custodian

You may know the custodian at your school — the person who's in charge of taking care of the building, in keeping it clean, making sure the heat works, and the roof doesn't leak.

The word custodian comes from Latin custos, meaning "guardian," and anyone who looks after something can be a custodian. You might be the custodian of your club's records — you take care of the files and keep them up to date. Or you could be the custodian of the crown jewels — you hold the keys to the treasury and it's your job to make sure the jewels don't get lost or stolen.

Definitions of custodian
1

n one having charge of buildings or grounds or animals

Synonyms:
keeper, steward
Types:
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caretaker
a custodian who is hired to take care of something (property or a person)
conservator, curator
the custodian of a collection (as a museum or library)
game warden, gamekeeper
a person employed to take care of game and wildlife
greenskeeper
someone responsible for the maintenance of a golf course
house sitter
a custodian who lives in and cares for a house while the regular occupant is away (usually without an exchange of money)
janitor
someone employed to clean and maintain a building
lighthouse keeper
the keeper of a lighthouse
critter sitter, pet sitter
someone left in charge of pets while their owners are away from home
zoo keeper
the chief person responsible for a zoological garden
concierge
a French caretaker of apartments or a hotel; lives on the premises and oversees people entering and leaving and handles mail and acts as janitor or porter
sacristan, sexton
an officer of the church who is in charge of sacred objects
super, superintendent
a caretaker for an apartment house; represents the owner as janitor and rent collector
verger
a church officer who takes care of the interior of the building and acts as an attendant (carries the verge) during ceremonies
warrener
maintains a rabbit warren
Type of:
defender, guardian, protector, shielder
a person who cares for persons or property

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