sestet

The noun sestet means the six final lines of a sonnet, or another group of six lines of poetry. You might discuss a sestet during a college literature class.

Use sestet to talk about very specific lines of verse, the last six in a sonnet. It's most common to find a sestet in Italian sonnets, such as those written by Petrarch and Dante. In English poetry, it's more usual to see a couplet — two lines of verse — at the end of a sonnet. The noun sestet occasionally fills in for the word sextet, or group of six things. The Latin root is sextus, or "sixth."

Definitions of sestet
  1. noun
    a rhythmic group of six lines of verse
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    type of:
    stanza
    a fixed number of lines of verse forming a unit of a poem
  2. noun
    a set of six similar things considered as a unit
    synonyms: sextet, sextette
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    type of:
    set
    a group of things of the same kind that belong together and are so used
  3. noun
    six performers or singers who perform together
    synonyms: sextet, sextette
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    type of:
    musical group, musical organisation, musical organization
    an organization of musicians who perform together
  4. noun
    a musical composition written for six performers
    synonyms: sextet, sextette
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    type of:
    composition, musical composition, opus, piece, piece of music
    a musical work that has been created
  5. noun
    the cardinal number that is the sum of five and one
    synonyms: 6, Captain Hicks, VI, half a dozen, hexad, sextet, sextuplet, sise, six, sixer
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    type of:
    digit, figure
    one of the elements that collectively form a system of numeration
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