inflate

Using your own breath or an air pump, you can inflate a balloon — or anything else you need to pump air into. When you inflate something you fill it with air (or any other gas) to make it expand.

From the Latin verb inflāre, "to blow into," the word inflate appeared in English in the early 16th century. Although we usually think of the word inflate as referring to blowing air or gas into a balloon or a tire, anything that grows larger, from food prices to an egoist's self-image, can be inflated. When an item becomes scarce, its price is likely to be inflated.

Definitions of inflate
1

v fill with gas or air

inflate a balloons”
Synonyms:
blow up
Antonyms:
deflate
become deflated or flaccid, as by losing air
Types:
reflate
inflate again
billow, heave, surge
rise and move, as in waves or billows
Type of:
expand
make bigger or wider in size, volume, or quantity

v become inflated

Synonyms:
balloon, billow
Types:
reflate
become inflated again
Type of:
expand
become larger in size or volume or quantity

v exaggerate or make bigger

“The charges were inflated
Synonyms:
amplify, blow up, expand
Types:
puff up
make larger or distend
Type of:
increase
make bigger or more

v cause prices to rise by increasing the available currency or credit

“The war inflated the economy”
Antonyms:
deflate
produce deflation in
Types:
reflate
economics: raise demand, expand the money supply, or raise prices, after a period of deflation
Type of:
alter, change, modify
cause to change; make different; cause a transformation

v increase the amount or availability of, creating a rise in value

inflate the currency”
Antonyms:
deflate
reduce or cut back the amount or availability of, creating a decline in value or prices
Type of:
bring down, cut, cut back, cut down, reduce, trim, trim back, trim down
cut down on; make a reduction in

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