"Macbeth" Vocabulary from Act 4 32 words

While you are reading the Shakespearean tragedy "Macbeth," (etext found here), learn these word lists for each act: Act 1, Act 2, Act 3, Act 4, and Act 5.
  1. whine
    make a high-pitched, screeching noise
    Thrice and once the hedge-pig whined.
  2. cauldron
    a very large pot that is used for boiling
    Round about the cauldron go;
    In the poison'd entrails throw.
  3. swelter
    be uncomfortably hot
    Toad, that under cold stone
    Days and nights has thirty-one
    Swelter'd venom sleeping got,
    Boil thou first i' the charmed pot.
  4. boil
    immerse or be immersed in a boiling liquid, often for cooking purposes
    Toad, that under cold stone
    Days and nights has thirty-one
    Swelter'd venom sleeping got,
    Boil thou first i' the charmed pot.
  5. toil
    productive work (especially physical work done for wages)
    Double, double toil and trouble;
    Fire burn, and cauldron bubble.
  6. gruel
    a thin porridge (usually oatmeal or cornmeal)
    Scale of dragon, tooth of wolf,
    Witches' mummy, maw and gulf
    Of the ravin'd salt-sea shark,
    Root of hemlock digg'd i' the dark,
    Liver of blaspheming Jew,
    Gall of goat, and slips of yew
    Silver'd in the moon's eclipse,
    Nose of Turk and Tartar's lips,
    Finger of birth-strangled babe
    Ditch-deliver'd by a drab,
    Make the gruel thick and slab:
  7. vanquish
    come out better in a competition, race, or conflict
    Macbeth shall never vanquish'd be until
    Great Birnam wood to high Dunsinane hill
    Shall come against him.
  8. bound
    held with another element, substance or material in chemical or physical union
    That will never be
    Who can impress the forest, bid the tree
    Unfix his earth-bound root?
  9. filthy
    disgustingly dirty; filled or smeared with offensive matter
    Filthy hags!
    Why do you show me this?
  10. flee
    run away quickly
    'Tis two or three, my lord, that bring you word
    Macduff is fled to England.
  11. traitor
    someone who betrays his country by committing treason
    When our actions do not,
    Our fears do make us traitors.
  12. wisdom
    the trait of utilizing knowledge and experience with common sense and insight
    You know not
    Whether it was his wisdom or his fear.
  13. wit
    mental ability
    Thou speak'st with all thy wit: and yet, i' faith,
    With wit enough for thee.
  14. empty
    emptied of emotion
    Let us seek out some desolate shade, and there
    Weep our sad bosoms empty.
  15. sorrow
    sadness associated with some wrong done or some disappointment
    Let us rather
    Hold fast the mortal sword, and like good men
    Bestride our down-fall'n birthdom: each new morn
    New widows howl, new orphans cry, new sorrows
    Strike heaven on the face, that it resounds
    As if it felt with Scotland and yell'd out
    Like syllable of dolour.
  16. honest
    not disposed to cheat or defraud; not deceptive or fraudulent
    This tyrant, whose sole name blisters our tongues,
    Was once thought honest.
  17. grace
    elegance and beauty of movement or expression
    Though all things foul would wear the brows of grace,
    Yet grace must still look so.
  18. precious
    of high worth or cost
    Perchance even there where I did find my doubts.
    Why in that rawness left you wife and child,
    Those precious motives, those strong knots of love,
    Without leave-taking?
  19. tyranny
    dominance through threat of punishment and violence
    Bleed, bleed, poor country!
    Great tyranny! lay thou thy basis sure,
    For goodness dare not cheque thee
  20. gracious
    characterized by kindness and warm courtesy especially of a king to his subjects
    Here from gracious England have I offer
    Of goodly thousands
  21. vice
    moral weakness
    For all this,
    When I shall tread upon the tyrant's head,
    Or wear it on my sword, yet my poor country
    Shall have more vices than it had before,
    More suffer and more sundry ways than ever,
    By him that shall succeed.
  22. sundry
    consisting of a haphazard assortment of different kinds
    For all this,
    When I shall tread upon the tyrant's head,
    Or wear it on my sword, yet my poor country
    Shall have more vices than it had before,
    More suffer and more sundry ways than ever,
    By him that shall succeed.
  23. succeed
    be the successor (of)
    For all this,
    When I shall tread upon the tyrant's head,
    Or wear it on my sword, yet my poor country
    Shall have more vices than it had before,
    More suffer and more sundry ways than ever,
    By him that shall succeed.
  24. desire
    an inclination to want things
    Your wives, your daughters,
    Your matrons and your maids, could not fill up
    The cistern of my lust, and my desire
    All continent impediments would o'erbear
    That did oppose my will:
  25. avarice
    reprehensible acquisitiveness; insatiable desire for wealth (personified as one of the deadly sins)
    With this there grows
    In my most ill-composed affection such
    A stanchless avarice that, were I king,
    I should cut off the nobles for their lands,
    Desire his jewels and this other's house.
  26. quarrel
    an angry dispute
    I should forge
    Quarrels unjust against the good and loyal,
    Destroying them for wealth.
  27. govern
    exercise authority over; as of nations
    If such a one be fit to govern, speak:
    I am as I have spoken.
  28. gentle
    belonging to or characteristic of the nobility or aristocracy
    Note that he's not calling Malcolm gentle -- they're going to war, afterall. This is gentle as in "Gentleman."
    My ever-gentle cousin, welcome hither.
  29. grief
    something that causes great unhappiness
    What's the newest grief?
  30. comfort
    a feeling of freedom from worry or disappointment
    Be't their comfort
    We are coming thither: gracious England hath
    Lent us good Siward and ten thousand men
  31. slaughter
    kill a large number of people indiscriminately
    Your castle is surprised; your wife and babes
    Savagely slaughter'd: to relate the manner,
    Were, on the quarry of these murder'd deer,
    To add the death of you.
  32. fare
    proceed or get along
    Fare thee well, lord:
    I would not be the villain that thou think'st
    For the whole space that's in the tyrant's grasp,
    And the rich East to boot.