Julius Caesar, Act I Scene I

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  1. unfirm
    not firmly or solidly positioned
    CASCA:
    Are not you moved, when all the sway of earth
    Shakes like a thing unfirm?
  2. accoutre
    provide with military equipment
    Upon the word,(110)
    Accoutred as I was, I plunged in
    And bade him follow.
  3. unbrace
    remove a brace or braces from
    For my part, I have walk'd about the streets,
    Submitting me unto the perilous night,
    And thus unbraced, Casca, as you see,(55)
    Have bared my bosom to the thunder-stone;
    And when the cross blue lightning seem'd to open
    The breast of heaven, I did present myself
    Even in the aim and very flash of it.
  4. preform
    form or shape beforehand or determine the shape of beforehand
    But if you would consider the true cause
    Why all these fires, why all these gliding ghosts,
    Why birds and beasts from quality and kind,(70)
    Why old men fool, and children calculate,
    Why all these things change from their ordinance,
    Their natures and preformed faculties,
    To monstrous quality, why, you shall find
    That heaven hath infused them with these spirits(75)
    To make them instruments of fear and warning
    Scene III 22
    Unto some monstrous state.
  5. soothsayer
    someone who makes predictions of the future
    Enter Caesar; Antony for the course, Calpurnia, Portia, Decius, Cicero, Brutus, Cassius, Casca; a
    Soothsayer; after them Marullus and Flavius.
  6. ides
    in the Roman calendar: the 15th of March or May or July or October or the 13th of any other month
    SOOTHSAYER:
    Beware the ides of March.
  7. unbraced
    without braces or props
    For my part, I have walk'd about the streets,
    Submitting me unto the perilous night,
    And thus unbraced, Casca, as you see,(55)
    Have bared my bosom to the thunder-stone;
    And when the cross blue lightning seem'd to open
    The breast of heaven, I did present myself
    Even in the aim and very flash of it.
  8. worthiness
    the quality or state of having merit or value
    CASSIUS:
    'Tis just,
    And it is very much lamented, Brutus,(60)
    Scene II 12
    That you have no such mirrors as will turn
    Your hidden worthiness into your eye
    That you might see your shadow.
  9. fearfulness
    an emotion experienced in anticipation of some specific pain or danger (usually accompanied by a desire to flee or fight)
    These growing feathers pluck'd from Caesar's wing
    Will make him fly an ordinary pitch,(75)
    Who else would soar above the view of men
    And keep us all in servile fearfulness.
  10. fleer
    someone who flees from an uncongenial situation
    CASCA:
    You speak to Casca, and to such a man
    That is no fleering tell-tale.
  11. replication
    the act of making copies
    And when you saw his chariot but appear,(45)
    Have you not made an universal shout,
    That Tiber trembled underneath her banks
    To hear the replication of your sounds
    Made in her concave shores?
  12. awl
    a pointed tool for marking surfaces or for punching holes
    COBBLER:
    Truly, Sir, all that I live by is with the awl; I meddle
    with no tradesman's matters, nor women's matters, but with
    awl.
  13. disrobe
    get undressed
    Go you down that way towards the Capitol;(65)
    This way will I. Disrobe the images,
    If you do find them deck'd with ceremonies.
  14. guiltiness
    the state of having committed an offense
    See, whether their basest metal be not moved;
    They vanish tongue-tied in their guiltiness.
  15. foolery
    foolish or senseless behavior
    It was(240)
    mere foolery; I did not mark it.
  16. construe
    make sense of; assign a meaning to
    Vexed I am
    Of late with passions of some difference,(45)
    Conceptions only proper to myself,
    Which give some soil perhaps to my behaviors;
    But let not therefore my good friends be grieved—
    Among which number, Cassius, be you one—
    Nor construe any further my neglect(50)
    Than that poor Brutus with himself at war
    Forgets the shows of love to other men.
  17. airless
    lacking fresh air
    Nor stony tower, nor walls of beaten brass,
    Nor airless dungeon, nor strong links of iron,(100)
    Can be retentive to the strength of spirit;
    But life, being weary of these worldly bars,
    Never lacks power to dismiss itself.
  18. mender
    a skilled worker who mends or repairs things
    COBBLER:
    A trade, sir, that, I hope, I may use with a safe conscience,
    which is indeed, sir, a mender of bad soles.
  19. scene
    the place where some action occurs
    Scene I 9
    Exeunt all the Commoners.
  20. intermit
    cease an action temporarily
    Run to your houses, fall upon your knees,(55)
    Pray to the gods to intermit the plague
    That needs must light on this ingratitude.
  21. conjointly
    in conjunction with; combined
    When these prodigies
    Do so conjointly meet, let not men say(30)
    “These are their reasons; they are natural,”
    For, I believe, they are portentous things
    Unto the climate that they point upon.
  22. accoutred
    provided with necessary articles of equipment for a specialized purpose (especially military)
    Upon the word,(110)
    Accoutred as I was, I plunged in
    And bade him follow.
  23. tongue-tied
    unable to express yourself clearly or fluently
    See, whether their basest metal be not moved;
    They vanish tongue-tied in their guiltiness.
  24. womanish
    having characteristics associated with women and considered undesirable in men
    Our fathers' minds are dead,
    And we are govern'd with our mothers' spirits;
    Our yoke and sufferance show us womanish.(90)
  25. retentive
    having the capacity to hold something
    Nor stony tower, nor walls of beaten brass,
    Nor airless dungeon, nor strong links of iron,(100)
    Can be retentive to the strength of spirit;
    But life, being weary of these worldly bars,
    Never lacks power to dismiss itself.
  26. offal
    viscera and trimmings of a butchered animal
    What trash is Rome,(115)
    What rubbish and what offal, when it serves
    For the base matter to illuminate
    So vile a thing as Caesar?
  27. cogitation
    attentive consideration and thought
    CASSIUS:
    Then, Brutus, I have much mistook your passion,
    By means whereof this breast of mine hath buried
    Thoughts of great value, worthy cogitations.(55)
  28. beware
    be on one's guard; be cautious or wary about; be alert to
    SOOTHSAYER:
    Beware the ides of March.
  29. sufferance
    patient endurance especially of pain or distress
    Our fathers' minds are dead,
    And we are govern'd with our mothers' spirits;
    Our yoke and sufferance show us womanish.(90)
  30. bestride
    get up on the back of
    CASSIUS:
    Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world
    Like a Colossus, and we petty men
    Scene II 14
    Walk under his huge legs and peep about
    To find ourselves dishonorable graves.
  31. gusty
    blowing in puffs or short intermittent blasts
    For once, upon a raw and gusty day,
    The troubled Tiber chafing with her shores,
    Caesar said to me, “Darest thou, Cassius, now
    Leap in with me into this angry flood
    And swim to yonder point?”
  32. crown
    an ornamental jeweled headdress signifying sovereignty
    CASCA:
    Why, there was a crown offered him, and being offered
    him: he put it by with the back of his hand, thus, and then
    the people fell a-shouting.
  33. obscurely
    in an obscure manner
    I will this night,
    In several hands, in at his windows throw,
    As if they came from several citizens,(320)
    Writings, all tending to the great opinion
    That Rome holds of his name, wherein obscurely
    Caesar's ambition shall be glanced at.
  34. underling
    an assistant subject to the authority or control of another
    Men at some time are masters of their fates:(145)
    The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars,
    But in ourselves, that we are underlings.
  35. alchemy
    a pseudoscientific forerunner of chemistry in medieval times
    CASCA:
    O, he sits high in all the people's hearts,
    And that which would appear offense in us,
    His countenance, like richest alchemy,
    Will change to virtue and to worthiness.
  36. factious
    dissenting with the majority opinion
    Be factious for redress of all these griefs,(125)
    And I will set this foot of mine as far
    As who goes farthest.
  37. noble
    of or belonging to hereditary aristocracy
    I have heard
    Where many of the best respect in Rome,
    Except immortal Caesar, speaking of Brutus,(65)
    And groaning underneath this age's yoke,
    Have wish'd that noble Brutus had his eyes.
  38. knotty
    tangled in snarls
    O Cicero,
    Scene III 20
    I have seen tempests, when the scolding winds(5)
    Have rived the knotty oaks, and I have seen
    The ambitious ocean swell and rage and foam,
    To be exalted with the threatening clouds,
    But never till tonight, never till now,
    Did I go through a tempest dropping fire.(10)
  39. luster
    the property of something that shines with reflected light
    'Tis true, this god did shake;
    His coward lips did from their color fly,
    And that same eye whose bend doth awe the world
    Did lose his luster.
  40. concave
    curving inward
    And when you saw his chariot but appear,(45)
    Have you not made an universal shout,
    That Tiber trembled underneath her banks
    To hear the replication of your sounds
    Made in her concave shores?
  41. infuse
    fill, as with a certain quality
    But if you would consider the true cause
    Why all these fires, why all these gliding ghosts,
    Why birds and beasts from quality and kind,(70)
    Why old men fool, and children calculate,
    Why all these things change from their ordinance,
    Their natures and preformed faculties,
    To monstrous quality, why, you shall find
    That heaven hath infused them with these spirits(75)
    To make them instruments of fear and warning
    Scene III 22
    Unto some monstrous state.
  42. dishonorable
    lacking integrity; not deserving of respect
    CASSIUS:
    Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world
    Like a Colossus, and we petty men
    Scene II 14
    Walk under his huge legs and peep about
    To find ourselves dishonorable graves.
  43. knave
    a deceitful and unreliable scoundrel
    MARULLUS:
    What trade, thou knave?
  44. Writings
    the third of three divisions of the Hebrew Scriptures
    I will this night,
    In several hands, in at his windows throw,
    As if they came from several citizens,(320)
    Writings, all tending to the great opinion
    That Rome holds of his name, wherein obscurely
    Caesar's ambition shall be glanced at.
  45. colossus
    someone or something that is abnormally large and powerful
    CASSIUS:
    Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world
    Like a Colossus, and we petty men
    Scene II 14
    Walk under his huge legs and peep about
    To find ourselves dishonorable graves.
  46. man
    an adult person who is male (as opposed to a woman)
    As proper men as ever
    trod upon neats-leather have gone upon my handiwork.
  47. fear
    an emotion in anticipation of some specific pain or danger
    I do fear the people
    Choose Caesar for their king.(85)
  48. incorporate
    make into a whole or make part of a whole
    CASSIUS:
    No, it is Casca, one incorporate
    To our attempts.
  49. seduce
    lure or entice away from duty, principles, or proper conduct
    Well, Brutus, thou art noble; yet, I see
    Thy honorable metal may be wrought
    From that it is disposed; therefore it is meet
    That noble minds keep ever with their likes;
    For who so firm that cannot be seduced?(315)
  50. mettle
    the courage to carry on
    He was quick mettle when he went to school.
  51. displease
    give displeasure to
    If the tag-rag people did not clap him
    and hiss him according as he pleased and displeased them,
    as they use to do the players in the theatre, I am no true
    man.(265)
  52. amaze
    affect with wonder
    It doth amaze me
    A man of such a feeble temper should(135)
    So get the start of the majestic world
    And bear the palm alone.
  53. bid
    propose a payment
    CASCA:
    Bid every noise be still.
  54. chafing
    soreness or irritation of the skin caused by friction
    For once, upon a raw and gusty day,
    The troubled Tiber chafing with her shores,
    Caesar said to me, “Darest thou, Cassius, now
    Leap in with me into this angry flood
    And swim to yonder point?”
  55. illuminate
    make lighter or brighter
    What trash is Rome,(115)
    What rubbish and what offal, when it serves
    For the base matter to illuminate
    So vile a thing as Caesar?
  56. shamed
    showing a sense of guilt
    Age, thou art shamed!
  57. cull
    remove something that has been rejected
    And do you now cull out a holiday?
  58. rive
    tear or be torn violently
    O Cicero,
    Scene III 20
    I have seen tempests, when the scolding winds(5)
    Have rived the knotty oaks, and I have seen
    The ambitious ocean swell and rage and foam,
    To be exalted with the threatening clouds,
    But never till tonight, never till now,
    Did I go through a tempest dropping fire.(10)
  59. dispose
    give, sell, or transfer to another
    Well, Brutus, thou art noble; yet, I see
    Thy honorable metal may be wrought
    From that it is disposed; therefore it is meet
    That noble minds keep ever with their likes;
    For who so firm that cannot be seduced?(315)
  60. thunder
    a booming or crashing noise along the path of lightning
    Thunder and lightning.
  61. portentous
    of momentous or ominous significance
    When these prodigies
    Do so conjointly meet, let not men say(30)
    “These are their reasons; they are natural,”
    For, I believe, they are portentous things
    Unto the climate that they point upon.
  62. tardy
    after the expected or usual time
    Scene II 19
    CASSIUS:
    So is he now in execution(300)
    Of any bold or noble enterprise,
    However he puts on this tardy form.
  63. ferret
    a small domesticated mammal with a flexible, elongated body
    But, look you, Cassius,
    The angry spot doth glow on Caesar's brow,
    And all the rest look like a chidden train:(190)
    Calpurnia's cheek is pale, and Cicero
    Looks with such ferret and such fiery eyes
    As we have seen him in the Capitol,
    Being cross'd in conference by some senators.
  64. bared
    having the head uncovered
    For my part, I have walk'd about the streets,
    Submitting me unto the perilous night,
    And thus unbraced, Casca, as you see,(55)
    Have bared my bosom to the thunder-stone;
    And when the cross blue lightning seem'd to open
    The breast of heaven, I did present myself
    Even in the aim and very flash of it.
  65. dangerous
    involving or causing risk; liable to hurt or harm
    And be not jealous on me, gentle Brutus;
    Were I a common laugher, or did use
    To stale with ordinary oaths my love
    To every new protester, if you know
    That I do fawn on men and hug them hard(80)
    And after scandal them, or if you know
    That I profess myself in banqueting
    To all the rout, then hold me dangerous.
  66. underneath
    on the lower or downward side; on the underside of
    And when you saw his chariot but appear,(45)
    Have you not made an universal shout,
    That Tiber trembled underneath her banks
    To hear the replication of your sounds
    Made in her concave shores?
  67. praetor
    an annually elected magistrate of the ancient Roman Republic
    Good Cinna, take this paper,
    And look you lay it in the praetor's chair,
    Where Brutus may but find it; and throw this
    In at his window; set this up with wax
    Upon old Brutus' statue.
  68. yoke
    a wooden frame across the shoulders for carrying buckets
    I have heard
    Where many of the best respect in Rome,
    Except immortal Caesar, speaking of Brutus,(65)
    And groaning underneath this age's yoke,
    Have wish'd that noble Brutus had his eyes.
  69. protester
    someone who participates in a public display of group feeling
    And be not jealous on me, gentle Brutus;
    Were I a common laugher, or did use
    To stale with ordinary oaths my love
    To every new protester, if you know
    That I do fawn on men and hug them hard(80)
    And after scandal them, or if you know
    That I profess myself in banqueting
    To all the rout, then hold me dangerous.
  70. saucy
    improperly forward or bold
    Either there is a civil strife in heaven,
    Or else the world too saucy with the gods
    Incenses them to send destruction.
  71. fearful
    experiencing or showing fear
    Now could I, Casca, name to thee a man
    Most like this dreadful night,
    That thunders, lightens, opens graves, and roars(80)
    As doth the lion in the Capitol,
    A man no mightier than thyself or me
    In personal action, yet prodigious grown
    And fearful, as these strange eruptions are.
  72. glazed
    having a shiny surface or coating
    Besides—I ha' not since put up my sword—
    Against the Capitol I met a lion,(20)
    Who glazed upon me and went surly by
    Without annoying me: and there were drawn
    Upon a heap a hundred ghastly women
    Transformed with their fear, who swore they saw
    Men all in fire walk up and down the streets.(25)
  73. commoner
    a person who holds no title
    Scene I 9
    Exeunt all the Commoners.
  74. loath
    strongly opposed
    But, to my(245)
    thinking, he was very loath to lay his fingers off it.
  75. sinew
    a band of tissue connecting a muscle to its bony attachment
    The torrent roar'd, and we did buffet it
    With lusty sinews, throwing it aside
    And stemming it with hearts of controversy.(115)
  76. heavens
    the apparent surface of the imaginary sphere on which celestial bodies appear to be projected
    CASCA:
    Who ever knew the heavens menace so?
  77. conjure
    summon into action or bring into existence
    Write them together, yours is as fair a name;(150)
    Sound them, it doth become the mouth as well;
    Weigh them, it is as heavy; conjure with 'em,
    Brutus will start a spirit as soon as Caesar.
  78. battlement
    a notched wall around the top of a castle for protection
    Many a time and oft
    Have you climb'd up to walls and battlements,(40)
    To towers and windows, yea, to chimney tops,
    Your infants in your arms, and there have sat
    The live-long day with patient expectation
    To see great Pompey pass the streets of Rome.
  79. monstrous
    distorted and unnatural in shape or size
    But if you would consider the true cause
    Why all these fires, why all these gliding ghosts,
    Why birds and beasts from quality and kind,(70)
    Why old men fool, and children calculate,
    Why all these things change from their ordinance,
    Their natures and preformed faculties,
    To monstrous quality, why, you shall find
    That heaven hath infused them with these spirits(75)
    To make them instruments of fear and warning
    Scene III 22
    Unto some monstrous state.
  80. conceited
    having an exaggerated sense of self-importance
    CASSIUS:
    Him and his worth and our great need of him(170)
    You have right well conceited.
  81. haste
    overly eager speed and possible carelessness
    Scene III 23
    Those that with haste will make a mighty fire
    Begin it with weak straws.
  82. rudeness
    a manner that is rude and insulting
    This rudeness is a sauce to his good wit,
    Which gives men stomach to digest his words
    With better appetite.(305)
  83. heaven
    any place of complete bliss and delight and peace
    Either there is a civil strife in heaven,
    Or else the world too saucy with the gods
    Incenses them to send destruction.
  84. mend
    restore by putting together what is torn or broken
    COBBLER:
    Nay, I beseech you, sir, be not out with me; yet, if you
    be out, sir, I can mend you.
  85. tremble
    move quickly and involuntarily up and down or sideways
    And when you saw his chariot but appear,(45)
    Have you not made an universal shout,
    That Tiber trembled underneath her banks
    To hear the replication of your sounds
    Made in her concave shores?
  86. rejoice
    feel happiness
    But indeed, sir, we make holiday, to see Caesar
    and to rejoice in his triumph.
  87. scolding
    rebuking a person harshly
    O Cicero,
    Scene III 20
    I have seen tempests, when the scolding winds(5)
    Have rived the knotty oaks, and I have seen
    The ambitious ocean swell and rage and foam,
    To be exalted with the threatening clouds,
    But never till tonight, never till now,
    Did I go through a tempest dropping fire.(10)
  88. sterile
    incapable of reproducing
    Scene II 10
    CAESAR:
    Forget not, in your speed, Antonio,
    To touch Calpurnia, for our elders say,
    The barren, touched in this holy chase,(10)
    Shake off their sterile curse.
  89. tempest
    a violent commotion or disturbance
    O Cicero,
    Scene III 20
    I have seen tempests, when the scolding winds(5)
    Have rived the knotty oaks, and I have seen
    The ambitious ocean swell and rage and foam,
    To be exalted with the threatening clouds,
    But never till tonight, never till now,
    Did I go through a tempest dropping fire.(10)
  90. surly
    unfriendly and inclined toward anger or irritation
    Besides—I ha' not since put up my sword—
    Against the Capitol I met a lion,(20)
    Who glazed upon me and went surly by
    Without annoying me: and there were drawn
    Upon a heap a hundred ghastly women
    Transformed with their fear, who swore they saw
    Men all in fire walk up and down the streets.(25)
  91. truly
    in accordance with fact or reality
    COBBLER:
    Truly, sir, in respect of a fine workman, I am but, as(10)
    you would say, a cobbler.
  92. exalted
    of high moral or intellectual value
    FLAVIUS:
    Go, go, good countrymen, and, for this fault,
    Assemble all the poor men of your sort,
    Draw them to Tiber banks, and weep your tears(60)
    Into the channel, till the lowest stream
    Do kiss the most exalted shores of all.
  93. awe
    an overwhelming feeling of wonder or admiration
    I cannot tell what you and other men
    Think of this life, but, for my single self,(100)
    I had as lief not be as live to be
    In awe of such a thing as I myself.
  94. trade
    the commercial exchange of goods and services
    Speak, what trade art thou?(5)
  95. hearts
    a form of whist in which players avoid winning tricks containing hearts or the queen of spades
    O you hard hearts, you cruel men of Rome,
    Knew you not Pompey?
  96. lusty
    vigorously passionate
    The torrent roar'd, and we did buffet it
    With lusty sinews, throwing it aside
    And stemming it with hearts of controversy.(115)
  97. foam
    a mass of small bubbles formed in or on a liquid
    CASCA:
    He fell down in the market-place and foamed at mouth
    and was speechless.
  98. servile
    submissive or fawning in attitude or behavior
    These growing feathers pluck'd from Caesar's wing
    Will make him fly an ordinary pitch,(75)
    Who else would soar above the view of men
    And keep us all in servile fearfulness.
  99. shrieking
    sharp piercing cry
    And yesterday the bird of night did sit
    Even at noon-day upon the market-place,
    Howling and shrieking.
  100. pluck
    pull lightly but sharply
    Scene II 15
    CASSIUS:
    As they pass by, pluck Casca by the sleeve,(185)
    And he will, after his sour fashion, tell you
    What hath proceeded worthy note today.
  101. meddle
    intrude in other people's affairs or business
    COBBLER:
    Truly, Sir, all that I live by is with the awl; I meddle
    with no tradesman's matters, nor women's matters, but with
    awl.
  102. chide
    scold or reprimand severely or angrily
    But, look you, Cassius,
    The angry spot doth glow on Caesar's brow,
    And all the rest look like a chidden train:(190)
    Calpurnia's cheek is pale, and Cicero
    Looks with such ferret and such fiery eyes
    As we have seen him in the Capitol,
    Being cross'd in conference by some senators.
  103. wench
    a young woman
    Three or four wenches, where I stood cried, “Alas, good(275)
    soul!” and forgave him with all their hearts.
  104. prodigy
    an unusually gifted or intelligent person
    When these prodigies
    Do so conjointly meet, let not men say(30)
    “These are their reasons; they are natural,”
    For, I believe, they are portentous things
    Unto the climate that they point upon.
  105. tyrant
    a cruel and oppressive dictator
    Therein, ye gods, you make the weak most strong;
    Therein, ye gods, you tyrants do defeat.
  106. porch
    a structure attached to the exterior of a building often forming a covered entrance
    Now know you, Casca, I have moved already
    Some certain of the noblest-minded Romans(130)
    To undergo with me an enterprise
    Of honorable-dangerous consequence;
    And I do know, by this they stay for me
    In Pompey's Porch.
  107. fiery
    like or suggestive of a flame
    But, look you, Cassius,
    The angry spot doth glow on Caesar's brow,
    And all the rest look like a chidden train:(190)
    Calpurnia's cheek is pale, and Cicero
    Looks with such ferret and such fiery eyes
    As we have seen him in the Capitol,
    Being cross'd in conference by some senators.
  108. dreamer
    someone who is dreaming
    CAESAR:
    He is a dreamer; let us leave him.
  109. buffet
    piece of furniture that stands at the side of a dining room
    The torrent roar'd, and we did buffet it
    With lusty sinews, throwing it aside
    And stemming it with hearts of controversy.(115)
  110. repute
    the state of being held in high esteem and honor
    Till then, my noble friend, chew upon this:
    Brutus had rather be a villager
    Than to repute himself a son of Rome
    Under these hard conditions as this time(180)
    Is like to lay upon us.
  111. eruption
    the sudden occurrence of a violent discharge
    Now could I, Casca, name to thee a man
    Most like this dreadful night,
    That thunders, lightens, opens graves, and roars(80)
    As doth the lion in the Capitol,
    A man no mightier than thyself or me
    In personal action, yet prodigious grown
    And fearful, as these strange eruptions are.
  112. honorable
    deserving of esteem and respect
    Well, Brutus, thou art noble; yet, I see
    Thy honorable metal may be wrought
    From that it is disposed; therefore it is meet
    That noble minds keep ever with their likes;
    For who so firm that cannot be seduced?(315)
  113. laboring
    doing arduous or unpleasant work
    What, know you not,
    Being mechanical, you ought not walk
    Upon a laboring day without the sign
    Of your profession?
  114. ingratitude
    a lack of gratitude
    Run to your houses, fall upon your knees,(55)
    Pray to the gods to intermit the plague
    That needs must light on this ingratitude.
  115. indifferently
    with indifference; in an indifferent manner
    If it be aught toward the general good,
    Set honor in one eye and death i' the other
    And I will look on both indifferently.
  116. annoying
    causing irritation
    Besides—I ha' not since put up my sword—
    Against the Capitol I met a lion,(20)
    Who glazed upon me and went surly by
    Without annoying me: and there were drawn
    Upon a heap a hundred ghastly women
    Transformed with their fear, who swore they saw
    Men all in fire walk up and down the streets.(25)
  117. annoy
    disturb, especially by minor irritations
    Besides—I ha' not since put up my sword—
    Against the Capitol I met a lion,(20)
    Who glazed upon me and went surly by
    Without annoying me: and there were drawn
    Upon a heap a hundred ghastly women
    Transformed with their fear, who swore they saw
    Men all in fire walk up and down the streets.(25)
  118. exalt
    praise, glorify, or honor
    FLAVIUS:
    Go, go, good countrymen, and, for this fault,
    Assemble all the poor men of your sort,
    Draw them to Tiber banks, and weep your tears(60)
    Into the channel, till the lowest stream
    Do kiss the most exalted shores of all.
  119. refuse
    show unwillingness towards
    And then
    he offered it the third time; he put it the third time by; and
    still as he refused it, the rabblement hooted and clapped
    their chopped hands and threw up their sweaty nightcaps
    and uttered such a deal of stinking breath because Caesar(250)
    refused the crown, that it had almost choked Caesar, for he
    swounded and fell down at it.
  120. amiss
    in an improper or mistaken manner
    When he came to himself
    again, he said, if he had done or said any thing amiss,
    he desired their worships to think it was his infirmity.
  121. calculate
    make a mathematical computation
    But if you would consider the true cause
    Why all these fires, why all these gliding ghosts,
    Why birds and beasts from quality and kind,(70)
    Why old men fool, and children calculate,
    Why all these things change from their ordinance,
    Their natures and preformed faculties,
    To monstrous quality, why, you shall find
    That heaven hath infused them with these spirits(75)
    To make them instruments of fear and warning
    Scene III 22
    Unto some monstrous state.
  122. speechless
    temporarily incapable of speaking
    CASCA:
    He fell down in the market-place and foamed at mouth
    and was speechless.
  123. tributary
    a branch that flows into the main stream
    What tributaries follow him to Rome,(35)
    To grace in captive bonds his chariot-wheels?
  124. sleek
    having a smooth, gleaming surface reflecting light
    CAESAR:
    Let me have men about me that are fat,
    Sleek-headed men, and such as sleep o' nights:
    Yond Cassius has a lean and hungry look;(200)
    He thinks too much; such men are dangerous.
  125. jealous
    suspicious or fearful of being displaced by a rival
    And be not jealous on me, gentle Brutus;
    Were I a common laugher, or did use
    To stale with ordinary oaths my love
    To every new protester, if you know
    That I do fawn on men and hug them hard(80)
    And after scandal them, or if you know
    That I profess myself in banqueting
    To all the rout, then hold me dangerous.
  126. chafe
    become or make sore by or as if by rubbing
    For once, upon a raw and gusty day,
    The troubled Tiber chafing with her shores,
    Caesar said to me, “Darest thou, Cassius, now
    Leap in with me into this angry flood
    And swim to yonder point?”
  127. farthest
    most remote in space or time or order
    Be factious for redress of all these griefs,(125)
    And I will set this foot of mine as far
    As who goes farthest.
  128. gliding
    the activity of flying a glider
    But if you would consider the true cause
    Why all these fires, why all these gliding ghosts,
    Why birds and beasts from quality and kind,(70)
    Why old men fool, and children calculate,
    Why all these things change from their ordinance,
    Their natures and preformed faculties,
    To monstrous quality, why, you shall find
    That heaven hath infused them with these spirits(75)
    To make them instruments of fear and warning
    Scene III 22
    Unto some monstrous state.
  129. speak
    use language
    Speak, what trade art thou?(5)
  130. incense
    make furious
    Either there is a civil strife in heaven,
    Or else the world too saucy with the gods
    Incenses them to send destruction.
  131. naughty
    badly behaved
    Thou naughty knave, what(15)
    trade?
  132. infirmity
    the state of being weak in health or body
    When he came to himself
    again, he said, if he had done or said any thing amiss,
    he desired their worships to think it was his infirmity.
  133. redress
    make reparations or amends for
    Be factious for redress of all these griefs,(125)
    And I will set this foot of mine as far
    As who goes farthest.
  134. lamented
    mourned or grieved for
    CASSIUS:
    'Tis just,
    And it is very much lamented, Brutus,(60)
    Scene II 12
    That you have no such mirrors as will turn
    Your hidden worthiness into your eye
    That you might see your shadow.
  135. flourish
    grow vigorously
    Flourish, and shout.
  136. ancestor
    someone from whom you are descended
    I, as Aeneas our great ancestor
    Did from the flames of Troy upon his shoulder
    The old Anchises bear, so from the waves of Tiber(120)
    Did I the tired Caesar.
  137. strange
    unusual or out of the ordinary
    CASSIUS:
    Brutus, I do observe you now of late;
    I have not from your eyes that gentleness
    And show of love as I was wont to have;
    You bear too stubborn and too strange a hand
    Over your friend that loves you.(40)
  138. honor
    a tangible symbol signifying approval or distinction
    If it be aught toward the general good,
    Set honor in one eye and death i' the other
    And I will look on both indifferently.
  139. fawn
    a young deer
    And be not jealous on me, gentle Brutus;
    Were I a common laugher, or did use
    To stale with ordinary oaths my love
    To every new protester, if you know
    That I do fawn on men and hug them hard(80)
    And after scandal them, or if you know
    That I profess myself in banqueting
    To all the rout, then hold me dangerous.
  140. endure
    undergo or be subjected to
    I was born free as Caesar, so were you;
    We both have fed as well, and we can both
    Endure the winter's cold as well as he.(105)
  141. senseless
    not marked by the use of reason
    You blocks, you stones, you worse than senseless things!
  142. displeased
    not pleased; experiencing or manifesting displeasure
    If the tag-rag people did not clap him
    and hiss him according as he pleased and displeased them,
    as they use to do the players in the theatre, I am no true
    man.(265)
  143. love
    a strong positive emotion of regard and affection
    CASSIUS:
    Brutus, I do observe you now of late;
    I have not from your eyes that gentleness
    And show of love as I was wont to have;
    You bear too stubborn and too strange a hand
    Over your friend that loves you.(40)
  144. pray
    address a deity, a prophet, a saint or an object of worship
    Run to your houses, fall upon your knees,(55)
    Pray to the gods to intermit the plague
    That needs must light on this ingratitude.
  145. rubbish
    worthless material that is to be disposed of
    What trash is Rome,(115)
    What rubbish and what offal, when it serves
    For the base matter to illuminate
    So vile a thing as Caesar?
  146. fault
    an imperfection in an object or machine
    FLAVIUS:
    Go, go, good countrymen, and, for this fault,
    Assemble all the poor men of your sort,
    Draw them to Tiber banks, and weep your tears(60)
    Into the channel, till the lowest stream
    Do kiss the most exalted shores of all.
  147. gentleness
    the quality of being mild and even-tempered
    CASSIUS:
    Brutus, I do observe you now of late;
    I have not from your eyes that gentleness
    And show of love as I was wont to have;
    You bear too stubborn and too strange a hand
    Over your friend that loves you.(40)
  148. groan
    an utterance expressing pain or disapproval
    I have heard
    Where many of the best respect in Rome,
    Except immortal Caesar, speaking of Brutus,(65)
    And groaning underneath this age's yoke,
    Have wish'd that noble Brutus had his eyes.
  149. perceive
    become aware of through the senses
    I'll about,
    And drive away the vulgar from the streets;
    So do you too, where you perceive them thick.
  150. bondage
    the state of being under the control of another person
    CASSIUS:
    I know where I will wear this dagger then:(95)
    Cassius from bondage will deliver Cassius.
  151. tag
    a small piece of cloth or paper
    If the tag-rag people did not clap him
    and hiss him according as he pleased and displeased them,
    as they use to do the players in the theatre, I am no true
    man.(265)
  152. honest
    marked by truth
    CASCA:
    Ay, marry, wast, and he put it by thrice, every time gentler
    than other, and at every putting by mine honest neighbors(235)
    shouted.
  153. attire
    clothing of a distinctive style or for a particular occasion
    And do you now put on your best attire?(50)
  154. lighten
    make lighter or brighter
    Now could I, Casca, name to thee a man
    Most like this dreadful night,
    That thunders, lightens, opens graves, and roars(80)
    As doth the lion in the Capitol,
    A man no mightier than thyself or me
    In personal action, yet prodigious grown
    And fearful, as these strange eruptions are.
  155. assemble
    create by putting components or members together
    FLAVIUS:
    Go, go, good countrymen, and, for this fault,
    Assemble all the poor men of your sort,
    Draw them to Tiber banks, and weep your tears(60)
    Into the channel, till the lowest stream
    Do kiss the most exalted shores of all.
  156. apparel
    clothing in general
    What dost thou with thy best apparel on?
  157. grown
    (of animals) fully developed
    Now, in the names of all the gods at once,
    Upon what meat doth this our Caesar feed(155)
    That he is grown so great?
  158. captivity
    the state of being imprisoned
    CASCA:
    So can I.
    So every bondman in his own hand bears
    The power to cancel his captivity.
  159. grieve
    feel intense sorrow, especially due to a loss
    Vexed I am
    Of late with passions of some difference,(45)
    Conceptions only proper to myself,
    Which give some soil perhaps to my behaviors;
    But let not therefore my good friends be grieved
    Among which number, Cassius, be you one—
    Nor construe any further my neglect(50)
    Than that poor Brutus with himself at war
    Forgets the shows of love to other men.
  160. digest
    convert food into absorbable substances
    This rudeness is a sauce to his good wit,
    Which gives men stomach to digest his words
    With better appetite.(305)
  161. recount
    narrate or give a detailed account of
    How I have thought of this and of these times,(170)
    I shall recount hereafter; for this present,
    I would not, so with love I might entreat you,
    Be any further moved.
  162. speed
    a rate at which something happens
    Scene II 10
    CAESAR:
    Forget not, in your speed, Antonio,
    To touch Calpurnia, for our elders say,
    The barren, touched in this holy chase,(10)
    Shake off their sterile curse.
  163. disposed
    (usually followed by `to') naturally disposed toward
    Well, Brutus, thou art noble; yet, I see
    Thy honorable metal may be wrought
    From that it is disposed; therefore it is meet
    That noble minds keep ever with their likes;
    For who so firm that cannot be seduced?(315)
  164. prodigious
    great in size, force, extent, or degree
    Now could I, Casca, name to thee a man
    Most like this dreadful night,
    That thunders, lightens, opens graves, and roars(80)
    As doth the lion in the Capitol,
    A man no mightier than thyself or me
    In personal action, yet prodigious grown
    And fearful, as these strange eruptions are.
  165. dreadful
    exceptionally bad or displeasing
    It is the part of men to fear and tremble
    When the most mighty gods by tokens send
    Such dreadful heralds to astonish us.
  166. majestic
    having or displaying great dignity or nobility
    It doth amaze me
    A man of such a feeble temper should(135)
    So get the start of the majestic world
    And bear the palm alone.
  167. stubborn
    tenaciously unwilling to yield
    CASSIUS:
    Brutus, I do observe you now of late;
    I have not from your eyes that gentleness
    And show of love as I was wont to have;
    You bear too stubborn and too strange a hand
    Over your friend that loves you.(40)
  168. repair
    fix by putting together what is torn or broken
    All this done,(155)
    Repair to Pompey's porch, where you shall find us.
  169. ghastly
    shockingly repellent; inspiring horror
    Besides—I ha' not since put up my sword—
    Against the Capitol I met a lion,(20)
    Who glazed upon me and went surly by
    Without annoying me: and there were drawn
    Upon a heap a hundred ghastly women
    Transformed with their fear, who swore they saw
    Men all in fire walk up and down the streets.(25)
  170. rogue
    a deceitful and unreliable scoundrel
    An had been a man of any occupation, if I would not(270)
    have taken him at a word, I would I might go to hell
    among the rogues.
  171. reflection
    the phenomenon of a wave being thrown back from a surface
    BRUTUS:
    No, Cassius, for the eye sees not itself
    But by reflection, by some other things.
  172. ordinance
    an authoritative rule
    But if you would consider the true cause
    Why all these fires, why all these gliding ghosts,
    Why birds and beasts from quality and kind,(70)
    Why old men fool, and children calculate,
    Why all these things change from their ordinance,
    Their natures and preformed faculties,
    To monstrous quality, why, you shall find
    That heaven hath infused them with these spirits(75)
    To make them instruments of fear and warning
    Scene III 22
    Unto some monstrous state.
  173. enterprise
    a purposeful or industrious undertaking
    Scene II 19
    CASSIUS:
    So is he now in execution(300)
    Of any bold or noble enterprise,
    However he puts on this tardy form.
  174. perilous
    fraught with danger
    For my part, I have walk'd about the streets,
    Submitting me unto the perilous night,
    And thus unbraced, Casca, as you see,(55)
    Have bared my bosom to the thunder-stone;
    And when the cross blue lightning seem'd to open
    The breast of heaven, I did present myself
    Even in the aim and very flash of it.
  175. rout
    an overwhelming defeat
    And be not jealous on me, gentle Brutus;
    Were I a common laugher, or did use
    To stale with ordinary oaths my love
    To every new protester, if you know
    That I do fawn on men and hug them hard(80)
    And after scandal them, or if you know
    That I profess myself in banqueting
    To all the rout, then hold me dangerous.
  176. breathless
    not breathing or able to breathe except with difficulty
    Why are you breathless, and why stare you so?
  177. offense
    a failure to show regard for others
    CASCA:
    O, he sits high in all the people's hearts,
    And that which would appear offense in us,
    His countenance, like richest alchemy,
    Will change to virtue and to worthiness.
  178. carelessly
    without care or concern
    And this man
    Is now become a god, and Cassius is
    A wretched creature, and must bend his body
    If Caesar carelessly but nod on him.
  179. vexed
    troubled persistently especially with petty annoyances
    Vexed I am
    Of late with passions of some difference,(45)
    Conceptions only proper to myself,
    Which give some soil perhaps to my behaviors;
    But let not therefore my good friends be grieved—
    Among which number, Cassius, be you one—
    Nor construe any further my neglect(50)
    Than that poor Brutus with himself at war
    Forgets the shows of love to other men.
  180. menace
    something that is a source of danger
    CASCA:
    Who ever knew the heavens menace so?
  181. flood
    the rising of a body of water and its overflowing onto land
    For once, upon a raw and gusty day,
    The troubled Tiber chafing with her shores,
    Caesar said to me, “Darest thou, Cassius, now
    Leap in with me into this angry flood
    And swim to yonder point?”
  182. strew
    spread by scattering
    And do you now strew flowers in his way
    That comes in triumph over Pompey's blood?
  183. ceremony
    a formal event performed on a special occasion
    Go you down that way towards the Capitol;(65)
    This way will I. Disrobe the images,
    If you do find them deck'd with ceremonies.
  184. countenance
    the appearance conveyed by a person's face
    BRUTUS:
    Cassius,
    Be not deceived; if I have veil'd my look,
    I turn the trouble of my countenance
    Merely upon myself.
  185. grief
    intense sorrow caused by loss of a loved one
    But, O grief,
    Where hast thou led me?
  186. fain
    having made preparations
    But for
    all that, to my thinking, he would fain have had it.
  187. transformed
    given a completely different form or appearance
    Besides—I ha' not since put up my sword—
    Against the Capitol I met a lion,(20)
    Who glazed upon me and went surly by
    Without annoying me: and there were drawn
    Upon a heap a hundred ghastly women
    Transformed with their fear, who swore they saw
    Men all in fire walk up and down the streets.(25)
  188. deceive
    cause someone to believe an untruth
    BRUTUS:
    Cassius,
    Be not deceived; if I have veil'd my look,
    I turn the trouble of my countenance
    Merely upon myself.
  189. move
    change location
    See, whether their basest metal be not moved;
    They vanish tongue-tied in their guiltiness.
  190. plunge
    dash violently or with great speed or impetuosity
    Upon the word,(110)
    Accoutred as I was, I plunged in
    And bade him follow.
  191. vile
    morally reprehensible
    What trash is Rome,(115)
    What rubbish and what offal, when it serves
    For the base matter to illuminate
    So vile a thing as Caesar?
  192. beseech
    ask for or request earnestly
    COBBLER:
    Nay, I beseech you, sir, be not out with me; yet, if you
    be out, sir, I can mend you.
  193. falling
    coming down freely under the influence of gravity
    BRUTUS:
    'Tis very like: he hath the falling sickness.
  194. triumph
    a successful ending of a struggle or contest
    But indeed, sir, we make holiday, to see Caesar
    and to rejoice in his triumph.
  195. worldly
    characteristic of secularity rather than spirituality
    Nor stony tower, nor walls of beaten brass,
    Nor airless dungeon, nor strong links of iron,(100)
    Can be retentive to the strength of spirit;
    But life, being weary of these worldly bars,
    Never lacks power to dismiss itself.
  196. torrent
    an overwhelming number or amount
    The torrent roar'd, and we did buffet it
    With lusty sinews, throwing it aside
    And stemming it with hearts of controversy.(115)
  197. barren
    completely wanting or lacking
    Scene II 10
    CAESAR:
    Forget not, in your speed, Antonio,
    To touch Calpurnia, for our elders say,
    The barren, touched in this holy chase,(10)
    Shake off their sterile curse.
  198. impart
    bestow a quality on
    What is it that you would impart to me?(90)
  199. entreat
    ask for or request earnestly
    How I have thought of this and of these times,(170)
    I shall recount hereafter; for this present,
    I would not, so with love I might entreat you,
    Be any further moved.
  200. danger
    the condition of being susceptible to harm or injury
    I am indeed, sir, a surgeon to old shoes; when they are(25)
    in great danger, I recover them.
  201. gentle
    soft and mild; not harsh or stern or severe
    And be not jealous on me, gentle Brutus;
    Were I a common laugher, or did use
    To stale with ordinary oaths my love
    To every new protester, if you know
    That I do fawn on men and hug them hard(80)
    And after scandal them, or if you know
    That I profess myself in banqueting
    To all the rout, then hold me dangerous.
  202. impatience
    irritation with anything that causes delay
    You look pale and gaze(65)
    And put on fear and cast yourself in wonder,
    To see the strange impatience of the heavens.
  203. spirits
    an alcoholic beverage that is distilled rather than fermented
    But if you would consider the true cause
    Why all these fires, why all these gliding ghosts,
    Why birds and beasts from quality and kind,(70)
    Why old men fool, and children calculate,
    Why all these things change from their ordinance,
    Their natures and preformed faculties,
    To monstrous quality, why, you shall find
    That heaven hath infused them with these spirits(75)
    To make them instruments of fear and warning
    Scene III 22
    Unto some monstrous state.
  204. tyranny
    government in which the ruler is an absolute dictator
    If I know this, know all the world besides,
    That part of tyranny that I do bear(105)
    I can shake off at pleasure.
  205. strife
    bitter conflict; heated or violent dissension
    Either there is a civil strife in heaven,
    Or else the world too saucy with the gods
    Incenses them to send destruction.
  206. liable
    subject to legal action
    But I fear him not,
    Yet if my name were liable to fear,(205)
    I do not know the man I should avoid
    So soon as that spare Cassius.
  207. soar
    rise rapidly
    These growing feathers pluck'd from Caesar's wing
    Will make him fly an ordinary pitch,(75)
    Who else would soar above the view of men
    And keep us all in servile fearfulness.
  208. torch
    a light usually carried in the hand
    CASCA:
    A common slave—you know him well by sight—(15)
    Held up his left hand, which did flame and burn
    Like twenty torches join'd, and yet his hand,
    Not sensible of fire, remain'd unscorch'd.
  209. angry
    feeling or showing extreme displeasure or hostility
    For once, upon a raw and gusty day,
    The troubled Tiber chafing with her shores,
    Caesar said to me, “Darest thou, Cassius, now
    Leap in with me into this angry flood
    And swim to yonder point?”
  210. token
    a disk that can be used in designated slot machines
    It is the part of men to fear and tremble
    When the most mighty gods by tokens send
    Such dreadful heralds to astonish us.
  211. vex
    disturb, especially by minor irritations
    Vexed I am
    Of late with passions of some difference,(45)
    Conceptions only proper to myself,
    Which give some soil perhaps to my behaviors;
    But let not therefore my good friends be grieved—
    Among which number, Cassius, be you one—
    Nor construe any further my neglect(50)
    Than that poor Brutus with himself at war
    Forgets the shows of love to other men.
  212. hinder
    be an obstacle to
    Let me not hinder, Cassius, your desires;
    I'll leave you.(35)
  213. breed
    cause to procreate (animals)
    Rome, thou hast lost the breed of noble bloods!
  214. matter
    that which has mass and occupies space
    COBBLER:
    Truly, Sir, all that I live by is with the awl; I meddle
    with no tradesman's matters, nor women's matters, but with
    awl.
  215. plague
    any large-scale calamity
    Run to your houses, fall upon your knees,(55)
    Pray to the gods to intermit the plague
    That needs must light on this ingratitude.
  216. sad
    experiencing or showing sorrow or unhappiness
    BRUTUS:
    Ay, Casca, tell us what hath chanced today,
    That Caesar looks so sad.
  217. petty
    small and of little importance
    CASSIUS:
    Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world
    Like a Colossus, and we petty men
    Scene II 14
    Walk under his huge legs and peep about
    To find ourselves dishonorable graves.
  218. mechanical
    using tools or devices
    What, know you not,
    Being mechanical, you ought not walk
    Upon a laboring day without the sign
    Of your profession?
  219. behavior
    the way a person acts toward other people
    Vexed I am
    Of late with passions of some difference,(45)
    Conceptions only proper to myself,
    Which give some soil perhaps to my behaviors;
    But let not therefore my good friends be grieved—
    Among which number, Cassius, be you one—
    Nor construe any further my neglect(50)
    Than that poor Brutus with himself at war
    Forgets the shows of love to other men.
  220. worthy
    an important, honorable person
    CASSIUS:
    Then, Brutus, I have much mistook your passion,
    By means whereof this breast of mine hath buried
    Thoughts of great value, worthy cogitations.(55)
  221. applause
    a demonstration of approval by clapping the hands together
    I do believe that these applauses are
    For some new honors that are heap'd on Caesar.(140)
  222. lament
    a cry of sorrow and grief
    CASSIUS:
    'Tis just,
    And it is very much lamented, Brutus,(60)
    Scene II 12
    That you have no such mirrors as will turn
    Your hidden worthiness into your eye
    That you might see your shadow.
  223. herald
    a person who announces important news
    It is the part of men to fear and tremble
    When the most mighty gods by tokens send
    Such dreadful heralds to astonish us.
  224. vulgar
    of or associated with the great masses of people
    I'll about,
    And drive away the vulgar from the streets;
    So do you too, where you perceive them thick.
  225. immortal
    not subject to death
    I have heard
    Where many of the best respect in Rome,
    Except immortal Caesar, speaking of Brutus,(65)
    And groaning underneath this age's yoke,
    Have wish'd that noble Brutus had his eyes.
  226. mighty
    having or showing great strength, force, or intensity
    It is the part of men to fear and tremble
    When the most mighty gods by tokens send
    Such dreadful heralds to astonish us.
  227. time
    the continuum of experience in which events pass to the past
    Many a time and oft
    Have you climb'd up to walls and battlements,(40)
    To towers and windows, yea, to chimney tops,
    Your infants in your arms, and there have sat
    The live-long day with patient expectation
    To see great Pompey pass the streets of Rome.
  228. glide
    move smoothly and effortlessly
    But if you would consider the true cause
    Why all these fires, why all these gliding ghosts,
    Why birds and beasts from quality and kind,(70)
    Why old men fool, and children calculate,
    Why all these things change from their ordinance,
    Their natures and preformed faculties,
    To monstrous quality, why, you shall find
    That heaven hath infused them with these spirits(75)
    To make them instruments of fear and warning
    Scene III 22
    Unto some monstrous state.
  229. throng
    a large gathering of people
    CASSIUS:
    Fellow, come from the throng; look upon Caesar.(25)
  230. pleasing
    giving pleasure and satisfaction
    CASSIUS:
    A very pleasing night to honest men.(50)
  231. controversy
    a dispute where there is strong disagreement
    The torrent roar'd, and we did buffet it
    With lusty sinews, throwing it aside
    And stemming it with hearts of controversy.(115)
  232. ordinary
    lacking special distinction, rank, or status
    These growing feathers pluck'd from Caesar's wing
    Will make him fly an ordinary pitch,(75)
    Who else would soar above the view of men
    And keep us all in servile fearfulness.
  233. threatening
    suggesting or expressive of evil, harm, or danger
    O Cicero,
    Scene III 20
    I have seen tempests, when the scolding winds(5)
    Have rived the knotty oaks, and I have seen
    The ambitious ocean swell and rage and foam,
    To be exalted with the threatening clouds,
    But never till tonight, never till now,
    Did I go through a tempest dropping fire.(10)
  234. transform
    change or alter in appearance or nature
    Besides—I ha' not since put up my sword—
    Against the Capitol I met a lion,(20)
    Who glazed upon me and went surly by
    Without annoying me: and there were drawn
    Upon a heap a hundred ghastly women
    Transformed with their fear, who swore they saw
    Men all in fire walk up and down the streets.(25)
  235. ambitious
    having a strong desire for success or achievement
    O Cicero,
    Scene III 20
    I have seen tempests, when the scolding winds(5)
    Have rived the knotty oaks, and I have seen
    The ambitious ocean swell and rage and foam,
    To be exalted with the threatening clouds,
    But never till tonight, never till now,
    Did I go through a tempest dropping fire.(10)
  236. outward
    that is going out or leaving
    CASSIUS:
    I know that virtue to be in you, Brutus,
    As well as I do know your outward favor.
  237. undergo
    pass through
    Now know you, Casca, I have moved already
    Some certain of the noblest-minded Romans(130)
    To undergo with me an enterprise
    Of honorable-dangerous consequence;
    And I do know, by this they stay for me
    In Pompey's Porch.
  238. yonder
    distant but within sight
    For once, upon a raw and gusty day,
    The troubled Tiber chafing with her shores,
    Caesar said to me, “Darest thou, Cassius, now
    Leap in with me into this angry flood
    And swim to yonder point?”
  239. worse
    inferior to another in quality or condition or desirability
    You blocks, you stones, you worse than senseless things!
  240. shriek
    sharp piercing cry
    And yesterday the bird of night did sit
    Even at noon-day upon the market-place,
    Howling and shrieking.
  241. quick
    moving rapidly and lightly
    BRUTUS:
    I am not gamesome; I do lack some part
    Of that quick spirit that is in Antony.
  242. captive
    a person who is confined; especially a prisoner of war
    What tributaries follow him to Rome,(35)
    To grace in captive bonds his chariot-wheels?
  243. recover
    regain or make up for
    I am indeed, sir, a surgeon to old shoes; when they are(25)
    in great danger, I recover them.
  244. raw
    not treated with heat to prepare it for eating
    For once, upon a raw and gusty day,
    The troubled Tiber chafing with her shores,
    Caesar said to me, “Darest thou, Cassius, now
    Leap in with me into this angry flood
    And swim to yonder point?”
  245. scandal
    a disgraceful event
    And be not jealous on me, gentle Brutus;
    Were I a common laugher, or did use
    To stale with ordinary oaths my love
    To every new protester, if you know
    That I do fawn on men and hug them hard(80)
    And after scandal them, or if you know
    That I profess myself in banqueting
    To all the rout, then hold me dangerous.
  246. indifferent
    marked by a lack of interest
    But I am arm'd,
    And dangers are to me indifferent.
  247. virtue
    the quality of doing what is right
    CASSIUS:
    I know that virtue to be in you, Brutus,
    As well as I do know your outward favor.
  248. profess
    confess one's faith in, or allegiance to
    And be not jealous on me, gentle Brutus;
    Were I a common laugher, or did use
    To stale with ordinary oaths my love
    To every new protester, if you know
    That I do fawn on men and hug them hard(80)
    And after scandal them, or if you know
    That I profess myself in banqueting
    To all the rout, then hold me dangerous.
  249. appetite
    a feeling of craving something
    This rudeness is a sauce to his good wit,
    Which gives men stomach to digest his words
    With better appetite.(305)
  250. woe
    misery resulting from affliction
    But, woe the while!
  251. wrought
    shaped to fit by altering the contours of a pliable mass
    Well, Brutus, thou art noble; yet, I see
    Thy honorable metal may be wrought
    From that it is disposed; therefore it is meet
    That noble minds keep ever with their likes;
    For who so firm that cannot be seduced?(315)
  252. consider
    think about carefully; weigh
    What you have said
    I will consider; what you have to say
    I will with patience hear, and find a time(175)
    Both meet to hear and answer such high things.
  253. grave
    a place for the burial of a corpse
    CASSIUS:
    Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world
    Like a Colossus, and we petty men
    Scene II 14
    Walk under his huge legs and peep about
    To find ourselves dishonorable graves.
  254. passion
    a strong feeling or emotion
    Vexed I am
    Of late with passions of some difference,(45)
    Conceptions only proper to myself,
    Which give some soil perhaps to my behaviors;
    But let not therefore my good friends be grieved—
    Among which number, Cassius, be you one—
    Nor construe any further my neglect(50)
    Than that poor Brutus with himself at war
    Forgets the shows of love to other men.
  255. quality
    an essential and distinguishing attribute of something
    But if you would consider the true cause
    Why all these fires, why all these gliding ghosts,
    Why birds and beasts from quality and kind,(70)
    Why old men fool, and children calculate,
    Why all these things change from their ordinance,
    Their natures and preformed faculties,
    To monstrous quality, why, you shall find
    That heaven hath infused them with these spirits(75)
    To make them instruments of fear and warning
    Scene III 22
    Unto some monstrous state.
  256. encounter
    come together
    Three parts of him
    Is ours already, and the man entire
    Upon the next encounter yields him ours.(165)
  257. common
    having no special distinction or quality
    And be not jealous on me, gentle Brutus;
    Were I a common laugher, or did use
    To stale with ordinary oaths my love
    To every new protester, if you know
    That I do fawn on men and hug them hard(80)
    And after scandal them, or if you know
    That I profess myself in banqueting
    To all the rout, then hold me dangerous.
  258. observer
    a person who becomes aware through the senses
    He reads much,
    He is a great observer, and he looks
    Quite through the deeds of men.
  259. creature
    a living organism characterized by voluntary movement
    FLAVIUS:
    Hence! home, you idle creatures, get you home.
  260. famed
    widely known and esteemed
    When went there by an age since the great flood
    But it was famed with more than with one man?
  261. fashion
    the latest and most admired style in clothes or behavior
    Scene II 15
    CASSIUS:
    As they pass by, pluck Casca by the sleeve,(185)
    And he will, after his sour fashion, tell you
    What hath proceeded worthy note today.
  262. stomach
    enlarged and muscular saclike organ of the alimentary canal
    This rudeness is a sauce to his good wit,
    Which gives men stomach to digest his words
    With better appetite.(305)
  263. tread
    put down, place, or press the foot
    As proper men as ever
    trod upon neats-leather have gone upon my handiwork.
  264. fare
    the sum charged for riding in a public conveyance
    Fare you well.
  265. propose
    present for consideration, examination, or criticism
    But ere we could arrive the point proposed,
    Caesar cried, “Help me, Cassius, or I sink!”
  266. sensible
    able to feel or perceive
    CASCA:
    A common slave—you know him well by sight—(15)
    Held up his left hand, which did flame and burn
    Like twenty torches join'd, and yet his hand,
    Not sensible of fire, remain'd unscorch'd.
  267. disturbed
    having the place or position changed
    This disturbed sky(40)
    Is not to walk in.
  268. wretched
    deserving or inciting pity
    And this man
    Is now become a god, and Cassius is
    A wretched creature, and must bend his body
    If Caesar carelessly but nod on him.
  269. expectation
    belief about the future
    Many a time and oft
    Have you climb'd up to walls and battlements,(40)
    To towers and windows, yea, to chimney tops,
    Your infants in your arms, and there have sat
    The live-long day with patient expectation
    To see great Pompey pass the streets of Rome.
  270. worth
    the quality of being desirable or valuable
    CASCA:
    Ay, if I be alive, and your mind hold, and your dinner
    worth the eating.(295)
  271. minded
    mentally oriented toward something specified
    Now know you, Casca, I have moved already
    Some certain of the noblest- minded Romans(130)
    To undergo with me an enterprise
    Of honorable-dangerous consequence;
    And I do know, by this they stay for me
    In Pompey's Porch.
  272. conquest
    the act of defeating and taking control of
    What conquest brings he home?
  273. dismiss
    stop associating with
    Nor stony tower, nor walls of beaten brass,
    Nor airless dungeon, nor strong links of iron,(100)
    Can be retentive to the strength of spirit;
    But life, being weary of these worldly bars,
    Never lacks power to dismiss itself.
  274. conception
    the creation of something in the mind
    Vexed I am
    Of late with passions of some difference,(45)
    Conceptions only proper to myself,
    Which give some soil perhaps to my behaviors;
    But let not therefore my good friends be grieved—
    Among which number, Cassius, be you one—
    Nor construe any further my neglect(50)
    Than that poor Brutus with himself at war
    Forgets the shows of love to other men.
  275. execution
    putting a condemned person to death
    Scene II 19
    CASSIUS:
    So is he now in execution(300)
    Of any bold or noble enterprise,
    However he puts on this tardy form.
  276. leave
    go away from a place
    CAESAR:
    Set on, and leave no ceremony out.
  277. patience
    good-natured tolerance of delay or incompetence
    What you have said
    I will consider; what you have to say
    I will with patience hear, and find a time(175)
    Both meet to hear and answer such high things.
  278. perceived
    detected by instinct or inference
    CASCA:
    Marry, before he fell down, when he perceived the
    common herd was glad he refused the crown, he plucked
    me ope his doublet and offered them his throat to cut.
  279. eternal
    continuing forever or indefinitely
    O, you and I have heard our fathers say
    There was a Brutus once that would have brook'd(165)
    The eternal devil to keep his state in Rome
    As easily as a king.
  280. respect
    regard highly; think much of
    COBBLER:
    Truly, sir, in respect of a fine workman, I am but, as(10)
    you would say, a cobbler.
  281. ambition
    a strong drive for success
    I will this night,
    In several hands, in at his windows throw,
    As if they came from several citizens,(320)
    Writings, all tending to the great opinion
    That Rome holds of his name, wherein obscurely
    Caesar's ambition shall be glanced at.
  282. instrument
    the means whereby some act is accomplished
    But if you would consider the true cause
    Why all these fires, why all these gliding ghosts,
    Why birds and beasts from quality and kind,(70)
    Why old men fool, and children calculate,
    Why all these things change from their ordinance,
    Their natures and preformed faculties,
    To monstrous quality, why, you shall find
    That heaven hath infused them with these spirits(75)
    To make them instruments of fear and warning
    Scene III 22
    Unto some monstrous state.
Created on December 19, 2009

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