moor

To moor is to tie up a ship, as in to moor the ocean liner to the docks. Or, if you're reading Victorian literature, a moor could be a mossy meet-up spot.

This word of many hats can also be a noun — a moor is mossy land covered in bushes and grass. The spooky dogs in Sherlock Holmes's The Hound of the Baskervilles lurk in the moor. With a capital "M," a Moor refers to a person descended from Muslims of northwestern Africa. It's usually used as a verb, though, meaning "to fasten a boat" — probably related to the Old English word mærels, "mooring rope." Say the word in a deep voice and it almost sounds like the foghorn on a ship that's about to moor in the harbor on a foggy night.

Primary Meanings of moor

1.
v
come into or dock at a wharf
2.
n
open land usually with peaty soil covered with heather and bracken and moss
Full Definitions of moor
1

v come into or dock at a wharf

Synonyms:
berth, wharf
Type of:
dock
come into dock

v secure in or as if in a berth or dock

Synonyms:
berth, tie up
Types:
wharf
moor at a wharf
Type of:
fasten, fix, secure
cause to be firmly attached

v secure with cables or ropes

moor the boat”
Type of:
fasten, fix, secure
cause to be firmly attached
2

n open land usually with peaty soil covered with heather and bracken and moss

Synonyms:
moorland
Examples:
Marston Moor
a former moor in northern England
Type of:
champaign, field, plain
extensive tract of level open land

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