"Hamlet," Vocabulary from Act 4 25 words

Possibly the greatest play ever written, William Shakespeare's "Hamlet" encompasses it all: family, revenge, the relationship between thought and action, and the essence of what it is to be a human being (etext found here).

Learn these word lists for the dramatic tragedy: Act 1, Act 2, Act 3, Act 4, Act 5
  1. providence
    the prudence and care exercised by someone in the management of resources
    It will be laid to us, whose providence
    Should have kept short, restrain'd and out of haunt,
    This mad young man.
  2. discord
    lack of agreement or harmony
    My soul is full of discord and dismay.
  3. kin
    related by blood
    Compounded it with dust, whereto 'tis kin.
  4. scourge
    whip
    He's loved of the distracted multitude,
    Who like not in their judgment, but their eyes;
    And where tis so, the offender's scourge is weigh'd,
    But never the offence.
  5. convocation
    a group gathered in response to a summons
    Not where he eats, but where he is eaten: a certain
    convocation of politic worms are e'en at him.
  6. conveyance
    the act of moving something from one location to another
    Tell him that, by his licence, Fortinbras
    Craves the conveyance of a promised march
    Over his kingdom.
  7. garrison
    the troops who maintain and guard a fortified place
    Yes, it is already garrison'd.
  8. bestial
    resembling a beast; showing lack of human sensibility
    Now, whether it be
    Bestial oblivion, or some craven scruple
    Of thinking too precisely on the event,
    A thought which, quarter'd, hath but one part wisdom
    And ever three parts coward, I do not know
    Why yet I live to say 'This thing's to do;'
  9. craven
    lacking even the rudiments of courage; abjectly fearful
    Now, whether it be
    Bestial oblivion, or some craven scruple
    Of thinking too precisely on the event,
    A thought which, quarter'd, hath but one part wisdom
    And ever three parts coward, I do not know
    Why yet I live to say 'This thing's to do;'
  10. scruple
    an ethical or moral principle that inhibits action
    Now, whether it be
    Bestial oblivion, or some craven scruple
    Of thinking too precisely on the event,
    A thought which, quarter'd, hath but one part wisdom
    And ever three parts coward, I do not know
    Why yet I live to say 'This thing's to do;'
  11. exhort
    force or impel in an indicated direction
    Examples gross as earth exhort me.
  12. importunate
    expressing earnest entreaty
    She is importunate, indeed distract.
  13. conjecture
    a hypothesis that has been formed by speculating or conjecturing (usually with little hard evidence)
    'Twere good she were spoken with; for she may strew
    Dangerous conjectures in ill-breeding minds.
  14. conceit
    an elaborate poetic image or a far-fetched comparison of very dissimilar things
    Conceit upon her father.
  15. inter
    place in a grave or tomb
    First, her father slain:
    Next, your son gone; and he most violent author
    Of his own just remove: the people muddied,
    Thick and unwholesome in their thoughts and whispers,
    For good Polonius' death; and we have done but greenly,
    In hugger-mugger to inter him.
  16. superfluous
    more than is needed, desired, or required
    O my dear Gertrude, this,
    Like to a murdering-piece, in many places
    Gives me superfluous death.
  17. impetuous
    marked by violent force
    The ocean, overpeering of his list,
    Eats not the flats with more impetuous haste
    Than young Laertes, in a riotous head
    O'erbears your officers.
  18. riotous
    characterized by unrest or disorder or insubordination
    The ocean, overpeering of his list,
    Eats not the flats with more impetuous haste
    Than young Laertes, in a riotous head,
    O'erbears your officers.
  19. antiquity
    the historic period preceding the Middle Ages in Europe
    The rabble call him lord;
    And, as the world were now but to begin,
    Antiquity forgot, custom not known,
    The ratifiers and props of every word,
    They cry 'Choose we: Laertes shall be king:'
  20. incensed
    angered at something unjust or wrong
    Tell me, Laertes,
    Why thou art thus incensed.
  21. repast
    the food served and eaten at one time
    To his good friends thus wide I'll ope my arms;
    And like the kind life-rendering pelican,
    Repast them with my blood.
  22. gallant
    a man who is much concerned with his dress and appearance
    I've seen myself, and served against, the French,
    And they can well on horseback: but this gallant
    Had witchcraft in't; he grew unto his seat;
    And to such wondrous doing brought his horse,
    As he had been incorpsed and demi-natured
    With the brave beast:
  23. abatement
    an interruption in the intensity or amount of something
    That we would do
    We should do when we would; for this 'would' changes
    And hath abatements and delays as many
    As there are tongues, are hands, are accidents;
  24. remiss
    failing in what duty requires
    He, being remiss,
    Most generous and free from all contriving,
    Will not peruse the foils.
  25. mountebank
    a flamboyant deceiver; one who attracts customers with tricks or jokes
    I bought an unction of a mountebank,
    So mortal that, but dip a knife in it,
    Where it draws blood no cataplasm so rare,
    Collected from all simples that have virtue
    Under the moon, can save the thing from death
    That is but scratch'd withal