profound

When you need a word that's deeper than "deep," consider profound. A philosopher is likely to make many profound pronouncements.

Profundus literally means "deep" in Latin, and profound had the same meaning when it entered English in the 14th century. But even then, it also meant "figuratively deep" — that is, very great or intense: "The new laws have had a profound impact." Of people, it means "very knowledgeable or insightful," but sometimes when a person tries to sound profound, they're really just giving you superficial knowledge dressed up with big words.

Definitions of profound
  1. adjective
    situated at or extending to great depth; too deep to have been sounded or plumbed
    “the profound depths of the sea”
    synonyms: unfathomed, unplumbed, unsounded
    deep
    having great spatial extension or penetration downward or inward from an outer surface or backward or laterally or outward from a center; sometimes used in combination
  2. adjective
    coming from deep within one
    “a profound sigh”
    Synonyms:
    deep
    relatively deep or strong; affecting one deeply
  3. adjective
    showing intellectual penetration or emotional depth
    “the differences are profound
    “a profound insight”
    “a profound book”
    “a profound mind”
    profound contempt”
    profound regret”
    Synonyms:
    intense
    possessing or displaying a distinctive feature to a heightened degree
    deep
    marked by depth of thinking
    thoughtful
    having intellectual depth
    scholarly
    characteristic of scholars or scholarship
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    Antonyms:
    superficial
    concerned with or comprehending only what is apparent or obvious; not deep or penetrating emotionally or intellectually
    careless
    marked by lack of attention or consideration or forethought or thoroughness; not careful
    outward
    relating to physical reality rather than with thoughts or the mind
    apparent, ostensible, seeming
    appearing as such but not necessarily so
    dilettante, dilettanteish, dilettantish, sciolistic
    showing frivolous or superficial interest; amateurish
    facile
    arrived at without due care or effort; lacking depth
    glib
    marked by lack of intellectual depth
    looking, sounding
    appearing to be as specified; usually used as combining forms
    shallow
    lacking depth of intellect or knowledge; concerned only with what is obvious
    skin-deep
    penetrating no deeper than the skin: "her beauty is only skin-deep"
    frivolous
    not serious in content or attitude or behavior
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  4. adjective
    of the greatest intensity; complete
    “a profound silence”
    “a state of profound shock”
    Synonyms:
    intense
    possessing or displaying a distinctive feature to a heightened degree
  5. adjective
    (of sleep) deep and complete
    “fell into a profound sleep”
    synonyms: heavy, sound, wakeless
    deep
    relatively deep or strong; affecting one deeply
  6. adjective
    far-reaching and thoroughgoing in effect especially on the nature of something
    profound social changes”
    synonyms: fundamental
    important, significant
    important in effect or meaning
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