"Adventures of Huckleberry Finn," Vocabulary from Chapters 10-18 30 words

Mark Twain's classic is about, among other things, friendship and freedom on the Mississippi River (etext found here).

Learn these word lists based on the classic novel: Chapters 1-9, Chapters 10-18, Chapters 19-31, Chapters 32-43
  1. reasonable
    marked by sound judgment
    That sounded pretty reasonable, so I didn't say no more; but I couldn't keep from studying over it and wishing I knowed who shot the man, and what they done it for.
  2. rummage
    search haphazardly
    We rummaged the clothes we'd got, and found eight dollars in silver sewed up in the lining of an old blanket overcoat.
  3. study
    give careful consideration to
    Then he studied it over and said, couldn't I put on some of them old things and dress up like a girl?
  4. curious
    having curiosity aroused; eagerly interested in learning more
    When the woman stopped talking I looked up, and she was looking at me pretty curious and smiling a little.
  5. prompt
    performed with little or no delay
    Answer up prompt now--don't stop to study over it.
  6. awkward
    lacking grace or skill in manner or movement or performance
    And when you throw at a rat or anything, hitch yourself up a tiptoe and fetch your hand up over your head as awkward as you can, and miss your rat about six or seven foot.
  7. contrive
    make or work out a plan for; devise
    Why, I spotted you for a boy when you was threading the needle; and I contrived the other things just to make certain.
  8. jabber
    talk in a noisy, excited, or declamatory manner
    I told Jim all about the time I had jabbering with that woman; and Jim said she was a smart one, and if she was to start after us herself she wouldn't set down and watch a camp fire--no, sir, she'd fetch a dog.
  9. solemn
    dignified and somber in manner or character and committed to keeping promises
    It was kind of solemn, drifting down the big, still river, laying on our backs looking up at the stars, and we didn't ever feel like talking loud, and it warn't often that we laughed--only a little kind of a low chuckle.
  10. decent
    socially or conventionally correct; refined or virtuous
    Pap always said it warn't no harm to borrow things if you was meaning to pay them back some time; but the widow said it warn't anything but a soft name for stealing, and no decent body would do it.
  11. conclude
    decide by reasoning; draw or come to a conclusion
    But towards daylight we got it all settled satisfactory, and concluded to drop crabapples and p'simmons.
  12. bluff
    a high steep bank (usually formed by river erosion)
    When the lightning glared out we could see a big straight river ahead, and high, rocky bluffs on both sides.
  13. adventure
    a wild and exciting undertaking (not necessarily lawful)
    He'd call it an adventure--that's what he'd call it; and he'd land on that wreck if it was his last act.
  14. derrick
    a simple crane having lifting tackle slung from a boom
    The lightning showed us the wreck again just in time, and we fetched the stabboard derrick, and made fast there.
  15. treacherous
    tending to betray; especially having a treacherous character as attributed to the Carthaginians by the Romans
    You're the meanest, treacherousest hound in this country."
  16. morals
    motivation based on ideas of right and wrong
    I'm unfavorable to killin' a man as long as you can git aroun' it; it ain't good sense, it ain't good morals.
  17. plunder
    goods or money obtained illegally
    The skiff was half full of plunder which that gang had stole there on the wreck.
  18. gumption
    fortitude and determination
    Does I shin aroun' mongs' de neighbors en fine out which un you de bill do b'long to, en han' it over to de right one, all safe en soun', de way dat anybody dat had any gumption would?
  19. dismal
    causing dejection
    If you think it ain't dismal and lonesome out in a fog that way by yourself in the night, you try it once--you'll see.
  20. aggravate
    exasperate or irritate
    The lot of towheads was troubles we was going to get into with quarrelsome people and all kinds of mean folks, but if we minded our business and didn't talk back and aggravate them, we would pull through and get out of the fog and into the big clear river, which was the free States, and wouldn't have no more trouble.
  21. humble
    cause to feel shame; hurt the pride of
    It was fifteen minutes before I could work myself up to go and humble myself to a nigger; but I done it, and I warn't ever sorry for it afterwards, neither.
  22. conscience
    motivation deriving logically from ethical or moral principles that govern a person's thoughts and actions
    I couldn't get that out of my conscience, no how nor no way.
  23. miserable
    very unhappy; full of misery
    I got to feeling so mean and so miserable I most wished I was dead.
  24. wince
    draw back, as with fear or pain
    Three big men with guns pointed at me, which made me wince, I tell you;
  25. fret
    worry unnecessarily or excessively
    "Never mind, Buck, my boy," says the old man, "you'll have show enough, all in good time, don't you fret about that.
  26. outlandish
    conspicuously or grossly unconventional or unusual
    Well, there was a big outlandish parrot on each side of the clock, made out of something like chalk, and painted up gaudy.
  27. disposition
    your usual mood
    But I reckoned that with her disposition she was having a better time in the graveyard.
  28. tribute
    something given or done as an expression of esteem
    Every time a man died, or a woman died, or a child died, she would be on hand with her " tribute" before he was cold.
  29. deny
    refuse to recognize or acknowledge
    He was well born, as the saying is, and that's worth as much in a man as it is in a horse, so the Widow Douglas said, and nobody ever denied that she was of the first aristocracy in our town; and pap he always said it, too, though he warn't no more quality than a mudcat himself.
  30. astonished
    filled with the emotional impact of overwhelming surprise or shock
    I was a good deal astonished, but when I got my breath I asked her what the paper was about, and she asked me if I had read it, and I said no, and she asked me if I could read writing, and I told her "no, only coarse-hand," and then she said the paper warn't anything but a bookmark to keep her place, and I might go and play now.