unwind

The literal meaning of the verb unwind is exactly what it sounds like — the opposite of "wind," or twist. But when someone says they need to unwind, they mean that they need to relax.

When you come inside on a cold, snowy day, you might first unwind the scarf from around your neck, loosening and untwisting it. If you then grab a cup of hot chocolate and put your feet up on the coffee table, you’ll feel yourself start to unwind, or become less tense. Unwind has been in use since the fourteenth century, but the figurative meaning of “to relax” dates only from the mid-twentieth century.

Definitions of unwind
1

v reverse the winding or twisting of

unwind a ball of yarn”
Synonyms:
unroll, wind off
Antonyms:
roll, twine, wind, wrap
arrange or or coil around
Type of:
displace, move
cause to move or shift into a new position or place, both in a concrete and in an abstract sense

v separate the tangles of

Synonyms:
disentangle
Types:
roll out, straighten
straighten by unrolling
uncoil
unwind or untwist
Type of:
undo
cancel, annul, or reverse an action or its effect

v become less tense, rest, or take one's ease

Synonyms:
decompress, loosen up, relax, slow down, unbend
Antonyms:
tense, tense up
become tense, nervous, or uneasy
Types:
vege out, vegetate
engage in passive relaxation
sit back, take it easy
settle into a comfortable sitting position
Type of:
change state, turn
undergo a transformation or a change of position or action

v cause to feel relaxed

Synonyms:
loosen up, make relaxed, relax, unlax, unstrain
Antonyms:
strain, tense, tense up
cause to be tense and uneasy or nervous or anxious
Types:
unbend
release from mental strain, tension, or formality
Type of:
affect
act physically on; have an effect upon

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