Gimme, Gimme, Gimme

National Pack Rat Day is May 17th. Here's a hoard of highly collectable words that'll help you amass an impressive vocabulary.

Read the related article: Highly Collectable Words for National Pack Rat Day
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definitions & notes only words
  1. stockpile
    something kept back or saved for future use
    “We hadn’t stockpiled happy memories to fall back on when times were tough,” she added.New York Times (Feb 20, 2018)
    The word stockpile has a militaristic undertone to it which lends a certain gravitas to the practice, never mind if what is being stockpiled is an assortment of every spork ever made or the full run of Alf stickers in their original packaging.
  2. cache
    a hidden storage space
    To prepare for the winter, squirrels spend a lot of time doing what's known as " caching."National Geographic (Oct 10, 2017)
    Cache comes from French Canadian trapper’s slang for “hiding place”. The term later came to refer to the hidden items as well as the actual hiding place itself.
  3. garner
    assemble or get together
    He won two Emmys, a Golden Globe and a Screen Actors Guild award for his performance on the series, which was the first Amazon TV original series to garner such critical acclaim.Reuters (May 7, 2018)
    Garner is a word that is usually used in the sense of picking up or gathering, as in the phrase "to garner praise." It originated in the late 15th century, meaning "to store grain."
  4. accrue
    grow by addition
    The number of these points a player accrues over the season determines if he or she is eligible to compete.Time (Aug 18, 2014)
    Accrue is another word with a similar passive sense like garner. Accrue means to "gain by increment" and emphasizes the slow growth of carefully maintained and curated collections. The value of an object may accrue without the collector doing anything at all, other than keeping it over a period of time.
  5. amass
    collect or gather
    Mr Rockefeller and his wife, Peggy, amassed a collection of art, furniture, ceramics and decor throughout their lives.BBC (May 9, 2018)
  6. accumulate
    get or gather together
    Large stores of arms and gunpowder were accumulated in the various depots in Dublin.Various
    Accumulate, a word from the early 16th century, literally means “ to heap up, amass” from Latin cumulus, “heap.” This is the same root that gives cumulus clouds their name, because the clouds resemble a big pile of fluffiness.
  7. hoard
    a secret store of valuables or money
    She first heard the 1905 waltz in a cafe after a yearlong recuperation in a Swedish hospital during which she remained mute and hoarded food.New York Times (Feb 21, 2018)
    A hoard originally referred to "a treasure, a valuable stock or store." To hoard items is to zealously collect and vigilantly hold onto them. Hoard is often used to connote a somewhat obsessive degree of collecting.
  8. aggregate
    a sum total of many heterogeneous things taken together
    In the aggregate these sums were something enormous.Jefferies, Richard
  9. collect
    get or gather together
    Vanessa is also looking forward to collecting some royal memorabilia while she is in the UK.BBC (May 12, 2018)
  10. acquisition
    the act of contracting or assuming possession of something
    Anna's attention instantly became concentrated upon this new acquisition, and gowns and handkerchiefs underwent a minute and searching examination.Rameur, E.
    Perhaps the word that best sums up all this behavior is acquisition. Dating from the 14th century, this word contains an element derived from the Latin quaerere, which means “seek to obtain.” Hoarders and collectors both seek to obtain many, many things.
  11. squirrel away
    save up as for future use
    During their travels, the family squirrels away Thanksgiving essentials like cranberries and pecans.New York Times (Nov 23, 2015)
  12. possession
    anything owned
    But I also was ready to admit that I like material possessions—very much—for the sensory pleasures they impart.Wall Street Journal (May 1, 2018)

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