Trumps

What does it mean to trump or have a trump? Find out through this list of synonymous verbs and nouns.
Read more...

Activities for this list:

definitions & notes only words
  1. ascendancy
    the state when one person or group has power over another
    There are struggles for power as new groups gain political ascendancy and older groups, once a majority, become minorities.
    Washington Post (Oct 14, 2016)
  2. asset
    a useful or valuable quality
    The dollar also recouped some ground, while assets that many investors search out at times of uncertainty, such as gold, came off earlier highs.
    Seattle Times (Nov 9, 2016)
  3. authority
    the power or right to give orders or make decisions
    I always respected their authority and considered them my president.
    Slate (Nov 9, 2016)
  4. convenience
    the state of being suitable or opportune
    For convenience, ballots are distributed when residents arrive.
    Wall Street Journal (Oct 16, 2016)
  5. defeat
    win a victory over
    In 1948, the Chicago Tribune incorrectly reported that Thomas Dewey had defeated Harry Truman in the presidential election.
    National Geographic (Nov 7, 2016)
  6. dominance
    the state when one person or group has power over another
    Dominance in Congress is seen as being crucial to the next president's prospects of turning policy plans into law.
    BBC (Nov 9, 2016)
  7. eminence
    high status importance owing to marked superiority
    In addition to celebrating the presidential nominee, national conventions are a showcase for party eminences, rising stars and elected officials.
    New York Times (Jun 21, 2016)
  8. expediency
    the quality of being suited to the end in view
    Political expediency and the passing of time may prevent anyone from ever knowing for sure.
    Seattle Times (Oct 4, 2016)
  9. finesse
    subtly skillful handling of a situation
    That dynamic gives them license to adopt a take-no-prisoners form of politics antithetical to the political finesse typically required to pass legislation.
    Washington Post (Nov 5, 2016)
  10. gratification
    state of being satisfied
    The world at large, and the United States in particular, has developed an unfortunate need for instant gratification.
    Washington Post (Feb 19, 2016)
  11. influence
    a power to affect persons or events
    Election Day was a reminder of Twitter’s influence in media and the distribution of information.
    New York Times (Nov 8, 2016)
  12. leverage
    strategic advantage; power to act effectively
    They have little leverage over their communities, but some believe in pushing for change through political engagement.
    The Guardian (Oct 29, 2016)
  13. mastery
    power to dominate or defeat
    All major European states imposed colonial mastery over Africa and Asia.
    Economist (Sep 1, 2016)
  14. precedence
    status established in order of importance or urgency
    "They should not give precedence to money. Money is not the first issue. Humans are the first issue. We are not numbers; we are humans."
    Los Angeles Times (Jul 4, 2015)
  15. preference
    grant of favor or advantage to one over another
    Fewer than half of voters who cast presidential ballots say they made their choice out of a strong preference for their candidate.
    Washington Times (Nov 8, 2016)
  16. prestige
    a high standing achieved through success or influence
    The resulting fears and discontents undermined the credibility and prestige of existing leaders and doctrines.
    Washington Post (Jul 24, 2016)
  17. prevalence
    a superiority in numbers or amount
    Given the prevalence of negative ads, many stock photo searches by political campaigns are actually for photos of their opponents.
    Slate (Feb 16, 2016)
  18. profit
    derive a benefit from
    These billionaires have pumped billions into creating a new privatized school system where those running schools can profit and evade government oversight.
    Salon (Oct 17, 2016)
  19. resource
    aid or support that may be drawn upon when needed
    “It’s all part of doing as much good as we can with the resources we have.”
    New York Times (Nov 4, 2016)
  20. sanction
    give authority or permission to
    When it comes to turning down a renewal petition, the school district must chose a reason sanctioned by state law.
    Los Angeles Times (Oct 18, 2016)
  21. superiority
    the quality of being better than someone or something
    Educated v less educated may be even more toxic than rich v poor, because it comes laden with assumptions of moral superiority.
    The Guardian (Oct 5, 2016)
  22. supremacy
    power to dominate or defeat
    Any account of the Klan’s disturbing legacy rightfully centers on the deadly acts of violence its members have perpetrated in the name of white supremacy.
    Washington Post (Mar 11, 2016)
  23. surpass
    be or do something to a greater degree
    More than 34 million Americans have already voted, surpassing the 32 million who cast their ballots early four years ago.
    The Guardian (Nov 4, 2016)
  24. triumph
    prove superior
    There is no more Cold War, as the United States and its allies triumphed over the Soviet Union.
    Salon (Nov 8, 2016)
    "Trump" could be an alteration of "triumph." This meaning is suggested by card games in which trumps rank above the other suits.
  25. trump
    get the better of
    The Constitution states that federal law is “the supreme law of the land,” trumping state constitutions when they conflict with the federal constitution.
    Newsweek (Feb 10, 2015)
    The Old French "tromper" means both "to blow a trumpet" and "to deceive." This connection comes from quacks who used to blow a trumpet in order to attract the public and convince them to buy their fake cures.

Sign up, it's free!

Whether you're a student, an educator, or a life-long learner, Vocabulary.com can put you on the path to systematic vocabulary improvement.