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Here at Vocabulary.com we're in the process of building a library of ready-made lists based on literature commonly taught in English and ELA classrooms. Please use them! And check out these tips for getting more out of them when you do. Continue reading...
When Snoopy takes out his typewriter and begins to compose a novel atop his doghouse, he always begins with "It was a dark and stormy night..." This phrase — originally appearing in a schmaltzy 19th century British novel — has come to symbolize all that can go wrong with melodramatic writing, especially the clumsy attempts of a writer trying to evoke a dramatic setting within the first sentence of a work of literature. Continue reading...
We've just added five new interactive lists of vocabulary from Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye. Continue reading...

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List of the Week: Jonathan Safran Foer

List of the Week: Jonathan Safran Foer

Test your vocabulary against Jonathan Safran Foer's with this new, interactive Vocabulary List of words from his novel Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
At Vocabulary.com, we take the concept of word mastery seriously. Here's why. Continue reading...
Despite its popularity among teens, you're not going to find class sets of Stephenie Meyer's Twilight series in the English department book rooms across the country. Even if most teachers don't incorporate trendy literature into their class syllabus, it doesn't mean that they can't take advantage of the excitement of the fad and harness it to teach some valuable lessons about writing, editing, and word choice. Continue reading...
Flexible and inflexible are opposites, but flammable and inflammable are not. Why is this? From a morphological and contextual perspective, Susan Ebbers discusses how to help students come to grips with confusing words, including inflammable, impregnable, and infamous. Continue reading...
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