precede

To precede is to come before. A short speech will precede the dinner. As you walk down the garden path, the bed of roses precedes the holly bush. When marching into the room, the younger kids precede the older ones.

Precede is one of many verbs ending in "-ceed" or "-cede" that trace their roots back to the Latin word cedere which means "to go." For precede, know that it's pre "first" + cedere "go." When you precede, you go first. You might precede your best friend in line, lunch might precede math class, a joke might precede a lecture, and radio preceded television. Anything that goes first or comes before precedes.

Definitions of precede
1

v be earlier in time; go back further

“Stone tools precede bronze tools”
Synonyms:
antecede, antedate, forego, forgo, predate
Antonyms:
follow, postdate
be later in time
come after, follow
come after in time, as a result
show more antonyms...

v move ahead (of others) in time or space

Synonyms:
lead
Antonyms:
follow
to travel behind, go after, come after
Types:
head, lead
travel in front of; go in advance of others
draw away
move ahead of (one's competitors) in a race
Type of:
go, locomote, move, travel
change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically

v be the predecessor of

“Bill preceded John in the long line of Susan's husbands”
Synonyms:
come before
Antonyms:
come after, follow, succeed
be the successor (of)

v come before

“Most English adjectives precede the noun they modify”
Synonyms:
predate
Type of:
lie
be located or situated somewhere; occupy a certain position

v furnish with a preface or introduction

“She always precedes her lectures with a joke”
Synonyms:
introduce, preface, premise
Types:
preamble
make a preliminary introduction, usually to a formal document
prologise, prologize, prologuize
write or speak a prologue
Type of:
say, state, tell
express in words

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