ambrosia

In Greek mythology, ambrosia was the food of the gods. At a picnic, ambrosia is a dessert made with oranges and shredded coconut. While the former bestowed immortality on all who ate it, the latter tastes very refreshing after fried chicken and potato salad.

In the Odyssey and the Iliad, Homer uses the word ambrosia for three things: the food of the Olympians, a salve used to treat corpses, and as a perfume to cover up the smell of uncured seal skins. Some scholars have identified ambrosia as honey while others feel that a type of hallucinogenic mushroom was meant in the myths. Regardless of all this confusion, the word is now used metaphorically to mean anything so fragrant, so delicious that it seems divine — including a popular orange-and-coconut confection.

Primary Meanings of ambrosia

1.
n
(classical mythology) the food and drink of the gods; mortals who ate it became immortal
2.
n
any of numerous chiefly North American weedy plants constituting the genus Ambrosia that produce highly allergenic pollen responsible for much hay fever and asthma
Full Definitions of ambrosia
1

n (classical mythology) the food and drink of the gods; mortals who ate it became immortal

Synonyms:
nectar
Type of:
dainty, delicacy, goody, kickshaw, treat
something considered choice to eat

n fruit dessert made of oranges and bananas with shredded coconut

Type of:
afters, dessert, sweet
a dish served as the last course of a meal

n a mixture of nectar and pollen prepared by worker bees and fed to larvae

Synonyms:
beebread
Type of:
composition
a mixture of ingredients
2

n any of numerous chiefly North American weedy plants constituting the genus Ambrosia that produce highly allergenic pollen responsible for much hay fever and asthma

Synonyms:
bitterweed, ragweed
Types:
Ambrosia artemisiifolia, common ragweed
annual weed with finely divided foliage and spikes of green flowers; common in North America; introduced elsewhere accidentally
Ambrosia trifida, great ragweed
a coarse annual with some leaves deeply and palmately three-cleft or five-cleft
Ambrosia psilostachya, perennial ragweed, western ragweed
coarse perennial ragweed with creeping roots of dry barren lands of southwestern United States and Mexico
Type of:
weed
any plant that crowds out cultivated plants

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