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preponderance

If there's a preponderance of something, there is A LOT of it. If you are a prosecutor, you are looking for a preponderance of evidence to convince the jury that the defendant is guilty.

The noun preponderance can also mean superiority in weight or significance. This meaning is particularly reflective of the word's Latin roots in the word praeponderare, which means "outweigh." The noun can also mean superiority in influence or importance. A country's economic preponderance, for example, might give it greater influence in international relations.

Choose your words

Caught between words? Learn how to make the right choice.

loath/ loathe

Confusion between loath ("unwilling or reluctant") and loathe ("to hate") is a growing trend.
read more...

faze/ phase

To faze is to disturb, bother, or embarrass, but a phase is a stage or step. It could faze your family if your princess phase lasts well into your college years.
read more...

prescribe/ proscribe

Warning! These similar sounding words have very different meanings. To prescribe is to recommend and to proscribe is to forbid. One little letter makes a big difference.
read more...

bridal/ bridle

Bridal is related to a bride, but bridle refers to a part of a horse’s harness and what you do with it. Although the words sound the same, they run in different circles unless you’re getting a horse ready for her wedding. read more...

amoral/ immoral

Both have to do with right and wrong, but amoral means having no sense of either, like a fish, but the evil immoral describes someone who knows the difference, doesn’t care, and says “mwah ha ha” while twirling a mustache. read more...

adopt/ adapt

"Adopt, adapt, and improve," says the thief in a Monty Python skit when he robs a lingerie shop instead of a bank. Adopt is to take something over, and to adapt is to change something to suit your needs. It’s helpful advice when you ask for money and get a pair of granny panties. read more...

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