pardon

If you belch, interrupt a conversation, or leave the table during dinner, you’re expected to say “Pardon me.” Once you’ve requested your companions’ pardon, or forgiveness, you can assume you have it; you don’t need to wait for their response.

The word pardon often occurs in the phrases “Pardon me” and “I beg your pardon.” (While “I beg your pardon” literally means “I request your forgiveness,” it’s used to indicate that the speaker did not hear what was just said.) Outside of these everyday phrases, pardon is typically used in formal or legal situations. If the president pardons a criminal, for example, the criminal is forgiven in the sense that he or she no longer has to serve the penalty for the crime.

Definitions of pardon
  1. verb
    accept an excuse for
    synonyms: excuse
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    type of:
    forgive
    stop blaming or grant forgiveness
  2. verb
    grant a pardon to
    “Ford pardoned Nixon”
    “The Thanksgiving turkey was pardoned by the President”
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    types:
    amnesty
    grant a pardon to (a group of people)
    type of:
    forgive
    stop blaming or grant forgiveness
  3. noun
    the act of excusing a mistake or offense
    synonyms: forgiveness
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    types:
    condonation
    a pardon by treating the offender as if the offense had not occurred
    exculpation
    the act of freeing from guilt or blame
    type of:
    benignity, kindness
    a kind act
  4. noun
    the formal act of liberating someone
    synonyms: amnesty, free pardon
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    type of:
    clemency, mercifulness, mercy
    leniency and compassion shown toward offenders by a person or agency charged with administering justice
  5. noun
    a warrant granting release from punishment for an offense
    synonyms: amnesty
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    type of:
    warrant
    a writ from a court commanding police to perform specified acts
Word Family