"Wuthering Heights," Vocabulary from Chapters 6-9 48 words

A strong current of revenge flows through the pages of Emily Bronte's gothic romance, "Wuthering Heights" (etext found here).

Learn these word lists for the novel: Chapters 1-5, Chapters 6-9, Chapters 10-14, Chapters 15-20, Chapters 21-26, Chapters 27-30, Chapters 31-34
  1. portend
    indicate by signs
    I did remark, to be sure, that mounting the stairs made her breathe very quick, that the least sudden noise set her all in a quiver, and that she coughed troublesomely sometimes: but I knew nothing of what these symptoms portended, and had no impulse to sympathize with her.
  2. prattle
    speak (about unimportant matters) rapidly and incessantly
    She expressed pleasure, too, at finding a sister among her new acquaintance, and she prattled to Catherine and kissed her and ran about with her, and gave her quantities of presents, at the beginning.
  3. peevish
    easily irritated or annoyed
    Her affection tired very soon, however, and when she grew peevish, Hindley became tyrannical.
  4. tyrannical
    marked by unjust severity or arbitrary behavior
    Her affection tired very soon, however, and when she grew peevish, Hindley became tyrannical.
  5. evince
    give expression to
    A few words from her, evincing a dislike to Heathcliff, were enough to rouse in him all his old hatred of the boy.
  6. moor
    open land usually with peaty soil covered with heather and bracken and moss
    But it was one of their chief amusements to run away to the moors in the morning and remain there all day, and the after-punishment grew a mere thing to laugh at.
  7. vociferate
    utter in a very loud voice
    I vociferated curses enough to annihilate any fiend in Christendom; and I got a stone and thrust it between his jaws, and tried with all my might to cram it down his throat.
  8. gallows
    an instrument of execution consisting of a wooden frame from which a condemned person is executed by hanging
    You shall go to the gallows for this--Mr. Linton, sir, don't lay by your gun.'
  9. insolence
    the trait of being rude and impertinent; inclined to take liberties
    Where will their insolence stop?
  10. spectacles
    optical instrument consisting of a frame that holds a pair of lenses for correcting defective vision
    He pulled me under the chandelier, and Mrs. Linton placed her spectacles on her nose and raised her hands in horror.
  11. culpable
    deserving blame or censure as being wrong or evil or injurious
    'What culpable carelessness in her brother!' exclaimed Mr. Linton, turning from me to Catherine.
  12. recommence
    begin again
    "I recommenced cursing--don't be angry, Nelly--and so Robert was ordered to take me off.
  13. expostulate
    reason with (somebody) for the purpose of dissuasion
    Mrs. Linton took off the gray cloak of the dairymaid which we had borrowed for our excursion, shaking her head and expostulating with her, I suppose.
  14. burnish
    polish and make shiny
    I removed the habit, and there shone forth beneath, a grand plaid silk frock, white trousers, and burnished shoes; and, while her eyes sparkled joyfully when the dogs came bounding up to welcome her, she dare hardly touch them lest they should fawn upon her splendid garments.
  15. mire
    deep soft mud in water or slush
    Therefore, not to mention his clothes, which had seen three months' service in mire and dust, and his thick uncombed hair, the surface of his face and hands was dismally beclouded.
  16. blackguard
    someone who is morally reprehensible
    "Heathcliff, you may come forward," cried Mr. Hindley, enjoying his discomfiture, and gratified to see what a forbidding young blackguard he would be compelled to present himself.
  17. dour
    showing a brooding ill humor
    He managed to continue work till nine o'clock, and then marched dumb and dour to his chamber.
  18. impertinence
    an impudent statement
    He ventured this remark without any intention to insult; but Heathcliff's violent nature was not prepared to endure the appearance of impertinence from one whom he seemed to hate, even then, as a rival.
  19. lament
    a cry of sorrow and grief
    He seized a tureen of hot apple sauce--the first thing that came under his gripe--and dashed it full against the speaker's face and neck, who instantly commenced a lament that brought Isabella and Catherine hurrying to the place.
  20. equanimity
    steadiness of mind under stress
    The little party recovered its equanimity at sight of the fragrant feast.
  21. victuals
    any substance that can be used as food
    I did not call her unfeeling long, for I perceived she was in purgatory throughout the day, and wearying to find an opportunity of getting by herself, or paying a visit to Heathcliff, who had been locked up by the master, as I discovered, on endeavouring to introduce to him a private mess of victuals.
  22. entreaty
    earnest or urgent request
    Her entreaties were vain, and I was appointed to supply the deficiency.
  23. gruel
    a thin porridge (usually oatmeal or cornmeal)
    I'm annoyed how I should dream of chattering on at such a rate, and your gruel cold, and you nodding for bed!
  24. prognosticate
    make a prediction about; tell in advance
    I prognosticate for myself an obstinate cold, at least."
  25. habituate
    make psychologically or physically used (to something)
    Excepting a few provincialisms of slight consequence, you have no marks of the manners which I am habituated to consider as peculiar to your class.
  26. malady
    impairment of normal physiological function affecting part or all of an organism
    When Kenneth warned him that his medicines were useless at that stage of the malady, and he needn't put him to further expense by attending her, he retorted
  27. execrate
    curse or declare to be evil or anathema or threaten with divine punishment
    He neither wept nor prayed; he cursed and defied-- execrated God and man, and gave himself up to reckless dissipation.
  28. ruffian
    a cruel and brutal fellow
    In the place where she heard Heathcliff termed a "vulgar young ruffian," and "worse than a brute," she took care not to act like him; but at home she had small inclination to practise politeness that would only be laughed at, and restrain an unruly nature when it would bring her neither credit nor praise.
  29. antipathy
    a feeling of intense dislike
    She was not artful, never played the coquette, and had evidently an objection to her two friends meeting at all; for when Heathcliff expressed contempt of Linton in his presence, she could not half coincide as she did in his absence; and when Linton evinced disgust and antipathy to Heathcliff, she dared not treat his sentiments with indifference, as if depreciation of her playmate were of scarcely any consequence to her.
  30. depreciation
    a communication that belittles somebody or something
    She was not artful, never played the coquette, and had evidently an objection to her two friends meeting at all; for when Heathcliff expressed contempt of Linton in his presence, she could not half coincide as she did in his absence; and when Linton evinced disgust and antipathy to Heathcliff, she dared not treat his sentiments with indifference, as if depreciation of her playmate were of scarcely any consequence to her.
  31. chasten
    correct by punishment or discipline
    That sounds ill-natured, but she was so proud it became really impossible to pity her distresses, till she should be chastened into more humility.
  32. poignant
    keenly distressing to the mind or feelings
    He struggled long to keep up an equality with Catherine in her studies, and yielded with poignant though silent regret; but he yielded completely, and there was no prevailing on him to take a step in the way of moving upward, when he found he must necessarily sink beneath his former level.
  33. ignoble
    completely lacking nobility in character or quality or purpose
    He acquired a slouching gait and ignoble look; his naturally reserved disposition was exaggerated into an almost idiotic excess of unsociable moroseness, and he took a grim pleasure, apparently, in exciting the aversion rather than the esteem of his few acquaintance.
  34. assiduously
    with care and persistence
    "I'm sorry for it, Miss Catherine," was my response; and I proceeded assiduously with my occupation.
  35. vagary
    an unexpected and inexplicable change in something (in a situation or a person's behavior, etc.)
    He held the knife in his hand, and pushed its point between my teeth; but, for my part, I was never much afraid of his vagaries.
  36. delude
    be false to; be dishonest with
    I'll teach thee to impose on a good-hearted, deluded father.
  37. thwart
    hinder or prevent (the efforts, plans, or desires) of
    It expressed, plainer than words could do, the intensest anguish at having made himself the instrument of thwarting his own revenge.
  38. abashed
    feeling or caused to feel uneasy and self-conscious
    Hindley descended more leisurely, sobered and abashed.
  39. perdition
    (Christianity) the abode of Satan and the forces of evil; where sinners suffer eternal punishment
    On the contrary I shall have great pleasure in sending it to perdition to punish its Maker," exclaimed the blasphemer.
  40. imprecation
    a slanderous accusation
    He drank the spirits and impatiently bade us go, terminating his command with a sequel of horrid imprecations too bad to repeat or remember.
  41. hoary
    showing characteristics of age, especially having grey or white hair
    Mr. Kenneth says he would wager his mare that he'll outlive any man on this side Gimmerton, and go to the grave a hoary sinner, unless some happy chance out of the common course befall him."
  42. asunder
    widely separated especially in space
    Her lips were half asunder, as if she meant to speak, and she drew a breath; but it escaped in a sigh instead of a sentence.
  43. winsome
    charming in a childlike or naive way
    "Nelly, will you keep a secret for me?" she pursued, kneeling down by me and lifting her winsome eyes to my face with that sort of look which turns off bad temper even when one has all the right in the world to indulge it.
  44. expostulation
    an exclamation of protest or remonstrance or reproof
    She kept wandering to and fro, from the gate to the door, in a state of agitation which permitted no repose, and at length took up a permanent situation on one side of the wall, near the road, where, heedless of my expostulations and the growling thunder, and the great drops that began to plash around her, she remained, calling at intervals, and then listening, and then crying outright.
  45. beseech
    ask for or request earnestly
    We thought a bolt had fallen in the middle of us, and Joseph swung on to his knees, beseeching the Lord to remember the patriarchs Noah and Lot, and, as in former times, spare the righteous, though He smote the ungodly.
  46. smite
    inflict a heavy blow on, with the hand, a tool, or a weapon
    We thought a bolt had fallen in the middle of us, and Joseph swung on to his knees, beseeching the Lord to remember the patriarchs Noah and Lot, and, as in former times, spare the righteous, though He smote the ungodly.
  47. whelp
    young of any of various canines such as a dog or wolf
    "What ails you, Cathy?" he was saying when I entered; "you look as dismal as a drowned whelp.
  48. munificent
    very generous
    The former offered me munificent wages; the latter ordered me to pack up.