imply

Imply means to express, suggest, or show something without stating it directly: A friend’s gruff manner would imply that she’s in a foul mood.

The verb imply comes from a Latin word meaning “enfold or entangle” but has come to mean “to hint at.” You might imply something that you don’t want to outright say if you’re feeling coy. If you don’t call someone back after she leaves eight messages, you imply that you don’t want to chat. When you make a subtle suggestion, you imply.

Definitions of imply
  1. verb
    express or state indirectly
    synonyms: connote
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    type of:
    evince, express, show
    give expression to
  2. verb
    have as a logical consequence
    synonyms: entail, mean
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    type of:
    necessitate
    cause to be a concomitant
  3. verb
    have as a necessary feature
    synonyms: involve
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    types:
    carry
    be necessarily associated with or result in or involve
    type of:
    feature, have
    have as a feature
  4. verb
    suggest as a logically necessary consequence; in logic
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    types:
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    presuppose, suppose
    require as a necessary antecedent or precondition
    intimate, suggest
    imply as a possibility
    connote, predicate
    involve as a necessary condition of consequence; as in logic
    make out
    imply or suggest
    type of:
    evince, express, show
    give expression to
  5. verb
    suggest that someone is guilty
    synonyms: incriminate, inculpate
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    type of:
    evoke, paint a picture, suggest
    call to mind
Commonly confused words

imply / infer

Imply and infer are opposites, like a throw and a catch. To imply is to hint at something, but to infer is to make an educated guess. The speaker does the implying, and the listener does the inferring.

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