jockey

During a horse race, the riders are called jockeys. Being a jockey is an excellent career choice for someone small.

Jockeys, usually male, are always small people, weighing less than 120 pounds and generally standing no more than five feet five inches tall. This keeps the horses' total weight light, allowing them to run faster. When jockey is used as a verb, it means "to struggle or compete," like when politicians jockey for dominance or kids jockey to be the first in line for a bouncy house. Jockey was originally a Scottish word for "boy."

Primary Meanings of jockey

1.
nv
someone employed to ride horses in horse races
ride a racehorse as a professional jockey
2.
v
compete (for an advantage or a position)
Full Definitions of jockey
1

n someone employed to ride horses in horse races

Type of:
equestrian, horseback rider, horseman
a man skilled in equitation

n an operator of some vehicle or machine or apparatus

“he's a truck jockey
“a computer jockey
“a disc jockey
Type of:
manipulator, operator
an agent that operates some apparatus or machine

v ride a racehorse as a professional jockey

Type of:
horse-race
compete in a horse race
2

v compete (for an advantage or a position)

Type of:
maneuver, manoeuver, manoeuvre, operate
perform a movement in military or naval tactics in order to secure an advantage in attack or defense

v defeat someone through trickery or deceit

Synonyms:
cheat, chicane, chouse, screw, shaft
Type of:
beat, beat out, crush, shell, trounce, vanquish
come out better in a competition, race, or conflict

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