The glaze on a doughnut is the thin sweet coating that makes your fingers sticky. The glaze on a coffee table is the shiny coating that makes it glossy. The glaze on your friend's eyes as you talk is a sign that maybe you're boring her.

Like glass, a glaze is a shiny clear substance so it's no surprise that they both come from the same root word glas. Objects that have a glaze on them include ceramic pots and doughnuts. If you glaze over something, you're covering it with a thin clear substance that makes it look polished. If someone says your eyes are starting to glaze over, snap out of it and look alive.

Definitions of glaze

n a coating for ceramics, metal, etc.

luster, lustre
a surface coating for ceramics or porcelain
Type of:
coating, finish, finishing
a decorative texture or appearance of a surface (or the substance that gives it that appearance)

n any of various thin shiny (savory or sweet) coatings applied to foods

Type of:
a flavorful addition on top of a dish

n a glossy finish on a fabric

Type of:
burnish, gloss, glossiness, polish
the property of being smooth and shiny

v coat with a glaze

“the potter glazed the dishes”
glaze the bread with eggwhite”
Type of:
coat, surface
put a coat on; cover the surface of; furnish with a surface

v coat with something sweet, such as a hard sugar glaze

candy, sugarcoat
Type of:
dulcify, dulcorate, edulcorate, sweeten
make sweeter in taste

v become glassy or take on a glass-like appearance

“Her eyes glaze over when she is bored”
glass, glass over, glaze over
Type of:
undergo a change; become different in essence; losing one's or its original nature

v furnish with glass

provide with two sheets of glass
Type of:
furnish, provide, render, supply
give something useful or necessary to

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