poem

A poem is written by composing lines of metrical feet (those are like beats or counts of syllables), arranged rhythmically. If you're looking to impress your crush, try penning a poem.

Poetry is literature in metrical form, and a poem is what we call a piece of poetry. There are so many different kinds of poems it's almost impossible to define, but usually poems are written in short lines, and sometimes don't have too many lines. What counts in a poem is distilling something down, and finding the right words. If someone tells you that your Tweets are like little poems, then you must be a lovely writer.

Definitions of poem
  1. noun
    a composition written in metrical feet forming rhythmical lines
    synonyms: verse form
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    types:
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    abecedarius
    a poem having lines beginning with letters of the alphabet in regular order
    Alcaic, Alcaic verse
    verse in the meter used in Greek and Latin poetry consisting of strophes of 4 tetrametric lines; reputedly invented by Alcaeus
    ballad, lay
    a narrative poem of popular origin
    ballade
    a poem consisting of 3 stanzas and an envoy
    blank verse
    unrhymed verse (usually in iambic pentameter)
    elegy, lament
    a mournful poem; a lament for the dead
    epic, epic poem, epos, heroic poem
    a long narrative poem telling of a hero's deeds
    free verse, vers libre
    unrhymed verse without a consistent metrical pattern
    haiku
    an epigrammatic Japanese verse form of three short lines
    lyric, lyric poem
    a short poem of songlike quality
    rondeau, rondel
    a French verse form of 10 or 13 lines running on two rhymes; the opening phrase is repeated as the refrain of the second and third stanzas
    sonnet
    a verse form consisting of 14 lines with a fixed rhyme scheme
    tanka
    a form of Japanese poetry; the 1st and 3rd lines have five syllables and the 2nd, 4th, and 5th have seven syllables
    terza rima
    a verse form with a rhyme scheme: aba bcb cdc, etc.
    rhyme, verse
    a piece of poetry
    versicle
    a short verse said or sung by a priest or minister in public worship and followed by a response from the congregation
    villanelle
    a poem comprised of five tercets and a quatrain and in which the first and third lines of the first tercet repeat as alternating end lines in subsequent stanzas
    sestina
    a poem comprised of six sestets and a final tercet and in which the end words of each line recur in each stanza in rotating order
    epigram
    a short, witty, and often satirical poem focusing on a single topic or observation
    clerihew
    a witty satiric verse containing two rhymed couplets and mentioning a famous person
    doggerel, doggerel verse, jingle
    a comic verse of irregular measure
    limerick
    a humorous verse form of 5 anapestic lines with a rhyme scheme aabba
    roundel
    English form of rondeau having three triplets with a refrain after the first and third
    rondelet
    a shorter form of rondeau
    chanson de geste
    Old French epic poems
    rhapsody
    an epic poem adapted for recitation
    Italian sonnet, Petrarchan sonnet
    a sonnet consisting of an octave with the rhyme pattern abbaabba, followed by a sestet with the rhyme pattern cdecde or cdcdcd
    Elizabethan sonnet, English sonnet, Shakespearean sonnet
    a sonnet consisting three quatrains and a concluding couplet in iambic pentameter with the rhyme pattern abab cdcd efef gg
    Spenserian sonnet
    a sonnet consisting of three quatrains and a concluding couplet in iambic pentameter with the rhyme pattern abab bcbd cdcd ee
    ode
    a lyric poem with complex stanza forms
    sursum corda
    (Roman Catholic Church) a Latin versicle meaning `lift up your hearts'
    heroic, heroic meter, heroic verse
    a verse form suited to the treatment of heroic or elevated themes; dactylic hexameter or iambic pentameter
    Edda
    either of two distinct works in Old Icelandic dating from the late 13th century and consisting of 34 mythological and heroic ballads composed between 800 and 1200; the primary source for Scandinavian mythology
    type of:
    literary composition, literary work
    imaginative or creative writing
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