Thou art too like the spirit of Banquo: down!
  747. earth
    the third planet from the sun
    What are these
    So wither'd and so wild in their attire,
    That look not like the inhabitants o' the earth,
    And yet are on't?
  748. confuse
    mistake one thing for another
    LENNOX
    The night has been unruly: where we lay,
    Our chimneys were blown down; and, as they say,
    Lamentings heard i' the air; strange screams of death,
    And prophesying with accents terrible
    Of dire combustion and confused events
    New hatch'd to the woeful time: the obscure bird
    Clamour'd the livelong night: some say, the earth
    Was feverous and did shake.
  749. rugged
    having long narrow shallow depressions in the surface
    LADY MACBETH
    Come on;
    Gentle my lord, sleek o'er your rugged looks;
    Be bright and jovial among your guests to-night.
  750. please
    give enjoyment to
    Messenger
    So please you, it is true: our thane is coming:
    One of my fellows had the speed of him,
    Who, almost dead for breath, had scarcely more
    Than would make up his message.
  751. sieve
    a strainer for separating lumps from powdered material
    Her husband's to Aleppo gone, master o' the Tiger:
    But in a sieve I'll thither sail,
    And, like a rat without a tail,
    I'll do, I'll do, and I'll do.
  752. command
    an authoritative direction or instruction to do something
    MACDUFF
    He did command me to call timely on him:
    I have almost slipp'd the hour.
  753. wrongly
    without justice or fairness
    Glamis thou art, and Cawdor; and shalt be
    What thou art promised: yet do I fear thy nature;
    It is too full o' the milk of human kindness
    To catch the nearest way: thou wouldst be great;
    Art not without ambition, but without
    The illness should attend it: what thou wouldst highly,
    That wouldst thou holily; wouldst not play false,
    And yet wouldst wrongly win: thou'ldst have, great Glamis,
    That which cries 'Thus thou must do, if thou have it;
    And that which rather thou dost fear ...
  754. pent
    closely confined
    I will drain him dry as hay:
    Sleep shall neither night nor day
    Hang upon his pent-house lid;
    He shall live a man forbid:
    Weary se'nnights nine times nine
    Shall he dwindle, peak and pine:
    Though his bark cannot be lost,
    Yet it shall be tempest-tost.
  755. each
    (used of count nouns) every one considered individually
    You seem to understand me,
    By each at once her chappy finger laying
    Upon her skinny lips: you should be women,
    And yet your beards forbid me to interpret
    That you are so.
  756. elf
    (folklore) a fairy that is somewhat mischievous
    I commend your pains;
    And every one shall share i' the gains;
    And now about the cauldron sing,
    Live elves and fairies in a ring,
    Enchanting all that you put in.
  757. fell
    cause to go down by or as if by delivering a blow
    Curbing his lavish spirit: and, to conclude,
    The victory fell on us.
  758. predominant
    having superior power or influence
    Do you find
    Your patience so predominant in your nature
    That you can let this go?
  759. gone
    no longer retained
    Her husband's to Aleppo gone, master o' the Tiger:
    But in a sieve I'll thither sail,
    And, like a rat without a tail,
    I'll do, I'll do, and I'll do.
  760. mind
    that which is responsible for one's thoughts and feelings
    DUNCAN
    There's no art
    To find the mind's construction in the face:
    He was a gentleman on whom I built
    An absolute trust.
  761. undaunted
    resolutely courageous
    MACBETH
    Bring forth men-children only;
    For thy undaunted mettle should compose
    Nothing but males.
  762. skinny
    being very thin
    You seem to understand me,
    By each at once her chappy finger laying
    Upon her skinny lips: you should be women,
    And yet your beards forbid me to interpret
    That you are so.
  763. cursed
    in danger of the eternal punishment of Hell
    A heavy summons lies like lead upon me,
    And yet I would not sleep: merciful powers,
    Restrain in me the cursed thoughts that nature
    Gives way to in repose!
  764. jointly
    in collaboration or cooperation
    MACBETH
    We hear, our bloody cousins are bestow'd
    In England and in Ireland, not confessing
    Their cruel parricide, filling their hearers
    With strange invention: but of that to-morrow,
    When therewithal we shall have cause of state
    Craving us jointly.
  765. robe
    any loose flowing garment
    MACBETH
    The thane of Cawdor lives: why do you dress me
    In borrow'd robes?
  766. wing
    a movable organ for flying (one of a pair)
    The sin of my ingratitude even now
    Was heavy on me: thou art so far before
    That swiftest wing of recompense is slow
    To overtake thee.
  767. sauce
    flavorful relish or dressing or topping served as an accompaniment to food
    Exit Murderer

    LADY MACBETH
    My royal lord,
    You do not give the cheer: the feast is sold
    That is not often vouch'd, while 'tis a-making,
    'Tis given with welcome: to feed were best at home;
    From thence the sauce to meat is ceremony;
    Meeting were bare without it.
  768. conjure
    summon into action or bring into existence
    MACBETH
    I conjure you, by that which you profess,
    Howe'er you come to know it, answer me:
    Though you untie the winds and let them fight
    Against the churches; though the yesty waves
    Confound and swallow navigation up;
    Though bladed corn be lodged and trees blown down;
    Though castles topple on their warders' heads;
    Though palaces and pyramids do slope
    Their heads to their foundations; though the treasure
    Of nature's germens tumble all together,
    Even till destruction sicken; ...
  769. set
    put into a certain place or abstract location
    Third Witch
    That will be ere the set of sun.
  770. storehouse
    a depository for goods
    MACDUFF
    Carried to Colmekill,
    The sacred storehouse of his predecessors,
    And guardian of their bones.
  771. oblivious
    lacking conscious awareness of
    Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased,
    Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow,
    Raze out the written troubles of the brain
    And with some sweet oblivious antidote
    Cleanse the stuff'd bosom of that perilous stuff
    Which weighs upon the heart?
  772. milk
    a white nutritious liquid secreted by mammals and used as food by human beings
    Glamis thou art, and Cawdor; and shalt be
    What thou art promised: yet do I fear thy nature;
    It is too full o' the milk of human kindness
    To catch the nearest way: thou wouldst be great;
    Art not without ambition, but without
    The illness should attend it: what thou wouldst highly,
    That wouldst thou holily; wouldst not play false,
    And yet wouldst wrongly win: thou'ldst have, great Glamis,
    That which cries 'Thus thou must do, if thou have it;
    And that which rather thou dost fear ...
  773. tidings
    information about recent and important events
    Enter a Messenger

    What is your tidings?
  774. boil
    change from a liquid to vapor
    In the middle, a boiling cauldron.
  775. terrible
    exceptionally bad or displeasing
    Norway himself,
    With terrible numbers,
    Assisted by that most disloyal traitor
    The thane of Cawdor, began a dismal conflict;
    Till that Bellona's bridegroom, lapp'd in proof,
    Confronted him with self-comparisons,
    Point against point rebellious, arm 'gainst arm.
  776. cheer
    a cry or shout of approval
    Exit Murderer

    LADY MACBETH
    My royal lord,
    You do not give the cheer: the feast is sold
    That is not often vouch'd, while 'tis a-making,
    'Tis given with welcome: to feed were best at home;
    From thence the sauce to meat is ceremony;
    Meeting were bare without it.
  777. mortified
    made to feel uncomfortable because of shame or wounded pride
    Enter MENTEITH, CAITHNESS, ANGUS, LENNOX, and Soldiers
    MENTEITH
    The English power is near, led on by Malcolm,
    His uncle Siward and the good Macduff:
    Revenges burn in them; for their dear causes
    Would to the bleeding and the grim alarm
    Excite the mortified man.
  778. horrible
    shockingly frightful or awful
    Present fears
    Are less than horrible imaginings:
    My thought, whose murder yet is but fantastical,
    Shakes so my single state of man that function
    Is smother'd in surmise, and nothing is
    But what is not.
  779. Wake
    an island in the western Pacific between Guam and Hawaii
    Knocking within

    Wake Duncan with thy knocking!
  780. own
    belonging to or on behalf of a specified person
    BANQUO
    There if I grow,
    The harvest is your own.
  781. succeeding
    coming after or following
    He chid the sisters
    When first they put the name of king upon me,
    And bade them speak to him: then prophet-like
    They hail'd him father to a line of kings:
    Upon my head they placed a fruitless crown,
    And put a barren sceptre in my gripe,
    Thence to be wrench'd with an unlineal hand,
    No son of mine succeeding.
  782. lesser
    of smaller size or importance
    First Witch
    Lesser than Macbeth, and greater.
  783. haste
    overly eager speed and possible carelessness
    LENNOX
    What a haste looks through his eyes!
  784. err
    make a mistake
    MALCOLM
    Let every soldier hew him down a bough
    And bear't before him: thereby shall we shadow
    The numbers of our host and make discovery
    Err in report of us.
  785. urine
    liquid excretory product
    Porter
    Marry, sir, nose-painting, sleep, and
    urine.
  786. amazed
    filled with the emotional impact of overwhelming surprise
    MACBETH
    Who can be wise, amazed, temperate and furious,
    Loyal and neutral, in a moment?
  787. fair
    free from favoritism, bias, or deception
    ALL
    Fair is foul, and foul is fair:
    Hover through the fog and filthy air.
  788. manly
    characteristic of a man
    MACBETH
    Let's briefly put on manly readiness,
    And meet i' the hall together.
  789. manhood
    the state of being a man; manly qualities
    Now, if you have a station in the file,
    Not i' the worst rank of manhood, say 't;
    And I will put that business in your bosoms,
    Whose execution takes your enemy off,
    Grapples you to the heart and love of us,
    Who wear our health but sickly in his life,
    Which in his death were perfect.
  790. wayward
    resistant to guidance or discipline
    And, which is worse, all you have done
    Hath been but for a wayward son,
    Spiteful and wrathful, who, as others do,
    Loves for his own ends, not for you.
  791. buttress
    a support usually of stone or brick
    BANQUO
    This guest of summer,
    The temple-haunting martlet, does approve,
    By his loved mansionry, that the heaven's breath
    Smells wooingly here: no jutty, frieze,
    Buttress, nor coign of vantage, but this bird
    Hath made his pendent bed and procreant cradle:
    Where they most breed and haunt, I have observed,
    The air is delicate.
  792. ravish
    hold spellbound
    With Tarquin's ravishing strides, towards his design
    Moves like a ghost.
  793. parley
    a negotiation between enemies
    Bell rings

    Enter LADY MACBETH

    LADY MACBETH
    What's the business,
    That such a hideous trumpet calls to parley
    The sleepers of the house? speak, speak!
  794. blanch
    turn pale, as if in fear
    You make me strange
    Even to the disposition that I owe,
    When now I think you can behold such sights,
    And keep the natural ruby of your cheeks,
    When mine is blanched with fear.
  795. and so
    subsequently or soon afterward
    What are these
    So wither'd and so wild in their attire,
    That look not like the inhabitants o' the earth,
    And yet are on't?
  796. trust
    belief in the honesty and reliability of others
    Mark, king of Scotland, mark:
    No sooner justice had with valour arm'd
    Compell'd these skipping kerns to trust their heels,
    But the Norweyan lord surveying vantage,
    With furbish'd arms and new supplies of men
    Began a fresh assault.
  797. full
    containing as much or as many as is possible or normal
    DUNCAN
    Welcome hither:
    I have begun to plant thee, and will labour
    To make thee full of growing.
  798. host
    a person who invites guests to a social event
    DUNCAN
    Give me your hand;
    Conduct me to mine host: we love him highly,
    And shall continue our graces towards him.
  799. tailor
    a person whose occupation is making and altering garments
    Faith, here's an
    English tailor come hither, for stealing out of
    a French hose: come in, tailor; here you may
    roast your goose.
  800. appease
    make peace with
    I am young;
    but something
    You may deserve of him through me, and wisdom
    To offer up a weak poor innocent lamb
    To appease an angry god.
  801. Neptune
    a giant planet with a ring of ice particles
    Will all great Neptune's ocean wash this blood
    Clean from my hand?
  802. angel
    spiritual being attendant upon God
    Besides, this Duncan
    Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been
    So clear in his great office, that his virtues
    Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against
    The deep damnation of his taking-off;
    And pity, like a naked new-born babe,
    Striding the blast, or heaven's cherubim, horsed
    Upon the sightless couriers of the air,
    Shall blow the horrid deed in every eye,
    That tears shall drown the wind.
  803. tremble
    move quickly and involuntarily up and down or sideways
    MACBETH
    What man dare, I dare:
    Approach thou like the rugged Russian bear,
    The arm'd rhinoceros, or the Hyrcan tiger;
    Take any shape but that, and my firm nerves
    Shall never tremble: or be alive again,
    And dare me to the desert with thy sword;
    If trembling I inhabit then, protest me
    The baby of a girl.
  804. strike down
    cause to fall by or as if by delivering a blow
    MACBETH
    So is he mine; and in such bloody distance,
    That every minute of his being thrusts
    Against my near'st of life: and though I could
    With barefaced power sweep him from my sight
    And bid my will avouch it, yet I must not,
    For certain friends that are both his and mine,
    Whose loves I may not drop, but wail his fall
    Who I myself struck down; and thence it is,
    That I to your assistance do make love,
    Masking the business from the common eye
    For sundry weighty reasons.
  805. antic
    ludicrously odd
    Come, sisters, cheer we up his sprites,
    And show the best of our delights:
    I'll charm the air to give a sound,
    While you perform your antic round:
    That this great king may kindly say,
    Our duties did his welcome pay.
  806. instrument
    the means whereby some act is accomplished
    But 'tis strange:
    And oftentimes, to win us to our harm,
    The instruments of darkness tell us truths,
    Win us with honest trifles, to betray's
    In deepest consequence.
  807. haunt
    follow stealthily or pursue like a ghost
    BANQUO
    This guest of summer,
    The temple- haunting martlet, does approve,
    By his loved mansionry, that the heaven's breath
    Smells wooingly here: no jutty, frieze,
    Buttress, nor coign of vantage, but this bird
    Hath made his pendent bed and procreant cradle:
    Where they most breed and haunt, I have observed,
    The air is delicate.
  808. deftly
    in an agile manner
    ALL
    Come, high or low;
    Thyself and office deftly show!
  809. balm
    preparation applied externally as a remedy or for soothing
    Macbeth does murder sleep', the innocent sleep,
    Sleep that knits up the ravell'd sleeve of care,
    The death of each day's life, sore labour's bath,
    Balm of hurt minds, great nature's second course,
    Chief nourisher in life's feast,--

    LADY MACBETH
    What do you mean?
  810. child
    a human offspring (son or daughter) of any age
    MACBETH
    Your children shall be kings.
  811. let in
    allow to enter; grant entry to
    I'll devil-porter
    it no further: I had thought to have let in
    some of all professions that go the primrose
    way to the everlasting bonfire.
  812. toil
    work hard
    ALL
    Double, double toil and trouble;
    Fire burn, and cauldron bubble.
  813. drab
    a dull greyish to yellowish or light olive brown
    Third Witch
    Scale of dragon, tooth of wolf,
    Witches' mummy, maw and gulf
    Of the ravin'd salt-sea shark,
    Root of hemlock digg'd i' the dark,
    Liver of blaspheming Jew,
    Gall of goat, and slips of yew
    Silver'd in the moon's eclipse,
    Nose of Turk and Tartar's lips,
    Finger of birth-strangled babe
    Ditch-deliver'd by a drab,
    Make the gruel thick and slab:
    Add thereto a tiger's chaudron,
    For the ingredients of our cauldron.
  814. prologue
    an introductory section of a novel or other literary work
    MACBETH
    [Aside] Two truths are told,
    As happy prologues to the swelling act
    Of the imperial theme.--I
  815. stay
    continue in a place, position, or situation
    MACBETH
    Stay, you imperfect speakers, tell me more:
    By Sinel's death I know I am thane of Glamis;
    But how of Cawdor? the thane of Cawdor lives,
    A prosperous gentleman; and to be king
    Stands not within the prospect of belief,
    No more than to be Cawdor.
  816. hold fast
    stick to firmly
    MACDUFF
    Let us rather
    Hold fast the mortal sword, and like good men
    Bestride our down-fall'n birthdom: each new morn
    New widows howl, new orphans cry, new sorrows
    Strike heaven on the face, that it resounds
    As if it felt with Scotland and yell'd out
    Like syllable of dolour.
  817. enchanting
    capturing interest as if by a spell
    I commend your pains;
    And every one shall share i' the gains;
    And now about the cauldron sing,
    Live elves and fairies in a ring,
    Enchanting all that you put in.
  818. words
    language that is spoken or written
    DUNCAN
    So well thy words become thee as thy wounds;
    They smack of honour both.
  819. sewer
    a conduit that carries away waste water or surface water
    Enter a Sewer, and divers Servants with dishes and service, and pass over the stage.
  820. ditch
    a long narrow excavation in the earth
    First Murderer
    Ay, my good lord: safe in a ditch he bides,
    With twenty trenched gashes on his head;
    The least a death to nature.
  821. offer up
    present as an act of worship
    I am young;
    but something
    You may deserve of him through me, and wisdom
    To offer up a weak poor innocent lamb
    To appease an angry god.
  822. coward
    a person who shows fear or timidity
    Wouldst thou have that
    Which thou esteem'st the ornament of life,
    And live a coward in thine own esteem,
    Letting 'I dare not' wait upon 'I would,'
    Like the poor cat i' the adage?
  823. down
    spatially or metaphorically from a higher to a lower level
    As thick as hail
    Came post with post; and every one did bear
    Thy praises in his kingdom's great defence,
    And pour'd them down before him.
  824. wail
    a cry of sorrow and grief
    MACBETH
    So is he mine; and in such bloody distance,
    That every minute of his being thrusts
    Against my near'st of life: and though I could
    With barefaced power sweep him from my sight
    And bid my will avouch it, yet I must not,
    For certain friends that are both his and mine,
    Whose loves I may not drop, but wail his fall
    Who I myself struck down; and thence it is,
    That I to your assistance do make love,
    Masking the business from the common eye
    For sundry weighty reasons.
  825. good and
    completely or thoroughly
    MALCOLM
    This is the sergeant
    Who like a good and hardy soldier fought
    'Gainst my captivity.
  826. redoubled
    become much greater in intensity or size or amount
    If I say sooth, I must report they were
    As cannons overcharged with double cracks, so they
    Doubly redoubled strokes upon the foe:
    Except they meant to bathe in reeking wounds,
    Or memorise another Golgotha,
    I cannot tell.
  827. leafy
    having or covered with leaves
    Enter MALCOLM, SIWARD, MACDUFF, and their Army, with boughs
    MALCOLM
    Now near enough: your leafy screens throw down.
  828. carve
    engrave or cut by chipping away at a surface
    The merciless Macdonwald--
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villanies of nature
    Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
    Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
    For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--
    Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like valour's minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave;
    Which...
  829. minutely
    in painstaking detail
    ANGUS
    Now does he feel
    His secret murders sticking on his hands;
    Now minutely revolts upbraid his faith-breach;
    Those he commands move only in command,
    Nothing in love: now does he feel his title
    Hang loose about him, like a giant's robe
    Upon a dwarfish thief.
  830. croak
    a harsh hoarse utterance (as of a frog)
    Exit Messenger

    The raven himself is hoarse
    That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan
    Under my battlements.
  831. lamb
    young sheep
    I am young;
    but something
    You may deserve of him through me, and wisdom
    To offer up a weak poor innocent lamb
    To appease an angry god.
  832. bat
    a club used for hitting a ball in various games
    MACBETH
    There's comfort yet; they are assailable;
    Then be thou jocund: ere the bat hath flown
    His cloister'd flight, ere to black Hecate's summons
    The shard-borne beetle with his drowsy hums
    Hath rung night's yawning peal, there shall be done
    A deed of dreadful note.
  833. bough
    any of the larger branches of a tree
    MALCOLM
    Let every soldier hew him down a bough
    And bear't before him: thereby shall we shadow
    The numbers of our host and make discovery
    Err in report of us.
  834. business
    the principal activity in one's life to earn money
    He that's coming
    Must be provided for: and you shall put
    This night's great business into my dispatch;
    Which shall to all our nights and days to come
    Give solely sovereign sway and masterdom.
  835. e'er
    at all times; all the time and on every occasion
    The spirits that know
    All mortal consequences have pronounced me thus:
    'Fear not, Macbeth; no man that's born of woman
    Shall e'er have power upon thee.'
  836. unprepared
    without preparation; not prepared for
    MACBETH
    Being unprepared,
    Our will became the servant to defect;
    Which else should free have wrought.
  837. commendation
    an official award given as formal public statement
    Exit

    DUNCAN
    True, worthy Banquo; he is full so valiant,
    And in his commendations I am fed;
    It is a banquet to me.
  838. swear
    to declare or affirm solemnly and formally as true
    I have given suck, and know
    How tender 'tis to love the babe that milks me:
    I would, while it was smiling in my face,
    Have pluck'd my nipple from his boneless gums,
    And dash'd the brains out, had I so sworn as you
    Have done to this.
  839. bird
    warm-blooded egg-laying vertebrate with feathers and wings
    BANQUO
    This guest of summer,
    The temple-haunting martlet, does approve,
    By his loved mansionry, that the heaven's breath
    Smells wooingly here: no jutty, frieze,
    Buttress, nor coign of vantage, but this bird
    Hath made his pendent bed and procreant cradle:
    Where they most breed and haunt, I have observed,
    The air is delicate.
  840. diminutive
    very small
    He loves us not;
    He wants the natural touch: for the poor wren,
    The most diminutive of birds, will fight,
    Her young ones in her nest, against the owl.
  841. soul
    the immaterial part of a person
    Know
    That it was he in the times past which held you
    So under fortune, which you thought had been
    Our innocent self: this I made good to you
    In our last conference, pass'd in probation with you,
    How you were borne in hand, how cross'd,
    the instruments,
    Who wrought with them, and all things else that might
    To half a soul and to a notion crazed
    Say 'Thus did Banquo.'
  842. amends
    something done or paid to make up for a wrong
    But make amends now: get you gone,
    And at the pit of Acheron
    Meet me i' the morning: thither he
    Will come to know his destiny:
    Your vessels and your spells provide,
    Your charms and every thing beside.
  843. stick
    a long thin implement resembling a length of wood
    But screw your courage to the sticking-place,
    And we'll not fail.
  844. sag
    droop, sink, or settle
    Then fly,
    false thanes,
    And mingle with the English epicures:
    The mind I sway by and the heart I bear
    Shall never sag with doubt nor shake with fear.
  845. strangled
    held in check with difficulty
    Third Witch
    Scale of dragon, tooth of wolf,
    Witches' mummy, maw and gulf
    Of the ravin'd salt-sea shark,
    Root of hemlock digg'd i' the dark,
    Liver of blaspheming Jew,
    Gall of goat, and slips of yew
    Silver'd in the moon's eclipse,
    Nose of Turk and Tartar's lips,
    Finger of birth- strangled babe
    Ditch-deliver'd by a drab,
    Make the gruel thick and slab:
    Add thereto a tiger's chaudron,
    For the ingredients of our cauldron.
  846. sweeten
    make sweeter in taste
    LADY MACBETH
    Here's the smell of the blood still: all the
    perfumes of Arabia will not sweeten this little
    hand.
  847. betray
    deliver to an enemy by treachery
    But 'tis strange:
    And oftentimes, to win us to our harm,
    The instruments of darkness tell us truths,
    Win us with honest trifles, to betray's
    In deepest consequence.
  848. olden
    long past
    MACBETH
    Blood hath been shed ere now, i' the olden time,
    Ere human statute purged the gentle weal;
    Ay, and since too, murders have been perform'd
    Too terrible for the ear: the times have been,
    That, when the brains were out, the man would die,
    And there an end; but now they rise again,
    With twenty mortal murders on their crowns,
    And push us from our stools: this is more strange
    Than such a murder is.
  849. true
    consistent with fact or reality; not false
    BANQUO
    What, can the devil speak true?
  850. majesty
    impressiveness in scale or proportion
    LADY MACBETH
    All our service
    In every point twice done and then done double
    Were poor and single business to contend
    Against those honours deep and broad wherewith
    Your majesty loads our house: for those of old,
    And the late dignities heap'd up to them,
    We rest your hermits.
  851. cur
    an inferior dog or one of mixed breed
    MACBETH
    Ay, in the catalogue ye go for men;
    As hounds and greyhounds, mongrels, spaniels, curs,
    Shoughs, water-rugs and demi-wolves, are clept
    All by the name of dogs: the valued file
    Distinguishes the swift, the slow, the subtle,
    The housekeeper, the hunter, every one
    According to the gift which bounteous nature
    Hath in him closed; whereby he does receive
    Particular addition. from the bill
    That writes them all alike: and so of men.
  852. remove
    take something away as by lifting, pushing, or taking off
    Good God, betimes remove
    The means that makes us strangers!
  853. gloss
    the property of being smooth and shiny
    MACBETH
    We will proceed no further in this business:
    He hath honour'd me of late; and I have bought
    Golden opinions from all sorts of people,
    Which would be worn now in their newest gloss,
    Not cast aside so soon.
  854. incensed
    angered at something unjust or wrong
    Second Murderer
    I am one, my liege,
    Whom the vile blows and buffets of the world
    Have so incensed that I am reckless what
    I do to spite the world.
  855. prosperous
    in fortunate circumstances financially
    MACBETH
    Stay, you imperfect speakers, tell me more:
    By Sinel's death I know I am thane of Glamis;
    But how of Cawdor? the thane of Cawdor lives,
    A prosperous gentleman; and to be king
    Stands not within the prospect of belief,
    No more than to be Cawdor.
  856. known
    apprehended with certainty
    Noble Banquo,
    That hast no less deserved, nor must be known
    No less to have done so, let me enfold thee
    And hold thee to my heart.
  857. descend
    move downward and lower, but not necessarily all the way
    LADY MACBETH
    Now.

    MACBETH
    As I descended?
  858. execution
    putting a condemned person to death
    The merciless Macdonwald--
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villanies of nature
    Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
    Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
    For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--
    Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like valour's minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave;
    Which...
  859. womanly
    befitting or characteristic of a woman especially a mature woman
    But I remember now
    I am in this earthly world; where to do harm
    Is often laudable, to do good sometime
    Accounted dangerous folly: why then, alas,
    Do I put up that womanly defence,
    To say I have done no harm?
  860. rest
    take a short break from one's activities in order to relax
    Enter ROSS and ANGUS

    ROSS
    The king hath happily received, Macbeth,
    The news of thy success; and when he reads
    Thy personal venture in the rebels' fight,
    His wonders and his praises do contend
    Which should be thine or his: silenced with that,
    In viewing o'er the rest o' the selfsame day,
    He finds thee in the stout Norweyan ranks,
    Nothing afeard of what thyself didst make,
    Strange images of death.
  861. yawning
    an involuntary intake of breath through a wide open mouth
    MACBETH
    There's comfort yet; they are assailable;
    Then be thou jocund: ere the bat hath flown
    His cloister'd flight, ere to black Hecate's summons
    The shard-borne beetle with his drowsy hums
    Hath rung night's yawning peal, there shall be done
    A deed of dreadful note.
  862. interim
    the time between one event, process, or period and another
    Think upon what hath chanced, and, at more time,
    The interim having weigh'd it, let us speak
    Our free hearts each to other.
  863. impostor
    a person who makes deceitful pretenses
    O, these flaws and starts,
    Impostors to true fear, would well become
    A woman's story at a winter's fire,
    Authorized by her grandam.
  864. breach
    an opening, especially a gap in a dike or fortification
    Here lay Duncan,
    His silver skin laced with his golden blood;
    And his gash'd stabs look'd like a breach in nature
    For ruin's wasteful entrance: there, the murderers,
    Steep'd in the colours of their trade, their daggers
    Unmannerly breech'd with gore: who could refrain,
    That had a heart to love, and in that heart
    Courage to make 's love kno wn?
  865. unreal
    lacking material form or substance; unreal
    Unreal mockery, hence!
  866. devilish
    showing the cunning or wickedness of an evil being
    Devilish Macbeth
    By many of these trains hath sought to win me
    Into his power, and modest wisdom plucks me
    From over-credulous haste: but God above
    Deal between thee and me! for even now
    I put myself to thy direction, and
    Unspeak mine own detraction, here abjure
    The taints and blames I laid upon myself,
    For strangers to my nature.
  867. laced
    closed with a lace
    Here lay Duncan,
    His silver skin laced with his golden blood;
    And his gash'd stabs look'd like a breach in nature
    For ruin's wasteful entrance: there, the murderers,
    Steep'd in the colours of their trade, their daggers
    Unmannerly breech'd with gore: who could refrain,
    That had a heart to love, and in that heart
    Courage to make 's love kno wn?
  868. vault
    a burial chamber (usually underground)
    I have no spur
    To prick the sides of my intent, but only
    Vaulting ambition, which o'erleaps itself
    And falls on the other.
  869. cut short
    make shorter as if by cutting off
    But, gentle heavens,
    Cut short all intermission; front to front
    Bring thou this fiend of Scotland and myself;
    Within my sword's length set him; if he 'scape,
    Heaven forgive him too!
  870. dishearten
    take away the enthusiasm of
    Lechery, sir, it provokes, and unprovokes;
    it provokes the desire, but it takes
    away the performance: therefore, much drink
    may be said to be an equivocator with lechery:
    it makes him, and it mars him; it sets
    him on, and it takes him off; it persuades him,
    and disheartens him; makes him stand to, and
    not stand to; in conclusion, equivocates him
    in a sleep, and, giving him the lie, leaves him.
  871. fast asleep
    sleeping deeply
    This is her very guise;
    and, upon my life, fast asleep.
  872. hang out
    spend time in a certain location or with certain people
    Enter MACBETH, SEYTON, and Soldiers, with drum and colours
    MACBETH
    Hang out our banners on the outward walls;
    The cry is still 'They come:' our castle's strength
    Will laugh a siege to scorn: here let them lie
    Till famine and the ague eat them up:
    Were they not forced with those that should be ours,
    We might have met them dareful, beard to beard,
    And beat them backward home.
  873. at once
    without delay or hesitation; with no time intervening
    You seem to understand me,
    By each at once her chappy finger laying
    Upon her skinny lips: you should be women,
    And yet your beards forbid me to interpret
    That you are so.
  874. fraught
    filled with or attended with
    What, man! ne'er pull your hat upon your brows;
    Give sorrow words: the grief that does not speak
    Whispers the o'er- fraught heart and bids it break.
  875. gout
    a painful inflammation of the big toe and foot caused by defects in uric acid metabolism resulting in deposits of the acid and its salts in the blood and joints
    Mine eyes are made the fools o' the other senses,
    Or else worth all the rest; I see thee still,
    And on thy blade and dudgeon gouts of blood,
    Which was not so before.
  876. beauteous
    (poetic )beautiful, especially to the sight
    ROSS
    And Duncan's horses--a thing most strange and certain--
    Beauteous and swift, the minions of their race,
    Turn'd wild in nature, broke their stalls, flung out,
    Contending 'gainst obedience, as they would make
    War with mankind.
  877. little hand
    the shorter hand of a clock that points to the hours
    LADY MACBETH
    Here's the smell of the blood still: all the
    perfumes of Arabia will not sweeten this little
    hand
    .
  878. patience
    good-natured tolerance of delay or incompetence
    Do you find
    Your patience so predominant in your nature
    That you can let this go?
  879. young
    any immature animal
    LENNOX
    My young remembrance cannot parallel
    A fellow to it.
  880. wear
    put clothing on one's body
    MACBETH
    We will proceed no further in this business:
    He hath honour'd me of late; and I have bought
    Golden opinions from all sorts of people,
    Which would be worn now in their newest gloss,
    Not cast aside so soon.
  881. deep
    having great spatial extension downward or inward
    But 'tis strange:
    And oftentimes, to win us to our harm,
    The instruments of darkness tell us truths,
    Win us with honest trifles, to betray's
    In deepest consequence.
  882. bones
    a percussion instrument consisting of a pair of hollow pieces of wood or bone (usually held between the thumb and fingers) that are made to click together (as by Spanish dancers) in rhythm with the dance
    MACDUFF
    Carried to Colmekill,
    The sacred storehouse of his predecessors,
    And guardian of their bones.
  883. stalls
    a farm building for housing horses or other livestock
    ROSS
    And Duncan's horses--a thing most strange and certain--
    Beauteous and swift, the minions of their race,
    Turn'd wild in nature, broke their stalls, flung out,
    Contending 'gainst obedience, as they would make
    War with mankind.
  884. bonfire
    a large outdoor fire that is lighted as a signal or in celebration
    I'll devil-porter
    it no further: I had thought to have let in
    some of all professions that go the primrose
    way to the everlasting bonfire.
  885. sleep in
    live in the house where one works
    But let the frame of things disjoint, both the
    worlds suffer,
    Ere we will eat our meal in fear and sleep
    In
    the affliction of these terrible dreams
    That shake us nightly: better be with the dead,
    Whom we, to gain our peace, have sent to peace,
    Than on the torture of the mind to lie
    In restless ecstasy.
  886. sovereignty
    the authority of a state to govern another state
    Then 'tis most like
    The sovereignty will fall upon Macbeth.
  887. convince
    make realize the truth or validity of something
    When Duncan is asleep--
    Whereto the rather shall his day's hard journey
    Soundly invite him--his two chamberlains
    Will I with wine and wassail so convince
    That memory, the warder of the brain,
    Shall be a fume, and the receipt of reason
    A limbeck only: when in swinish sleep
    Their drenched natures lie as in a death,
    What cannot you and I perform upon
    The unguarded Duncan? what not put upon
    His spongy officers, who shall bear the guilt
    Of our great quell?
  888. country
    the territory occupied by a nation
    Whether he was combined
    With those of Norway, or did line the rebel
    With hidden help and vantage, or that with both
    He labour'd in his country's wreck, I know not;
    But treasons capital, confess'd and proved,
    Have overthrown him.
  889. hand in hand
    clasping each other's hands
    ALL
    The weird sisters, hand in hand,
    Posters of the sea and land,
    Thus do go about, about:
    Thrice to thine and thrice to mine
    And thrice again, to make up nine.
  890. jovial
    full of or showing high-spirited merriment
    LADY MACBETH
    Come on;
    Gentle my lord, sleek o'er your rugged looks;
    Be bright and jovial among your guests to-night.
  891. new
    not of long duration
    He can report,
    As seemeth by his plight, of the revolt
    The newest state.
  892. herein
    in this place or thing or document
    Herein I teach you
    How you shall bid God 'ild us for your pains,
    And thank us for your trouble.
  893. impediment
    something immaterial that interferes with action or progress
    MALCOLM
    I grant him bloody,
    Luxurious, avaricious, false, deceitful,
    Sudden, malicious, smacking of every sin
    That has a name: but there's no bottom, none,
    In my voluptuousness: your wives, your daughters,
    Your matrons and your maids, could not fill up
    The cistern of my lust, and my desire
    All continent impediments would o'erbear
    That did oppose my will: better Macbeth
    Than such an one to reign.
  894. aright
    in an accurate manner
    Descends

    MACBETH
    Whate'er thou art, for thy good caution, thanks;
    Thou hast harp'd my fear aright: but one
    word more,--

    First Witch
    He will not be commanded: here's another,
    More potent than the first.
  895. set forth
    leave
    But I have spoke
    With one that saw him die: who did report
    That very frankly he confess'd his treasons,
    Implored your highness' pardon and set forth
    A deep repentance: nothing in his life
    Became him like the leaving it; he died
    As one that had been studied in his death
    To throw away the dearest thing he owed,
    As 'twere a careless trifle.
  896. benediction
    a blessing or ceremonial prayer invoking divine protection
    How he solicits heaven,
    Himself best knows: but strangely-visited people,
    All swoln and ulcerous, pitiful to the eye,
    The mere despair of surgery, he cures,
    Hanging a golden stamp about their necks,
    Put on with holy prayers: and 'tis spoken,
    To the succeeding royalty he leaves
    The healing benediction.
  897. swimmer
    a person who travels through the water by swimming
    Sergeant
    Doubtful it stood;
    As two spent swimmers, that do cling together
    And choke their art.
  898. reek
    give off smoke, fumes, warm vapour, steam, etc.
    If I say sooth, I must report they were
    As cannons overcharged with double cracks, so they
    Doubly redoubled strokes upon the foe:
    Except they meant to bathe in reeking wounds,
    Or memorise another Golgotha,
    I cannot tell.
  899. gate
    a movable barrier in a fence or wall
    If a
    man were porter of hell- gate, he should have
    old turning the key.
  900. beard
    the hair growing on the lower part of a man's face
    You seem to understand me,
    By each at once her chappy finger laying
    Upon her skinny lips: you should be women,
    And yet your beards forbid me to interpret
    That you are so.
  901. deserved
    properly deserved
    Would thou hadst less deserved,
    That the proportion both of thanks and payment
    Might have been mine! only I have left to say,
    More is thy due than more than all can pay.
  902. outwardly
    in outward appearance
    I' the name of truth,
    Are ye fantastical, or that indeed
    Which outwardly ye show?
  903. send out
    to cause or order to be taken, directed, or transmitted to another place
    Send out more horses; skirr the country round;
    Hang those that talk of fear.
  904. gentleman
    a man of refinement
    DUNCAN
    O valiant cousin! worthy gentleman!
  905. falcon
    a diurnal bird of prey
    On Tuesday last,
    A falcon, towering in her pride of place,
    Was by a mousing owl hawk'd at and kill'd.
  906. find
    discover or determine the existence, presence, or fact of
    Enter ROSS and ANGUS

    ROSS
    The king hath happily received, Macbeth,
    The news of thy success; and when he reads
    Thy personal venture in the rebels' fight,
    His wonders and his praises do contend
    Which should be thine or his: silenced with that,
    In viewing o'er the rest o' the selfsame day,
    He finds thee in the stout Norweyan ranks,
    Nothing afeard of what thyself didst make,
    Strange images of death.
  907. due
    that which is deserved or owed
    Would thou hadst less deserved,
    That the proportion both of thanks and payment
    Might have been mine! only I have left to say,
    More is thy due than more than all can pay.
  908. hearts
    a form of whist in which players avoid winning tricks containing hearts or the queen of spades
    Think upon what hath chanced, and, at more time,
    The interim having weigh'd it, let us speak
    Our free hearts each to other.
  909. spurn
    reject with contempt
    I am for the air; this night I'll spend
    Unto a dismal and a fatal end:
    Great business must be wrought ere noon:
    Upon the corner of the moon
    There hangs a vaporous drop profound;
    I'll catch it ere it come to ground:
    And that distill'd by magic sleights
    Shall raise such artificial sprites
    As by the strength of their illusion
    Shall draw him on to his confusion:
    He shall spurn fate, scorn death, and bear
    He hopes 'bove wisdom, grace and fear:
    And you all know, security
    Is mor...
  910. wash
    clean with some chemical process
    Go get some water,
    And wash this filthy witness from your hand.
  911. place
    a point located with respect to surface features of a region
    ACT I
    SCENE I. A desert place.
  912. mistrust
    regard with suspicion
    Second Murderer
    He needs not our mistrust, since he delivers
    Our offices and what we have to do
    To the direction just.
  913. palpable
    capable of being perceived
    I see thee yet, in form as palpable
    As this which now I draw.
  914. primrose
    any of numerous short-stemmed plants of the genus Primula having tufted basal leaves and showy flowers clustered in umbels or heads
    I'll devil-porter
    it no further: I had thought to have let in
    some of all professions that go the primrose
    way to the everlasting bonfire.
  915. pleasure
    something or someone that provides a source of happiness
    LADY MACBETH
    Your servants ever
    Have theirs, themselves and what is theirs, in compt,
    To make their audit at your highness' pleasure,
    Still to return your own.
  916. three
    the cardinal number that is the sum of one and one and one
    Enter three Witches
    First Witch
    When shall we three meet again
    In thunder, lightning, or in rain?
  917. health
    the general condition of body and mind
    Now, if you have a station in the file,
    Not i' the worst rank of manhood, say 't;
    And I will put that business in your bosoms,
    Whose execution takes your enemy off,
    Grapples you to the heart and love of us,
    Who wear our health but sickly in his life,
    Which in his death were perfect.
  918. clog
    any object that acts as a hindrance or obstruction
    Lord
    He did: and with an absolute 'Sir, not I,'
    The cloudy messenger turns me his back,
    And hums, as who should say 'You'll rue the time
    That clogs me with this answer.'
  919. latch
    catch for fastening a door or gate
    But I have words
    That would be howl'd out in the desert air,
    Where hearing should not latch them.
  920. mortify
    cause to feel shame
    Enter MENTEITH, CAITHNESS, ANGUS, LENNOX, and Soldiers
    MENTEITH
    The English power is near, led on by Malcolm,
    His uncle Siward and the good Macduff:
    Revenges burn in them; for their dear causes
    Would to the bleeding and the grim alarm
    Excite the mortified man.
  921. portable
    easily or conveniently transported
    Of your mere own: all these are portable,
    With other graces weigh'd.
  922. yield
    give or supply
    I am thane of Cawdor:
    If good, why do I yield to that suggestion
    Whose horrid image doth unfix my hair
    And make my seated heart knock at my ribs,
    Against the use of nature?
  923. broth
    liquid in which meat and vegetables are simmered
    Second Witch
    Fillet of a fenny snake,
    In the cauldron boil and bake;
    Eye of newt and toe of frog,
    Wool of bat and tongue of dog,
    Adder's fork and blind-worm's sting,
    Lizard's leg and owlet's wing,
    For a charm of powerful trouble,
    Like a hell- broth boil and bubble.
  924. serpent
    limbless scaly elongate reptile; some are venomous
    To beguile the time,
    Look like the time; bear welcome in your eye,
    Your hand, your tongue: look like the innocent flower,
    But be the serpent under't.
  925. flight
    an instance of traveling by air
    Banquo, thy soul's flight,
    If it find heaven, must find it out to-night.
  926. quell
    suppress or crush completely
    When Duncan is asleep--
    Whereto the rather shall his day's hard journey
    Soundly invite him--his two chamberlains
    Will I with wine and wassail so convince
    That memory, the warder of the brain,
    Shall be a fume, and the receipt of reason
    A limbeck only: when in swinish sleep
    Their drenched natures lie as in a death,
    What cannot you and I perform upon
    The unguarded Duncan? what not put upon
    His spongy officers, who shall bear the guilt
    Of our great quell?
  927. thumb
    the thick short innermost digit of the forelimb
    First Witch
    Here I have a pilot's thumb,
    Wreck'd as homeward he did come.
  928. go about
    begin to deal with
    ALL
    The weird sisters, hand in hand,
    Posters of the sea and land,
    Thus do go about, about:
    Thrice to thine and thrice to mine
    And thrice again, to make up nine.
  929. knit
    make by needlework with interlacing yarn
    Macbeth does murder sleep', the innocent sleep,
    Sleep that knits up the ravell'd sleeve of care,
    The death of each day's life, sore labour's bath,
    Balm of hurt minds, great nature's second course,
    Chief nourisher in life's feast,--

    LADY MACBETH
    What do you mean?
  930. boasting
    speaking of yourself in superlatives
    No boasting like a fool;
    This deed I'll do before this purpose cool.
  931. rabble
    a disorderly crowd of people
    MACBETH
    I will not yield,
    To kiss the ground before young Malcolm's feet,
    And to be baited with the rabble's curse.
  932. afraid
    filled with fear or apprehension
    LADY MACBETH
    Alack, I am afraid they have awaked,
    And 'tis not done.
  933. chide
    scold or reprimand severely or angrily
    He chid the sisters
    When first they put the name of king upon me,
    And bade them speak to him: then prophet-like
    They hail'd him father to a line of kings:
    Upon my head they placed a fruitless crown,
    And put a barren sceptre in my gripe,
    Thence to be wrench'd with an unlineal hand,
    No son of mine succeeding.
  934. craze
    state of violent mental agitation
    Know
    That it was he in the times past which held you
    So under fortune, which you thought had been
    Our innocent self: this I made good to you
    In our last conference, pass'd in probation with you,
    How you were borne in hand, how cross'd,
    the instruments,
    Who wrought with them, and all things else that might
    To half a soul and to a notion crazed
    Say 'Thus did Banquo.'
  935. surmise
    infer from incomplete evidence
    Present fears
    Are less than horrible imaginings:
    My thought, whose murder yet is but fantastical,
    Shakes so my single state of man that function
    Is smother'd in surmise, and nothing is
    But what is not.
  936. mummy
    a body that is embalmed, dried, and wrapped for burial
    Third Witch
    Scale of dragon, tooth of wolf,
    Witches' mummy, maw and gulf
    Of the ravin'd salt-sea shark,
    Root of hemlock digg'd i' the dark,
    Liver of blaspheming Jew,
    Gall of goat, and slips of yew
    Silver'd in the moon's eclipse,
    Nose of Turk and Tartar's lips,
    Finger of birth-strangled babe
    Ditch-deliver'd by a drab,
    Make the gruel thick and slab:
    Add thereto a tiger's chaudron,
    For the ingredients of our cauldron.
  937. strut
    walk in a proud, confident way
    Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player
    That struts and frets his hour upon the stage
    And then is heard no more: it is a tale
    Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
    Signifying nothing.
  938. toad
    any of various tailless stout-bodied amphibians with long hind limbs for leaping; semiaquatic and terrestrial species
    Toad, that under cold stone
    Days and nights has thirty-one
    Swelter'd venom sleeping got,
    Boil thou first i' the charmed pot.
  939. diseased
    showing signs of sickness or illness
    Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased,
    Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow,
    Raze out the written troubles of the brain
    And with some sweet oblivious antidote
    Cleanse the stuff'd bosom of that perilous stuff
    Which weighs upon the heart?
  940. expire
    lose validity
    It cannot
    Be call'd our mother, but our grave; where nothing,
    But who knows nothing, is once seen to smile;
    Where sighs and groans and shrieks that rend the air
    Are made, not mark'd; where violent sorrow seems
    A modern ecstasy; the dead man's knell
    Is there scarce ask'd for who; and good men's lives
    Expire before the flowers in their caps,
    Dying or ere they sicken.
  941. cheque
    a written order directing a bank to pay money
    Great tyranny! lay thou thy basis sure,
    For goodness dare not cheque thee: wear thou
    thy wrongs;
    The title is affeer'd!
  942. spirit
    the vital principle or animating force within living things
    Curbing his lavish spirit: and, to conclude,
    The victory fell on us.
  943. partner
    a person who is a member of a cooperative relationship
    My noble partner
    You greet with present grace and great prediction
    Of noble having and of royal hope,
    That he seems rapt withal: to me you speak not.
  944. buffet
    piece of furniture that stands at the side of a dining room
    Second Murderer
    I am one, my liege,
    Whom the vile blows and buffets of the world
    Have so incensed that I am reckless what
    I do to spite the world.
  945. drowsy
    half asleep
    MACBETH
    There's comfort yet; they are assailable;
    Then be thou jocund: ere the bat hath flown
    His cloister'd flight, ere to black Hecate's summons
    The shard-borne beetle with his drowsy hums
    Hath rung night's yawning peal, there shall be done
    A deed of dreadful note.
  946. perfect
    being complete of its kind and without defect or blemish
    Enter LADY MACBETH, reading a letter
    LADY MACBETH
    'They met me in the day of success: and I have
    learned by the perfectest report, they have more in
    them than mortal knowledge.
  947. set upon
    assail or attack on all sides: "The zebra was beset by leopards"
    They set upon BANQUO

    BANQUO
    O, treachery!
  948. resolve
    find a solution or answer
    Resolve yourselves apart:
    I'll come to you anon.
  949. way of life
    a course of conduct
    I have lived long enough: my way of life
    Is fall'n into the sear, the yellow leaf;
    And that which should accompany old age,
    As honour, love, obedience, troops of friends,
    I must not look to have; but, in their stead,
    Curses, not loud but deep, mouth-honour, breath,
    Which the poor heart would fain deny, and dare not.
  950. drenched
    abundantly covered or supplied with
    When Duncan is asleep--
    Whereto the rather shall his day's hard journey
    Soundly invite him--his two chamberlains
    Will I with wine and wassail so convince
    That memory, the warder of the brain,
    Shall be a fume, and the receipt of reason
    A limbeck only: when in swinish sleep
    Their drenched natures lie as in a death,
    What cannot you and I perform upon
    The unguarded Duncan? what not put upon
    His spongy officers, who shall bear the guilt
    Of our great quell?
  951. stirring
    exciting strong but not unpleasant emotions
    MACDUFF
    Is thy master stirring?
  952. dishonour
    a state of shame or disgrace
    I pray you,
    Let not my jealousies be your dishonours,
    But mine own safeties.
  953. napkin
    a small piece of table linen that is used to wipe the mouth and to cover the lap in order to protect clothing
    Here's a farmer, that hanged
    himself on the expectation of plenty: come in
    time; have napkins enow about you; here
    you'll sweat for't.
  954. behold
    see with attention
    MACBETH
    Prithee, see there! behold! look! lo!
    how say you?
  955. recompense
    make payment to
    The sin of my ingratitude even now
    Was heavy on me: thou art so far before
    That swiftest wing of recompense is slow
    To overtake thee.
  956. snore
    breathe noisily during one's sleep
    He is about it:
    The doors are open; and the surfeited grooms
    Do mock their charge with snores: I have drugg'd
    their possets,
    That death and nature do contend about them,
    Whether they live or die.
  957. stir
    move an implement through
    MACBETH
    [Aside] If chance will have me king, why, chance may crown me,
    Without my stir.
  958. brag
    show off
    Re-enter MACBETH and LENNOX, with ROSS

    MACBETH
    Had I but died an hour before this chance,
    I had lived a blessed time; for, from this instant,
    There 's nothing serious in mortality:
    All is but toys: renown and grace is dead;
    The wine of life is drawn, and the mere lees
    Is left this vault to brag of.
  959. lose
    fail to keep or to maintain
    Second Witch
    When the hurlyburly's done,
    When the battle's lost and won.
  960. march
    walk fast, with regular or measured steps
    CAITHNESS
    Well, march we on,
    To give obedience where 'tis truly owed:
    Meet we the medicine of the sickly weal,
    And with him pour we in our country's purge
    Each drop of us.
  961. rings
    gymnastic apparatus consisting of a pair of heavy metal circles (usually covered with leather) suspended by ropes; used for gymnastic exercises
    A bell rings

    I go, and it is done; the bell invites me.
  962. golden
    made from or covered with gold
    Hie thee hither,
    That I may pour my spirits in thine ear;
    And chastise with the valour of my tongue
    All that impedes thee from the golden round,
    Which fate and metaphysical aid doth seem
    To have thee crown'd withal.
  963. merciless
    lacking pity, compassion, or forgiveness
    The merciless Macdonwald--
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villanies of nature
    Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
    Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
    For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--
    Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like valour's minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave;
    Which...
  964. toe
    one of the digits of the foot
    Come, you spirits
    That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here,
    And fill me from the crown to the toe top-full
    Of direst cruelty! make thick my blood;
    Stop up the access and passage to remorse,
    That no compunctious visitings of nature
    Shake my fell purpose, nor keep peace between
    The effect and it!
  965. treble
    having or denoting a high range
    I'll see no more:
    And yet the eighth appears, who bears a glass
    Which shows me many more; and some I see
    That two-fold balls and treble scepters carry:
    Horrible sight!
  966. viewing
    the display of a motion picture
    Enter ROSS and ANGUS

    ROSS
    The king hath happily received, Macbeth,
    The news of thy success; and when he reads
    Thy personal venture in the rebels' fight,
    His wonders and his praises do contend
    Which should be thine or his: silenced with that,
    In viewing o'er the rest o' the selfsame day,
    He finds thee in the stout Norweyan ranks,
    Nothing afeard of what thyself didst make,
    Strange images of death.
  967. unwelcome
    not giving pleasure or received with pleasure
    MACDUFF
    Such welcome and unwelcome things at once
    'Tis hard to reconcile.
  968. Man
    one of the British Isles in the Irish Sea
    Enter ROSS and an old Man
    Old Man
    Threescore and ten I can remember well:
    Within the volume of which time I have seen
    Hours dreadful and things strange; but this sore night
    Hath trifled former knowings.
  969. destroy
    do away with; cause the ruin or undoing of
    MACDUFF
    Approach the chamber, and destroy your sight
    With a new Gorgon: do not bid me speak;
    See, and then speak yourselves.
  970. pain
    a physical feeling of suffering or discomfort
    To ROSS and ANGUS

    Thanks for your pains.
  971. teem
    be full of or abuzz with
    ROSS
    That of an hour's age doth hiss the speaker:
    Each minute teems a new one.
  972. oppose
    be against
    MALCOLM
    I grant him bloody,
    Luxurious, avaricious, false, deceitful,
    Sudden, malicious, smacking of every sin
    That has a name: but there's no bottom, none,
    In my voluptuousness: your wives, your daughters,
    Your matrons and your maids, could not fill up
    The cistern of my lust, and my desire
    All continent impediments would o'erbear
    That did oppose my will: better Macbeth
    Than such an one to reign.
  973. chance
    an unknown and unpredictable phenomenon
    MACBETH
    [Aside] If chance will have me king, why, chance may crown me,
    Without my stir.
  974. sceptre
    a ceremonial or emblematic staff
    He chid the sisters
    When first they put the name of king upon me,
    And bade them speak to him: then prophet-like
    They hail'd him father to a line of kings:
    Upon my head they placed a fruitless crown,
    And put a barren sceptre in my gripe,
    Thence to be wrench'd with an unlineal hand,
    No son of mine succeeding.
  975. interpret
    make sense of; assign a meaning to
    You seem to understand me,
    By each at once her chappy finger laying
    Upon her skinny lips: you should be women,
    And yet your beards forbid me to interpret
    That you are so.
  976. haunting
    having a deeply disquieting or disturbing effect
    BANQUO
    This guest of summer,
    The temple- haunting martlet, does approve,
    By his loved mansionry, that the heaven's breath
    Smells wooingly here: no jutty, frieze,
    Buttress, nor coign of vantage, but this bird
    Hath made his pendent bed and procreant cradle:
    Where they most breed and haunt, I have observed,
    The air is delicate.
  977. anoint
    administer an oil or ointment to, often ceremonially
    Most sacrilegious murder hath broke ope
    The Lord's anointed temple, and stole thence
    The life o' the building!
  978. repose
    freedom from activity
    A heavy summons lies like lead upon me,
    And yet I would not sleep: merciful powers,
    Restrain in me the cursed thoughts that nature
    Gives way to in repose!
  979. lay
    put into a certain place
    You seem to understand me,
    By each at once her chappy finger laying
    Upon her skinny lips: you should be women,
    And yet your beards forbid me to interpret
    That you are so.
  980. pour
    cause to run
    Hie thee hither,
    That I may pour my spirits in thine ear;
    And chastise with the valour of my tongue
    All that impedes thee from the golden round,
    Which fate and metaphysical aid doth seem
    To have thee crown'd withal.
  981. walk
    use one's feet to advance; advance by steps
    Thou sure and firm-set earth,
    Hear not my steps, which way they walk, for fear
    Thy very stones prate of my whereabout,
    And take the present horror from the time,
    Which now suits with it.
  982. head
    the upper part of the human body or the body in animals
    The merciless Macdonwald--
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villanies of nature
    Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
    Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
    For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--
    Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like valour's minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave;
    Which ne'er ...
  983. absolute
    perfect or complete or pure
    DUNCAN
    There's no art
    To find the mind's construction in the face:
    He was a gentleman on whom I built
    An absolute trust.
  984. hold
    have in one's hands or grip
    Noble Banquo,
    That hast no less deserved, nor must be known
    No less to have done so, let me enfold thee
    And hold thee to my heart.
  985. send
    cause to go somewhere
    ANGUS
    We are sent
    To give thee from our royal master thanks;
    Only to herald thee into his sight,
    Not pay thee.
  986. light
    electromagnetic radiation that can produce visual sensation
    Stars, hide your fires;
    Let not light see my black and deep desires:
    The eye wink at the hand; yet let that be,
    Which the eye fears, when it is done, to see.
  987. ever
    at all times; all the time and on every occasion
    LADY MACBETH
    Only look up clear;
    To alter favour ever is to fear:
    Leave all the rest to me.
  988. coming
    of the relatively near future
    Whiles I stood rapt in
    the wonder of it, came missives from the king, who
    all-hailed me 'Thane of Cawdor;' by which title,
    before, these weird sisters saluted me, and referred
    me to the coming on of time, with 'Hail, king that
    shalt be!'
  989. ingratitude
    a lack of gratitude
    The sin of my ingratitude even now
    Was heavy on me: thou art so far before
    That swiftest wing of recompense is slow
    To overtake thee.
  990. guest
    a visitor to whom hospitality is extended
    BANQUO
    This guest of summer,
    The temple-haunting martlet, does approve,
    By his loved mansionry, that the heaven's breath
    Smells wooingly here: no jutty, frieze,
    Buttress, nor coign of vantage, but this bird
    Hath made his pendent bed and procreant cradle:
    Where they most breed and haunt, I have observed,
    The air is delicate.
  991. nave
    the central area of a church
    The merciless Macdonwald--
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villanies of nature
    Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
    Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
    For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--
    Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like valour's minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave;
    Which ne'er ...
  992. pass over
    travel across or pass over
    Enter a Sewer, and divers Servants with dishes and service, and pass over the stage.
  993. blown
    being moved or acted upon by moving air or vapor
    LENNOX
    The night has been unruly: where we lay,
    Our chimneys were blown down; and, as they say,
    Lamentings heard i' the air; strange screams of death,
    And prophesying with accents terrible
    Of dire combustion and confused events
    New hatch'd to the woeful time: the obscure bird
    Clamour'd the livelong night: some say, the earth
    Was feverous and did shake.
  994. metaphysical
    pertaining to the philosophical study of being and knowing
    Hie thee hither,
    That I may pour my spirits in thine ear;
    And chastise with the valour of my tongue
    All that impedes thee from the golden round,
    Which fate and metaphysical aid doth seem
    To have thee crown'd withal.
  995. cold
    having a low or inadequate temperature
    ROSS
    From Fife, great king;
    Where the Norweyan banners flout the sky
    And fan our people cold.
  996. stroke
    a single complete movement
    If I say sooth, I must report they were
    As cannons overcharged with double cracks, so they
    Doubly redoubled strokes upon the foe:
    Except they meant to bathe in reeking wounds,
    Or memorise another Golgotha,
    I cannot tell.
  997. adhere
    stick to firmly
    Nor time nor place
    Did then adhere, and yet you would make both:
    They have made themselves, and that their fitness now
    Does unmake you.
  998. gore
    coagulated blood from a wound
    Here lay Duncan,
    His silver skin laced with his golden blood;
    And his gash'd stabs look'd like a breach in nature
    For ruin's wasteful entrance: there, the murderers,
    Steep'd in the colours of their trade, their daggers
    Unmannerly breech'd with gore: who could refrain,
    That had a heart to love, and in that heart
    Courage to make 's love kno wn?
  999. ambition
    a strong drive for success
    Glamis thou art, and Cawdor; and shalt be
    What thou art promised: yet do I fear thy nature;
    It is too full o' the milk of human kindness
    To catch the nearest way: thou wouldst be great;
    Art not without ambition, but without
    The illness should attend it: what thou wouldst highly,
    That wouldst thou holily; wouldst not play false,
    And yet wouldst wrongly win: thou'ldst have, great Glamis,
    That which cries 'Thus thou must do, if thou have it;
    And that which rather thou dost fear ...
  1000. eyes
    opinion or judgment
    LENNOX
    What a haste looks through his eyes!
  1001. counterfeit
    not genuine; imitating something superior
    Shake off this downy sleep, death's counterfeit,
    And look on death itself! up, up, and see
    The great doom's image!
  1002. constancy
    the quality of being enduring and free from change
    Your constancy
    Hath left you unattended.
  1003. dun
    a color or pigment varying around a light grey-brown color
    Come, thick night,
    And pall thee in the dunnest smoke of hell,
    That my keen knife see not the wound it makes,
    Nor heaven peep through the blanket of the dark,
    To cry 'Hold, hold!'
  1004. hound
    a dog used for hunting typically having large drooping ears
    MACBETH
    Ay, in the catalogue ye go for men;
    As hounds and greyhounds, mongrels, spaniels, curs,
    Shoughs, water-rugs and demi-wolves, are clept
    All by the name of dogs: the valued file
    Distinguishes the swift, the slow, the subtle,
    The housekeeper, the hunter, every one
    According to the gift which bounteous nature
    Hath in him closed; whereby he does receive
    Particular addition. from the bill
    That writes them all alike: and so of men.
  1005. banner
    long strip of cloth or paper for decoration or advertising
    ROSS
    From Fife, great king;
    Where the Norweyan banners flout the sky
    And fan our people cold.
  1006. at most
    not more than
    Within this hour at most
    I will advise you where to plant yourselves;
    Acquaint you with the perfect spy o' the time,
    The moment on't; for't must be done to-night,
    And something from the palace; always thought
    That I require a clearness: and with him--
    To leave no rubs nor botches in the work--
    Fleance his son, that keeps him company,
    Whose absence is no less material to me
    Than is his father's, must embrace the fate
    Of that dark hour.
  1007. smear
    smudge or soil by smudging
    They must lie there: go carry them; and smear
    The sleepy grooms with blood.
  1008. guilt
    the state of having committed an offense
    When Duncan is asleep--
    Whereto the rather shall his day's hard journey
    Soundly invite him--his two chamberlains
    Will I with wine and wassail so convince
    That memory, the warder of the brain,
    Shall be a fume, and the receipt of reason
    A limbeck only: when in swinish sleep
    Their drenched natures lie as in a death,
    What cannot you and I perform upon
    The unguarded Duncan? what not put upon
    His spongy officers, who shall bear the guilt
    Of our great quell?
  1009. feed
    provide as food
    First Witch
    A sailor's wife had chestnuts in her lap,
    And munch'd, and munch'd, and munch'd:--
    'Give me,' quoth I:
    'Aroint thee, witch!' the rump- fed ronyon cries.
  1010. wind
    air moving from high pressure to low pressure
    Second Witch
    I'll give thee a wind.
  1011. blade
    the flat part of a tool or weapon that has a cutting edge
    Mine eyes are made the fools o' the other senses,
    Or else worth all the rest; I see thee still,
    And on thy blade and dudgeon gouts of blood,
    Which was not so before.
  1012. strike
    deliver a sharp blow, as with the hand, fist, or weapon
    Exeunt BANQUO and FLEANCE

    MACBETH
    Go bid thy mistress, when my drink is ready,
    She strike upon the bell.
  1013. foe
    an armed adversary
    If I say sooth, I must report they were
    As cannons overcharged with double cracks, so they
    Doubly redoubled strokes upon the foe:
    Except they meant to bathe in reeking wounds,
    Or memorise another Golgotha,
    I cannot tell.
  1014. buckle
    fastener that fastens together two ends of a belt or strap
    CAITHNESS
    Great Dunsinane he strongly fortifies:
    Some say he's mad; others that lesser hate him
    Do call it valiant fury: but, for certain,
    He cannot buckle his distemper'd cause
    Within the belt of rule.
  1015. at peace
    dead
    ROSS
    No; they were well at peace when I did leave 'em.
  1016. broil
    cook by exposing to strong heat in a part of an oven
    Say to the king the knowledge of the broil
    As thou didst leave it.
  1017. surveying
    the practice of measuring angles and distances on the ground so that they can be accurately plotted on a map
    Mark, king of Scotland, mark:
    No sooner justice had with valour arm'd
    Compell'd these skipping kerns to trust their heels,
    But the Norweyan lord surveying vantage,
    With furbish'd arms and new supplies of men
    Began a fresh assault.
  1018. Wisdom
    an Apocryphal book consisting mainly of a meditation on wisdom; although ascribed to Solomon it was probably written in the first century BC
    LADY MACDUFF
    Wisdom! to leave his wife, to leave his babes,
    His mansion and his titles in a place
    From whence himself does fly?
  1019. vulture
    a large diurnal bird of prey feeding chiefly on carrion
    We have willing dames enough: there cannot be
    That vulture in you, to devour so many
    As will to greatness dedicate themselves,
    Finding it so inclined.
  1020. pious
    having or showing or expressing reverence for a deity
    How it did grieve Macbeth! did he not straight
    In pious rage the two delinquents tear,
    That were the slaves of drink and thralls of sleep?
  1021. pillow
    a cushion to support the head of a sleeping person
    LENNOX
    Those of his chamber, as it seem'd, had done 't:
    Their hands and faces were an badged with blood;
    So were their daggers, which unwiped we found
    Upon their pillows:
    They stared, and were distracted; no man's life
    Was to be trusted with them.
  1022. advise
    give advice to
    Within this hour at most
    I will advise you where to plant yourselves;
    Acquaint you with the perfect spy o' the time,
    The moment on't; for't must be done to-night,
    And something from the palace; always thought
    That I require a clearness: and with him--
    To leave no rubs nor botches in the work--
    Fleance his son, that keeps him company,
    Whose absence is no less material to me
    Than is his father's, must embrace the fate
    Of that dark hour.
  1023. go with
    go or occur together
    Old Man
    God's benison go with you; and with those
    That would make good of bad, and friends of foes!
  1024. howl
    cry loudly, as of animals
    Now o'er the one halfworld
    Nature seems dead, and wicked dreams abuse
    The curtain'd sleep; witchcraft celebrates
    Pale Hecate's offerings, and wither'd murder,
    Alarum'd by his sentinel, the wolf,
    Whose howl's his watch, thus with his stealthy pace.
  1025. lizard
    relatively long-bodied reptile with legs and a tapering tail
    Second Witch
    Fillet of a fenny snake,
    In the cauldron boil and bake;
    Eye of newt and toe of frog,
    Wool of bat and tongue of dog,
    Adder's fork and blind-worm's sting,
    Lizard's leg and owlet's wing,
    For a charm of powerful trouble,
    Like a hell-broth boil and bubble.
  1026. swine
    stout-bodied short-legged omnivorous animals
    Second Witch
    Killing swine.
  1027. oftener
    more often or more frequently
    Thy royal father
    Was a most sainted king: the queen that bore thee,
    Oftener upon her knees than on her feet,
    Died every day she lived.
  1028. throw
    propel through the air
    But I have spoke
    With one that saw him die: who did report
    That very frankly he confess'd his treasons,
    Implored your highness' pardon and set forth
    A deep repentance: nothing in his life
    Became him like the leaving it; he died
    As one that had been studied in his death
    To throw away the dearest thing he owed,
    As 'twere a careless trifle.
  1029. perform
    get done
    When Duncan is asleep--
    Whereto the rather shall his day's hard journey
    Soundly invite him--his two chamberlains
    Will I with wine and wassail so convince
    That memory, the warder of the brain,
    Shall be a fume, and the receipt of reason
    A limbeck only: when in swinish sleep
    Their drenched natures lie as in a death,
    What cannot you and I perform upon
    The unguarded Duncan? what not put upon
    His spongy officers, who shall bear the guilt
    Of our great quell?
  1030. quarrel
    an angry dispute
    The merciless Macdonwald--
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villanies of nature
    Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
    Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
    For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--
    Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like valour's minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave;
    Which...
  1031. once
    on one occasion
    You seem to understand me,
    By each at once her chappy finger laying
    Upon her skinny lips: you should be women,
    And yet your beards forbid me to interpret
    That you are so.
  1032. all together
    used of a group whose members acted or were acted upon collectively and when `all' and `together' can be separated by other words
    MACBETH
    I conjure you, by that which you profess,
    Howe'er you come to know it, answer me:
    Though you untie the winds and let them fight
    Against the churches; though the yesty waves
    Confound and swallow navigation up;
    Though bladed corn be lodged and trees blown down;
    Though castles topple on their warders' heads;
    Though palaces and pyramids do slope
    Their heads to their foundations; though the treasure
    Of nature's germens tumble all together,
    Even till destruction sicken; ...
  1033. seem
    give a certain impression or have a certain outward aspect
    So should he look
    That seems to speak things strange.
  1034. make love
    have sexual intercourse with
    MACBETH
    So is he mine; and in such bloody distance,
    That every minute of his being thrusts
    Against my near'st of life: and though I could
    With barefaced power sweep him from my sight
    And bid my will avouch it, yet I must not,
    For certain friends that are both his and mine,
    Whose loves I may not drop, but wail his fall
    Who I myself struck down; and thence it is,
    That I to your assistance do make love,
    Masking the business from the common eye
    For sundry weighty reasons.
  1035. soundly
    completely and absolutely
    When Duncan is asleep--
    Whereto the rather shall his day's hard journey
    Soundly invite him--his two chamberlains
    Will I with wine and wassail so convince
    That memory, the warder of the brain,
    Shall be a fume, and the receipt of reason
    A limbeck only: when in swinish sleep
    Their drenched natures lie as in a death,
    What cannot you and I perform upon
    The unguarded Duncan? what not put upon
    His spongy officers, who shall bear the guilt
    Of our great quell?
  1036. uplifted
    exalted emotionally especially with pride
    I think our country sinks beneath the yoke;
    It weeps, it bleeds; and each new day a gash
    Is added to her wounds: I think withal
    There would be hands uplifted in my right;
    And here from gracious England have I offer
    Of goodly thousands: but, for all this,
    When I shall tread upon the tyrant's head,
    Or wear it on my sword, yet my poor country
    Shall have more vices than it had before,
    More suffer and more sundry ways than ever,
    By him that shall succeed.
  1037. other
    not the same one or ones already mentioned or implied
    First Witch
    I myself have all the other,
    And the very ports they blow,
    All the quarters that they know
    I' the shipman's card.
  1038. deign
    do something that one considers to be below one's dignity
    ROSS
    That now
    Sweno, the Norways' king, craves composition:
    Nor would we deign him burial of his men
    Till he disbursed at Saint Colme's inch
    Ten thousand dollars to our general use.
  1039. wound up
    brought to a state of great tension
    Peace! the charm's wound up.
  1040. dispatch
    the act of sending off something
    He that's coming
    Must be provided for: and you shall put
    This night's great business into my dispatch;
    Which shall to all our nights and days to come
    Give solely sovereign sway and masterdom.
  1041. call
    utter a sudden loud cry
    Second Witch
    Paddock calls.
  1042. implore
    beg or request earnestly and urgently
    But I have spoke
    With one that saw him die: who did report
    That very frankly he confess'd his treasons,
    Implored your highness' pardon and set forth
    A deep repentance: nothing in his life
    Became him like the leaving it; he died
    As one that had been studied in his death
    To throw away the dearest thing he owed,
    As 'twere a careless trifle.
  1043. lodge
    a rustic house used as a temporary shelter
    LADY MACBETH
    There are two lodged together.
  1044. sit
    take a seat
    Lest our old robes sit easier than our new!
  1045. conclude
    bring to a close
    Curbing his lavish spirit: and, to conclude,
    The victory fell on us.
  1046. bide
    dwell
    First Murderer
    Ay, my good lord: safe in a ditch he bides,
    With twenty trenched gashes on his head;
    The least a death to nature.
  1047. disgrace
    a state of dishonor
    But, peace! for from broad words and 'cause he fail'd
    His presence at the tyrant's feast, I hear
    Macduff lives in disgrace: sir, can you tell
    Where he bestows himself?
  1048. strangely
    in a strange manner
    Enter LENNOX and another Lord
    LENNOX
    My former speeches have but hit your thoughts,
    Which can interpret further: only, I say,
    Things have been strangely borne.
  1049. amiss
    in an improper or mistaken manner
    Enter MALCOLM and DONALBAIN

    DONALBAIN
    What is amiss?
  1050. blister
    an elevation of the skin filled with fluid
    This tyrant, whose sole name blisters our tongues,
    Was once thought honest: you have loved him well.
  1051. rather
    more readily or willingly
    Glamis thou art, and Cawdor; and shalt be
    What thou art promised: yet do I fear thy nature;
    It is too full o' the milk of human kindness
    To catch the nearest way: thou wouldst be great;
    Art not without ambition, but without
    The illness should attend it: what thou wouldst highly,
    That wouldst thou holily; wouldst not play false,
    And yet wouldst wrongly win: thou'ldst have, great Glamis,
    That which cries 'Thus thou must do, if thou have it;
    And that which rather thou dost fear ...
  1052. catch it
    receive punishment; be scolded or reprimanded
    I am for the air; this night I'll spend
    Unto a dismal and a fatal end:
    Great business must be wrought ere noon:
    Upon the corner of the moon
    There hangs a vaporous drop profound;
    I'll catch it ere it come to ground:
    And that distill'd by magic sleights
    Shall raise such artificial sprites
    As by the strength of their illusion
    Shall draw him on to his confusion:
    He shall spurn fate, scorn death, and bear
    He hopes 'bove wisdom, grace and fear:
    And you all know, security
    Is mor...
  1053. digestion
    the process by which the body breaks down food
    Now, good digestion wait on appetite,
    And health on both!
  1054. tarry
    leave slowly and hesitantly
    If this which he avouches does appear,
    There is nor flying hence nor tarrying here.
  1055. weighty
    having relatively great weight; heavy
    MACBETH
    So is he mine; and in such bloody distance,
    That every minute of his being thrusts
    Against my near'st of life: and though I could
    With barefaced power sweep him from my sight
    And bid my will avouch it, yet I must not,
    For certain friends that are both his and mine,
    Whose loves I may not drop, but wail his fall
    Who I myself struck down; and thence it is,
    That I to your assistance do make love,
    Masking the business from the common eye
    For sundry weighty reasons.
  1056. hose
    a flexible pipe for conveying a liquid or gas
    Faith, here's an
    English tailor come hither, for stealing out of
    a French hose: come in, tailor; here you may
    roast your goose.
  1057. trusted
    (of persons) worthy of trust or confidence
    BANQUO
    That trusted home
    Might yet enkindle you unto the crown,
    Besides the thane of Cawdor.
  1058. fee
    a fixed charge for a privilege or for professional services
    Exit Murderer

    LADY MACBETH
    My royal lord,
    You do not give the cheer: the feast is sold
    That is not often vouch'd, while 'tis a-making,
    'Tis given with welcome: to feed were best at home;
    From thence the sauce to meat is ceremony;
    Meeting were bare without it.
  1059. master
    a person who has authority over others
    Her husband's to Aleppo gone, master o' the Tiger:
    But in a sieve I'll thither sail,
    And, like a rat without a tail,
    I'll do, I'll do, and I'll do.
  1060. fill
    make full, also in a metaphorical sense
    Come, you spirits
    That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here,
    And fill me from the crown to the toe top-full
    Of direst cruelty! make thick my blood;
    Stop up the access and passage to remorse,
    That no compunctious visitings of nature
    Shake my fell purpose, nor keep peace between
    The effect and it!
  1061. grease
    a thick fatty oil
    First Witch
    Pour in sow's blood, that hath eaten
    Her nine farrow; grease that's sweaten
    From the murderer's gibbet throw
    Into the flame.
  1062. sleek
    having a smooth, gleaming surface reflecting light
    LADY MACBETH
    Come on;
    Gentle my lord, sleek o'er your rugged looks;
    Be bright and jovial among your guests to-night.
  1063. fit
    meeting adequate standards for a purpose
    MACBETH
    Then comes my fit again: I had else been perfect,
    Whole as the marble, founded as the rock,
    As broad and general as the casing air:
    But now I am cabin'd, cribb'd, confined, bound in
    To saucy doubts and fears.
  1064. knife
    edge tool used as a cutting instrument
    Come, thick night,
    And pall thee in the dunnest smoke of hell,
    That my keen knife see not the wound it makes,
    Nor heaven peep through the blanket of the dark,
    To cry 'Hold, hold!'
  1065. worse
    inferior to another in quality or condition or desirability
    LADY MACBETH
    I pray you, speak not; he grows worse and worse;
    Question enrages him.
  1066. mar
    cause to become imperfect
    Lechery, sir, it provokes, and unprovokes;
    it provokes the desire, but it takes
    away the performance: therefore, much drink
    may be said to be an equivocator with lechery:
    it makes him, and it mars him; it sets
    him on, and it takes him off; it persuades him,
    and disheartens him; makes him stand to, and
    not stand to; in conclusion, equivocates him
    in a sleep, and, giving him the lie, leaves him.
  1067. bathe
    clean one's body by immersion into water
    If I say sooth, I must report they were
    As cannons overcharged with double cracks, so they
    Doubly redoubled strokes upon the foe:
    Except they meant to bathe in reeking wounds,
    Or memorise another Golgotha,
    I cannot tell.
  1068. shriek
    sharp piercing cry
    It cannot
    Be call'd our mother, but our grave; where nothing,
    But who knows nothing, is once seen to smile;
    Where sighs and groans and shrieks that rend the air
    Are made, not mark'd; where violent sorrow seems
    A modern ecstasy; the dead man's knell
    Is there scarce ask'd for who; and good men's lives
    Expire before the flowers in their caps,
    Dying or ere they sicken.
  1069. swoop
    move with a sweep
    All?
    What, all my pretty chickens and their dam
    At one fell swoop?
  1070. seek out
    look for a specific person or thing
    Enter MALCOLM and MACDUFF
    MALCOLM
    Let us seek out some desolate shade, and there
    Weep our sad bosoms empty.
  1071. given
    acknowledged as a supposition
    Aside

    Cannot be ill, cannot be good: if ill,
    Why hath it given me earnest of success,
    Commencing in a truth?
  1072. spend
    pass time in a specific way
    Sergeant
    Doubtful it stood;
    As two spent swimmers, that do cling together
    And choke their art.
  1073. warrant
    formal and explicit approval
    Therefore, to horse;
    And let us not be dainty of leave-taking,
    But shift away: there's warrant in that theft
    Which steals itself, when there's no mercy left.
  1074. scale
    an ordered reference standard
    Faith, here's an equivocator, that could
    swear in both the scales against either scale;
    who committed treason enough for God's sake,
    yet could not equivocate to heaven: O, come
    in, equivocator.
  1075. coveted
    greatly desired
    I am yet
    Unknown to woman, never was forsworn,
    Scarcely have coveted what was mine own,
    At no time broke my faith, would not betray
    The devil to his fellow and delight
    No less in truth than life: my first false speaking
    Was this upon myself: what I am truly,
    Is thine and my poor country's to command:
    Whither indeed, before thy here-approach,
    Old Siward, with ten thousand warlike men,
    Already at a point, was setting forth.
  1076. savagely
    in a vicious manner
    ROSS
    Your castle is surprised; your wife and babes
    Savagely slaughter'd: to relate the manner,
    Were, on the quarry of these murder'd deer,
    To add the death of you.
  1077. late
    at or toward an end or late period or stage of development
    LADY MACBETH
    All our service
    In every point twice done and then done double
    Were poor and single business to contend
    Against those honours deep and broad wherewith
    Your majesty loads our house: for those of old,
    And the late dignities heap'd up to them,
    We rest your hermits.
  1078. pall
    burial garment in which a corpse is wrapped
    Come, thick night,
    And pall thee in the dunnest smoke of hell,
    That my keen knife see not the wound it makes,
    Nor heaven peep through the blanket of the dark,
    To cry 'Hold, hold!'
  1079. away
    at a distance in space or time
    But I have spoke
    With one that saw him die: who did report
    That very frankly he confess'd his treasons,
    Implored your highness' pardon and set forth
    A deep repentance: nothing in his life
    Became him like the leaving it; he died
    As one that had been studied in his death
    To throw away the dearest thing he owed,
    As 'twere a careless trifle.
  1080. scour
    rub hard or scrub
    What rhubarb, cyme, or what purgative drug,
    Would scour these English hence?
  1081. win
    a victory (as in a race or other competition)
    Second Witch
    When the hurlyburly's done,
    When the battle's lost and won.
  1082. dame
    a woman of refinement
    Enter a Messenger

    Messenger
    Bless you, fair dame!
  1083. miss
    fail to perceive or to catch with the senses or the mind
    I laid their daggers ready;
    He could not miss 'em.
  1084. summon
    ask to come
    A heavy summons lies like lead upon me,
    And yet I would not sleep: merciful powers,
    Restrain in me the cursed thoughts that nature
    Gives way to in repose!
  1085. abhor
    feel hatred or disgust toward
    YOUNG SIWARD
    Thou liest, abhorred tyrant; with my sword
    I'll prove the lie thou speak'st.
  1086. nightly
    happening every night
    But let the frame of things disjoint, both the
    worlds suffer,
    Ere we will eat our meal in fear and sleep
    In the affliction of these terrible dreams
    That shake us nightly: better be with the dead,
    Whom we, to gain our peace, have sent to peace,
    Than on the torture of the mind to lie
    In restless ecstasy.
  1087. never
    not ever; at no time in the past or future
    LADY MACBETH
    O, never
    Shall sun that morrow see!
  1088. wound
    an injury to living tissue
    If I say sooth, I must report they were
    As cannons overcharged with double cracks, so they
    Doubly redoubled strokes upon the foe:
    Except they meant to bathe in reeking wounds,
    Or memorise another Golgotha,
    I cannot tell.
  1089. mock
    treat with contempt
    Away, and mock the time with fairest show:
    False face must hide what the false heart doth know.
  1090. purpose
    what something is used for
    Come, you spirits
    That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here,
    And fill me from the crown to the toe top-full
    Of direst cruelty! make thick my blood;
    Stop up the access and passage to remorse,
    That no compunctious visitings of nature
    Shake my fell purpose, nor keep peace between
    The effect and it!
  1091. eclipse
    the phenomenon when one celestial body obscures another
    Third Witch
    Scale of dragon, tooth of wolf,
    Witches' mummy, maw and gulf
    Of the ravin'd salt-sea shark,
    Root of hemlock digg'd i' the dark,
    Liver of blaspheming Jew,
    Gall of goat, and slips of yew
    Silver'd in the moon's eclipse,
    Nose of Turk and Tartar's lips,
    Finger of birth-strangled babe
    Ditch-deliver'd by a drab,
    Make the gruel thick and slab:
    Add thereto a tiger's chaudron,
    For the ingredients of our cauldron.
  1092. retire
    withdraw from active participation
    Knocking within

    I hear a knocking
    At the south entry: retire we to our chamber;
    A little water clears us of this deed:
    How easy is it, then!
  1093. shadow
    a dark shape created by an object blocking a source of light
    Hence, horrible shadow!
  1094. loyal
    steadfast in allegiance or duty
    MACBETH
    Who can be wise, amazed, temperate and furious,
    Loyal and neutral, in a moment?
  1095. black
    being of the achromatic color of maximum darkness
    Stars, hide your fires;
    Let not light see my black and deep desires:
    The eye wink at the hand; yet let that be,
    Which the eye fears, when it is done, to see.
  1096. weep
    shed tears because of sadness, rage, or pain
    Son
    If he were dead, you'ld weep for
    him: if you would not, it were a good sign
    that I should quickly have a new father.
  1097. chafe
    become or make sore by or as if by rubbing
    Third Apparition
    Be lion-mettled, proud; and take no care
    Who chafes, who frets, or where conspirers are:
    Macbeth shall never vanquish'd be until
    Great Birnam wood to high Dunsinane hill
    Shall come against him.
  1098. blasted
    expletives used informally as intensifiers
    Say from whence
    You owe this strange intelligence? or why
    Upon this blasted heath you stop our way
    With such prophetic greeting?
  1099. caution
    judiciousness in avoiding harm or danger
    LENNOX
    And that well might
    Advise him to a caution, to hold what distance
    His wisdom can provide.
  1100. faith
    complete confidence in a person or plan, etc.
    Faith, here's an equivocator, that could
    swear in both the scales against either scale;
    who committed treason enough for God's sake,
    yet could not equivocate to heaven: O, come
    in, equivocator.
  1101. profess
    confess one's faith in, or allegiance to
    MACBETH
    I conjure you, by that which you profess,
    Howe'er you come to know it, answer me:
    Though you untie the winds and let them fight
    Against the churches; though the yesty waves
    Confound and swallow navigation up;
    Though bladed corn be lodged and trees blown down;
    Though castles topple on their warders' heads;
    Though palaces and pyramids do slope
    Their heads to their foundations; though the treasure
    Of nature's germens tumble all together,
    Even till destruction sicken; ...
  1102. cloudy
    full of or covered with clouds
    Lord
    He did: and with an absolute 'Sir, not I,'
    The cloudy messenger turns me his back,
    And hums, as who should say 'You'll rue the time
    That clogs me with this answer.'
  1103. temperate
    not extreme
    MACBETH
    Who can be wise, amazed, temperate and furious,
    Loyal and neutral, in a moment?
  1104. sanctity
    the quality of being holy
    Doctor
    Ay, sir; there are a crew of wretched souls
    That stay his cure: their malady convinces
    The great assay of art; but at his touch--
    Such sanctity hath heaven given his hand--
    They presently amend.
  1105. clamour
    utter or proclaim insistently and noisily
    LADY MACBETH
    Who dares receive it other,
    As we shall make our griefs and clamour roar
    Upon his death?
  1106. less
    a quantifier meaning not as great in amount or degree
    To BANQUO

    Do you not hope your children shall be kings,
    When those that gave the thane of Cawdor to me
    Promised no less to them?
  1107. need
    require or want
    I had most need of blessing, and 'Amen'
    Stuck in my throat.
  1108. heavy
    of comparatively great physical weight or density
    ANGUS
    Who was the thane lives yet;
    But under heavy judgment bears that life
    Which he deserves to lose.
  1109. prophesy
    predict or reveal, as if through divine inspiration
    LENNOX
    The night has been unruly: where we lay,
    Our chimneys were blown down; and, as they say,
    Lamentings heard i' the air; strange screams of death,
    And prophesying with accents terrible
    Of dire combustion and confused events
    New hatch'd to the woeful time: the obscure bird
    Clamour'd the livelong night: some say, the earth
    Was feverous and did shake.
  1110. seize
    take hold of; grab
    DONALBAIN
    [Aside to MALCOLM] What should be spoken here,
    where our fate,
    Hid in an auger-hole, may rush, and seize us?
  1111. Heaven
    the abode of God and the angels
    Heaven preserve you!
  1112. witchcraft
    the art of sorcery
    Now o'er the one halfworld
    Nature seems dead, and wicked dreams abuse
    The curtain'd sleep; witchcraft celebrates
    Pale Hecate's offerings, and wither'd murder,
    Alarum'd by his sentinel, the wolf,
    Whose howl's his watch, thus with his stealthy pace.
  1113. rung
    one of the crosspieces that form the steps of a ladder
    MACBETH
    There's comfort yet; they are assailable;
    Then be thou jocund: ere the bat hath flown
    His cloister'd flight, ere to black Hecate's summons
    The shard-borne beetle with his drowsy hums
    Hath rung night's yawning peal, there shall be done
    A deed of dreadful note.
  1114. badge
    an emblem that signifies your status
    LENNOX
    Those of his chamber, as it seem'd, had done 't:
    Their hands and faces were an badged with blood;
    So were their daggers, which unwiped we found
    Upon their pillows:
    They stared, and were distracted; no man's life
    Was to be trusted with them.
  1115. snake
    limbless scaly elongate reptile; some are venomous
    MACBETH
    We have scotch'd the snake, not kill'd it:
    She'll close and be herself, whilst our poor malice
    Remains in danger of her former tooth.
  1116. cruelty
    the quality of being able or disposed to inflict pain
    Come, you spirits
    That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here,
    And fill me from the crown to the toe top-full
    Of direst cruelty! make thick my blood;
    Stop up the access and passage to remorse,
    That no compunctious visitings of nature
    Shake my fell purpose, nor keep peace between
    The effect and it!
  1117. step on
    place or press the foot on
    MACBETH
    [Aside] The Prince of Cumberland! that is a step
    On
    which I must fall down, or else o'erleap,
    For in my way it lies.
  1118. womb
    a hollow muscular organ in which a developing fetus grows
    MACDUFF
    Despair thy charm;
    And let the angel whom thou still hast served
    Tell thee, Macduff was from his mother's womb
    Untimely ripp'd.
  1119. beetle
    insect having biting mouthparts
    MACBETH
    There's comfort yet; they are assailable;
    Then be thou jocund: ere the bat hath flown
    His cloister'd flight, ere to black Hecate's summons
    The shard-borne beetle with his drowsy hums
    Hath rung night's yawning peal, there shall be done
    A deed of dreadful note.
  1120. sore
    causing misery or pain or distress
    Macbeth does murder sleep', the innocent sleep,
    Sleep that knits up the ravell'd sleeve of care,
    The death of each day's life, sore labour's bath,
    Balm of hurt minds, great nature's second course,
    Chief nourisher in life's feast,--

    LADY MACBETH
    What do you mean?
  1121. wake
    stop sleeping
    And wakes it now, to look so green and pale
    At what it did so freely?
  1122. thereto
    to that
    Third Witch
    Scale of dragon, tooth of wolf,
    Witches' mummy, maw and gulf
    Of the ravin'd salt-sea shark,
    Root of hemlock digg'd i' the dark,
    Liver of blaspheming Jew,
    Gall of goat, and slips of yew
    Silver'd in the moon's eclipse,
    Nose of Turk and Tartar's lips,
    Finger of birth-strangled babe
    Ditch-deliver'd by a drab,
    Make the gruel thick and slab:
    Add thereto a tiger's chaudron,
    For the ingredients of our cauldron.
  1123. incense
    make furious
    Second Murderer
    I am one, my liege,
    Whom the vile blows and buffets of the world
    Have so incensed that I am reckless what
    I do to spite the world.
  1124. break
    destroy the integrity of
    Sergeant
    As whence the sun 'gins his reflection
    Shipwrecking storms and direful thunders break,
    So from that spring whence comfort seem'd to come
    Discomfort swells.
  1125. scarf
    a garment worn around the head or neck
    Come, seeling night,
    Scarf up the tender eye of pitiful day;
    And with thy bloody and invisible hand
    Cancel and tear to pieces that great bond
    Which keeps me pale!
  1126. shake off
    get rid of
    Shake off this downy sleep, death's counterfeit,
    And look on death itself! up, up, and see
    The great doom's image!
  1127. stride
    walk with long steps
    Besides, this Duncan
    Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been
    So clear in his great office, that his virtues
    Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against
    The deep damnation of his taking-off;
    And pity, like a naked new-born babe,
    Striding the blast, or heaven's cherubim, horsed
    Upon the sightless couriers of the air,
    Shall blow the horrid deed in every eye,
    That tears shall drown the wind.
  1128. charge
    assign a duty, responsibility or obligation to
    Speak, I charge you.
  1129. VII
    the cardinal number that is the sum of six and one
    Exeunt

    SCENE VII. Macbeth's castle.
  1130. woe
    misery resulting from affliction
    LADY MACBETH
    Woe, alas!
  1131. meeting
    the social act of assembling for some common purpose
    Enter DUNCAN, MALCOLM, DONALBAIN, LENNOX, with Attendants, meeting a bleeding Sergeant
    DUNCAN
    What bloody man is that?
  1132. abound in
    exist in large quantity
    MALCOLM
    But I have none: the king-becoming graces,
    As justice, verity, temperance, stableness,
    Bounty, perseverance, mercy, lowliness,
    Devotion, patience, courage, fortitude,
    I have no relish of them, but abound
    In
    the division of each several crime,
    Acting it many ways.
  1133. nine
    the cardinal number that is the sum of eight and one
    I will drain him dry as hay:
    Sleep shall neither night nor day
    Hang upon his pent-house lid;
    He shall live a man forbid:
    Weary se'nnights nine times nine
    Shall he dwindle, peak and pine:
    Though his bark cannot be lost,
    Yet it shall be tempest-tost.
  1134. no end
    on and on for a long time
    ROSS
    Ay, and brought off the field: your cause of sorrow
    Must not be measured by his worth, for then
    It hath no end.
  1135. doubtful
    fraught with uncertainty
    Sergeant
    Doubtful it stood;
    As two spent swimmers, that do cling together
    And choke their art.
  1136. infirmity
    the state of being weak in health or body
    Do not muse at me, my most worthy friends,
    I have a strange infirmity, which is nothing
    To those that know me.
  1137. redress
    make reparations or amends for
    MALCOLM
    What I believe I'll wail,
    What know believe, and what I can redress,
    As I shall find the time to friend, I will.
  1138. sleeper
    a rester who is in slumber
    Bell rings

    Enter LADY MACBETH

    LADY MACBETH
    What's the business,
    That such a hideous trumpet calls to parley
    The sleepers of the house? speak, speak!
  1139. fitness
    the quality of being suitable
    Nor time nor place
    Did then adhere, and yet you would make both:
    They have made themselves, and that their fitness now
    Does unmake you.
  1140. murderous
    characteristic of or capable of or having a tendency toward killing another human being
    MALCOLM
    This murderous shaft that's shot
    Hath not yet lighted, and our safest way
    Is to avoid the aim.
  1141. silenced
    reduced to silence
    Enter ROSS and ANGUS

    ROSS
    The king hath happily received, Macbeth,
    The news of thy success; and when he reads
    Thy personal venture in the rebels' fight,
    His wonders and his praises do contend
    Which should be thine or his: silenced with that,
    In viewing o'er the rest o' the selfsame day,
    He finds thee in the stout Norweyan ranks,
    Nothing afeard of what thyself didst make,
    Strange images of death.
  1142. physics
    the science of matter and energy and their interactions
    MACBETH
    The labour we delight in physics pain.
  1143. give way
    move in order to make room for someone for something
    A heavy summons lies like lead upon me,
    And yet I would not sleep: merciful powers,
    Restrain in me the cursed thoughts that nature
    Gives way to in repose!
  1144. mad
    roused to anger
    LADY MACBETH
    Thou'rt mad to say it:
    Is not thy master with him? who, were't so,
    Would have inform'd for preparation.
  1145. strike out
    set out on a course of action
    FLEANCE escapes

    Third Murderer
    Who did strike out the light?
  1146. in this
    (formal) in or into that thing or place
    MACBETH
    We will proceed no further in this business:
    He hath honour'd me of late; and I have bought
    Golden opinions from all sorts of people,
    Which would be worn now in their newest gloss,
    Not cast aside so soon.
  1147. supper
    the evening meal
    MACBETH
    To-night we hold a solemn supper sir,
    And I'll request your presence.
  1148. blame
    an accusation that one is responsible for some misdeed
    ROSS
    His absence, sir,
    Lays blame upon his promise.
  1149. drench
    cover with liquid; pour liquid onto
    When Duncan is asleep--
    Whereto the rather shall his day's hard journey
    Soundly invite him--his two chamberlains
    Will I with wine and wassail so convince
    That memory, the warder of the brain,
    Shall be a fume, and the receipt of reason
    A limbeck only: when in swinish sleep
    Their drenched natures lie as in a death,
    What cannot you and I perform upon
    The unguarded Duncan? what not put upon
    His spongy officers, who shall bear the guilt
    Of our great quell?
  1150. some
    quantifier
    I dreamt last night of the three weird sisters:
    To you they have show'd some truth.
  1151. relate
    give an account of
    ROSS
    Your castle is surprised; your wife and babes
    Savagely slaughter'd: to relate the manner,
    Were, on the quarry of these murder'd deer,
    To add the death of you.
  1152. graft
    tissue or organ transplanted from a donor to a recipient
    MALCOLM
    It is myself I mean: in whom I know
    All the particulars of vice so grafted
    That, when they shall be open'd, black Macbeth
    Will seem as pure as snow, and the poor state
    Esteem him as a lamb, being compared
    With my confineless harms.
  1153. heard
    detected or perceived via the auditory sense
    FLEANCE
    The moon is down; I have not heard the clock.
  1154. wanton
    a lewd or immoral person
    DUNCAN
    My plenteous joys,
    Wanton in fulness, seek to hide themselves
    In drops of sorrow.
  1155. vulnerable
    capable of being wounded or hurt
    They fight

    MACBETH
    Thou losest labour:
    As easy mayst thou the intrenchant air
    With thy keen sword impress as make me bleed:
    Let fall thy blade on vulnerable crests;
    I bear a charmed life, which must not yield,
    To one of woman born.
  1156. salutation
    an acknowledgment or expression of good will
    Re-enter MACDUFF, with MACBETH's head

    MACDUFF
    Hail, king! for so thou art: behold, where stands
    The usurper's cursed head: the time is free:
    I see thee compass'd with thy kingdom's pearl,
    That speak my salutation in their minds;
    Whose voices I desire aloud with mine:
    Hail, King of Scotland!
  1157. fortitude
    strength of mind that enables one to endure adversity
    MALCOLM
    But I have none: the king-becoming graces,
    As justice, verity, temperance, stableness,
    Bounty, perseverance, mercy, lowliness,
    Devotion, patience, courage, fortitude,
    I have no relish of them, but abound
    In the division of each several crime,
    Acting it many ways.
  1158. invest
    lay out money or resources in an enterprise
    Sons, kinsmen, thanes,
    And you whose places are the nearest, know
    We will establish our estate upon
    Our eldest, Malcolm, whom we name hereafter
    The Prince of Cumberland; which honour must
    Not unaccompanied invest him only,
    But signs of nobleness, like stars, shall shine
    On all deservers.
  1159. trumpets
    pitcher plant of southeastern United States having erect yellow trumpet-shaped pitchers with wide mouths and erect lids
    MACDUFF
    Make all our trumpets speak; give them all breath,
    Those clamorous harbingers of blood and death.
  1160. pay
    give money, usually in exchange for goods or services
    ANGUS
    We are sent
    To give thee from our royal master thanks;
    Only to herald thee into his sight,
    Not pay thee.
  1161. thicken
    make thick or thicker
    Light thickens; and the crow
    Makes wing to the rooky wood:
    Good things of day begin to droop and drowse;
    While night's black agents to their preys do rouse.
  1162. watcher
    a guard who keeps watch
    Get on your nightgown, lest occasion call us,
    And show us to be watchers.
  1163. cry for
    need badly or desperately
    But I am faint, my gashes cry for help.
  1164. poster
    a sign posted in a public place as an advertisement
    ALL
    The weird sisters, hand in hand,
    Posters of the sea and land,
    Thus do go about, about:
    Thrice to thine and thrice to mine
    And thrice again, to make up nine.
  1165. provide
    give something useful or necessary to
    He that's coming
    Must be provided for: and you shall put
    This night's great business into my dispatch;
    Which shall to all our nights and days to come
    Give solely sovereign sway and masterdom.
  1166. hang up
    cause to be hanging or suspended
    Son
    Then the liars and swearers are fools,
    for there are liars and swearers enow to beat
    the honest men and hang up them.
  1167. constrained
    lacking spontaneity; not natural
    MALCOLM
    'Tis his main hope:
    For where there is advantage to be given,
    Both more and less have given him the revolt,
    And none serve with him but constrained things
    Whose hearts are absent too.
  1168. former
    the first of two or the first mentioned of two
    DUNCAN
    No more that thane of Cawdor shall deceive
    Our bosom interest: go pronounce his present death,
    And with his former title greet Macbeth.
  1169. prophetic
    foretelling events as if by supernatural intervention
    Say from whence
    You owe this strange intelligence? or why
    Upon this blasted heath you stop our way
    With such prophetic greeting?
  1170. flaw
    an imperfection in an object or machine
    O, these flaws and starts,
    Impostors to true fear, would well become
    A woman's story at a winter's fire,
    Authorized by her grandam.
  1171. meek
    humble in spirit or manner
    Besides, this Duncan
    Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been
    So clear in his great office, that his virtues
    Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against
    The deep damnation of his taking-off;
    And pity, like a naked new-born babe,
    Striding the blast, or heaven's cherubim, horsed
    Upon the sightless couriers of the air,
    Shall blow the horrid deed in every eye,
    That tears shall drown the wind.
  1172. forge
    create by hammering
    MALCOLM
    With this there grows
    In my most ill-composed affection such
    A stanchless avarice that, were I king,
    I should cut off the nobles for their lands,
    Desire his jewels and this other's house:
    And my more-having would be as a sauce
    To make me hunger more; that I should forge
    Quarrels unjust against the good and loyal,
    Destroying them for wealth.
  1173. lightning
    flash of light from an electric discharge in the atmosphere
    Thunder and lightning.
  1174. speculative
    not based on fact or investigation
    Thoughts speculative their unsure hopes relate,
    But certain issue strokes must arbitrate:
    Towards which advance the war.
  1175. much
    great in quantity or degree or extent
    Second Witch
    Not so happy, yet much happier.
  1176. doom
    an unpleasant or disastrous destiny
    Shake off this downy sleep, death's counterfeit,
    And look on death itself! up, up, and see
    The great doom's image!
  1177. nobly
    in a noble manner
    Was not that nobly done?
  1178. shipwreck
    a wrecked ship (or a part of one)
    Sergeant
    As whence the sun 'gins his reflection
    Shipwrecking storms and direful thunders break,
    So from that spring whence comfort seem'd to come
    Discomfort swells.
  1179. doubt
    the state of being unsure of something
    MACBETH
    Then comes my fit again: I had else been perfect,
    Whole as the marble, founded as the rock,
    As broad and general as the casing air:
    But now I am cabin'd, cribb'd, confined, bound in
    To saucy doubts and fears.
  1180. drunk
    someone who is intoxicated
    LADY MACBETH
    Was the hope drunk
    Wherein you dress'd yourself? hath it slept since?
  1181. franchise
    a statutory right or privilege granted by a government
    BANQUO
    So I lose none
    In seeking to augment it, but still keep
    My bosom franchised and allegiance clear,
    I shall be counsell'd.
  1182. abuse
    cruel or inhumane treatment
    Now o'er the one halfworld
    Nature seems dead, and wicked dreams abuse
    The curtain'd sleep; witchcraft celebrates
    Pale Hecate's offerings, and wither'd murder,
    Alarum'd by his sentinel, the wolf,
    Whose howl's his watch, thus with his stealthy pace.
  1183. broke
    lacking funds
    Most sacrilegious murder hath broke ope
    The Lord's anointed temple, and stole thence
    The life o' the building!
  1184. consort
    keep company with
    Let's not consort with them:
    To show an unfelt sorrow is an office
    Which the false man does easy.
  1185. craving
    an intense desire for some particular thing
    MACBETH
    We hear, our bloody cousins are bestow'd
    In England and in Ireland, not confessing
    Their cruel parricide, filling their hearers
    With strange invention: but of that to-morrow,
    When therewithal we shall have cause of state
    Craving us jointly.
  1186. burn
    destroy by fire
    When I burned in desire
    to question them further, they made themselves air,
    into which they vanished.
  1187. come away
    come to be detached
    Music and a song within: 'Come away, come away,' & c

    Hark!
  1188. Tartar
    a member of the Mongolian people of central Asia who invaded Russia in the 13th century
    Third Witch
    Scale of dragon, tooth of wolf,
    Witches' mummy, maw and gulf
    Of the ravin'd salt-sea shark,
    Root of hemlock digg'd i' the dark,
    Liver of blaspheming Jew,
    Gall of goat, and slips of yew
    Silver'd in the moon's eclipse,
    Nose of Turk and Tartar's lips,
    Finger of birth-strangled babe
    Ditch-deliver'd by a drab,
    Make the gruel thick and slab:
    Add thereto a tiger's chaudron,
    For the ingredients of our cauldron.
  1189. while
    a period of indeterminate length marked by some action
    Whiles I stood rapt in
    the wonder of it, came missives from the king, who
    all-hailed me 'Thane of Cawdor;' by which title,
    before, these weird sisters saluted me, and referred
    me to the coming on of time, with 'Hail, king that
    shalt be!'
  1190. pertain
    be relevant to
    ROSS
    No mind that's honest
    But in it shares some woe; though the main part
    Pertains to you alone.
  1191. poorly
    in a poor or improper or unsatisfactory manner; not well
    Be not lost
    So poorly in your thoughts.
  1192. clearness
    the quality of clear water
    Within this hour at most
    I will advise you where to plant yourselves;
    Acquaint you with the perfect spy o' the time,
    The moment on't; for't must be done to-night,
    And something from the palace; always thought
    That I require a clearness: and with him--
    To leave no rubs nor botches in the work--
    Fleance his son, that keeps him company,
    Whose absence is no less material to me
    Than is his father's, must embrace the fate
    Of that dark hour.
  1193. paint
    a substance used as a coating to protect or decorate a surface (especially a mixture of pigment suspended in a liquid); dries to form a hard coating
    Give me the daggers: the sleeping and the dead
    Are but as pictures: 'tis the eye of childhood
    That fears a painted devil.
  1194. almost
    slightly short of or not quite accomplished; all but
    Messenger
    So please you, it is true: our thane is coming:
    One of my fellows had the speed of him,
    Who, almost dead for breath, had scarcely more
    Than would make up his message.
  1195. sense
    the faculty through which the external world is apprehended
    Enter DUNCAN, MALCOLM, DONALBAIN, BANQUO, LENNOX, MACDUFF, ROSS, ANGUS, and Attendants
    DUNCAN
    This castle hath a pleasant seat; the air
    Nimbly and sweetly recommends itself
    Unto our gentle senses.
  1196. move
    change location
    With Tarquin's ravishing strides, towards his design
    Moves like a ghost.
  1197. come to
    cause to experience suddenly
    Come to my woman's breasts,
    And take my milk for gall, you murdering ministers,
    Wherever in your sightless substances
    You wait on nature's mischief!
  1198. at rest
    in a state of repose or especially sleep
    BANQUO
    What, sir, not yet at rest?
  1199. doubly
    twice the degree
    If I say sooth, I must report they were
    As cannons overcharged with double cracks, so they
    Doubly redoubled strokes upon the foe:
    Except they meant to bathe in reeking wounds,
    Or memorise another Golgotha,
    I cannot tell.
  1200. endure
    undergo or be subjected to
    SIWARD
    We learn no other but the confident tyrant
    Keeps still in Dunsinane, and will endure
    Our setting down before 't.
  1201. sting
    deliver a sudden pain to
    Second Witch
    Fillet of a fenny snake,
    In the cauldron boil and bake;
    Eye of newt and toe of frog,
    Wool of bat and tongue of dog,
    Adder's fork and blind-worm's sting,
    Lizard's leg and owlet's wing,
    For a charm of powerful trouble,
    Like a hell-broth boil and bubble.
  1202. unlock
    open the lock of
    Gentlewoman
    Since his majesty went into the field, I have seen
    her rise from her bed, throw her night-gown upon
    her, unlock her closet, take forth paper, fold it,
    write upon't, read it, afterwards seal it, and again
    return to bed; yet all this while in a most fast sleep.
  1203. renown
    the state or quality of being widely honored and acclaimed
    Re-enter MACBETH and LENNOX, with ROSS

    MACBETH
    Had I but died an hour before this chance,
    I had lived a blessed time; for, from this instant,
    There 's nothing serious in mortality:
    All is but toys: renown and grace is dead;
    The wine of life is drawn, and the mere lees
    Is left this vault to brag of.
  1204. mean
    denote or connote
    If I say sooth, I must report they were
    As cannons overcharged with double cracks, so they
    Doubly redoubled strokes upon the foe:
    Except they meant to bathe in reeking wounds,
    Or memorise another Golgotha,
    I cannot tell.
  1205. enough
    sufficient for the purpose
    MACBETH
    Till then, enough.
  1206. malady
    impairment of normal physiological function
    Doctor
    Ay, sir; there are a crew of wretched souls
    That stay his cure: their malady convinces
    The great assay of art; but at his touch--
    Such sanctity hath heaven given his hand--
    They presently amend.
  1207. judicious
    marked by the exercise of common sense in practical matters
    ROSS
    My dearest coz,
    I pray you, school yourself: but for your husband,
    He is noble, wise, judicious, and best knows
    The fits o' the season.
  1208. prepare for
    prepare mentally or emotionally for something unpleasant
    Lord
    The son of Duncan,
    From whom this tyrant holds the due of birth
    Lives in the English court, and is received
    Of the most pious Edward with such grace
    That the malevolence of fortune nothing
    Takes from his high respect: thither Macduff
    Is gone to pray the holy king, upon his aid
    To wake Northumberland and warlike Siward:
    That, by the help of these--with Him above
    To ratify the work--we may again
    Give to our tables meat, sleep to our nights,
    Free from our feasts and banquets b...
  1209. abide
    dwell
    MACBETH
    I'll call upon you straight: abide within.
  1210. fruitless
    unproductive of success
    He chid the sisters
    When first they put the name of king upon me,
    And bade them speak to him: then prophet-like
    They hail'd him father to a line of kings:
    Upon my head they placed a fruitless crown,
    And put a barren sceptre in my gripe,
    Thence to be wrench'd with an unlineal hand,
    No son of mine succeeding.
  1211. speaker
    someone who expresses in language
    MACBETH
    Stay, you imperfect speakers, tell me more:
    By Sinel's death I know I am thane of Glamis;
    But how of Cawdor? the thane of Cawdor lives,
    A prosperous gentleman; and to be king
    Stands not within the prospect of belief,
    No more than to be Cawdor.
  1212. in hand
    under control
    ALL
    The weird sisters, hand in hand,
    Posters of the sea and land,
    Thus do go about, about:
    Thrice to thine and thrice to mine
    And thrice again, to make up nine.
  1213. chuck
    throw carelessly
    MACBETH
    Be innocent of the knowledge, dearest chuck,
    Till thou applaud the deed.
  1214. tumble
    fall down, as if collapsing
    MACBETH
    I conjure you, by that which you profess,
    Howe'er you come to know it, answer me:
    Though you untie the winds and let them fight
    Against the churches; though the yesty waves
    Confound and swallow navigation up;
    Though bladed corn be lodged and trees blown down;
    Though castles topple on their warders' heads;
    Though palaces and pyramids do slope
    Their heads to their foundations; though the treasure
    Of nature's germens tumble all together,
    Even till destruction sicken; ...
  1215. perseverance
    the act of continuing or repeating
    MALCOLM
    But I have none: the king-becoming graces,
    As justice, verity, temperance, stableness,
    Bounty, perseverance, mercy, lowliness,
    Devotion, patience, courage, fortitude,
    I have no relish of them, but abound
    In the division of each several crime,
    Acting it many ways.
  1216. all too
    to a high degree
    The merciless Macdonwald--
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villanies of nature
    Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
    Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
    For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--
    Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like valour's minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave;
    Which...
  1217. pity
    a feeling of sympathy and sorrow for misfortunes of others
    Besides, this Duncan
    Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been
    So clear in his great office, that his virtues
    Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against
    The deep damnation of his taking-off;
    And pity, like a naked new-born babe,
    Striding the blast, or heaven's cherubim, horsed
    Upon the sightless couriers of the air,
    Shall blow the horrid deed in every eye,
    That tears shall drown the wind.
  1218. better
    superior to another in excellence or quality or desirability
    BANQUO
    As far, my lord, as will fill up the time
    'Twixt this and supper: go not my horse the better,
    I must become a borrower of the night
    For a dark hour or twain.
  1219. loads
    a large number or amount
    LADY MACBETH
    All our service
    In every point twice done and then done double
    Were poor and single business to contend
    Against those honours deep and broad wherewith
    Your majesty loads our house: for those of old,
    And the late dignities heap'd up to them,
    We rest your hermits.
  1220. reign
    royal authority; the dominion of a monarch
    fears in Banquo
    Stick deep; and in his royalty of nature
    Reigns that which would be fear'd: 'tis much he dares;
    And, to that dauntless temper of his mind,
    He hath a wisdom that doth guide his valour
    To act in safety.
  1221. malicious
    having the nature of threatening evil
    MALCOLM
    I grant him bloody,
    Luxurious, avaricious, false, deceitful,
    Sudden, malicious, smacking of every sin
    That has a name: but there's no bottom, none,
    In my voluptuousness: your wives, your daughters,
    Your matrons and your maids, could not fill up
    The cistern of my lust, and my desire
    All continent impediments would o'erbear
    That did oppose my will: better Macbeth
    Than such an one to reign.
  1222. sparrow
    a small dull-colored singing bird
    Sergeant
    Yes;
    As sparrows eagles, or the hare the lion.
  1223. gentry
    the most powerful members of a society
    LENNOX
    For certain, sir, he is not: I have a file
    Of all the gentry: there is Siward's son,
    And many unrough youths that even now
    Protest their first of manhood.
  1224. incline
    lower or bend, as in a nod or bow
    We have willing dames enough: there cannot be
    That vulture in you, to devour so many
    As will to greatness dedicate themselves,
    Finding it so inclined.
  1225. stays
    a woman's close-fitting foundation garment
    I am call'd; my little spirit, see,
    Sits in a foggy cloud, and stays for me.
  1226. taper
    diminish gradually
    Enter LADY MACBETH, with a taper

    Lo you, here she comes!
  1227. cause
    events that provide the generative force of something
    MACBETH
    We hear, our bloody cousins are bestow'd
    In England and in Ireland, not confessing
    Their cruel parricide, filling their hearers
    With strange invention: but of that to-morrow,
    When therewithal we shall have cause of state
    Craving us jointly.
  1228. tending
    (usually followed by `to') naturally disposed toward
    LADY MACBETH
    Give him tending;
    He brings great news.
  1229. present
    happening or existing now
    DUNCAN
    No more that thane of Cawdor shall deceive
    Our bosom interest: go pronounce his present death,
    And with his former title greet Macbeth.
  1230. moon
    the natural satellite of the Earth
    FLEANCE
    The moon is down; I have not heard the clock.
  1231. mockery
    showing your contempt by derision
    Unreal mockery, hence!
  1232. lost
    confused as to time or place or personal identity
    Second Witch
    When the hurlyburly's done,
    When the battle's lost and won.
  1233. smile
    a facial expression with the corners of the mouth turned up
    The merciless Macdonwald--
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villanies of nature
    Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
    Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
    For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--
    Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like valour's minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave;
    Which...
  1234. offend
    cause to feel resentment or indignation
    LADY MACBETH
    Sit, worthy friends: my lord is often thus,
    And hath been from his youth: pray you, keep seat;
    The fit is momentary; upon a thought
    He will again be well: if much you note him,
    You shall offend him and extend his passion:
    Feed, and regard him not.
  1235. leaf
    a flat, usually green part of a plant attached to a stem
    Kind gentlemen, your pains
    Are register'd where every day I turn
    The leaf to read them.
  1236. alive
    possessing life
    MACBETH
    What man dare, I dare:
    Approach thou like the rugged Russian bear,
    The arm'd rhinoceros, or the Hyrcan tiger;
    Take any shape but that, and my firm nerves
    Shall never tremble: or be alive again,
    And dare me to the desert with thy sword;
    If trembling I inhabit then, protest me
    The baby of a girl.
  1237. favour
    an act of gracious kindness
    If you can look into the seeds of time,
    And say which grain will grow and which will not,
    Speak then to me, who neither beg nor fear
    Your favours nor your hate.
  1238. naked
    completely unclothed
    Besides, this Duncan
    Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been
    So clear in his great office, that his virtues
    Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against
    The deep damnation of his taking-off;
    And pity, like a naked new-born babe,
    Striding the blast, or heaven's cherubim, horsed
    Upon the sightless couriers of the air,
    Shall blow the horrid deed in every eye,
    That tears shall drown the wind.
  1239. riddle
    pierce with many holes
    How did you dare
    To trade and traffic with Macbeth
    In riddles and affairs of death;
    And I, the mistress of your charms,
    The close contriver of all harms,
    Was never call'd to bear my part,
    Or show the glory of our art?
  1240. slab
    block consisting of a thick piece of something
    Third Witch
    Scale of dragon, tooth of wolf,
    Witches' mummy, maw and gulf
    Of the ravin'd salt-sea shark,
    Root of hemlock digg'd i' the dark,
    Liver of blaspheming Jew,
    Gall of goat, and slips of yew
    Silver'd in the moon's eclipse,
    Nose of Turk and Tartar's lips,
    Finger of birth-strangled babe
    Ditch-deliver'd by a drab,
    Make the gruel thick and slab:
    Add thereto a tiger's chaudron,
    For the ingredients of our cauldron.
  1241. goodness
    moral excellence or admirableness
    Great tyranny! lay thou thy basis sure,
    For goodness dare not cheque thee: wear thou
    thy wrongs;
    The title is affeer'd!
  1242. rebellious
    resisting control or authority
    Norway himself,
    With terrible numbers,
    Assisted by that most disloyal traitor
    The thane of Cawdor, began a dismal conflict;
    Till that Bellona's bridegroom, lapp'd in proof,
    Confronted him with self-comparisons,
    Point against point rebellious, arm 'gainst arm.
  1243. augment
    enlarge or increase
    BANQUO
    So I lose none
    In seeking to augment it, but still keep
    My bosom franchised and allegiance clear,
    I shall be counsell'd.
  1244. boundless
    seemingly limitless in amount, number, degree, or extent
    MACDUFF
    Boundless intemperance
    In nature is a tyranny; it hath been
    The untimely emptying of the happy throne
    And fall of many kings.
  1245. stead
    the place properly occupied or served by another
    I have lived long enough: my way of life
    Is fall'n into the sear, the yellow leaf;
    And that which should accompany old age,
    As honour, love, obedience, troops of friends,
    I must not look to have; but, in their stead,
    Curses, not loud but deep, mouth-honour, breath,
    Which the poor heart would fain deny, and dare not.
  1246. whine
    a complaint uttered in a plaintive way
    Second Witch
    Thrice and once the hedge-pig whined.
  1247. deliver
    bring to a destination
    This have I thought good to deliver
    thee, my dearest partner of greatness, that thou
    mightst not lose the dues of rejoicing, by being
    ignorant of what greatness is promised thee.
  1248. bone
    rigid tissue that makes up the skeleton of vertebrates
    MACDUFF
    Carried to Colmekill,
    The sacred storehouse of his predecessors,
    And guardian of their bones.
  1249. Christendom
    the collective body of Christians throughout the world and history (found predominantly in Europe and the Americas and Australia)
    MALCOLM
    Be't their comfort
    We are coming thither: gracious England hath
    Lent us good Siward and ten thousand men;
    An older and a better soldier none
    That Christendom gives out.
  1250. eat
    take in solid food
    Or have we eaten on the insane root
    That takes the reason prisoner?
  1251. English
    of or relating to England or its culture or people
    Faith, here's an
    English tailor come hither, for stealing out of
    a French hose: come in, tailor; here you may
    roast your goose.
  1252. peal
    a deep prolonged sound
    MACBETH
    There's comfort yet; they are assailable;
    Then be thou jocund: ere the bat hath flown
    His cloister'd flight, ere to black Hecate's summons
    The shard-borne beetle with his drowsy hums
    Hath rung night's yawning peal, there shall be done
    A deed of dreadful note.
  1253. blast
    a sudden very loud noise
    Say from whence
    You owe this strange intelligence? or why
    Upon this blasted heath you stop our way
    With such prophetic greeting?
  1254. needs
    in such a manner as could not be otherwise
    Second Murderer
    He needs not our mistrust, since he delivers
    Our offices and what we have to do
    To the direction just.
  1255. hateful
    evoking or deserving hatred
    YOUNG SIWARD
    The devil himself could not pronounce a title
    More hateful to mine ear.
  1256. sound
    mechanical vibrations transmitted by an elastic medium
    BANQUO
    Good sir, why do you start; and seem to fear
    Things that do sound so fair?
  1257. wretched
    deserving or inciting pity
    Doctor
    Ay, sir; there are a crew of wretched souls
    That stay his cure: their malady convinces
    The great assay of art; but at his touch--
    Such sanctity hath heaven given his hand--
    They presently amend.
  1258. expectation
    belief about the future
    Here's a farmer, that hanged
    himself on the expectation of plenty: come in
    time; have napkins enow about you; here
    you'll sweat for't.
  1259. tooth
    hard bonelike structures in the jaws of vertebrates
    MACBETH
    We have scotch'd the snake, not kill'd it:
    She'll close and be herself, whilst our poor malice
    Remains in danger of her former tooth.
  1260. grow
    increase in size by natural process
    If you can look into the seeds of time,
    And say which grain will grow and which will not,
    Speak then to me, who neither beg nor fear
    Your favours nor your hate.
  1261. heavens
    the apparent surface of the imaginary sphere on which celestial bodies appear to be projected
    ROSS
    Ah, good father,
    Thou seest, the heavens, as troubled with man's act,
    Threaten his bloody stage: by the clock, 'tis day,
    And yet dark night strangles the travelling lamp:
    Is't night's predominance, or the day's shame,
    That darkness does the face of earth entomb,
    When living light should kiss it?
  1262. quickly
    with little or no delay
    Then enter MACBETH
    MACBETH
    If it were done when 'tis done, then 'twere well
    It were done quickly: if the assassination
    Could trammel up the consequence, and catch
    With his surcease success; that but this blow
    Might be the be-all and the end-all here,
    But here, upon this bank and shoal of time,
    We'ld jump the life to come.
  1263. Antony
    Roman general under Julius Caesar in the Gallic wars
    There is none but he
    Whose being I do fear: and, under him,
    My Genius is rebuked; as, it is said,
    Mark Antony's was by Caesar.
  1264. worth
    the quality of being desirable or valuable
    Mine eyes are made the fools o' the other senses,
    Or else worth all the rest; I see thee still,
    And on thy blade and dudgeon gouts of blood,
    Which was not so before.
  1265. bridegroom
    a man participant in his own marriage ceremony
    Norway himself,
    With terrible numbers,
    Assisted by that most disloyal traitor
    The thane of Cawdor, began a dismal conflict;
    Till that Bellona's bridegroom, lapp'd in proof,
    Confronted him with self-comparisons,
    Point against point rebellious, arm 'gainst arm.
  1266. take off
    remove clothes
    Besides, this Duncan
    Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been
    So clear in his great office, that his virtues
    Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against
    The deep damnation of his taking-off;
    And pity, like a naked new-born babe,
    Striding the blast, or heaven's cherubim, horsed
    Upon the sightless couriers of the air,
    Shall blow the horrid deed in every eye,
    That tears shall drown the wind.
  1267. jewel
    a precious or semiprecious stone incorporated into a piece of jewelry
    If 't be so,
    For Banquo's issue have I filed my mind;
    For them the gracious Duncan have I murder'd;
    Put rancours in the vessel of my peace
    Only for them; and mine eternal jewel
    Given to the common enemy of man,
    To make them kings, the seed of Banquo kings!
  1268. made
    produced by a manufacturing process
    When I burned in desire
    to question them further, they made themselves air,
    into which they vanished.
  1269. comforted
    made comfortable or more comfortable in a time of distress
    MALCOLM
    Be comforted:
    Let's make us medicines of our great revenge,
    To cure this deadly grief.
  1270. matron
    a married woman who is staid and dignified
    MALCOLM
    I grant him bloody,
    Luxurious, avaricious, false, deceitful,
    Sudden, malicious, smacking of every sin
    That has a name: but there's no bottom, none,
    In my voluptuousness: your wives, your daughters,
    Your matrons and your maids, could not fill up
    The cistern of my lust, and my desire
    All continent impediments would o'erbear
    That did oppose my will: better Macbeth
    Than such an one to reign.
  1271. bind
    secure with or as if with ropes
    From hence to Inverness,
    And bind us further to you.
  1272. fume
    a cloud of fine particles suspended in a gas
    When Duncan is asleep--
    Whereto the rather shall his day's hard journey
    Soundly invite him--his two chamberlains
    Will I with wine and wassail so convince
    That memory, the warder of the brain,
    Shall be a fume, and the receipt of reason
    A limbeck only: when in swinish sleep
    Their drenched natures lie as in a death,
    What cannot you and I perform upon
    The unguarded Duncan? what not put upon
    His spongy officers, who shall bear the guilt
    Of our great quell?
  1273. temperance
    the trait of avoiding excesses
    MALCOLM
    But I have none: the king-becoming graces,
    As justice, verity, temperance, stableness,
    Bounty, perseverance, mercy, lowliness,
    Devotion, patience, courage, fortitude,
    I have no relish of them, but abound
    In the division of each several crime,
    Acting it many ways.
  1274. stick in
    insert casually
    I had most need of blessing, and 'Amen'
    Stuck in my throat.
  1275. attire
    clothing of a distinctive style or for a particular occasion
    What are these
    So wither'd and so wild in their attire,
    That look not like the inhabitants o' the earth,
    And yet are on't?
  1276. rebuke
    an act or expression of criticism and censure
    There is none but he
    Whose being I do fear: and, under him,
    My Genius is rebuked; as, it is said,
    Mark Antony's was by Caesar.
  1277. sinful
    morally objectionable or wicked
    Sinful Macduff,
    They were all struck for thee! naught that I am,
    Not for their own demerits, but for mine,
    Fell slaughter on their souls.
  1278. Eight
    a group of United States painters founded in 1907 and noted for their realistic depictions of sordid aspects of city life
    A show of Eight Kings, the last with a glass in his hand; GHOST OF BANQUO following

    MACBETH
    Thou art too like the spirit of Banquo: down!
  1279. uproar
    a state of commotion and noise and confusion
    Nay, had I power, I should
    Pour the sweet milk of concord into hell,
    Uproar the universal peace, confound
    All unity on earth.
  1280. clock
    a timepiece that shows the time of day
    FLEANCE
    The moon is down; I have not heard the clock.
  1281. needful
    necessary for relief or supply
    What's more to do,
    Which would be planted newly with the time,
    As calling home our exiled friends abroad
    That fled the snares of watchful tyranny;
    Producing forth the cruel ministers
    Of this dead butcher and his fiend-like queen,
    Who, as 'tis thought, by self and violent hands
    Took off her life; this, and what needful else
    That calls upon us, by the grace of Grace,
    We will perform in measure, time and place:
    So, thanks to all at once and to each one,
    Whom we invite to see u...
  1282. come in
    to come or go into
    Here's a farmer, that hanged
    himself on the expectation of plenty: come in
    time; have napkins enow about you; here
    you'll sweat for't.
  1283. image
    a visual representation produced on a surface
    Enter ROSS and ANGUS

    ROSS
    The king hath happily received, Macbeth,
    The news of thy success; and when he reads
    Thy personal venture in the rebels' fight,
    His wonders and his praises do contend
    Which should be thine or his: silenced with that,
    In viewing o'er the rest o' the selfsame day,
    He finds thee in the stout Norweyan ranks,
    Nothing afeard of what thyself didst make,
    Strange images of death.
  1284. mortality
    the quality or state of being subject to death
    Re-enter MACBETH and LENNOX, with ROSS

    MACBETH
    Had I but died an hour before this chance,
    I had lived a blessed time; for, from this instant,
    There 's nothing serious in mortality:
    All is but toys: renown and grace is dead;
    The wine of life is drawn, and the mere lees
    Is left this vault to brag of.
  1285. cricket
    leaping insect with long antennae
    LADY MACBETH
    I heard the owl scream and the crickets cry.
  1286. seek
    try to locate, discover, or establish the existence of
    DUNCAN
    My plenteous joys,
    Wanton in fulness, seek to hide themselves
    In drops of sorrow.
  1287. breast
    either of two soft fleshy milk-secreting glandular organs on the chest of a woman
    Come to my woman's breasts,
    And take my milk for gall, you murdering ministers,
    Wherever in your sightless substances
    You wait on nature's mischief!
  1288. nearest
    within the shortest distance
    Sons, kinsmen, thanes,
    And you whose places are the nearest, know
    We will establish our estate upon
    Our eldest, Malcolm, whom we name hereafter
    The Prince of Cumberland; which honour must
    Not unaccompanied invest him only,
    But signs of nobleness, like stars, shall shine
    On all deservers.
  1289. drown
    kill by submerging in water
    Besides, this Duncan
    Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been
    So clear in his great office, that his virtues
    Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against
    The deep damnation of his taking-off;
    And pity, like a naked new-born babe,
    Striding the blast, or heaven's cherubim, horsed
    Upon the sightless couriers of the air,
    Shall blow the horrid deed in every eye,
    That tears shall drown the wind.
  1290. tune
    a succession of notes forming a distinctive sequence
    BANQUO
    To the selfsame tune and words.
  1291. towering
    of imposing height; especially standing out above others
    On Tuesday last,
    A falcon, towering in her pride of place,
    Was by a mousing owl hawk'd at and kill'd.
  1292. in so far
    to the degree or extent that
    For mine own good,
    All causes shall give way: I am in blood
    Stepp'd in so far that, should I wade no more,
    Returning were as tedious as go o'er:
    Strange things I have in head, that will to hand;
    Which must be acted ere they may be scann'd.
  1293. quarry
    animal hunted or caught for food
    ROSS
    Your castle is surprised; your wife and babes
    Savagely slaughter'd: to relate the manner,
    Were, on the quarry of these murder'd deer,
    To add the death of you.
  1294. husband
    a male partner in a marriage
    Her husband's to Aleppo gone, master o' the Tiger:
    But in a sieve I'll thither sail,
    And, like a rat without a tail,
    I'll do, I'll do, and I'll do.
  1295. wade
    walk through relatively shallow water
    For mine own good,
    All causes shall give way: I am in blood
    Stepp'd in so far that, should I wade no more,
    Returning were as tedious as go o'er:
    Strange things I have in head, that will to hand;
    Which must be acted ere they may be scann'd.
  1296. ratify
    approve and express assent, responsibility, or obligation
    Lord
    The son of Duncan,
    From whom this tyrant holds the due of birth
    Lives in the English court, and is received
    Of the most pious Edward with such grace
    That the malevolence of fortune nothing
    Takes from his high respect: thither Macduff
    Is gone to pray the holy king, upon his aid
    To wake Northumberland and warlike Siward:
    That, by the help of these--with Him above
    To ratify the work--we may again
    Give to our tables meat, sleep to our nights,
    Free from our feasts and ban...
  1297. duty
    the social force that obliges you to behave in a certain way
    Your highness' part
    Is to receive our duties; and our duties
    Are to your throne and state children and servants,
    Which do but what they should, by doing every thing
    Safe toward your love and honour.
  1298. courier
    a person who carries a message
    Besides, this Duncan
    Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been
    So clear in his great office, that his virtues
    Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against
    The deep damnation of his taking-off;
    And pity, like a naked new-born babe,
    Striding the blast, or heaven's cherubim, horsed
    Upon the sightless couriers of the air,
    Shall blow the horrid deed in every eye,
    That tears shall drown the wind.
  1299. constrain
    hold back
    MALCOLM
    'Tis his main hope:
    For where there is advantage to be given,
    Both more and less have given him the revolt,
    And none serve with him but constrained things
    Whose hearts are absent too.
  1300. reconciled
    made compatible or consistent
    MALCOLM
    Macduff, this noble passion,
    Child of integrity, hath from my soul
    Wiped the black scruples, reconciled my thoughts
    To thy good truth and honour.
  1301. prowess
    a superior skill learned by study and practice
    ROSS
    Your son, my lord, has paid a soldier's debt:
    He only lived but till he was a man;
    The which no sooner had his prowess confirm'd
    In the unshrinking station where he fought,
    But like a man he died.
  1302. even
    being level or straight or regular and without variation
    The sin of my ingratitude even now
    Was heavy on me: thou art so far before
    That swiftest wing of recompense is slow
    To overtake thee.
  1303. counsellor
    someone who gives advice about problems
    Death of thy soul! those linen cheeks of thine
    Are counsellors to fear.
  1304. watchful
    engaged in or accustomed to close observation
    What's more to do,
    Which would be planted newly with the time,
    As calling home our exiled friends abroad
    That fled the snares of watchful tyranny;
    Producing forth the cruel ministers
    Of this dead butcher and his fiend-like queen,
    Who, as 'tis thought, by self and violent hands
    Took off her life; this, and what needful else
    That calls upon us, by the grace of Grace,
    We will perform in measure, time and place:
    So, thanks to all at once and to each one,
    Whom we invite to see u...
  1305. raven
    a large black bird with a straight bill and long tail
    Exit Messenger

    The raven himself is hoarse
    That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan
    Under my battlements.
  1306. morn
    the time period between dawn and noon
    MACDUFF
    Let us rather
    Hold fast the mortal sword, and like good men
    Bestride our down-fall'n birthdom: each new morn
    New widows howl, new orphans cry, new sorrows
    Strike heaven on the face, that it resounds
    As if it felt with Scotland and yell'd out
    Like syllable of dolour.
  1307. hew
    make or shape as with an axe
    MALCOLM
    Let every soldier hew him down a bough
    And bear't before him: thereby shall we shadow
    The numbers of our host and make discovery
    Err in report of us.
  1308. esteem
    the condition of being honored
    Wouldst thou have that
    Which thou esteem'st the ornament of life,
    And live a coward in thine own esteem,
    Letting 'I dare not' wait upon 'I would,'
    Like the poor cat i' the adage?
  1309. sorry
    feeling or expressing regret
    MACBETH
    This is a sorry sight.
  1310. prepare
    make ready or suitable or equip in advance
    A banquet prepared.
  1311. best
    having the most positive qualities
    MACBETH
    To know my deed, 'twere best not know myself.
  1312. start
    take the first step or steps in carrying out an action
    BANQUO
    Good sir, why do you start; and seem to fear
    Things that do sound so fair?
  1313. ante
    the initial contribution that each player makes to the pot
    Ante-room in the castle.
  1314. flattering
    showing or representing to advantage
    MACBETH
    So shall I, love; and so, I pray, be you:
    Let your remembrance apply to Banquo;
    Present him eminence, both with eye and tongue:
    Unsafe the while, that we
    Must lave our honours in these flattering streams,
    And make our faces vizards to our hearts,
    Disguising what they are.
  1315. lee
    the side of something that is sheltered from the wind
    Re-enter MACBETH and LENNOX, with ROSS

    MACBETH
    Had I but died an hour before this chance,
    I had lived a blessed time; for, from this instant,
    There 's nothing serious in mortality:
    All is but toys: renown and grace is dead;
    The wine of life is drawn, and the mere lees
    Is left this vault to brag of.
  1316. tell
    narrate or give a detailed account of
    If I say sooth, I must report they were
    As cannons overcharged with double cracks, so they
    Doubly redoubled strokes upon the foe:
    Except they meant to bathe in reeking wounds,
    Or memorise another Golgotha,
    I cannot tell.
  1317. disease
    an impairment of health
    Exit Doctor

    MACDUFF
    What's the disease he means?
  1318. deny
    declare untrue; contradict
    MACBETH
    How say'st thou, that Macduff denies his person
    At our great bidding?
  1319. rooted
    absolutely still
    Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased,
    Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow,
    Raze out the written troubles of the brain
    And with some sweet oblivious antidote
    Cleanse the stuff'd bosom of that perilous stuff
    Which weighs upon the heart?
  1320. dark
    devoid of or deficient in light or brightness
    Come, thick night,
    And pall thee in the dunnest smoke of hell,
    That my keen knife see not the wound it makes,
    Nor heaven peep through the blanket of the dark,
    To cry 'Hold, hold!'
  1321. miraculous
    peculiarly fortunate, as if by divine intervention
    MALCOLM
    'Tis call'd the evil:
    A most miraculous work in this good king;
    Which often, since my here-remain in England,
    I have seen him do.
  1322. industrious
    characterized by hard work and perseverance
    MACDUFF
    Let our just censures
    Attend the true event, and put we on
    Industrious soldiership.
  1323. captivity
    the state of being imprisoned
    MALCOLM
    This is the sergeant
    Who like a good and hardy soldier fought
    'Gainst my captivity.
  1324. at heart
    in reality
    am sick at heart,
    When I behold--Seyton, I say!--This
  1325. spoken
    uttered through the medium of speech or characterized by speech; sometimes used in combination
    DONALBAIN
    [Aside to MALCOLM] What should be spoken here,
    where our fate,
    Hid in an auger-hole, may rush, and seize us?
  1326. slave
    a person who is forcibly held in servitude
    The merciless Macdonwald--
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villanies of nature
    Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
    Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
    For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--
    Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like valour's minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave;
    Which...
  1327. distracted
    having the attention diverted especially because of anxiety
    LENNOX
    Those of his chamber, as it seem'd, had done 't:
    Their hands and faces were an badged with blood;
    So were their daggers, which unwiped we found
    Upon their pillows:
    They stared, and were distracted; no man's life
    Was to be trusted with them.
  1328. pyramid
    a polyhedron having a polygonal base and triangular sides
    MACBETH
    I conjure you, by that which you profess,
    Howe'er you come to know it, answer me:
    Though you untie the winds and let them fight
    Against the churches; though the yesty waves
    Confound and swallow navigation up;
    Though bladed corn be lodged and trees blown down;
    Though castles topple on their warders' heads;
    Though palaces and pyramids do slope
    Their heads to their foundations; though the treasure
    Of nature's germens tumble all together,
    Even till destruction sicken; ...
  1329. success
    an event that accomplishes its intended purpose
    Enter ROSS and ANGUS

    ROSS
    The king hath happily received, Macbeth,
    The news of thy success; and when he reads
    Thy personal venture in the rebels' fight,
    His wonders and his praises do contend
    Which should be thine or his: silenced with that,
    In viewing o'er the rest o' the selfsame day,
    He finds thee in the stout Norweyan ranks,
    Nothing afeard of what thyself didst make,
    Strange images of death.
  1330. shoal
    a stretch of shallow water
    Then enter MACBETH
    MACBETH
    If it were done when 'tis done, then 'twere well
    It were done quickly: if the assassination
    Could trammel up the consequence, and catch
    With his surcease success; that but this blow
    Might be the be-all and the end-all here,
    But here, upon this bank and shoal of time,
    We'ld jump the life to come.
  1331. snare
    a trap for birds or small mammals; often has a slip noose
    What's more to do,
    Which would be planted newly with the time,
    As calling home our exiled friends abroad
    That fled the snares of watchful tyranny;
    Producing forth the cruel ministers
    Of this dead butcher and his fiend-like queen,
    Who, as 'tis thought, by self and violent hands
    Took off her life; this, and what needful else
    That calls upon us, by the grace of Grace,
    We will perform in measure, time and place:
    So, thanks to all at once and to each one,
    Whom we invite to see u...
  1332. homely
    lacking in physical beauty or proportion
    I doubt some danger does approach you nearly:
    If you will take a homely man's advice,
    Be not found here; hence, with your little ones.
  1333. steal
    take without the owner's consent
    Faith, here's an
    English tailor come hither, for stealing out of
    a French hose: come in, tailor; here you may
    roast your goose.
  1334. covet
    wish, long, or crave for
    I am yet
    Unknown to woman, never was forsworn,
    Scarcely have coveted what was mine own,
    At no time broke my faith, would not betray
    The devil to his fellow and delight
    No less in truth than life: my first false speaking
    Was this upon myself: what I am truly,
    Is thine and my poor country's to command:
    Whither indeed, before thy here-approach,
    Old Siward, with ten thousand warlike men,
    Already at a point, was setting forth.
  1335. rub
    move over something with pressure
    Within this hour at most
    I will advise you where to plant yourselves;
    Acquaint you with the perfect spy o' the time,
    The moment on't; for't must be done to-night,
    And something from the palace; always thought
    That I require a clearness: and with him--
    To leave no rubs nor botches in the work--
    Fleance his son, that keeps him company,
    Whose absence is no less material to me
    Than is his father's, must embrace the fate
    Of that dark hour.
  1336. goodly
    large in size, amount, or degree
    I think our country sinks beneath the yoke;
    It weeps, it bleeds; and each new day a gash
    Is added to her wounds: I think withal
    There would be hands uplifted in my right;
    And here from gracious England have I offer
    Of goodly thousands: but, for all this,
    When I shall tread upon the tyrant's head,
    Or wear it on my sword, yet my poor country
    Shall have more vices than it had before,
    More suffer and more sundry ways than ever,
    By him that shall succeed.
  1337. do good
    be beneficial for
    But I remember now
    I am in this earthly world; where to do harm
    Is often laudable, to do good sometime
    Accounted dangerous folly: why then, alas,
    Do I put up that womanly defence,
    To say I have done no harm?
  1338. arm
    a human limb
    Mark, king of Scotland, mark:
    No sooner justice had with valour arm'd
    Compell'd these skipping kerns to trust their heels,
    But the Norweyan lord surveying vantage,
    With furbish'd arms and new supplies of men
    Began a fresh assault.
  1339. folly
    the trait of acting stupidly or rashly
    GHOST OF BANQUO vanishes

    LADY MACBETH
    What, quite unmann'd in folly?
  1340. doctor
    a person who holds Ph.D. degree from an academic institution
    MALCOLM
    I thank you, doctor.
  1341. sweetly
    in an affectionate or loving manner
    Enter DUNCAN, MALCOLM, DONALBAIN, BANQUO, LENNOX, MACDUFF, ROSS, ANGUS, and Attendants
    DUNCAN
    This castle hath a pleasant seat; the air
    Nimbly and sweetly recommends itself
    Unto our gentle senses.
  1342. courage
    a quality of spirit that enables you to face danger or pain
    But screw your courage to the sticking-place,
    And we'll not fail.
  1343. hearer
    someone who listens attentively
    MACBETH
    We hear, our bloody cousins are bestow'd
    In England and in Ireland, not confessing
    Their cruel parricide, filling their hearers
    With strange invention: but of that to-morrow,
    When therewithal we shall have cause of state
    Craving us jointly.
  1344. sorely
    to a great degree
    The heart is sorely charged.
  1345. scream
    utter a sudden loud cry
    LADY MACBETH
    I heard the owl scream and the crickets cry.
  1346. repentance
    remorse for your past conduct
    But I have spoke
    With one that saw him die: who did report
    That very frankly he confess'd his treasons,
    Implored your highness' pardon and set forth
    A deep repentance: nothing in his life
    Became him like the leaving it; he died
    As one that had been studied in his death
    To throw away the dearest thing he owed,
    As 'twere a careless trifle.
  1347. rise
    move upward
    As from your graves rise up, and walk like sprites,
    To countenance this horror!
  1348. oracle
    a shrine where a prophet is consulted
    If there come truth from them--
    As upon thee, Macbeth, their speeches shine--
    Why, by the verities on thee made good,
    May they not be my oracles as well,
    And set me up in hope?
  1349. transport
    move something or somebody around
    Thy letters have transported me beyond
    This ignorant present, and I feel now
    The future in the instant.
  1350. candle
    stick of wax with a wick in the middle
    There's husbandry in heaven;
    Their candles are all out.
  1351. calendar
    a system of timekeeping that defines divisions of the year
    Let this pernicious hour
    Stand aye accursed in the calendar!
  1352. off
    from a particular thing or place or position
    Besides, this Duncan
    Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been
    So clear in his great office, that his virtues
    Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against
    The deep damnation of his taking- off;
    And pity, like a naked new-born babe,
    Striding the blast, or heaven's cherubim, horsed
    Upon the sightless couriers of the air,
    Shall blow the horrid deed in every eye,
    That tears shall drown the wind.
  1353. sleeping
    the state of being asleep
    Give me the daggers: the sleeping and the dead
    Are but as pictures: 'tis the eye of childhood
    That fears a painted devil.
  1354. shut
    move so that an opening or passage is obstructed; make shut
    He's here in double trust;
    First, as I am his kinsman and his subject,
    Strong both against the deed; then, as his host,
    Who should against his murderer shut the door,
    Not bear the knife myself.
  1355. luxurious
    furnishing gratification to the senses
    MALCOLM
    I grant him bloody,
    Luxurious, avaricious, false, deceitful,
    Sudden, malicious, smacking of every sin
    That has a name: but there's no bottom, none,
    In my voluptuousness: your wives, your daughters,
    Your matrons and your maids, could not fill up
    The cistern of my lust, and my desire
    All continent impediments would o'erbear
    That did oppose my will: better Macbeth
    Than such an one to reign.
  1356. together
    in contact with each other or in proximity
    Sergeant
    Doubtful it stood;
    As two spent swimmers, that do cling together
    And choke their art.
  1357. lack
    the state of needing something that is absent or unavailable
    LADY MACBETH
    My worthy lord,
    Your noble friends do lack you.
  1358. skip
    jump lightly
    Mark, king of Scotland, mark:
    No sooner justice had with valour arm'd
    Compell'd these skipping kerns to trust their heels,
    But the Norweyan lord surveying vantage,
    With furbish'd arms and new supplies of men
    Began a fresh assault.
  1359. twain
    two items of the same kind
    BANQUO
    As far, my lord, as will fill up the time
    'Twixt this and supper: go not my horse the better,
    I must become a borrower of the night
    For a dark hour or twain.
  1360. ill
    affected by an impairment of normal physical or mental function
    Aside

    Cannot be ill, cannot be good: if ill,
    Why hath it given me earnest of success,
    Commencing in a truth?
  1361. round
    having a circular shape
    Hie thee hither,
    That I may pour my spirits in thine ear;
    And chastise with the valour of my tongue
    All that impedes thee from the golden round,
    Which fate and metaphysical aid doth seem
    To have thee crown'd withal.
  1362. wicked
    having committed unrighteous acts
    Now o'er the one halfworld
    Nature seems dead, and wicked dreams abuse
    The curtain'd sleep; witchcraft celebrates
    Pale Hecate's offerings, and wither'd murder,
    Alarum'd by his sentinel, the wolf,
    Whose howl's his watch, thus with his stealthy pace.
  1363. buy
    obtain by purchase
    MACBETH
    We will proceed no further in this business:
    He hath honour'd me of late; and I have bought
    Golden opinions from all sorts of people,
    Which would be worn now in their newest gloss,
    Not cast aside so soon.
  1364. uplift
    fill with high spirits; fill with optimism
    I think our country sinks beneath the yoke;
    It weeps, it bleeds; and each new day a gash
    Is added to her wounds: I think withal
    There would be hands uplifted in my right;
    And here from gracious England have I offer
    Of goodly thousands: but, for all this,
    When I shall tread upon the tyrant's head,
    Or wear it on my sword, yet my poor country
    Shall have more vices than it had before,
    More suffer and more sundry ways than ever,
    By him that shall succeed.
  1365. clatter
    a rattling noise
    There thou shouldst be;
    By this great clatter, one of greatest note
    Seems bruited.
  1366. seed
    small, hard part of a plant from which a new plant can grow
    If you can look into the seeds of time,
    And say which grain will grow and which will not,
    Speak then to me, who neither beg nor fear
    Your favours nor your hate.
  1367. divers
    many and different
    Enter a Sewer, and divers Servants with dishes and service, and pass over the stage.
  1368. theft
    the act of taking something from someone unlawfully
    Therefore, to horse;
    And let us not be dainty of leave-taking,
    But shift away: there's warrant in that theft
    Which steals itself, when there's no mercy left.
  1369. lighted
    set afire or burning
    MALCOLM
    This murderous shaft that's shot
    Hath not yet lighted, and our safest way
    Is to avoid the aim.
  1370. glimmer
    a flash of light
    The west yet glimmers with some streaks of day:
    Now spurs the lated traveller apace
    To gain the timely inn; and near approaches
    The subject of our watch.
  1371. harness
    an arrangement of leather straps fitted to a draft animal
    At least we'll die with harness on our back.
  1372. imperial
    relating to or associated with an empire
    MACBETH
    [Aside] Two truths are told,
    As happy prologues to the swelling act
    Of the imperial theme.--I
  1373. prediction
    a statement made about the future
    My noble partner
    You greet with present grace and great prediction
    Of noble having and of royal hope,
    That he seems rapt withal: to me you speak not.
  1374. solicit
    request urgently or persistently
    How he solicits heaven,
    Himself best knows: but strangely-visited people,
    All swoln and ulcerous, pitiful to the eye,
    The mere despair of surgery, he cures,
    Hanging a golden stamp about their necks,
    Put on with holy prayers: and 'tis spoken,
    To the succeeding royalty he leaves
    The healing benediction.
  1375. being
    the state or fact of existing
    This have I thought good to deliver
    thee, my dearest partner of greatness, that thou
    mightst not lose the dues of rejoicing, by being
    ignorant of what greatness is promised thee.
  1376. give out
    give to several people
    MALCOLM
    Be't their comfort
    We are coming thither: gracious England hath
    Lent us good Siward and ten thousand men;
    An older and a better soldier none
    That Christendom gives out.
  1377. heel
    the back part of the human foot
    Mark, king of Scotland, mark:
    No sooner justice had with valour arm'd
    Compell'd these skipping kerns to trust their heels,
    But the Norweyan lord surveying vantage,
    With furbish'd arms and new supplies of men
    Began a fresh assault.
  1378. sentinel
    a person employed to keep watch for some anticipated event
    Now o'er the one halfworld
    Nature seems dead, and wicked dreams abuse
    The curtain'd sleep; witchcraft celebrates
    Pale Hecate's offerings, and wither'd murder,
    Alarum'd by his sentinel, the wolf,
    Whose howl's his watch, thus with his stealthy pace.
  1379. chestnut
    any of several attractive deciduous trees yellow-brown in autumn; yield a hard wood and edible nuts in a prickly bur
    First Witch
    A sailor's wife had chestnuts in her lap,
    And munch'd, and munch'd, and munch'd:--
    'Give me,' quoth I:
    'Aroint thee, witch!' the rump-fed ronyon cries.
  1380. lion
    large gregarious predatory feline of Africa and India having a tawny coat with a shaggy mane in the male
    Sergeant
    Yes;
    As sparrows eagles, or the hare the lion.
  1381. homeward
    toward home
    First Witch
    Here I have a pilot's thumb,
    Wreck'd as homeward he did come.
  1382. hoarse
    deep and harsh sounding as if from shouting or illness
    Exit Messenger

    The raven himself is hoarse
    That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan
    Under my battlements.
  1383. practise
    engage in a rehearsal (of)
    Doctor
    This disease is beyond my practise: yet I have known
    those which have walked in their sleep who have died
    holily in their beds.
  1384. broad
    having great extent from one side to the other
    LADY MACBETH
    All our service
    In every point twice done and then done double
    Were poor and single business to contend
    Against those honours deep and broad wherewith
    Your majesty loads our house: for those of old,
    And the late dignities heap'd up to them,
    We rest your hermits.
  1385. resound
    emit a noise
    MACDUFF
    Let us rather
    Hold fast the mortal sword, and like good men
    Bestride our down-fall'n birthdom: each new morn
    New widows howl, new orphans cry, new sorrows
    Strike heaven on the face, that it resounds
    As if it felt with Scotland and yell'd out
    Like syllable of dolour.
  1386. queen
    a female sovereign ruler
    Enter MACBETH, as king, LADY MACBETH, as queen, LENNOX, ROSS, Lords, Ladies, and Attendants

    MACBETH
    Here's our chief guest.
  1387. weeds
    a black garment worn by a widow as a sign of mourning
    LENNOX
    Or so much as it needs,
    To dew the sovereign flower and drown the weeds.
  1388. clear
    readily apparent to the mind
    LADY MACBETH
    Only look up clear;
    To alter favour ever is to fear:
    Leave all the rest to me.
  1389. hermit
    one retired from society for religious reasons
    LADY MACBETH
    All our service
    In every point twice done and then done double
    Were poor and single business to contend
    Against those honours deep and broad wherewith
    Your majesty loads our house: for those of old,
    And the late dignities heap'd up to them,
    We rest your hermits.
  1390. catalogue
    a complete list of things, usually arranged systematically
    MACBETH
    Ay, in the catalogue ye go for men;
    As hounds and greyhounds, mongrels, spaniels, curs,
    Shoughs, water-rugs and demi-wolves, are clept
    All by the name of dogs: the valued file
    Distinguishes the swift, the slow, the subtle,
    The housekeeper, the hunter, every one
    According to the gift which bounteous nature
    Hath in him closed; whereby he does receive
    Particular addition. from the bill
    That writes them all alike: and so of men.
  1391. ignorant
    uneducated in general; lacking knowledge or sophistication
    This have I thought good to deliver
    thee, my dearest partner of greatness, that thou
    mightst not lose the dues of rejoicing, by being
    ignorant of what greatness is promised thee.
  1392. ten
    the cardinal number that is the sum of nine and one
    ROSS
    That now
    Sweno, the Norways' king, craves composition:
    Nor would we deign him burial of his men
    Till he disbursed at Saint Colme's inch
    Ten thousand dollars to our general use.
  1393. troubled
    characterized by or indicative of distress or affliction or danger or need
    ROSS
    Ah, good father,
    Thou seest, the heavens, as troubled with man's act,
    Threaten his bloody stage: by the clock, 'tis day,
    And yet dark night strangles the travelling lamp:
    Is't night's predominance, or the day's shame,
    That darkness does the face of earth entomb,
    When living light should kiss it?
  1394. wine
    fermented juice (of grapes especially)
    When Duncan is asleep--
    Whereto the rather shall his day's hard journey
    Soundly invite him--his two chamberlains
    Will I with wine and wassail so convince
    That memory, the warder of the brain,
    Shall be a fume, and the receipt of reason
    A limbeck only: when in swinish sleep
    Their drenched natures lie as in a death,
    What cannot you and I perform upon
    The unguarded Duncan? what not put upon
    His spongy officers, who shall bear the guilt
    Of our great quell?
  1395. lease
    a contract granting use or occupation of property
    Rebellion's head, rise never till the wood
    Of Birnam rise, and our high-placed Macbeth
    Shall live the lease of nature, pay his breath
    To time and mortal custom.
  1396. curb
    the act of restraining power or action or limiting excess
    Curbing his lavish spirit: and, to conclude,
    The victory fell on us.
  1397. reason
    a logical motive for a belief or action
    Or have we eaten on the insane root
    That takes the reason prisoner?
  1398. treacherous
    dangerously unstable and unpredictable
    MACDUFF
    I am not treacherous.
  1399. kingdom
    the domain ruled by a monarch
    As thick as hail
    Came post with post; and every one did bear
    Thy praises in his kingdom's great defence,
    And pour'd them down before him.
  1400. free
    able to act at will
    Think upon what hath chanced, and, at more time,
    The interim having weigh'd it, let us speak
    Our free hearts each to other.
  1401. Hell
    the abode of Satan and the forces of evil
    two: why,
    then, 'tis time to do't.-- Hell
  1402. spacious
    having ample room
    But fear not yet
    To take upon you what is yours: you may
    Convey your pleasures in a spacious plenty,
    And yet seem cold, the time you may so hoodwink.
  1403. use
    put into service
    ROSS
    That now
    Sweno, the Norways' king, craves composition:
    Nor would we deign him burial of his men
    Till he disbursed at Saint Colme's inch
    Ten thousand dollars to our general use.
  1404. do it
    have sexual intercourse with
    MACBETH
    The service and the loyalty I owe,
    In doing it, pays itself.
  1405. desert
    leave someone who needs or counts on you; leave in the lurch
    ACT I
    SCENE I. A desert place.
  1406. office
    place of business where professional duties are performed
    Besides, this Duncan
    Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been
    So clear in his great office, that his virtues
    Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against
    The deep damnation of his taking-off;
    And pity, like a naked new-born babe,
    Striding the blast, or heaven's cherubim, horsed
    Upon the sightless couriers of the air,
    Shall blow the horrid deed in every eye,
    That tears shall drown the wind.
  1407. dreadful
    exceptionally bad or displeasing
    Enter ROSS and an old Man
    Old Man
    Threescore and ten I can remember well:
    Within the volume of which time I have seen
    Hours dreadful and things strange; but this sore night
    Hath trifled former knowings.
  1408. shark
    any of numerous elongate mostly marine carnivorous fishes with heterocercal caudal fins and tough skin covered with small toothlike scales
    Third Witch
    Scale of dragon, tooth of wolf,
    Witches' mummy, maw and gulf
    Of the ravin'd salt-sea shark,
    Root of hemlock digg'd i' the dark,
    Liver of blaspheming Jew,
    Gall of goat, and slips of yew
    Silver'd in the moon's eclipse,
    Nose of Turk and Tartar's lips,
    Finger of birth-strangled babe
    Ditch-deliver'd by a drab,
    Make the gruel thick and slab:
    Add thereto a tiger's chaudron,
    For the ingredients of our cauldron.
  1409. guise
    an artful or simulated semblance
    This is her very guise;
    and, upon my life, fast asleep.
  1410. healing
    the natural process by which the body repairs itself
    How he solicits heaven,
    Himself best knows: but strangely-visited people,
    All swoln and ulcerous, pitiful to the eye,
    The mere despair of surgery, he cures,
    Hanging a golden stamp about their necks,
    Put on with holy prayers: and 'tis spoken,
    To the succeeding royalty he leaves
    The healing benediction.
  1411. hair
    a covering for the body (or parts of it) consisting of a dense growth of threadlike structures (as on the human head); helps to prevent heat loss
    I am thane of Cawdor:
    If good, why do I yield to that suggestion
    Whose horrid image doth unfix my hair
    And make my seated heart knock at my ribs,
    Against the use of nature?
  1412. resolute
    firm in purpose or belief
    Second Apparition
    Be bloody, bold, and resolute; laugh to scorn
    The power of man, for none of woman born
    Shall harm Macbeth.
  1413. news
    information about recent and important events
    Enter ROSS and ANGUS

    ROSS
    The king hath happily received, Macbeth,
    The news of thy success; and when he reads
    Thy personal venture in the rebels' fight,
    His wonders and his praises do contend
    Which should be thine or his: silenced with that,
    In viewing o'er the rest o' the selfsame day,
    He finds thee in the stout Norweyan ranks,
    Nothing afeard of what thyself didst make,
    Strange images of death.
  1414. pine
    a coniferous tree
    I will drain him dry as hay:
    Sleep shall neither night nor day
    Hang upon his pent-house lid;
    He shall live a man forbid:
    Weary se'nnights nine times nine
    Shall he dwindle, peak and pine:
    Though his bark cannot be lost,
    Yet it shall be tempest-tost.
  1415. throw away
    throw or cast away
    But I have spoke
    With one that saw him die: who did report
    That very frankly he confess'd his treasons,
    Implored your highness' pardon and set forth
    A deep repentance: nothing in his life
    Became him like the leaving it; he died
    As one that had been studied in his death
    To throw away the dearest thing he owed,
    As 'twere a careless trifle.
  1416. tedious
    so lacking in interest as to cause mental weariness
    For mine own good,
    All causes shall give way: I am in blood
    Stepp'd in so far that, should I wade no more,
    Returning were as tedious as go o'er:
    Strange things I have in head, that will to hand;
    Which must be acted ere they may be scann'd.
  1417. plight
    a situation from which extrication is difficult
    He can report,
    As seemeth by his plight, of the revolt
    The newest state.
  1418. ruby
    a transparent piece of ruby that has been cut and polished and is valued as a precious gem
    You make me strange
    Even to the disposition that I owe,
    When now I think you can behold such sights,
    And keep the natural ruby of your cheeks,
    When mine is blanched with fear.
  1419. shine
    emit light; be bright, as of the sun or a light
    Sons, kinsmen, thanes,
    And you whose places are the nearest, know
    We will establish our estate upon
    Our eldest, Malcolm, whom we name hereafter
    The Prince of Cumberland; which honour must
    Not unaccompanied invest him only,
    But signs of nobleness, like stars, shall shine
    On all deservers.
  1420. firm
    not soft or yielding to pressure
    Thou sure and firm-set earth,
    Hear not my steps, which way they walk, for fear
    Thy very stones prate of my whereabout,
    And take the present horror from the time,
    Which now suits with it.
  1421. come by
    obtain, especially accidentally
    I did hear
    The galloping of horse: who was't came by?
  1422. strong
    having strength or power greater than average or expected
    He's here in double trust;
    First, as I am his kinsman and his subject,
    Strong both against the deed; then, as his host,
    Who should against his murderer shut the door,
    Not bear the knife myself.
  1423. surgery
    science treating disease or injury by operative procedures
    How he solicits heaven,
    Himself best knows: but strangely-visited people,
    All swoln and ulcerous, pitiful to the eye,
    The mere despair of surgery, he cures,
    Hanging a golden stamp about their necks,
    Put on with holy prayers: and 'tis spoken,
    To the succeeding royalty he leaves
    The healing benediction.
  1424. fail
    be unable
    MACBETH
    If we should fail?
  1425. keen
    intense or sharp
    Come, thick night,
    And pall thee in the dunnest smoke of hell,
    That my keen knife see not the wound it makes,
    Nor heaven peep through the blanket of the dark,
    To cry 'Hold, hold!'
  1426. cancel
    declare null and void
    Come, seeling night,
    Scarf up the tender eye of pitiful day;
    And with thy bloody and invisible hand
    Cancel and tear to pieces that great bond
    Which keeps me pale!
  1427. assassination
    murder of a public figure by surprise attack
    Then enter MACBETH
    MACBETH
    If it were done when 'tis done, then 'twere well
    It were done quickly: if the assassination
    Could trammel up the consequence, and catch
    With his surcease success; that but this blow
    Might be the be-all and the end-all here,
    But here, upon this bank and shoal of time,
    We'ld jump the life to come.
  1428. impress
    have a powerful and usually positive effect on
    Descends

    MACBETH
    That will never be
    Who can impress the forest, bid the tree
    Unfix his earth-bound root?
  1429. two
    the cardinal number that is the sum of one and one
    Sergeant
    Doubtful it stood;
    As two spent swimmers, that do cling together
    And choke their art.
  1430. bond
    a connection that fastens things together
    Come, seeling night,
    Scarf up the tender eye of pitiful day;
    And with thy bloody and invisible hand
    Cancel and tear to pieces that great bond
    Which keeps me pale!
  1431. momentary
    lasting for a markedly brief time
    LADY MACBETH
    Sit, worthy friends: my lord is often thus,
    And hath been from his youth: pray you, keep seat;
    The fit is momentary; upon a thought
    He will again be well: if much you note him,
    You shall offend him and extend his passion:
    Feed, and regard him not.
  1432. idiot
    a person of subnormal intelligence
    Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player
    That struts and frets his hour upon the stage
    And then is heard no more: it is a tale
    Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
    Signifying nothing.
  1433. smell
    the faculty that enables us to distinguish scents
    BANQUO
    This guest of summer,
    The temple-haunting martlet, does approve,
    By his loved mansionry, that the heaven's breath
    Smells wooingly here: no jutty, frieze,
    Buttress, nor coign of vantage, but this bird
    Hath made his pendent bed and procreant cradle:
    Where they most breed and haunt, I have observed,
    The air is delicate.
  1434. shift
    move very slightly
    Porter
    That it did, sir, i' the very throat on
    me: but I requited him for his lie; and, I
    think, being too strong for him, though he took
    up my legs sometime, yet I made a shift to cast
    him.
  1435. consequence
    a phenomenon that is caused by some previous phenomenon
    But 'tis strange:
    And oftentimes, to win us to our harm,
    The instruments of darkness tell us truths,
    Win us with honest trifles, to betray's
    In deepest consequence.
  1436. hardy
    having rugged physical strength
    MALCOLM
    This is the sergeant
    Who like a good and hardy soldier fought
    'Gainst my captivity.
  1437. return
    go or come back to place, condition, or activity where one has been before
    LADY MACBETH
    Your servants ever
    Have theirs, themselves and what is theirs, in compt,
    To make their audit at your highness' pleasure,
    Still to return your own.
  1438. housekeeper
    a servant who is employed to perform domestic task in a household
    MACBETH
    Ay, in the catalogue ye go for men;
    As hounds and greyhounds, mongrels, spaniels, curs,
    Shoughs, water-rugs and demi-wolves, are clept
    All by the name of dogs: the valued file
    Distinguishes the swift, the slow, the subtle,
    The housekeeper, the hunter, every one
    According to the gift which bounteous nature
    Hath in him closed; whereby he does receive
    Particular addition. from the bill
    That writes them all alike: and so of men.
  1439. prayer
    reverent petition to a deity
    That they did wake each other: I stood and heard them:
    But they did say their prayers, and address'd them
    Again to sleep.
  1440. Call
    a special disposition to pursue a particular course
    MACBETH
    Call 'em; let me see 'em.
  1441. contradict
    prove negative; show to be false
    Dear Duff, I prithee, contradict thyself,
    And say it is not so.
  1442. remember
    recall knowledge; have a recollection
    I pray you, remember the porter.
  1443. govern
    exercise authority over, as of nations
    MALCOLM
    If such a one be fit to govern, speak:
    I am as I have spoken.
  1444. strongly
    with power
    Doctor
    Hark! she speaks: I will set down what comes from
    her, to satisfy my remembrance the more strongly.
  1445. humbly
    in a humble manner
    MACBETH
    The rest is labour, which is not used for you:
    I'll be myself the harbinger and make joyful
    The hearing of my wife with your approach;
    So humbly take my leave.
  1446. insane
    afflicted with or characteristic of mental derangement
    Or have we eaten on the insane root
    That takes the reason prisoner?
  1447. help
    give assistance; be of service
    But I am faint, my gashes cry for help.
  1448. censure
    harsh criticism or disapproval
    MACDUFF
    Let our just censures
    Attend the true event, and put we on
    Industrious soldiership.
  1449. watch
    look attentively
    Now o'er the one halfworld
    Nature seems dead, and wicked dreams abuse
    The curtain'd sleep; witchcraft celebrates
    Pale Hecate's offerings, and wither'd murder,
    Alarum'd by his sentinel, the wolf,
    Whose howl's his watch, thus with his stealthy pace.
  1450. serve
    devote one's life or efforts to, as of countries or ideas
    MACBETH
    I think not of them:
    Yet, when we can entreat an hour to serve,
    We would spend it in some words upon that business,
    If you would grant the time.
  1451. swelling
    something that bulges out or is protuberant or projects from its surroundings
    MACBETH
    [Aside] Two truths are told,
    As happy prologues to the swelling act
    Of the imperial theme.--I
  1452. liver
    large and complicated reddish-brown glandular organ located in the upper right portion of the abdominal cavity; secretes bile and functions in metabolism of protein and carbohydrate and fat; synthesizes substances involved in the clotting of the blood; synthesizes vitamin A; detoxifies poisonous substances and breaks down worn-out erythrocytes
    Third Witch
    Scale of dragon, tooth of wolf,
    Witches' mummy, maw and gulf
    Of the ravin'd salt-sea shark,
    Root of hemlock digg'd i' the dark,
    Liver of blaspheming Jew,
    Gall of goat, and slips of yew
    Silver'd in the moon's eclipse,
    Nose of Turk and Tartar's lips,
    Finger of birth-strangled babe
    Ditch-deliver'd by a drab,
    Make the gruel thick and slab:
    Add thereto a tiger's chaudron,
    For the ingredients of our cauldron.
  1453. defence
    the act of shielding someone or something against attack
    As thick as hail
    Came post with post; and every one did bear
    Thy praises in his kingdom's great defence,
    And pour'd them down before him.
  1454. masterpiece
    the most outstanding work of a creative artist or craftsman
    MACDUFF
    Confusion now hath made his masterpiece!
  1455. Tell
    a Swiss patriot who lived in the early 14th century and who was renowned for his skill as an archer; according to legend an Austrian governor compelled him to shoot an apple from his son's head with his crossbow (which he did successfully without mishap)
    First Apparition: an armed Head

    MACBETH
    Tell me, thou unknown power,--

    First Witch
    He knows thy thought:
    Hear his speech, but say thou nought.
  1456. ways
    structure consisting of a sloping way down to the water from the place where ships are built or repaired
    LADY MACBETH
    These deeds must not be thought
    After these ways; so, it will make us mad.
  1457. another
    any of various alternatives; some other
    If I say sooth, I must report they were
    As cannons overcharged with double cracks, so they
    Doubly redoubled strokes upon the foe:
    Except they meant to bathe in reeking wounds,
    Or memorise another Golgotha,
    I cannot tell.
  1458. spoke
    a rod joining the hub of a wheel to the rim
    But I have spoke
    With one that saw him die: who did report
    That very frankly he confess'd his treasons,
    Implored your highness' pardon and set forth
    A deep repentance: nothing in his life
    Became him like the leaving it; he died
    As one that had been studied in his death
    To throw away the dearest thing he owed,
    As 'twere a careless trifle.
  1459. crack
    a narrow opening
    If I say sooth, I must report they were
    As cannons overcharged with double cracks, so they
    Doubly redoubled strokes upon the foe:
    Except they meant to bathe in reeking wounds,
    Or memorise another Golgotha,
    I cannot tell.
  1460. minister
    a person authorized to conduct religious worship
    Come to my woman's breasts,
    And take my milk for gall, you murdering ministers,
    Wherever in your sightless substances
    You wait on nature's mischief!
  1461. cradle
    a baby bed with sides and rockers
    BANQUO
    This guest of summer,
    The temple-haunting martlet, does approve,
    By his loved mansionry, that the heaven's breath
    Smells wooingly here: no jutty, frieze,
    Buttress, nor coign of vantage, but this bird
    Hath made his pendent bed and procreant cradle:
    Where they most breed and haunt, I have observed,
    The air is delicate.
  1462. stuff
    the tangible substance that goes into a physical object
    LADY MACBETH
    O proper stuff!
  1463. wind up
    coil the spring of a device by turning a stem
    Peace! the charm's wound up.
  1464. Mark
    Apostle and companion of Saint Peter
    Mark, king of Scotland, mark:
    No sooner justice had with valour arm'd
    Compell'd these skipping kerns to trust their heels,
    But the Norweyan lord surveying vantage,
    With furbish'd arms and new supplies of men
    Began a fresh assault.
  1465. sun
    the star that is the source of light and heat for the planets in the solar system
    Third Witch
    That will be ere the set of sun.
  1466. precious
    of high worth or cost
    Why in that rawness left you wife and child,
    Those precious motives, those strong knots of love,
    Without leave-taking?
  1467. only
    without any others being included or involved
    ANGUS
    We are sent
    To give thee from our royal master thanks;
    Only to herald thee into his sight,
    Not pay thee.
  1468. whispering
    speaking softly without vibration of the vocal cords
    Doctor
    Foul whisperings are abroad: unnatural deeds
    Do breed unnatural troubles: infected minds
    To their deaf pillows will discharge their secrets:
    More needs she the divine than the physician.
  1469. justice
    the quality of being fair, reasonable, or impartial
    Mark, king of Scotland, mark:
    No sooner justice had with valour arm'd
    Compell'd these skipping kerns to trust their heels,
    But the Norweyan lord surveying vantage,
    With furbish'd arms and new supplies of men
    Began a fresh assault.
  1470. sit in
    attend as a visitor
    The GHOST OF BANQUO enters, and sits in MACBETH's place

    MACBETH
    Here had we now our country's honour roof'd,
    Were the graced person of our Banquo present;
    Who may I rather challenge for unkindness
    Than pity for mischance!
  1471. posterity
    all future generations
    Enter BANQUO
    BANQUO
    Thou hast it now: king, Cawdor, Glamis, all,
    As the weird women promised, and, I fear,
    Thou play'dst most foully for't: yet it was said
    It should not stand in thy posterity,
    But that myself should be the root and father
    Of many kings.
  1472. Arabia
    a peninsula between the Red Sea and the Persian Gulf
    LADY MACBETH
    Here's the smell of the blood still: all the
    perfumes of Arabia will not sweeten this little
    hand.
  1473. rug
    floor covering consisting of a piece of thick heavy fabric
    MACBETH
    Ay, in the catalogue ye go for men;
    As hounds and greyhounds, mongrels, spaniels, curs,
    Shoughs, water- rugs and demi-wolves, are clept
    All by the name of dogs: the valued file
    Distinguishes the swift, the slow, the subtle,
    The housekeeper, the hunter, every one
    According to the gift which bounteous nature
    Hath in him closed; whereby he does receive
    Particular addition. from the bill
    That writes them all alike: and so of men.
  1474. tree
    a tall perennial woody plant having a main trunk and branches forming a distinct elevated crown; includes both gymnosperms and angiosperms
    Exeunt all but MACBETH and LADY MACBETH

    MACBETH
    It will have blood; they say, blood will have blood:
    Stones have been known to move and trees to speak;
    Augurs and understood relations have
    By magot-pies and choughs and rooks brought forth
    The secret'st man of blood.
  1475. earnest
    characterized by a firm, sincere belief in one's opinions
    ROSS
    And, for an earnest of a greater honour,
    He bade me, from him, call thee thane of Cawdor:
    In which addition, hail, most worthy thane!
  1476. eternal
    continuing forever or indefinitely
    If 't be so,
    For Banquo's issue have I filed my mind;
    For them the gracious Duncan have I murder'd;
    Put rancours in the vessel of my peace
    Only for them; and mine eternal jewel
    Given to the common enemy of man,
    To make them kings, the seed of Banquo kings!
  1477. medicine
    the profession devoted to alleviating diseases and injuries
    MALCOLM
    Be comforted:
    Let's make us medicines of our great revenge,
    To cure this deadly grief.
  1478. naught
    a quantity of no importance
    Sinful Macduff,
    They were all struck for thee! naught that I am,
    Not for their own demerits, but for mine,
    Fell slaughter on their souls.
  1479. affliction
    a cause of great suffering and distress
    But let the frame of things disjoint, both the
    worlds suffer,
    Ere we will eat our meal in fear and sleep
    In the affliction of these terrible dreams
    That shake us nightly: better be with the dead,
    Whom we, to gain our peace, have sent to peace,
    Than on the torture of the mind to lie
    In restless ecstasy.
  1480. rejoicing
    a feeling of great happiness
    This have I thought good to deliver
    thee, my dearest partner of greatness, that thou
    mightst not lose the dues of rejoicing, by being
    ignorant of what greatness is promised thee.
  1481. thousand
    the cardinal number that is the product of 10 and 100
    ROSS
    That now
    Sweno, the Norways' king, craves composition:
    Nor would we deign him burial of his men
    Till he disbursed at Saint Colme's inch
    Ten thousand dollars to our general use.
  1482. asleep
    in a state of sleep
    When Duncan is asleep--
    Whereto the rather shall his day's hard journey
    Soundly invite him--his two chamberlains
    Will I with wine and wassail so convince
    That memory, the warder of the brain,
    Shall be a fume, and the receipt of reason
    A limbeck only: when in swinish sleep
    Their drenched natures lie as in a death,
    What cannot you and I perform upon
    The unguarded Duncan? what not put upon
    His spongy officers, who shall bear the guilt
    Of our great quell?
  1483. diver
    someone who works underwater
    Enter a Sewer, and divers Servants with dishes and service, and pass over the stage.
  1484. fall down
    lose an upright position suddenly
    MACBETH
    [Aside] The Prince of Cumberland! that is a step
    On which I must fall down, or else o'erleap,
    For in my way it lies.
  1485. door
    a swinging or sliding barrier that will close the entrance to a room or building or vehicle
    He's here in double trust;
    First, as I am his kinsman and his subject,
    Strong both against the deed; then, as his host,
    Who should against his murderer shut the door,
    Not bear the knife myself.
  1486. remorse
    a feeling of deep regret, usually for some misdeed
    Come, you spirits
    That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here,
    And fill me from the crown to the toe top-full
    Of direst cruelty! make thick my blood;
    Stop up the access and passage to remorse,
    That no compunctious visitings of nature
    Shake my fell purpose, nor keep peace between
    The effect and it!
  1487. relish
    vigorous and enthusiastic enjoyment
    MALCOLM
    But I have none: the king-becoming graces,
    As justice, verity, temperance, stableness,
    Bounty, perseverance, mercy, lowliness,
    Devotion, patience, courage, fortitude,
    I have no relish of them, but abound
    In the division of each several crime,
    Acting it many ways.
  1488. perilous
    fraught with danger
    Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased,
    Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow,
    Raze out the written troubles of the brain
    And with some sweet oblivious antidote
    Cleanse the stuff'd bosom of that perilous stuff
    Which weighs upon the heart?
  1489. painted
    coated with paint
    Give me the daggers: the sleeping and the dead
    Are but as pictures: 'tis the eye of childhood
    That fears a painted devil.
  1490. confusion
    a mistake that results from taking one thing to be another
    MACDUFF
    Confusion now hath made his masterpiece!
  1491. yawn
    an involuntary intake of breath through a wide open mouth
    MACBETH
    There's comfort yet; they are assailable;
    Then be thou jocund: ere the bat hath flown
    His cloister'd flight, ere to black Hecate's summons
    The shard-borne beetle with his drowsy hums
    Hath rung night's yawning peal, there shall be done
    A deed of dreadful note.
  1492. thank you
    a conversational expression of gratitude
    thank you, gentlemen.
  1493. gum
    any of various substances that exude from certain plants
    I have given suck, and know
    How tender 'tis to love the babe that milks me:
    I would, while it was smiling in my face,
    Have pluck'd my nipple from his boneless gums,
    And dash'd the brains out, had I so sworn as you
    Have done to this.
  1494. fire
    the process of combustion of inflammable materials
    Stars, hide your fires;
    Let not light see my black and deep desires:
    The eye wink at the hand; yet let that be,
    Which the eye fears, when it is done, to see.
  1495. means
    how a result is obtained or an end is achieved
    Thriftless ambition, that wilt ravin up
    Thine own life's means!
  1496. celebrate
    have a festivity
    Now o'er the one halfworld
    Nature seems dead, and wicked dreams abuse
    The curtain'd sleep; witchcraft celebrates
    Pale Hecate's offerings, and wither'd murder,
    Alarum'd by his sentinel, the wolf,
    Whose howl's his watch, thus with his stealthy pace.
  1497. smoked
    dried and cured by hanging in wood smoke
    The merciless Macdonwald--
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villanies of nature
    Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
    Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
    For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--
    Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like valour's minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave;
    Which...
  1498. cavern
    a large cave or a large chamber in a cave
    Exeunt


    ACT IV
    SCENE I. A cavern.
  1499. sure
    having or feeling no doubt or uncertainty
    Thou sure and firm-set earth,
    Hear not my steps, which way they walk, for fear
    Thy very stones prate of my whereabout,
    And take the present horror from the time,
    Which now suits with it.
  1500. care
    providing treatment for or attending to someone or something
    Let's after him,
    Whose care is gone before to bid us welcome:
    It is a peerless kinsman.
  1501. allegiance
    the act of binding yourself to a course of action
    BANQUO
    So I lose none
    In seeking to augment it, but still keep
    My bosom franchised and allegiance clear,
    I shall be counsell'd.
  1502. lavish
    very generous
    Curbing his lavish spirit: and, to conclude,
    The victory fell on us.
  1503. part
    one of the portions into which something is regarded as divided and which together constitute a whole
    Your highness' part
    Is to receive our duties; and our duties
    Are to your throne and state children and servants,
    Which do but what they should, by doing every thing
    Safe toward your love and honour.
  1504. about
    (of quantities) imprecise but fairly close to correct
    ALL
    The weird sisters, hand in hand,
    Posters of the sea and land,
    Thus do go about, about:
    Thrice to thine and thrice to mine
    And thrice again, to make up nine.
  1505. tear
    separate or cause to separate abruptly
    Besides, this Duncan
    Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been
    So clear in his great office, that his virtues
    Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against
    The deep damnation of his taking-off;
    And pity, like a naked new-born babe,
    Striding the blast, or heaven's cherubim, horsed
    Upon the sightless couriers of the air,
    Shall blow the horrid deed in every eye,
    That tears shall drown the wind.
  1506. wholesome
    characteristic of physical or moral well-being
    O nation miserable,
    With an untitled tyrant bloody-scepter'd,
    When shalt thou see thy wholesome days again,
    Since that the truest issue of thy throne
    By his own interdiction stands accursed,
    And does blaspheme his breed?
  1507. destruction
    an event that completely ruins something
    Exit

    LADY MACBETH
    Nought's had, all's spent,
    Where our desire is got without content:
    'Tis safer to be that which we destroy
    Than by destruction dwell in doubtful joy.
  1508. swell
    increase in size, magnitude, number, or intensity
    Sergeant
    As whence the sun 'gins his reflection
    Shipwrecking storms and direful thunders break,
    So from that spring whence comfort seem'd to come
    Discomfort swells.
  1509. authorized
    sanctioned by established authority
    O, these flaws and starts,
    Impostors to true fear, would well become
    A woman's story at a winter's fire,
    Authorized by her grandam.
  1510. get
    come into the possession of something concrete or abstract
    Go get him surgeons.
  1511. aught
    a quantity of no importance
    Live you? or are you aught
    That man may question?
  1512. drop
    let fall to the ground
    DUNCAN
    My plenteous joys,
    Wanton in fulness, seek to hide themselves
    In drops of sorrow.
  1513. fold
    bend or lay so that one part covers the other
    I'll see no more:
    And yet the eighth appears, who bears a glass
    Which shows me many more; and some I see
    That two- fold balls and treble scepters carry:
    Horrible sight!
  1514. yoke
    a wooden frame across the shoulders for carrying buckets
    I think our country sinks beneath the yoke;
    It weeps, it bleeds; and each new day a gash
    Is added to her wounds: I think withal
    There would be hands uplifted in my right;
    And here from gracious England have I offer
    Of goodly thousands: but, for all this,
    When I shall tread upon the tyrant's head,
    Or wear it on my sword, yet my poor country
    Shall have more vices than it had before,
    More suffer and more sundry ways than ever,
    By him that shall succeed.
  1515. holy
    belonging to or associated with a divine power
    Lord
    The son of Duncan,
    From whom this tyrant holds the due of birth
    Lives in the English court, and is received
    Of the most pious Edward with such grace
    That the malevolence of fortune nothing
    Takes from his high respect: thither Macduff
    Is gone to pray the holy king, upon his aid
    To wake Northumberland and warlike Siward:
    That, by the help of these--with Him above
    To ratify the work--we may again
    Give to our tables meat, sleep to our nights,
    Free from our feasts and ban...
  1516. suck
    draw into the mouth by creating a vacuum in the mouth
    I have given suck, and know
    How tender 'tis to love the babe that milks me:
    I would, while it was smiling in my face,
    Have pluck'd my nipple from his boneless gums,
    And dash'd the brains out, had I so sworn as you
    Have done to this.
  1517. valued
    having value of a specified kind
    MACBETH
    Ay, in the catalogue ye go for men;
    As hounds and greyhounds, mongrels, spaniels, curs,
    Shoughs, water-rugs and demi-wolves, are clept
    All by the name of dogs: the valued file
    Distinguishes the swift, the slow, the subtle,
    The housekeeper, the hunter, every one
    According to the gift which bounteous nature
    Hath in him closed; whereby he does receive
    Particular addition. from the bill
    That writes them all alike: and so of men.
  1518. bravely
    in a courageous manner
    Alarums

    Enter MALCOLM and SIWARD

    SIWARD
    This way, my lord; the castle's gently render'd:
    The tyrant's people on both sides do fight;
    The noble thanes do bravely in the war;
    The day almost itself professes yours,
    And little is to do.
  1519. annoyance
    the state of being irritated or bothered
    Look after her;
    Remove from her the means of all annoyance,
    And still keep eyes upon her.
  1520. court
    an assembly to conduct judicial business
    Enter LADY MACBETH and a Servant
    LADY MACBETH
    Is Banquo gone from court?
  1521. confine
    place limits on
    MACBETH
    Then comes my fit again: I had else been perfect,
    Whole as the marble, founded as the rock,
    As broad and general as the casing air:
    But now I am cabin'd, cribb'd, confined, bound in
    To saucy doubts and fears.
  1522. charged
    of a particle or body or system
    The heart is sorely charged.
  1523. suffer
    undergo or be subjected to
    BANQUO
    Look to the lady:

    LADY MACBETH is carried out

    And when we have our naked frailties hid,
    That suffer in exposure, let us meet,
    And question this most bloody piece of work,
    To know it further.
  1524. ride
    sit and travel on the back of animal, usually while controlling its motions
    We coursed him at the heels, and had a purpose
    To be his purveyor: but he rides well;
    And his great love, sharp as his spur, hath holp him
    To his home before us.
  1525. sooner
    comparatives of `soon' or `early'
    Mark, king of Scotland, mark:
    No sooner justice had with valour arm'd
    Compell'd these skipping kerns to trust their heels,
    But the Norweyan lord surveying vantage,
    With furbish'd arms and new supplies of men
    Began a fresh assault.
  1526. sovereign
    a nation's ruler usually by hereditary right
    He that's coming
    Must be provided for: and you shall put
    This night's great business into my dispatch;
    Which shall to all our nights and days to come
    Give solely sovereign sway and masterdom.
  1527. many
    amounting to a large but indefinite number
    Enter BANQUO
    BANQUO
    Thou hast it now: king, Cawdor, Glamis, all,
    As the weird women promised, and, I fear,
    Thou play'dst most foully for't: yet it was said
    It should not stand in thy posterity,
    But that myself should be the root and father
    Of many kings.
  1528. nay
    a negative
    Son
    Nay, how will you do for a husband?
  1529. blunt
    not sharp (used of a knife or other blade)
    MALCOLM
    Be this the whetstone of your sword: let grief
    Convert to anger; blunt not the heart, enrage it.
  1530. mere
    being nothing more than specified
    Re-enter MACBETH and LENNOX, with ROSS

    MACBETH
    Had I but died an hour before this chance,
    I had lived a blessed time; for, from this instant,
    There 's nothing serious in mortality:
    All is but toys: renown and grace is dead;
    The wine of life is drawn, and the mere lees
    Is left this vault to brag of.
  1531. certain
    established beyond doubt or question; definitely known
    ROSS
    And Duncan's horses--a thing most strange and certain--
    Beauteous and swift, the minions of their race,
    Turn'd wild in nature, broke their stalls, flung out,
    Contending 'gainst obedience, as they would make
    War with mankind.
  1532. dragon
    a mythological creature with a reptilian body and wings
    Third Witch
    Scale of dragon, tooth of wolf,
    Witches' mummy, maw and gulf
    Of the ravin'd salt-sea shark,
    Root of hemlock digg'd i' the dark,
    Liver of blaspheming Jew,
    Gall of goat, and slips of yew
    Silver'd in the moon's eclipse,
    Nose of Turk and Tartar's lips,
    Finger of birth-strangled babe
    Ditch-deliver'd by a drab,
    Make the gruel thick and slab:
    Add thereto a tiger's chaudron,
    For the ingredients of our cauldron.
  1533. self
    your consciousness of your own identity
    Norway himself,
    With terrible numbers,
    Assisted by that most disloyal traitor
    The thane of Cawdor, began a dismal conflict;
    Till that Bellona's bridegroom, lapp'd in proof,
    Confronted him with self-comparisons,
    Point against point rebellious, arm 'gainst arm.
  1534. lid
    a movable top or cover (hinged or separate) for closing the opening at the top of a box, chest, jar, pan, etc.
    I will drain him dry as hay:
    Sleep shall neither night nor day
    Hang upon his pent-house lid;
    He shall live a man forbid:
    Weary se'nnights nine times nine
    Shall he dwindle, peak and pine:
    Though his bark cannot be lost,
    Yet it shall be tempest-tost.
  1535. treatise
    a formal text that treats a particular topic systematically
    Exit

    MACBETH
    I have almost forgot the taste of fears;
    The time has been, my senses would have cool'd
    To hear a night-shriek; and my fell of hair
    Would at a dismal treatise rouse and stir
    As life were in't: I have supp'd full with horrors;
    Direness, familiar to my slaughterous thoughts
    Cannot once start me.
  1536. content
    satisfied or showing satisfaction with things as they are
    This diamond he greets your wife withal,
    By the name of most kind hostess; and shut up
    In measureless content.
  1537. dusty
    covered with a layer of fine powdery material
    To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow,
    Creeps in this petty pace from day to day
    To the last syllable of recorded time,
    And all our yesterdays have lighted fools
    The way to dusty death.
  1538. faced
    having a face or facing especially of a specified kind or number; often used in combination
    The merciless Macdonwald--
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villanies of nature
    Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
    Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
    For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--
    Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like valour's minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave;
    Which...
  1539. pretence
    the act of giving a false appearance
    Fears and scruples shake us:
    In the great hand of God I stand; and thence
    Against the undivulged pretence I fight
    Of treasonous malice.
  1540. go to
    be present at (meetings, church services, university), etc.
    Opens the gate

    Enter MACDUFF and LENNOX

    MACDUFF
    Was it so late, friend, ere you went to bed,
    That you do lie so late?
  1541. homage
    respectful deference
    Lord
    The son of Duncan,
    From whom this tyrant holds the due of birth
    Lives in the English court, and is received
    Of the most pious Edward with such grace
    That the malevolence of fortune nothing
    Takes from his high respect: thither Macduff
    Is gone to pray the holy king, upon his aid
    To wake Northumberland and warlike Siward:
    That, by the help of these--with Him above
    To ratify the work--we may again
    Give to our tables meat, sleep to our nights,
    Free from our feasts and banquets b...
  1542. painting
    creating a picture with paints
    Porter
    Marry, sir, nose- painting, sleep, and
    urine.
  1543. wisely
    in a wise manner
    Ay, and wisely too;
    For 'twould have anger'd any heart alive
    To hear the men deny't.
  1544. dainty
    something considered choice to eat