leeward

The adjective leeward describes an area or side of a boat that's facing away from the wind. If you move to the leeward side of your sailboat, you're shifting to the sheltered, downwind side.

You're likely to hear the word leeward when you're on a boat, since wind direction is hugely important when you're sailing. You can, however, use it to describe any area that's protected from the wind, even when you're on land. Your tent might fare best if you pitch it on the leeward side of a valley, for example. The lee part of leeward comes from the Old English hleo, which means "shelter, defense, or protection."

Definitions of leeward
1

adj on the side away from the wind

“on the leeward side of the island”
Synonyms:
downwind, lee
towards the side away from the wind
Antonyms:
windward
on the side exposed to the wind
upwind, weather
towards the side exposed to wind
show more antonyms...

adv toward the wind

“they were sailing leeward
Synonyms:
upwind
Antonyms:
downwind, windward
away from the wind

n the direction in which the wind is blowing

Antonyms:
windward
the direction from which the wind is coming
Types:
leeward side, to leeward
the side sheltered from the wind
Type of:
direction
the spatial relation between something and the course along which it points or moves

n the side of something that is sheltered from the wind

Synonyms:
lee, lee side
Antonyms:
windward
the side of something that is toward the wind
Type of:
face, side
a surface forming part of the outside of an object

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