"Twilight," Vocabulary from Ch's 11-The Epilogue 150 words

As you read Stephanie Meyer's vampire-romance novel "Twilight" (2005), learn these word lists: Ch's 1-5, Ch's 6-10, and Ch 11 – The Epilogue.
  1. acerbic
    harsh or corrosive in tone
    “Thanks so much,” I said, my voice acerbic.
  2. alight
    lighted up by or as by fire or flame
    I took a step back toward him, my eyes alight with curiosity.
  3. alleviate
    provide physical relief, as from pain
    “Okay, then,” I said flippantly, trying to alleviate the suddenly tense atmosphere.
  4. aloof
    remote in manner
    His voice was aloof.
  5. ambivalent
    uncertain or unable to decide about what course to follow
    I sighed in relief again when Mr. Banner turned the lights on, finally glancing at Edward; he was looking at me, his eyes ambivalent.
  6. apropos
    of an appropriate or pertinent nature
    “I should have let you drive yourself today,” he announced, apropos of nothing, while I chewed.
  7. arctic
    extremely cold
    I opened the door, and the arctic draft that burst into the car helped clear my head.
  8. ashen
    anemic looking from illness or emotion
    Face ashen, eyes wide, I sat like a bird locked in the eyes of a snake.
  9. bleak
    unpleasantly cold and damp
    Edward’s voice was low and bleak.
  10. blissful
    completely happy and contented
    When I woke to the pearl gray morning, my mood was blissful.
  11. brusquely
    in a blunt direct manner
    “Excuse me,” she said brusquely to Edward.
  12. buoyant
    tending to float on a liquid or rise in air or gas
    I asked, tentative, not wanting to upset his buoyant humor.
  13. chivalry
    the medieval principles governing knighthood and knightly conduct
    Mercifully, some vestiges of Mike’s chivalry still survived; he came to stand beside me.
  14. circuitous
    deviating from a straight course
    I wasn’t used to having to go to such circuitous measures, listening to your words in Jessica’s mind . . . her mind isn’t very original, and it was annoying to have to stoop to that.
  15. clarify
    make clear by removing impurities or solids, as by heating
    “Well,” I clarified, “I was mostly wondering about your reaction.”
  16. converge
    be adjacent or come together
    They gathered together, block¬ing me from view as they converged.
  17. curfew
    an order that after a specific time certain activities (as being outside on the streets) are prohibited
    These days I had rules that hadn’t existed before: curfews . . . visiting hours.
  18. deftly
    in a deft manner
    She deftly rolled the hems a few times so I could stand.
  19. dejection
    a state of melancholy depression
    He smiled, holding my glance, trying to lift me out of my sudden, unexplained dejection.
  20. deluge
    a heavy rain
    We sat in front of Charlie’s house for hours, as the sky darkened and rain plummeted around us in a sudden deluge.
  21. deplorable
    of very poor quality or condition
    I’ve told you, on the one hand, the hunger — the thirst — that, deplorable creature that I am, I feel for you.
  22. deprivation
    the disadvantage that results from losing something
    My brain had worked slowly through the fog of sleep deprivation.
  23. diabolical
    showing the cunning or ingenuity or wickedness typical of a devil
    “She’s diabolical,” Emmett chuckled.
  24. digit
    a finger or toe in human beings or corresponding body part in other vertebrates
    There, on the whiteboard, was a ten-digit number written in a small, neat hand.
  25. discernible
    perceptible by the senses or intellect
    The forest encroached on both sides, leaving the road ahead only discernible for a few meters as it twisted, serpentlike, around the ancient trees.
  26. disconcerting
    causing an emotional disturbance
    Realizing what I wished, he flipped his palm up in one of those blindingly fast, disconcerting movements of his.
  27. dispel
    to cause to separate and go in different directions
    While I shook my head to dispel the direction my thoughts had taken, I thought of something else.
  28. diversion
    a turning aside (of your course or attention or concern)
    “I wasn’t being nice,” I confessed, ignoring his attempt at diversion, looking down at my knees.
  29. edible
    suitable for use as food
    “Yeah, it’s an off day when I don’t get somebody telling me how edible I smell.”
  30. empathize
    be understanding of
    Though” — he half-smiled — “as you are not addicted to any illegal substances, you probably can’t empathize completely.
  31. era
    a period marked by distinctive character or reckoned from a fixed point or event
    Something about her heart-shaped face, her billows of soft, caramel-colored hair, reminded me of the ingenues of the silent-movie era.
  32. erratic
    liable to sudden unpredictable change
    It didn’t matter that my body was rigid as a plank, my hands balled into fists, my breathing erratic .
  33. excruciating
    extremely painful
    He was smiling, relaxed — and, as usual, perfect and beautiful to an excruciating degree.
  34. exhilaration
    the feeling of lively and cheerful joy
    The sense of exhilaration that usually seemed to possess Edward as he ran was completely absent, replaced by a fury that consumed him and drove him still faster.
  35. facade
    the face or front of a building
    I’d never seen him so completely freed of that carefully cultivated facade.
  36. feint
    any distracting or deceptive maneuver (as a mock attack)
    James feinted slightly to the side, and Edward shifted in response.
  37. feline
    of or relating to cats
    Her posture was distinctly feline.
  38. feral
    wild and menacing
    Edward bared his teeth, crouching in defense, a feral snarl ripping from his throat.
  39. furtively
    in a furtive manner
    I could see a few of the other kids in class eye¬ing me furtively.
  40. futility
    uselessness as a consequence of having no practical result
    I struggled violently, with total futility.
  41. groggy
    stunned or confused and slow to react (as from blows or drunkenness or exhaustion)
    I lay with my arm across my eyes, groggy and dazed.
  42. haphazard
    dependent upon or characterized by chance
    Phoenix — the palm trees, the scrubby creosote, the haphazard lines of the intersect¬ing freeways, the green swaths of golf courses and tur¬quoise splotches of swimming pools, all submerged in a thin smog and embraced by the short, rocky ridges that weren’t really big enough to be called mountains.
  43. havoc
    violent and needless disturbance
    His eyes burned with sincerity for a protracted moment — playing havoc with the rhythm of my heart — and then turned playful.
  44. hysteria
    state of violent mental agitation
    I choked back the hysteria that threatened to explode, but a small giggle managed to get out despite my efforts.
  45. imbecile
    a person of subnormal intelligence
    “Listen, Charlie’s not an imbecile,” I protested.
  46. immortality
    the quality or state of being immortal
    Immortality must grant endless patience.
  47. immune
    relating to the condition of immunity
    Now he is all but immune to the scent of human blood, and he is able to do the work he loves without agony.
  48. impending
    close in time; about to occur
    From the cheerful topic of my impending demise, we were suddenly declaring ourselves.
  49. imperceptibly
    in an imperceptible manner or to an imperceptible degree
    As I fidgeted and paced, they simply grew more still, two statues whose eyes followed me imperceptibly as I moved.
  50. incarnation
    the act of attributing human characteristics to abstract ideas etc.
    “But honestly,” I teased, “for that to bother you, after I have to hear that Rosalie — Rosalie, the incarnation of pure beauty, Rosalie — was meant for you.
  51. ironic
    characterized by often poignant difference or incongruity between what is expected and what actually is
    “It is sort of ironic.”
  52. labyrinth
    complex system of paths or tunnels in which it is easy to get lost
    The forest spread out around us in a boundless labyrinth of ancient trees, and I began to be nervous that we would never find our way out again.
  53. latter
    the second of two or the second mentioned of two
    The latter instinct proved correct — my truck sat in the same space he’d parked his Volvo in this morning.
  54. lax
    lacking in rigor or strictness
    Occasionally I would permit myself a quick glance in his direction, but he never seemed to re¬lax, either.
  55. leonine
    of or characteristic of or resembling a lion
    No one else seemed to know quite what to say, and then Jasper was there — tall and leonine.
  56. lethal
    of an instrument of certain death
    He’s absolutely lethal.
  57. lethargic
    deficient in alertness or activity
    Now he is able to manipulate the emo¬tions of those around him — calm down a room of angry people, for example, or excite a lethargic crowd, conversely.
  58. lithe
    moving and bending with ease
    He was on his feet in one of his lithe, almost invisibly quick movements.
  59. livid
    furiously angry
    She stared back at him with livid disbelief.
  60. magnitude
    the property of relative size or extent (whether large or small)
    I’d dealt with temptation before, not of this magnitude, not even close, but I was strong.
  61. manacle
    shackle that consists of a metal loop that can be locked around the wrist; usually used in pairs
    But his long hands formed manacles around my wrists as he spoke.
  62. maneuver
    a military training exercise
    She must be attributing the change in her vision to some maneuver of the tracker’s rather than a betrayal by me.
  63. mar
    make imperfect
    Sometimes they live separately from us, as a mar¬ried couple.
  64. martyr
    one who voluntarily suffers death as the penalty for refusing to renounce their religion
    He waited by the passenger door with a martyred expression that was easy to understand.
  65. marvel
    be amazed at
    I marveled again at the perfect texture, satin smooth, cool as stone.
  66. masochistic
    deriving pleasure or sexual gratification from being abused or dominated
    “What a sick, masochistic lion.”
  67. massacre
    the savage and excessive killing of many people
    “Do you want me to bolt the doors so you can massacre the unsuspecting townsfolk?”
  68. mayhem
    violent and needless disturbance
    He touched a comparatively sedate quartet of figures painted on the highest balcony, looking down calmly on the mayhem below them.
  69. meditation
    continuous and profound contemplation or musing on a subject or series of subjects of a deep or abstruse nature
    We lay silently, wrapped in our individual meditations.
  70. melancholy
    a constitutional tendency to be gloomy and depressed
    The song he was still playing, my song, drifted to an end, the final chords shifting to a more melancholy key.
  71. mercurial
    liable to sudden unpredictable change
    But his mercurial mood shifted on me.
  72. mirage
    an optical illusion in which atmospheric refraction by a layer of hot air distorts or inverts reflections of distant objects
    Hesitantly, always afraid, even now, that he would dis¬appear like a mirage, too beautiful to be real . . . hesitantly, I reached out one finger and stroked the back of his shim¬mering hand, where it lay within my reach.
  73. mocking
    abusing vocally; expressing contempt or ridicule
    His smile turned mocking.
  74. morgue
    a building (or room) where dead bodies are kept before burial or cremation
    They brought her straight to the hospital morgue, though, somehow, her heart was still beating.”
  75. motif
    a unifying idea that is a recurrent element in literary or artistic work
    I searched for some logic, some binding motif the collection had in common, but I found nothing in my hasty examination.
  76. mythical
    based on or told of in traditional stories; lacking factual basis or historical validity
    “You are mythical, after all.”
  77. nomad
    a member of a people who have no permanent home but move about according to the seasons
    Nomads, for the most part.
  78. noncommittal
    refusing to bind oneself to a particular course of action or view or the like
    I nodded noncommittally, keeping my eyes down as I flipped sandwiches.
  79. obscure
    not clearly understood or expressed
    “It’s twilight,” Edward murmured, looking at the western horizon, obscured as it was with clouds.
  80. obsolete
    no longer in use
    The trees held their protecting shadow right up to the walls of the house that rose among them, making obsolete the deep porch that wrapped around the first story.
  81. optometrist
    a person skilled in testing for defects of vision in order to prescribe corrective glasses
    “Time to visit the optometrist,” I muttered.
  82. ostentatious
    intended to attract notice and impress others
    Ostentatious,” he muttered.
  83. pallor
    unnatural lack of color in the skin (as from bruising or sickness or emotional distress)
    The man in front was easily the most beautiful, his skin olive-toned beneath the typical pallor, his hair a glossy black.
  84. patina
    a fine coating of oxide on the surface of a metal
    My hand raised automatically, one fin¬ger extended as if to touch the large wooden cross, its dark patina contrasting with the lighter tone of the wall.
  85. penance
    voluntary self-punishment in order to atone for some wrongdoing
    By night he studied music, science, medicine — and found his calling, his penance, in that, in saving human lives.”
  86. peril
    a state of danger involving risk
    “I’ll do the laun¬dry tonight — that ought to be fraught with peril.”
  87. persona
    (Jungian psychology) a personal facade that one presents to the world
    She was happy, absorbed — she seemed like a new, mysterious being to me then, someone outside the “mom” persona I took for granted.
  88. pretense
    the act of giving a false appearance
    Following the same instinct that had prompted me to lie to Mike, I called Jessica on the pretense of wishing her luck at the dance.
  89. primordial
    having existed from the beginning; in an earliest or original stage or state
    The gloom of the forest didn’t re¬lent, though, for there were six primordial cedars that shaded an entire acre with their vast sweep of branches.
  90. privation
    act of depriving someone of food or money or rights
    I normally wouldn’t condone that type of behavior in myself, but tomorrow would be com¬plicated enough without me being loopy from sleep de¬privation on top of everything else.
  91. probe
    an exploratory action or expedition
    His quiet, probing questions kept me talking freely, forgetting, in the dim light of the storm, to be embar¬rassed for monopolizing the conversation.
  92. profanity
    vulgar or irreverent speech or action
    Edward was growling something too fast for me to un¬derstand, but it sounded a lot like a string of profanities.
  93. profound
    situated at or extending to great depth; too deep to have been sounded or plumbed
    The respect in his voice was profound whenever he spoke of his father figure.
  94. prolong
    lengthen in time; cause to be or last longer
    Perhaps he would hesitate to prolong the moment, that ideal moment of anticipation, sometimes better than the kiss itself.
  95. protracted
    relatively long in duration; tediously protracted
    His eyes burned with sincerity for a protracted moment — playing havoc with the rhythm of my heart — and then turned playful.
  96. proximity
    the property of being close together
    He reached across to open my door for me, and his sudden proximity sent my heart into frenzied palpitations.
  97. pulpit
    a platform raised above the surrounding level to give prominence to the person on it
    It hung on the wall above the pulpit in the vicarage where he preached.”
  98. puncture
    pierce with a pointed object; make a hole into
    The cabbie’s question punctured my fantasy, letting all the colors run out of my lovely delusions.
  99. pursuit
    the act of pursuing in an effort to overtake or capture
    He ran through the streets, and Carlisle — he was twenty-three and very fast — was in the lead of the pursuit.
  100. quest
    the act of searching for something
    I was careful not to over-emphasize the word boys in my quest to be truthful with Charlie.
  101. ravenous
    extremely hungry
    I realized now that I was ravenous.
  102. rebuff
    a deliberate discourteous act (usually as an expression of anger or disapproval)
    Carlisle’s firm rebuff was directed toward James.
  103. reconcile
    come to terms
    The two desires are impossible to reconcile.
  104. reflexive
    referring back to itself
    Reflexively, his eyes flickered to another picture — the most colorful of them all, the most ornately framed, and the largest; it was twice as wide as the door it hung next to.
  105. reluctant
    not eager
    Mr. Banner shoved the tape into the reluctant VCR and walked to the wall to turn off the lights.
  106. remorse
    a feeling of deep regret (usually for some misdeed)
    Jacob scowled and ducked his head while I fought back a surge of remorse.
  107. render
    give or supply
    I stared at the precise rendering of my mother’s family room.
  108. repel
    force or drive back
    Most humans instinctively shy away from us, are repelled by our alienness.
  109. reprieve
    postpone the punishment of a convicted criminal, such as an execution
    There was no escape, no reprieve.
  110. resonant
    characterized by resonance
    I recognized Billy’s resonant voice easily, despite the years.
  111. retort
    a quick reply to a question or remark (especially a witty or critical one)
    “This truck is old enough to be your car’s grandfather — have some respect,” I retorted.
  112. reverent
    feeling or showing profound respect or veneration
    His expression became awed, almost reverent.
  113. rhetorical
    of or relating to rhetoric
    It was clearly a rhetorical question.
  114. rigidity
    the physical property of being stiff and resisting bending
    A swift rigidity fell on all of them as James lurched one step forward into a crouch.
  115. ruse
    a deceptive maneuver (especially to avoid capture)
    “And you’ll make it look like that’s a ruse, obviously.
  116. sanctuary
    a consecrated place where sacred objects are kept
    There was no time to look back at my house, and I didn’t want to see it as it was now — empty, a symbol of fear instead of sanctuary.
  117. saturate
    infuse or fill completely
    “Do you want to go home?” he said quietly, a different pain than mine saturating his voice.
  118. scoff
    laugh at with contempt and derision
    Could he really believe the impossible legends his son had scoffed at?
  119. scowl
    frown with displeasure
    Jacob scowled and ducked his head while I fought back a surge of remorse.
  120. scrutiny
    the act of examining something closely (as for mistakes)
    I kept my face composed, aware of his scrutiny as I lis¬tened.
  121. sedate
    characterized by dignity and propriety
    He touched a comparatively sedate quartet of figures painted on the highest balcony, looking down calmly on the mayhem below them.
  122. serenity
    the absence of mental stress or anxiety
    That must have been what alerted Jasper, why a fresh wave of serenity filled the car.
  123. shackle
    a restraint that confines or restricts freedom (especially something used to tie down or restrain a prisoner)
    “Bring on the shackles — I’m your prisoner.”
  124. sinuous
    curved or curving in and out
    She left without another word; her walk was so fluid, so sinuous that I felt a sharp pang of jealousy.
  125. slack
    not tense or taut
    As soon as I was done she handed me her slacks.
  126. solace
    comfort in disappointment or misery
    The only solace, the only hope I had left, was knowing that I would see Edward soon.
  127. sparse
    not dense
    The hardest thing to explain was why it was so beautiful to me — to justify a beauty that didn’t depend on the sparse, spiny vegetation that often looked half dead, a beauty that had more to do with the exposed shape of the land, with the shallow bowls of valleys between the craggy hills, and the way they held on to the sun.
  128. speculate
    reflect deeply on a subject
    I hurried through my cereal, speculating.
  129. sulk
    be in a huff and display one's displeasure
    He sulked again.
  130. superstitious
    showing ignorance of the laws of nature and faith in magic or chance
    Superstitious old man,” Jacob muttered under his breath.
  131. surreal
    characterized by fantastic imagery and incongruous juxtapositions
    I’d never seen him dress in black before, and, with the contrast against his pale skin, his beauty was absolutely surreal.
  132. tangible
    perceptible by the senses especially the sense of touch
    A movie day — the lift in the class atmosphere was almost tangible.
  133. tattered
    worn to shreds; or wearing torn or ragged clothing
    His eyes appraised me, taking in the damp hair, the tattered shirt.
  134. tenacity
    persistent determination
    Emmett brought his strength, Rosalie her . . . tenacity.
  135. terminal
    occurring at or forming an end or termination
    Edward’s plane was landing in termi¬nal four, the largest terminal, where most flights landed — so it wasn’t surprising that his was.
  136. threshold
    the starting point for a new state or experience
    Jacob asked as he pushed his father over the lip of the threshold.
  137. thwarted
    disappointingly unsuccessful
    He’s not used to being thwarted, no matter how insignificant the object.
  138. tranquil
    (of a body of water) free from disturbance by heavy waves
    I felt a tranquil atmosphere settle around me.
  139. treacherous
    dangerously unstable and unpredictable
    Five miles of treacherous roots and loose stones, trying to twist my ankles or otherwise in¬capacitate me.
  140. tyrant
    a cruel and oppressive dictator
    “I have to, because I’m going to be a little . . . over¬bearingly protective over the next few days — or weeks — and I wouldn’t want you to think I’m naturally a tyrant.”
  141. unfathomable
    impossible to come to understand
    As many years of unfathomable experience as he had, this was hard for him, too.
  142. urbane
    showing a high degree of refinement and the assurance that comes from wide social experience
    Their sharp eyes carefully took in the more polished, urbane stance of Carlisle, who, flanked by Emmett and Jasper, stepped guardedly forward to meet them.
  143. vampire
    (folklore) a corpse that rises at night to drink the blood of the living
    I doubted there were any etiquette books detailing how to dress when your vampire sweetheart takes you home to meet his vampire family.
  144. venison
    meat from a deer used as food
    Had he not eaten venison in his former life?
  145. venom
    toxin secreted by animals; secreted by certain snakes and poisonous insects (e.g., spiders and scorpions)
    I flinched back from the venom in her voice.
  146. vicarious
    experienced at secondhand
    Whenever I fidgeted or complained, she re¬minded me that she didn’t have any memories of be¬ing human, and asked me not to ruin her vicarious fun.
  147. wraith
    a mental representation of some haunting experience
    They were much more civilized and educated than the wraiths of the London sewers.”
  148. writhe
    to move in a twisting or contorted motion, (especially when struggling)
    The canvas overflowed with bright figures in swirling robes, writhing around long pillars and off marbled balconies.
  149. wry
    humorously sarcastic or mocking
    “Alice, Bella — Bella, Alice,” he introduced us, ges¬turing casually with his hand, a wry smile on his face.
  150. yearn
    desire strongly or persistently
    His anguish was plain; I yearned to comfort him, but I was at a loss to know how.