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belabor

Belabor means to go at something with everything you've got. When you say, "Don't belabor or agonize over the decision," it means, "Move on."

Belabor is made up of the Latin roots be and labor meaning "to exert one's strength upon." You can belabor a point by using excessive detail, or you could belabor the obvious by stating over and over what everyone already knows. Belaboring can be a physical attack as well. A person can belabor or beat the living daylights out of you with a club.

Choose your words

Caught between words? Learn how to make the right choice.

paradox/ oxymoron

A paradox is a logical puzzle that seems to contradict itself. No it isn't. Actually, it is. An oxymoron is a figure of speech — words that seem to cancel each other out, like "working vacation" or "instant classic."
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breach/ breech

If you break a contract, it's a breach. If you're talking about pantaloons, guns, or feet-first babies, use breech with a double "e."
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connotation/ denotation

A connotation is the feeling a word invokes. But take note! A denotation is what the word literally says. If these words were on a trip, connotation would be the baggage, and denotation would be the traveler.
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eminent/ imminent/ immanent

No, it's not the name of the latest rapper from Detroit, but it could describe one — eminent describes anyone who's famous. Imminent refers to something about to happen. And anything immanent (with an "a" in there) is inherent, like that good attitude you were born with. read more...

gig/ jig

Gig with a hard "g" is a job. Jig, on the other hand, is a dance. The kind a band might do when they land a gig headlining Madison Square Garden. read more...

hale/ hail

Hale describes someone hearty and healthy. Rarr. All hail the next word! To hail is to greet enthusiastically. And when it hails, ice falls from the sky and hits those hale people on the head. read more...

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