1 2 3 Displaying 8-14 of 20 Articles
In anticipation of the announcement of the winner of The Man Booker International Prize this Wednesday, we're awarding our own prizes to the nominees today. But don't look here for an analysis of literary merit. We're considering these writers only in terms of their usefulness to vocabulary learners. Continue reading...
In an essay on writing in last week's The New Yorker, John McPhee describes drawing boxes around "perfectly O.K." words in a search for the "mot juste." Meanwhile, Virginia Woolf tells us words are a messy tangle that will always elude our best efforts to tie them down. Continue reading...
Today is Shakespeare's birthday! In honor of the great bard, learn new, comprehensive lists of words from some of his best known plays. Continue reading...
Apposite's a word you don't hear every day. Meaning "fitting and relevant," it is derived from the Latin terms "appositus" and "apponere." "Ponere" means to place, and thus "apponere" is "well-placed or well-put." Continue reading...
Topics: Writers
With the 200th birthday of Charles Dickens approaching (get your party hats ready for February 7th!), it's a good time to gauge the enormous impact he had on the English language. By many accounts he was the most widely read author of the Victorian era, and no writer since has held a candle to him in terms of popularity, prolificness, and influence in spreading new forms of the language — both highbrow and lowbrow. Continue reading...
A new play is opening tonight on Broadway, and it's a treat for language lovers. It's called "Chinglish," and it was written by David Henry Hwang, who won a Tony Award for "M. Butterfly." I had a chance to talk to Hwang about his comic exploration of the perils of cross-linguistic misunderstanding. Continue reading...
1 2 3 Displaying 8-14 of 20 Articles

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