Tartuffe by Moilere

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definitions & notes only words
  1. rival
    the contestant you hope to defeat
    Jean Baptiste Poquelin, better known by his stage name of Moliere,
    stands without a rival at the head of French comedy.
  2. province
    the territory in an administrative district of a nation
    His life
    was spent in Paris and in the provinces, acting, directing
    performances, managing theaters, and writing plays.
  3. satire
    witty language used to convey insults or scorn
    He had his share
    of applause from the king and from the public; but the satire in his
    comedies made him many enemies, and he was the object of the most
    venomous attacks and the most impossible slanders.
  4. venomous
    extremely poisonous or injurious
    He had his share
    of applause from the king and from the public; but the satire in his
    comedies made him many enemies, and he was the object of the most
    venomous attacks and the most impossible slanders.
  5. slander
    words falsely spoken that damage the reputation of another
    He had his share
    of applause from the king and from the public; but the satire in his
    comedies made him many enemies, and he was the object of the most
    venomous attacks and the most impossible slanders.
  6. solace
    comfort offered to one who is disappointed or miserable
    Nor did he find
    much solace at home; for he married unfortunately, and the unhappiness
    that followed increased the bitterness that public hostility had
    brought into his life.
  7. misanthrope
    someone who dislikes people in general
    In the great plays that followed, "The School for Husbands"
    and "The School for Wives," "The Misanthrope" and "The Hypocrite"
  8. hypocrite
    a person who professes beliefs that he or she does not hold
    In the great plays that followed, "The School for Husbands"
    and "The School for Wives," "The Misanthrope" and "The Hypocrite"
  9. hypochondriac
    a patient with imaginary symptoms and ailments
    (Tartuffe), "The Miser" and "The Hypochondriac," "The Learned Ladies,"
  10. vice
    a specific form of evildoing
    "The Doctor in Spite of Himself," "The Citizen Turned Gentleman," and
    many others, he exposed mercilessly one after another the vices and
    foibles of the day.
  11. foible
    a minor weakness or peculiarity in someone's character
    "The Doctor in Spite of Himself," "The Citizen Turned Gentleman," and
    many others, he exposed mercilessly one after another the vices and
    foibles of the day.
  12. pandemonium
    a state of extreme confusion and disorder
    Must have his say; it's perfect pandemonium.
  13. impertinent
    improperly forward or bold
    Too full of gab, and too impertinent
  14. plague
    any large-scale calamity
    Or give him anything but plague and torment.
  15. conduct
    the way a person behaves toward other people
    Daughter, by your leave, your conduct
  16. esteem
    the condition of being honored
    The lady's brother, I esteem you highly,
  17. entreat
    ask for or request earnestly
    I'd urgently entreat you not to come
  18. bigot
    a prejudiced person who is intolerant of differing opinions
    Shall I let a bigot criticaster
  19. usurp
    seize and take control without authority
    Come and usurp a tyrant's power here?
  20. deign
    do something that one considers to be below one's dignity
    Till this fine gentleman deigns to consent?
  21. maxim
    a saying that is widely accepted on its own merits
    If we must hark to him, and heed his maxims,
  22. censure
    harsh criticism or disapproval
    He censures everything, this zealous carper.
  23. zealous
    marked by active interest and enthusiasm
    He censures everything, this zealous carper.
  24. belie
    be in contradiction with
    I should belie my feelings not to say so.
  25. vagabond
    a wanderer with no established residence or means of support
    This vagabond, who hadn't, when he came,
  26. pious
    having or showing or expressing reverence for a deity
    If all were governed by his pious orders.
  27. grievous
    causing or marked by grief or anguish
    It would be a grievous thing
  28. gall
    a digestive juice secreted by the liver
    And leave the gossips free to vent their gall.
  29. argument
    a dispute where there is strong disagreement
    These arguments are nothing to the purpose.
  30. austerity
    self-denial, especially refraining from worldly pleasures
    She lives the model of austerity;
  31. piety
    righteousness by virtue of being religiously devout
    But age has brought this piety upon her,
  32. specious
    plausible but false
    And in the specious veil of haughty virtue
  33. haughty
    having or showing arrogant superiority
    And in the specious veil of haughty virtue
  34. carp
    any of various freshwater fish of the family Cyprinidae
    Must carp at everything, and pardon nothing.
  35. pardon
    accept an excuse for
    Must carp at everything, and pardon nothing.
  36. rigmarole
    a long and complicated and confusing procedure
    That's the kind of rigmarole to please you,
  37. repent
    feel sorry for; be contrite about
    In your great need, to make you all repent;
  38. agape
    with the mouth wide open as in wonder or awe
    What makes you dream and stand agape,
  39. recompense
    make payment to
    Monsieur has his own kind of recompense,/And it's his zeal on your behalf, I guess,/That leads him to dishonor you, no less. -Moliere, Tartuffe, Act III scene 5, lines 1058-1059
  40. reprobate
    a person without moral scruples
    Dear son, go on; tell me my crimes are great; /Call me thief, killer, traitor, reprobate; Load me with epithets still more abhorred: /I won't say no; they are my just reward.-Moliere, Tartuffe, Act III scene 6, lines 1101-1104
Created on September 3, 2013 (updated October 14, 2013)

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