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Othello: Act 5

Influenced by the duplicitous Iago, Othello, a Moorish general in the Venetian army, begins to doubt his wife's faithfulness. Read the full text here.

Here are links to our lists for the play: Act 1, Act 2, Act 3, Act 4, Act 5
35 words 5,289 learners

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Full list of words from this list:

  1. rapier
    a straight sword with a narrow blade and two edges
    Here, stand behind this bulk. Straight will he come.
    Wear thy good rapier bare, and put it home.
    Quick, quick! Fear nothing. I’ll be at thy elbow.
  2. restitution
    a sum of money paid in compensation for loss or injury
    Now, whether he kill Cassio,
    Or Cassio him, or each do kill the other,
    Every way makes my gain. Live Roderigo,
    He calls me to a restitution large
    Of gold and jewels that I bobbed from him
    As gifts to Desdemona.
  3. gait
    a person's manner of walking
    I know his gait. ’Tis he!—Villain, thou diest!
  4. maim
    injure or wound seriously and leave permanent disfiguration
    I am maimed forever! Help, ho! Murder, murder!
  5. mischance
    an unpredictable outcome that is unfortunate
    ’Tis some mischance. The voice is very direful.
  6. grievous
    causing or marked by grief or anguish
    What are you here that cry so grievously?
  7. treacherous
    tending to betray
    O treacherous villains!
  8. mangle
    destroy or injure severely
    Cassio, may you suspect
    Who they should be that have thus mangled you?
  9. alabaster
    a fine-textured white gypsum used for carving
    Yet I’ll not shed her blood,
    Nor scar that whiter skin of hers than snow,
    And smooth as monumental alabaster.
  10. quench
    put out, as of fires, flames, or lights
    If I quench thee, thou flaming minister,
    I can again thy former light restore
    Should I repent me.
  11. balmy
    mild and pleasant
    O balmy breath, that dost almost persuade
    Justice to break her sword!
  12. reconciled
    made compatible or consistent
    If you bethink yourself of any crime
    Unreconciled as yet to heaven and grace,
    Solicit for it straight.
  13. portent
    a sign of something about to happen
    That death’s unnatural that kills for loving.
    Alas, why gnaw you so your nether lip?
    Some bloody passion shakes your very frame.
    These are portents, but yet I hope, I hope
    They do not point on me.
  14. perjury
    criminal offense of making false statements under oath
    Sweet soul, take heed, take heed of perjury.
    Thou art on thy deathbed.
  15. alteration
    the act of making something different
    Methinks it should be now a huge eclipse
    Of sun and moon, and that th’ affrighted globe
    Should yawn at alteration.
  16. extremity
    the outermost or farthest region or point
    O, I were damned beneath all depth in hell
    But that I did proceed upon just grounds
    To this extremity.
  17. iteration
    the act or process of doing or saying again
    What needs this iterance, woman? I say, thy husband.
  18. pernicious
    exceedingly harmful
    If he say so, may his pernicious soul
    Rot half a grain a day! He lies to th’ heart!
    She was too fond of her most filthy bargain.
  19. odious
    extremely repulsive or unpleasant
    You told a lie, an odious, damnèd lie!
    Upon my soul, a lie, a wicked lie!
  20. reprobation
    rejection by God
    Did he live now,
    This sight would make him do a desperate turn,
    Yea, curse his better angel from his side,
    And fall to reprobance.
  21. amorous
    inclined toward or displaying love
    Cassio confessed it,
    And she did gratify his amorous works
    With that recognizance and pledge of love
    Which I first gave her.
  22. solemn
    characterized by a firm belief in your opinions
    O thou dull Moor, that handkerchief thou speak’st of
    I found by fortune, and did give my husband—
    For often, with a solemn earnestness
    (More than indeed belonged to such a trifle),
    He begged of me to steal ’t.
  23. earnestness
    the trait of being serious or sincere
    O thou dull Moor, that handkerchief thou speak’st of
    I found by fortune, and did give my husband—
    For often, with a solemn earnestness
    (More than indeed belonged to such a trifle),
    He begged of me to steal ’t.
  24. notorious
    known widely and usually unfavorably
    ’Tis a notorious villain. Take you this weapon
    Which I have here recovered from the Moor.
    Come, guard the door without. Let him not pass,
    But kill him rather.
  25. bode
    indicate by signs
    What did thy song bode, lady?
  26. perforce
    by necessity
    If thou attempt it, it will cost thee dear;
    Thou hast no weapon and perforce must suffer.
  27. ensnare
    take or catch as if in a trap
    Will you, I pray, demand that demi-devil
    Why he hath thus ensnared my soul and body?
  28. interim
    the time between one event, process, or period and another
    Now here’s another discontented paper
    Found in his pocket, too; and this it seems
    Roderigo meant t’ have sent this damnèd villain,
    But that, belike, Iago in the interim
    Came in and satisfied him.
  29. upbraid
    express criticism towards
    There is besides, in Roderigo’s letter,
    How he upbraids Iago, that he made him
    Brave me upon the watch, whereon it came
    That I was cast.
  30. extenuate
    lessen or to try to lessen the seriousness or degree of
    I pray you in your letters,
    When you shall these unlucky deeds relate,
    Speak of me as I am. Nothing extenuate,
    Nor set down aught in malice.
  31. perplexed
    full of difficulty or confusion or bewilderment
    Then must you speak
    Of one that loved not wisely, but too well;
    Of one not easily jealous, but being wrought,
    Perplexed in the extreme; of one whose hand,
    Like the base Judean, threw a pearl away
    Richer than all his tribe; of one whose subdued eyes,
    Albeit unused to the melting mood,
    Drops tears as fast as the Arabian trees
    Their medicinable gum.
  32. subdued
    quieted and brought under control
    Then must you speak
    Of one that loved not wisely, but too well;
    Of one not easily jealous, but being wrought,
    Perplexed in the extreme; of one whose hand,
    Like the base Judean, threw a pearl away
    Richer than all his tribe; of one whose subdued eyes,
    Albeit unused to the melting mood,
    Drops tears as fast as the Arabian trees
    Their medicinable gum.
  33. malignant
    dangerous to health
    Set you down this.
    And say besides, that in Aleppo once,
    Where a malignant and a turbanned Turk
    Beat a Venetian and traduced the state,
    I took by th’ throat the circumcisèd dog,
    And smote him, thus. [He stabs himself.]
  34. traduce
    speak unfavorably about
    Set you down this.
    And say besides, that in Aleppo once,
    Where a malignant and a turbanned Turk
    Beat a Venetian and traduced the state,
    I took by th’ throat the circumcisèd dog,
    And smote him, thus. [He stabs himself.]
  35. smite
    inflict a heavy blow on, with the hand, a tool, or a weapon
    Set you down this.
    And say besides, that in Aleppo once,
    Where a malignant and a turbanned Turk
    Beat a Venetian and traduced the state,
    I took by th’ throat the circumcisèd dog,
    And smote him, thus. [He stabs himself.]
Created on February 21, 2013 (updated June 2, 2022)

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