fable

A fable is a moral tale that often features animal characters. “The Tortoise and the Hare” is a well-known fable whose moral is "Slow and steady wins the race."

We often associate fables with the master of them all, Aesop. Among the most famous fables attributed to this storyteller of ancient Greece are "The Boy Who Cried Wolf" and "The Fox and the Grapes." But like its cousins tale, myth, and legend, the word fable is also used to describe a deliberate fabrication or fiction. In other words, it can be a polite way to describe a lie.

Definitions of fable
1

n a short moral story (often with animal characters)

Synonyms:
allegory, apologue, parable
Examples:
Pilgrim's Progress
an allegory written by John Bunyan in 1678
Types:
Aesop's fables
a collection of fables believed to have been written by the Greek storyteller Aesop
Type of:
story
a piece of fiction that narrates a chain of related events

n a story about mythical or supernatural beings or events

Synonyms:
legend
Types:
Arthurian legend
the legend of King Arthur and his court at Camelot
Type of:
story
a piece of fiction that narrates a chain of related events

n a deliberately false or improbable account

Synonyms:
fabrication, fiction
Types:
canard
a deliberately misleading fabrication
Type of:
falsehood, falsity, untruth
a false statement

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