converge

Use the verb converge to describe something that comes together at a common point: “Thousands of Elvis fans plan to converge on the small Arkansas town where unconfirmed sightings of the deceased superstar eating at a local barbeque restaurant had been widely reported.”

Two roads, a roomful of politicians, or a group of rabid fans — when things come together from different points they converge. Converge traces back to the Latin word vergere, meaning “to bend or to turn." The prefix con- means "with," a good way to remember that things that converge come together. Don't confuse it with diverge, which means the opposite: "move away," because the prefix “dis-” means “apart.”

DEFINITIONS OF: converge

1

v be adjacent or come together

“The lines converge at this point”
Synonyms:
meet
adjoin, contact, meet, touch
be in direct physical contact with; make contact
Antonyms:
diverge
extend in a different direction
diverge
have no limits as a mathematical series
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Types:
breast
meet at breast level

v approach a limit as the number of terms increases without limit

Antonyms:
diverge
have no limits as a mathematical series
Type of:
approach, border on
come near or verge on, resemble, come nearer in quality, or character

v move or draw together at a certain location

“The crowd converged on the movie star”
Antonyms:
diverge
move or draw apart
Types:
concentrate
draw together or meet in one common center
Type of:
assemble, foregather, forgather, gather, meet
collect in one place

v come together so as to form a single product

“Social forces converged to bring the Fascists back to power”
Type of:
merge, unify, unite
become one
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