The New York Times Learning Network has been running a Summer Reading Contest for students, and each week a different literacy organization judges the competition. This week, Vocabulary.com is honored to serve as the judge. Students, submit an entry and you could be a winner!

Here is this week's announcement:

Whether it was the 19 firefighters who lost their lives in Arizona, the revolt in EgyptMichael Cera, Wimbledon or pie, tell us what you found most compelling in The Times this week, and why.

Judges from Vocabulary.com, an adaptive learning system that motivates you to learn words and to remember them, will choose this week's winner(s), who will be published on Monday, July 22.

Need more details? The contest rules are all here, and you can read the work of previous winners here. A quick overview, though:

  • You can choose from anything published in the print paper or on NYTimes.com in 2013. And yes, videosgraphics, slide showsblogs and podcasts count.
  • We'll post this same Student Opinion question each Friday from today through Aug. 16, and you'll have until the next Friday to post your picks. Then we'll close that Student Opinion post and open a new one with the same question.
  • At the end of each week, our judges will choose at least one favorite answer to feature on the blog.
  • Feel free to participate each week, but we allow only one submission per person per week.
  • The contest is open to students ages 13 to 19.
  • Each response should be 350 words or fewer. (To check, you can paste yours into an online word-count tool like this one before you submit it.)
  • For privacy policy reasons, please don't include your last name, but please do include your age and hometown.

So, students: Tell us what you've read, watched or listened to in The Times recently that got your attention, and explain why.

Maybe you liked a piece because you had a personal connection to it, because it reminded you of someone or taught you something, or because it moved you or made you laugh. Or maybe you were annoyed by something you read and want to argue with it.

Whatever the case may be, we're interested in hearing what you're interested in.

To submit your entry, go to the Learning Network's post and write your response in the comments section (not the comments section below). We'll announce the winner or winners next week!