rhetorical device

A rhetorical device is a use of language that is intended to have an effect on its audience. Repetition, figurative language, and even rhetorical questions are all examples of rhetorical devices. You hear me?

Rhetorical devices are common, such as saying language is a living beast: that's a metaphor — one of the most common rhetorical devices. Another is alliteration, like saying "bees behave badly in Boston." Rhetorical devices go beyond the meaning of words to create effects that are creative and imaginative, adding literary quality to writing.

Definitions of rhetorical device
1

n a use of language that creates a literary effect (but often without regard for literal significance)

Types:
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anacoluthia, anacoluthon
an abrupt change within a sentence from one syntactic structure to another
asyndeton
the omission of conjunctions where they would normally be used
repetition
the repeated use of the same word or word pattern as a rhetorical device
anastrophe, inversion
the reversal of the normal order of words
antiphrasis
the use of a word in a sense opposite to its normal sense (especially in irony)
antithesis
the juxtaposition of contrasting words or ideas to give a feeling of balance
antinomasia
substitution of a title for a name
apophasis
mentioning something by saying it will not be mentioned
aposiopesis
breaking off in the middle of a sentence (as by writers of realistic conversations)
apostrophe
address to an absent or imaginary person
catachresis
strained or paradoxical use of words either in error (as `blatant' to mean `flagrant') or deliberately (as in a mixed metaphor: `blind mouths')
chiasmus
inversion in the second of two parallel phrases
climax
arrangement of clauses in ascending order of forcefulness
conversion
interchange of subject and predicate of a proposition
ecphonesis, exclamation
an exclamatory rhetorical device
emphasis
special and significant stress by means of position or repetition e.g.
enallage
a substitution of part of speech or gender or number or tense etc. (e.g., editorial `we' for `I')
epanorthosis
immediate rephrasing for intensification or justification
epiplexis
a rhetorical device in which the speaker reproaches the audience in order to incite or convince them
hendiadys
use of two conjoined nouns instead of a noun and modifier
hypallage
reversal of the syntactic relation of two words (as in `her beauty's face')
hyperbaton
reversal of normal word order (as in `cheese I love')
hypozeugma
use of a series of subjects with a single predicate
hypozeuxis
use of a series of parallel clauses (as in `I came, I saw, I conquered')
hysteron proteron
reversal of normal order of two words or sentences etc. (as in `bred and born')
litotes, meiosis
understatement for rhetorical effect (especially when expressing an affirmative by negating its contrary)
onomatopoeia
using words that imitate the sound they denote
paraleipsis, paralepsis, paralipsis, preterition
suggesting by deliberately concise treatment that much of significance is omitted
paregmenon
juxtaposing words having a common derivation (as in `sense and sensibility')
polysyndeton
using several conjunctions in close succession, especially where some might be omitted (as in `he ran and jumped and laughed for joy')
prolepsis
anticipating and answering objections in advance
wellerism
a comparison comprising a well-known quotation followed by a facetious sequel
figure, figure of speech, image, trope
language used in a figurative or nonliteral sense
topicalization
(linguistics) emphasis placed on the topic or focus of a sentence by preposing it to the beginning of the sentence; placing the topic at the beginning of the sentence is typical for English
anadiplosis, reduplication
repetition of the final words of a sentence or line at the beginning of the next
epanalepsis
repetition after intervening words
epanodos
repetition of a group of words in reverse order
epiphora, epistrophe
repetition of the ends of two or more successive sentences, verses, etc.
gemination
the doubling of a word or phrase (as for rhetorical effect)
ploce
(rhetoric) repetition to gain special emphasis or extend meaning
polyptoton
repetition of a word in a different case or inflection in the same sentence
anaphora, epanaphora
repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning of successive clauses
anaphora
using a pronoun or similar word instead of repeating a word used earlier
symploce
repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning and another at the end of successive clauses, i.e., simultaneous use of anaphora and epistrophe
conceit
an elaborate poetic image or a far-fetched comparison of very dissimilar things
irony
a trope that involves incongruity between what is expected and what occurs
exaggeration, hyperbole
extravagant exaggeration
kenning
conventional metaphoric name for something, used especially in Old English and Old Norse poetry
metaphor
a figure of speech in which an expression is used to refer to something that it does not literally denote in order to suggest a similarity
metonymy
substituting the name of an attribute or feature for the name of the thing itself (as in `they counted heads')
oxymoron
conjoining contradictory terms (as in `deafening silence')
personification, prosopopoeia
representing an abstract quality or idea as a person or creature
simile
a figure of speech that expresses a resemblance between things of different kinds (usually formed with `like' or `as')
synecdoche
substituting a more inclusive term for a less inclusive one or vice versa
zeugma
use of a word to govern two or more words though appropriate to only one
Type of:
device
something in an artistic work designed to achieve a particular effect

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