Robert Louis Stevenson's Treasure Island

Vocabulary study guide for Robert Louis Stevenson's Treasure Island
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definitions & notes only words
  1. seamanly
    characteristic of or befitting a seaman
    Is that seamanly behaviour, now, I want to know?
  2. squire
    a man who attends or escorts a woman
    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keep
  3. rum
    liquor distilled from fermented molasses
    I remember him looking round the cover and whistling to himself
    as he did so, and then breaking out in that old sea-song that he sang so
    often afterwards:

    "Fifteen men on the dead man's chest--
    Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!
  4. stockade
    fortification consisting of a fence set firmly for defense
    From the ship we could see nothing
    of the house or stockade, for they were quite buried among trees; and if
    it had not been for the chart on the companion, we might have been the
    first that had ever anchored there since the island arose out of the
    seas.
  5. clove hitch
    a knot used to fasten a line temporarily to a post or spar
    "You're a good lad, Jim," he said; "and you're all in a clove hitch,
    ain't you?
  6. captain
    the leader of a group of people
    You mought call me captain.
  7. buccaneer
    someone who robs at sea or plunders the land from the sea
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  8. deadlight
    a strong shutter over a ship's porthole that is closed in stormy weather
    Here you comes and tells me of it plain; and
    here I let him give us all the slip before my blessed deadlights!
  9. pew
    long bench with backs; used in church by the congregation
    " Pew," he cried, "they've been before us.
  10. seafaring
    the work of a sailor
    Every day when he came back
    from his stroll he would ask if any seafaring men had gone by along the
    road.
  11. pine family
    a family of Pinaceae
    This even tint
    was indeed broken up by streaks of yellow sand-break in the lower lands,
    and by many tall trees of the pine family, out-topping the others--some
    singly, some in clumps; but the general colouring was uniform and sad.
  12. fourpenny
    used of nail size; 1 3/8 in or 3.8 cm long
    He had taken me aside one day
    and promised me a silver fourpenny on the first of every month if I
    would only keep my "weather-eye open for a seafaring man with one leg"
    and let him know the moment he appeared.
  13. dilly-dally
    postpone doing what one should be doing
    There is no time to dilly-dally in our work.
  14. ashore
    towards or to the edge of a body of water
    I found
    he was an old sailor, kept a public-house, knew
    all the seafaring men in Bristol, had lost his
    health ashore, and wanted a good berth as cook to
    get to sea again.
  15. swab
    cleaning implement consisting of absorbent material fastened to a handle; for cleaning floors
    "Doctors is all swabs," he said; "and that doctor there, why, what do
    he know about seafaring men?
  16. overjoy
    cause to feel extremely joyful or happy
    I
    set off, overjoyed at this opportunity to see some more of the ships and
    seamen, and picked my way among a great crowd of people and carts and
    bales, for the dock was now at its busiest, until I found the tavern in
    question.
  17. black spot
    any of several fungous diseases of plants that produce small black spots on the plant
    "I have
    drawn blood enough to keep him quiet awhile; he should lie for a week
    where he is--that is the best thing for him and you; but another stroke
    would settle him."




    3

    The Black Spot

    ABOUT noon I stopped at the captain's door with some cooling drinks
    and medicines.
  18. mate
    a person's partner in marriage
    Much company, mate?"
  19. Jolly Roger
    a flag usually bearing a white skull and crossbones on a black background; indicates a pirate ship
    "Why, in a place like this, where nobody puts in but
    gen'lemen of fortune, Silver would fly the Jolly Roger, you don't make
    no doubt of that.
  20. mutineer
    someone who is openly rebellious and refuses to obey authorities (especially seamen or soldiers)
    There was nothing left for me but death by
    starvation or death by the hands of the mutineers.
  21. piece of eight
    an old silver Spanish coin; worth 8 reales
    It was a long, difficult business, for the coins were of all countries
    and sizes--doubloons, and louis d'ors, and guineas, and pieces of eight,
    and I know not what besides, all shaken together at random.
  22. cutlas
    a short heavy curved sword with one edge
    The captain had risen earlier than usual and set out down the
    beach, his cutlass swinging under the broad skirts of the old blue coat,
    his brass telescope under his arm, his hat tilted back upon his head.
  23. matey
    having the relationship of friends or pals
    Here you, matey," he
    cried to the man who trundled the barrow; "bring up alongside and help
    up my chest.
  24. shipmate
    an associate on the same ship with you
    "Come, Bill, you know me; you know an old shipmate, Bill, surely," said
    the stranger.
  25. gig
    a booking for musicians
    A turn ashore'll hurt nobody--the boats are still in the water;
    you can take the gigs, and as many as please may go ashore for the
    afternoon.
  26. Bristol
    an industrial city and port in southwestern England near the mouth of the River Avon
    When a seaman did put up at the Admiral Benbow
    (as now and then some did, making by the coast road for Bristol) he
    would look in at him through the curtained door before he entered the
    parlour; and he was always sure to be as silent as a mouse when any such
    was present.
  27. aboard
    on a ship, train, plane or other vehicle
    Well, then, you get on a horse, and go to--well, yes,
    I will!--to that eternal doctor swab, and tell him to pipe all
    hands--magistrates and sich--and he'll lay 'em aboard at the Admiral
    Benbow--all old Flint's crew, man and boy, all on 'em that's left.
  28. say
    utter aloud
    "This is a handy cove," says he at length; "and a pleasant sittyated
    grog-shop.
  29. cutlass
    a short heavy curved sword with one edge
    The captain had risen earlier than usual and set out down the
    beach, his cutlass swinging under the broad skirts of the old blue coat,
    his brass telescope under his arm, his hat tilted back upon his head.
  30. coxswain
    the helmsman of a ship's boat or a racing crew
    And the
    coxswain, Israel Hands, was a careful, wily, old, experienced seaman who
    could be trusted at a pinch with almost anything.
  31. gamekeeper
    a person employed to take care of game and wildlife
    The doctor had to go
    to London for a physician to take charge of his practice; the squire was
    hard at work at Bristol; and I lived on at the hall under the charge of
    old Redruth, the gamekeeper, almost a prisoner, but full of sea-dreams
    and the most charming anticipations of strange islands and adventures.
  32. sir
    term of address for a man
    "Were you addressing me, sir?" says the doctor; and when the ruffian had
    told him, with another oath, that this was so, "I have only one thing to
    say to you, sir," replies the doctor, "that if you keep on drinking rum,
    the world will soon be quit of a very dirty scoundrel!"
  33. ship
    a vessel that carries passengers or freight
    "I'm a plain man; rum
    and bacon and eggs is what I want, and that head up there for to watch
    ships off.
  34. anchorage
    place for vessels to anchor
    The doctor opened the seals with great care, and there fell out
    the map of an island, with latitude and longitude, soundings, names of
    hills and bays and inlets, and every particular that would be needed
    to bring a ship to a safe anchorage upon its shores.
  35. manner of speaking
    your characteristic style or manner of expressing yourself orally
    She would swear the same, in a manner of speaking, before
    chaplain."
  36. man
    an adult person who is male (as opposed to a woman)
    I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the
    inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow--a
    tall, strong, heavy, nut-brown man, his tarry pigtail falling over the
    shoulder of his soiled blue coat, his hands ragged and scarred, with
    black, broken nails, and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid
    white.
  37. whistle
    the sound made by something moving rapidly
    I remember him looking round the cover and whistling to himself
    as he did so, and then breaking out in that old sea-song that he sang so
    often afterwards:

    "Fifteen men on the dead man's chest--
    Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!"

    in the high, old tottering voice that seemed to have been tuned and
    broken at the capstan bars.
  38. Joyce
    influential Irish writer noted for his many innovations
    We'll take Redruth, Joyce, and Hunter.
  39. cry
    shed tears because of sadness, rage, or pain
    Here you, matey," he
    cried to the man who trundled the barrow; "bring up alongside and help
    up my chest.
  40. sea lawyer
    an argumentative and contentious seaman
    When I'm in
    Parlyment and riding in my coach, I don't want none of these sea-lawyers
    in the cabin a-coming home, unlooked for, like the devil at prayers.
  41. lubber
    an awkward stupid person
    The lubbers is going about to get the wind of me
    this blessed moment; lubbers as couldn't keep what they got, and want to
    nail what is another's.
  42. squalling
    characterized by short periods of noisy commotion
    "Take the
    Georges, Pew, and don't stand here squalling."
  43. pipe up
    utter a shrill cry
    Suddenly he--the captain,
    that is--began to pipe up his eternal song:

    "Fifteen men on the dead man's chest--
    Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!
  44. seaman
    a man who serves as a sailor
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old seaman...
  45. parlour
    a room in a private house or establishment where people can sit and talk and relax
    All day he hung round the cove or
    upon the cliffs with a brass telescope; all evening he sat in a corner
    of the parlour next the fire and drank rum and water very strong.
  46. signboard
    structure displaying a board on which advertisements can be posted
    This, when it was brought to him,
    he drank slowly, like a connoisseur, lingering on the taste and still
    looking about him at the cliffs and up at our signboard.
  47. treasure
    any possession that is highly valued by its owner
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  48. inn
    a hotel providing overnight lodging for travelers
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  49. hamlet
    a community of people smaller than a village
    Dr. Livesey came
    late one afternoon to see the patient, took a bit of dinner from my
    mother, and went into the parlour to smoke a pipe until his horse should
    come down from the hamlet, for we had no stabling at the old Benbow.
  50. tottery
    unsteady in gait as from infirmity or old age
    There were several additions of a
    later date, but above all, three crosses of red ink--two on the north
    part of the island, one in the southwest--and beside this last, in
    the same red ink, and in a small, neat hand, very different from the
    captain's tottery characters, these words: "Bulk of treasure here."
  51. forecastle
    living quarters consisting of a superstructure in the bow of a merchant ship where the crew is housed
    The whole schooner had been
    overhauled; six berths had been made astern out of what had been the
    after-part of the main hold; and this set of cabins was only joined to
    the galley and forecastle by a sparred passage on the port side.
  52. said
    being the one previously mentioned or spoken of
    "Well, then," said he, "this is the berth for me.
  53. Black
    British chemist who identified carbon dioxide and who formulated the concepts of specific heat and latent heat (1728-1799)
    Soon after, Dr. Livesey's horse came to the door and he rode away, but
    the captain held his peace that evening, and for many evenings to come.




    2

    Black Dog Appears and Disappears


    IT was not very long after this that there occurred the first of the
    mysterious events that rid us at last of the captain, though not, as you
    will see, of his affairs.
  54. luff
    the act of sailing close to the wind
    The man at
    the helm was watching the luff of the sail and whistling away gently
    to himself, and that was the only sound excepting the swish of the sea
    against the bows and around the sides of the ship.
  55. grumble
    make complaining remarks or noises under one's breath
    Then followed a battle of looks between them, but the captain soon
    knuckled under, put up his weapon, and resumed his seat, grumbling like
    a beaten dog.
  56. log up
    record a distance travelled; on planes and cars
    I was
    wedged in between Redruth and a stout old gentleman, and in spite of the
    swift motion and the cold night air, I must have dozed a great deal from
    the very first, and then slept like a log up hill and down dale through
    stage after stage, for when I was awakened at last it was by a punch
    in the ribs, and I opened my eyes to find that we were standing still
    before a large building in a city street and that the day had already
    broken a long time.
  57. noggin
    informal terms for a human head
    And now you see, mate, I'm pretty low,
    and deserted by all; and Jim, you'll bring me one noggin of rum, now,
    won't you, matey?"
  58. hand
    the (prehensile) extremity of the superior limb
    I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the
    inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow--a
    tall, strong, heavy, nut-brown man, his tarry pigtail falling over the
    shoulder of his soiled blue coat, his hands ragged and scarred, with
    black, broken nails, and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid
    white.
  59. but
    and nothing more
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  60. berth
    a place where a craft can be made fast
    "Well, then," said he, "this is the berth for me.
  61. foolhardiness
    the trait of giving little thought to danger
    Of course I said I would go with my mother, and of course they all cried
    out at our foolhardiness, but even then not a man would go along with
    us.
  62. now
    at the present moment
    When a seaman did put up at the Admiral Benbow
    (as now and then some did, making by the coast road for Bristol) he
    would look in at him through the curtained door before he entered the
    parlour; and he was always sure to be as silent as a mouse when any such
    was present.
  63. blandly
    in a bland manner
    I got her through my old friend, Blandly, who
    has proved himself throughout the most surprising
    trump.
  64. one iron
    (golf) the long iron with the most nearly vertical face
    The blind man clung close to me, holding me in one iron fist
    and leaning almost more of his weight on me than I could carry.
  65. sonny
    a male child (a familiar term of address to a boy)
    "Come here, sonny," says he.
  66. short and sweet
    dealt with very quickly; to the point
    That's short and sweet."
  67. all
    to a complete degree or to the full or entire extent
    And
    that was all we could learn of our guest.
  68. bandoleer
    a broad cartridge belt worn over the shoulder by soldiers
    As for the captain, he had carried his over his
    shoulder by a bandoleer, and like a wise man, lock uppermost.
  69. lugger
    small fishing boat rigged with one or more lugsails
    Some of the men who
    had been to field-work on the far side of the Admiral Benbow remembered,
    besides, to have seen several strangers on the road, and taking them to
    be smugglers, to have bolted away; and one at least had seen a little
    lugger in what we called Kitt's Hole.
  70. blind
    unable to see
    He was plainly blind, for he tapped
    before him with a stick and wore a great green shade over his eyes and
    nose; and he was hunched, as if with age or weakness, and wore a huge
    old tattered sea-cloak with a hood that made him appear positively
    deformed.
  71. like
    having the same or similar characteristics
    Then he rapped on the door with a bit of
    stick like a handspike that he carried, and when my father appeared,
    called roughly for a glass of rum.
  72. flag of truce
    flag consisting of a piece of white cloth that is hoisted to signal surrender or to ask for a truce
    " Flag of truce!"
  73. powder
    a solid substance in the form of tiny loose particles
    I
    followed him in, and I remember observing the contrast the neat, bright
    doctor, with his powder as white as snow and his bright, black eyes and
    pleasant manners, made with the coltish country folk, and above all,
    with that filthy, heavy, bleared scarecrow of a pirate of ours, sitting,
    far gone in rum, with his arms on the table.
  74. forelock
    a lock of a horse's mane that grows forward between the ears
    "Aye, aye, sir," answered the cook, and touching his forelock, he
    disappeared at once in the direction of his galley.
  75. leastways
    if nothing else
    But
    you're able to hear, I reckon; leastways, your ears is big enough.
  76. barbecue
    a cookout in which food is cooked over an open fire
    "Now, Barbecue, tip us a stave," cried one voice.
  77. Gray
    English radiobiologist in whose honor the gray was named
    "It's to you, Abraham Gray--it's to you I am speaking."
  78. figurehead
    a person used as a cover for some questionable activity
    I saw the most wonderful figureheads, that had all been far over the
    ocean.
  79. here
    in or at this place; where the speaker or writer is
    I'll stay here a bit," he continued.
  80. shipshape
    of places
    All well, I hope; all
    shipshape and seaworthy?"
  81. capstan
    a windlass rotated in a horizontal plane around a vertical axis; used on ships for weighing anchor or raising heavy sails
    I remember him looking round the cover and whistling to himself
    as he did so, and then breaking out in that old sea-song that he sang so
    often afterwards:

    "Fifteen men on the dead man's chest--
    Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!"

    in the high, old tottering voice that seemed to have been tuned and
    broken at the capstan bars.
  82. see
    perceive by sight or have the power to perceive by sight
    Oh, I
    see what you're at--there"; and he threw down three or four gold pieces
    on the threshold.
  83. marooned
    cut off or left behind
    "Nay, mate," said he; " marooned."
  84. coltish
    given to merry frolicking
    I
    followed him in, and I remember observing the contrast the neat, bright
    doctor, with his powder as white as snow and his bright, black eyes and
    pleasant manners, made with the coltish country folk, and above all,
    with that filthy, heavy, bleared scarecrow of a pirate of ours, sitting,
    far gone in rum, with his arms on the table.
  85. ben
    a mountain or tall hill
    Ben, run and help Harry.
  86. sea
    a large body of salt water partially enclosed by land
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  87. sure enough
    as supposed or expected
    And here, sure enough, is my mate Bill, with a spy-glass under his arm,
    bless his old 'art, to be sure.
  88. head sea
    a sea in which the waves are running directly against the course of the ship
    He was not only useless as an officer and a bad influence amongst
    the men, but it was plain that at this rate he must soon kill himself
    outright, so nobody was much surprised, nor very sorry, when one dark
    night, with a head sea, he disappeared entirely and was seen no more.
  89. John
    disciple of Jesus
    Long John Silver, he is
    called, and has lost a leg; but that I regarded as
    a recommendation, since he lost it in his
    country's service, under the immortal Hawke.
  90. sand
    a loose material consisting of grains of rock or coral
    The arms are easy found, in the sand-hill, N.
    point of north inlet cape, bearing E. and a
    quarter N.
    J.F.

    That was all; but brief as it was, and to me incomprehensible, it filled
    the squire and Dr. Livesey with delight.
  91. island
    a land mass that is surrounded by water
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  92. nohow
    in no manner; in no way
    Now, if I can't get away nohow, and they tip me the black spot, mind
    you, it's my old sea-chest they're after; you get on a horse--you can,
    can't you?
  93. chest
    the part of the human torso between the neck and the diaphragm or the corresponding part in other vertebrates
    I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the
    inn door, his sea- chest following behind him in a hand-barrow--a
    tall, strong, heavy, nut-brown man, his tarry pigtail falling over the
    shoulder of his soiled blue coat, his hands ragged and scarred, with
    black, broken nails, and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid
    white.
  94. cabin
    a small house built of wood; usually in a wooded area
    Hawkins shall come as cabin-boy.
  95. crew
    an organized group of workmen
    Well, then, you get on a horse, and go to--well, yes,
    I will!--to that eternal doctor swab, and tell him to pipe all
    hands--magistrates and sich--and he'll lay 'em aboard at the Admiral
    Benbow--all old Flint's crew, man and boy, all on 'em that's left.
  96. raggedness
    a texture of a surface or edge that is not smooth but is irregular and uneven
    Of all the beggar-men that I had seen
    or fancied, he was the chief for raggedness.
  97. out
    moving or appearing to move away from a place, especially one that is enclosed or hidden
    I remember him looking round the cover and whistling to himself
    as he did so, and then breaking out in that old sea-song that he sang so
    often afterwards:

    "Fifteen men on the dead man's chest--
    Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!"

    in the high, old tottering voice that seemed to have been tuned and
    broken at the capstan bars.
  98. old salt
    a man who serves as a sailor
    People were frightened at the time, but on looking
    back they rather liked it; it was a fine excitement in a quiet country
    life, and there was even a party of the younger men who pretended to
    admire him, calling him a "true sea-dog" and a "real old salt" and
    such like names, and saying there was the sort of man that made England
    terrible at sea.
  99. to be sure
    admittedly
    And here, sure enough, is my mate Bill, with a spy-glass under his arm,
    bless his old 'art, to be sure.
  100. bumboat
    a small boat that ferries supplies and commodities for sale to a larger ship at anchor
    "But look here," he went on, "here's what I want to know, Barbecue: how
    long are we a-going to stand off and on like a blessed bumboat?
  101. handspike
    a metal bar (or length of pipe) used as a lever
    Then he rapped on the door with a bit of
    stick like a handspike that he carried, and when my father appeared,
    called roughly for a glass of rum.
  102. boat
    a small vessel for travel on water
    Underneath there
    was an old boat-cloak, whitened with sea-salt on many a harbour-bar.
  103. shore bird
    any of numerous wading birds that frequent mostly seashores and estuaries
    Perhaps it was this--perhaps it was the look of the island, with its
    grey, melancholy woods, and wild stone spires, and the surf that we
    could both see and hear foaming and thundering on the steep beach--at
    least, although the sun shone bright and hot, and the shore birds were
    fishing and crying all around us, and you would have thought anyone
    would have been glad to get to land after being so long at sea, my heart
    sank, as the saying is, into my boots; and from the first look onward,...
  104. come
    move toward, travel toward
    I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the
    inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow--a
    tall, strong, heavy, nut-brown man, his tarry pigtail falling over the
    shoulder of his soiled blue coat, his hands ragged and scarred, with
    black, broken nails, and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid
    white.
  105. cove
    a small inlet
    "This is a handy cove," says he at length; "and a pleasant sittyated
    grog-shop.
  106. get
    come into the possession of something concrete or abstract
    You and me'll just go back into the
    parlour, sonny, and get behind the door, and we'll give Bill a little
    surprise--bless his 'art, I say again."
  107. pigtail
    a plait of braided hair
    I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the
    inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow--a
    tall, strong, heavy, nut-brown man, his tarry pigtail falling over the
    shoulder of his soiled blue coat, his hands ragged and scarred, with
    black, broken nails, and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid
    white.
  108. overloaded
    loaded past capacity
    In the
    first place, the little gallipot of a boat that we were in was gravely
    overloaded.
  109. run
    move fast by using one's feet
    To see him leap and run and pursue me over hedge and
    ditch was the worst of nightmares.
  110. sailing master
    the ship's officer in charge of navigation
    John Trelawney

    Postscript--I did not tell you that Blandly,
    who, by the way, is to send a consort after us if
    we don't turn up by the end of August, had found
    an admirable fellow for sailing master--a stiff
    man, which I regret, but in all other respects a
    treasure.
  111. old
    having lived for a long time or attained a specific age
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  112. there
    in or at that place
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  113. dog
    a canine domesticated by man since prehistoric times
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea- dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  114. admiral
    the supreme commander of a fleet
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  115. yellow jack
    caused by a flavivirus transmitted by a mosquito
    I been in places hot as pitch, and mates
    dropping round with Yellow Jack, and the blessed land a-heaving like the
    sea with earthquakes--what to the doctor know of lands like that?--and I
    lived on rum, I tell you.
  116. take time by the forelock
    act quickly and decisively; not let slip an opportunity
    Now, sir, it's got to come
    to blows sooner or later, and what I propose is to take time by the
    forelock
    , as the saying is, and come to blows some fine day when they
    least expect it.
  117. bustle
    move or cause to move energetically or busily
    I assure you I was quite of the squire's way of thinking, and hated the
    captain deeply.




    10

    The Voyage

    ALL that night we were in a great bustle getting things stowed in their
    place, and boatfuls of the squire's friends, Mr. Blandly and the like,
    coming off to wish him a good voyage and a safe return.
  118. live oak
    any of several American evergreen oaks
    All this while, as I say, I was still running, and without taking any
    notice, I had drawn near to the foot of the little hill with the two
    peaks and had got into a part of the island where the live-oaks grew
    more widely apart and seemed more like forest trees in their bearing and
    dimensions.
  119. gaskin
    lower part of a horse's thigh between the hock and the stifle
    He was clothed with tatters
    of old ship's canvas and old sea-cloth, and this extraordinary patchwork
    was all held together by a system of the most various and incongruous
    fastenings, brass buttons, bits of stick, and loops of tarry gaskin.
  120. Port of Spain
    the capital and largest city of Trinidad and Tobago on the west coast of the island of Trinidad
    I've seen his top-sails with
    these eyes, off Trinidad, and the cowardly son of a rum-puncheon that I
    sailed with put back--put back, sir, into Port of Spain."
  121. lad
    a boy or man
    All they would do was to give me a loaded pistol lest we were
    attacked, and to promise to have horses ready saddled in case we were
    pursued on our return, while one lad was to ride forward to the doctor's
    in search of armed assistance.
  122. hands
    guardianship over
    I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the
    inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow--a
    tall, strong, heavy, nut-brown man, his tarry pigtail falling over the
    shoulder of his soiled blue coat, his hands ragged and scarred, with
    black, broken nails, and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid
    white.
  123. grog
    rum cut with water
    "This is a handy cove," says he at length; "and a pleasant sittyated
    grog-shop.
  124. mates
    a pair of people who live together
    I been in places hot as pitch, and mates
    dropping round with Yellow Jack, and the blessed land a-heaving like the
    sea with earthquakes--what to the doctor know of lands like that?--and I
    lived on rum, I tell you.
  125. repaint
    paint again
    The squire had had everything repaired, and the
    public rooms and the sign repainted, and had added some furniture--above
    all a beautiful armchair for mother in the bar.
  126. one
    smallest whole number or a numeral representing this number
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  127. ebb
    the outward flow of the tide
    "There's a strong scour with the ebb," he said, "and this here passage
    has been dug out, in a manner of speaking, with a spade."
  128. hear
    perceive (sound) via the auditory sense
    The man who came
    with the barrow told us the mail had set him down the morning before at
    the Royal George, that he had inquired what inns there were along the
    coast, and hearing ours well spoken of, I suppose, and described as
    lonely, had chosen it from the others for his place of residence.
  129. cook
    transform by heating
    PART TWO--The Sea- cook




    7

    I Go to Bristol

    IT was longer than the squire imagined ere we were ready for the sea,
    and none of our first plans--not even Dr. Livesey's, of keeping me
    beside him--could be carried out as we intended.
  130. lay
    put into a certain place or abstract location
    Well, mother was upstairs with father and I was laying the
    breakfast-table against the captain's return when the parlour door
    opened and a man stepped in on whom I had never set my eyes before.
  131. iron fist
    rigorous or ruthless control
    The blind man clung close to me, holding me in one iron fist
    and leaning almost more of his weight on me than I could carry.
  132. knoll
    a small natural hill
    The thicket stretched down from the top of
    one of the sandy knolls, spreading and growing taller as it went, until
    it reached the margin of the broad, reedy fen, through which the nearest
    of the little rivers soaked its way into the anchorage.
  133. maroon
    a dark purplish-red to dark brownish-red color
    Put 'em ashore like maroons?
  134. doubloon
    a former Spanish gold coin
    It was a long, difficult business, for the coins were of all countries
    and sizes-- doubloons, and louis d'ors, and guineas, and pieces of eight,
    and I know not what besides, all shaken together at random.
  135. knuckle under
    consent reluctantly
    Then followed a battle of looks between them, but the captain soon
    knuckled under, put up his weapon, and resumed his seat, grumbling like
    a beaten dog.
  136. beggar
    a pauper who lives by begging
    Between this and that, I
    was so utterly terrified of the blind beggar that I forgot my terror of
    the captain, and as I opened the parlour door, cried out the words he
    had ordered in a trembling voice.
  137. tell
    narrate or give a detailed account of
    My father told him no, very little company, the more was the pity.
  138. monstrously
    in a hideous manner
    There is a class of men in Bristol
    monstrously prejudiced against Blandly.
  139. lie
    be prostrate; be in a horizontal position
    Rum! Rum!"

    I ran to fetch it, but I was quite unsteadied by all that had fallen
    out, and I broke one glass and fouled the tap, and while I was still
    getting in my own way, I heard a loud fall in the parlour, and running
    in, beheld the captain lying full length upon the floor.
  140. pipe
    a hollow cylindrical shape
    Dr. Livesey came
    late one afternoon to see the patient, took a bit of dinner from my
    mother, and went into the parlour to smoke a pipe until his horse should
    come down from the hamlet, for we had no stabling at the old Benbow.
  141. marsh
    low-lying wet land with grassy vegetation
    The marsh was
    steaming in the strong sun, and the outline of the Spy-glass trembled
    through the haze.
  142. powder and shot
    ammunition consisting of gunpowder and bullets for muskets
    I had heard the word, and I knew it stood for a horrible kind of
    punishment common enough among the buccaneers, in which the offender
    is put ashore with a little powder and shot and left behind on some
    desolate and distant island.
  143. run on
    continue uninterrupted
    It's been meat and drink, and man and wife,
    to me; and if I'm not to have my rum now I'm a poor old hulk on a lee
    shore, my blood'll be on you, Jim, and that doctor swab"; and he ran on
    again for a while with curses.
  144. down
    spatially or metaphorically from a higher to a lower level
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  145. startle
    surprise greatly
    I was so much startled that I
    struggled to withdraw, but the blind man pulled me close up to him with
    a single action of his arm.
  146. brass buttons
    South African herb with golden-yellow globose flower heads
    He was clothed with tatters
    of old ship's canvas and old sea-cloth, and this extraordinary patchwork
    was all held together by a system of the most various and incongruous
    fastenings, brass buttons, bits of stick, and loops of tarry gaskin.
  147. hobble
    walk impeded by some physical limitation or injury
    He had hobbled down there that
    morning, he said, to get a smell of the salt.
  148. rattle off
    recite volubly or extravagantly
    And I was a civil,
    pious boy, and could rattle off my catechism that fast, as you couldn't
    tell one word from another.
  149. oilskin
    a macintosh made from cotton fabric treated with oil and pigment to make it waterproof
    "And I'll take this to square the count," said I, picking up the oilskin
    packet.
  150. thimble
    a small metal cap to protect the finger while sewing
    A few small coins, a thimble,
    and some thread and big needles, a piece of pigtail tobacco bitten away
    at the end, his gully with the crooked handle, a pocket compass, and a
    tinder box were all that they contained, and I began to despair.
  151. long
    primarily spatial sense
    In one way, indeed, he bade fair to ruin us, for he kept on staying week
    after week, and at last month after month, so that all the money had
    been long exhausted, and still my father never plucked up the heart to
    insist on having more.
  152. pannikin
    a small pan or cup (usually of tin)
    There's the key; you fill a pannikin and bring it up."
  153. jolly
    full of or showing high-spirited merriment
    They wasn't so high and dry, nohow, but took their
    fling, like jolly companions every one."
  154. annoyingly
    in an annoying manner or to an annoying degree
    The
    workpeople, to be sure--riggers and what not--were
    most annoyingly slow; but time cured that.
  155. bulrush
    tall marsh plant with cylindrical seed heads
    I had crossed a marshy tract full of willows, bulrushes, and odd,
    outlandish, swampy trees; and I had now come out upon the skirts of an
    open piece of undulating, sandy country, about a mile long, dotted with
    a few pines and a great number of contorted trees, not unlike the oak
    in growth, but pale in the foliage, like willows.
  156. not
    negation of a word or group of words
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  157. lookout
    the act of looking out
    "We sail tomorrow!"




    8

    At the Sign of the Spy-glass

    WHEN I had done breakfasting the squire gave me a note addressed to John
    Silver, at the sign of the Spy-glass, and told me I should easily
    find the place by following the line of the docks and keeping a bright
    lookout for a little tavern with a large brass telescope for sign.
  158. sail
    a large piece of fabric used to propel a vessel
    And indeed bad as his clothes were and coarsely as he spoke, he had none
    of the appearance of a man who sailed before the mast, but seemed like
    a mate or skipper accustomed to be obeyed or to strike.
  159. in the meantime
    during the intervening time
    In the meantime, the captain gradually
    brightened up at his own music, and at last flapped his hand upon
    the table before him in a way we all knew to mean silence.
  160. deck
    any of various platforms built into a vessel
    The captain glared at him for a while, flapped his hand again,
    glared still harder, and at last broke out with a villainous, low oath,
    "Silence, there, between decks!"
  161. backstay
    a stay that supports the back of something
    I had
    to cling tight to the backstay, and the world turned giddily before my
    eyes, for though I was a good enough sailor when there was way on, this
    standing still and being rolled about like a bottle was a thing I never
    learned to stand without a qualm or so, above all in the morning, on an
    empty stomach.
  162. then
    at that time
    I remember him looking round the cover and whistling to himself
    as he did so, and then breaking out in that old sea-song that he sang so
    often afterwards:

    "Fifteen men on the dead man's chest--
    Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!"

    in the high, old tottering voice that seemed to have been tuned and
    broken at the capstan bars.
  163. ease off
    become less intense
    We'll have to do sentry-go and ease off a point or so on the
    rum.
  164. blab
    speak (about unimportant matters) rapidly and incessantly
    " Blabbed, I mean.
  165. door
    a swinging or sliding barrier that will close the entrance to a room or building or vehicle
    I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the
    inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow--a
    tall, strong, heavy, nut-brown man, his tarry pigtail falling over the
    shoulder of his soiled blue coat, his hands ragged and scarred, with
    black, broken nails, and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid
    white.
  166. begin
    set in motion, cause to start
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  167. sure
    having or feeling no doubt or uncertainty
    When a seaman did put up at the Admiral Benbow
    (as now and then some did, making by the coast road for Bristol) he
    would look in at him through the curtained door before he entered the
    parlour; and he was always sure to be as silent as a mouse when any such
    was present.
  168. seaward
    in the direction of the sea
    It was one January morning, very early--a pinching, frosty morning--the
    cove all grey with hoar-frost, the ripple lapping softly on the stones,
    the sun still low and only touching the hilltops and shining far to
    seaward.
  169. musket
    a muzzle-loading shoulder gun with a long barrel
    'As
    for you, Benjamin Gunn,' says they, 'here's a musket,' they says, 'and
    a spade, and pick-axe.
  170. pork
    meat from a domestic hog or pig
    Or cut 'em down like that much pork?
  171. parrot
    usually brightly colored zygodactyl tropical birds with short hooked beaks and the ability to mimic sounds
    Now, treasure is ticklish work; I don't
    like treasure voyages on any account, and I don't like them, above all,
    when they are secret and when (begging your pardon, Mr. Trelawney) the
    secret has been told to the parrot."
  172. round
    having a circular shape
    I remember him looking round the cover and whistling to himself
    as he did so, and then breaking out in that old sea-song that he sang so
    often afterwards:

    "Fifteen men on the dead man's chest--
    Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!"

    in the high, old tottering voice that seemed to have been tuned and
    broken at the capstan bars.
  173. dog-tired
    drained of energy or effectiveness
    We never had
    a night at the Admiral Benbow when I had half the work; and I was
    dog-tired when, a little before dawn, the boatswain sounded his pipe
    and the crew began to man the capstan-bars.
  174. out and away
    by a considerable margin
    "Mr. Trelawney, out and away," said I.

    "Mr. Trelawney, will you please pick me off one of these men, sir?
  175. before
    at or in the front
    And indeed bad as his clothes were and coarsely as he spoke, he had none
    of the appearance of a man who sailed before the mast, but seemed like
    a mate or skipper accustomed to be obeyed or to strike.
  176. log
    a segment of the trunk of a tree when stripped of branches
    I was
    wedged in between Redruth and a stout old gentleman, and in spite of the
    swift motion and the cold night air, I must have dozed a great deal from
    the very first, and then slept like a log up hill and down dale through
    stage after stage, for when I was awakened at last it was by a punch
    in the ribs, and I opened my eyes to find that we were standing still
    before a large building in a city street and that the day had already
    broken a long time.
  177. bewilder
    cause to be confused emotionally
    The captain, for
    his part, stood staring at the signboard like a bewildered man.
  178. bad egg
    (old-fashioned slang) a bad person
    I observed the doctor sniffing
    and sniffing, like someone tasting a bad egg.
  179. well
    in a good or satisfactory manner or to a high standard
    " Well, then," said he, "this is the berth for me.
  180. good
    having desirable or positive qualities
    My father was always saying the inn would be
    ruined, for people would soon cease coming there to be tyrannized over
    and put down, and sent shivering to their beds; but I really believe his
    presence did us good.
  181. fancy
    not plain; decorative or ornamented
    And altogether I paid pretty dear for
    my monthly fourpenny piece, in the shape of these abominable fancies.
  182. glass
    a brittle transparent solid with irregular atomic structure
    Then he rapped on the door with a bit of
    stick like a handspike that he carried, and when my father appeared,
    called roughly for a glass of rum.
  183. word
    a unit of language that native speakers can identify
    The voices
    stopped at once, all but Dr. Livesey's; he went on as before speaking
    clear and kind and drawing briskly at his pipe between every word or
    two.
  184. spy
    (military) a secret agent hired by a state to obtain information about its enemies or by a business to obtain industrial secrets from competitors
    And here, sure enough, is my mate Bill, with a spy-glass under his arm,
    bless his old 'art, to be sure.
  185. soon
    in the near future
    Mostly
    he would not speak when spoken to, only look up sudden and fierce and
    blow through his nose like a fog-horn; and we and the people who came
    about our house soon learned to let him be.
  186. voice
    the sound made by the vibration of vocal folds
    I remember him looking round the cover and whistling to himself
    as he did so, and then breaking out in that old sea-song that he sang so
    often afterwards:

    "Fifteen men on the dead man's chest--
    Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!"

    in the high, old tottering voice that seemed to have been tuned and
    broken at the capstan bars.
  187. take
    get into one's hands
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  188. tree stump
    the base part of a tree that remains standing after the tree has been felled
    What with the
    steepness of the incline, the thick tree stumps, and the soft sand, he
    and his crutch were as helpless as a ship in stays.
  189. on board
    on a ship, train, plane or other vehicle
    I
    have a boatswain who pipes, Livesey; so things
    shall go man-o'-war fashion on board the good ship
    HISPANIOLA.
  190. half-heartedly
    without enthusiasm; in a half-hearted manner
    This appeal seemed to produce some effect, for two of the fellows began
    to look here and there among the lumber, but half-heartedly, I thought,
    and with half an eye to their own danger all the time, while the rest
    stood irresolute on the road.
  191. overload
    place too much a burden on
    In the
    first place, the little gallipot of a boat that we were in was gravely
    overloaded.
  192. boatswain
    a petty officer on a merchant ship
    I
    have a boatswain who pipes, Livesey; so things
    shall go man-o'-war fashion on board the good ship
    HISPANIOLA.
  193. and then
    subsequently or soon afterward
    I remember him looking round the cover and whistling to himself
    as he did so, and then breaking out in that old sea-song that he sang so
    often afterwards:

    "Fifteen men on the dead man's chest--
    Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!"

    in the high, old tottering voice that seemed to have been tuned and
    broken at the capstan bars.
  194. shot
    the act of firing a projectile
    Almost at the same time a
    pistol- shot, flash and report, came from the hedge side.
  195. gold dust
    the particles and flakes of gold obtained in placer mining
    "Mate," he was saying, "it's because I thinks gold dust of you--gold
    dust, and you may lay to that!
  196. chart
    a visual display of information
    "I have a chart here," says Captain Smollett.
  197. hilltop
    the peak of a hill
    It was one January morning, very early--a pinching, frosty morning--the
    cove all grey with hoar-frost, the ripple lapping softly on the stones,
    the sun still low and only touching the hilltops and shining far to
    seaward.
  198. fortune hunter
    a person who seeks wealth through marriage
    By good fortune Hunter pulled a good oar.
  199. fighting cock
    a cock bred and trained for fighting
    They lives rough, and they risk
    swinging, but they eat and drink like fighting-cocks, and when a cruise
    is done, why, it's hundreds of pounds instead of hundreds of farthings
    in their pockets.
  200. have a go
    make an attempt at something
    Let's have a go of the rum."
  201. keel
    one of the main longitudinal beams of the hull of a vessel
    "We was a-talkin' of keel-hauling," answered Morgan.
  202. hang
    cause to be hanging or suspended
    All day he hung round the cove or
    upon the cliffs with a brass telescope; all evening he sat in a corner
    of the parlour next the fire and drank rum and water very strong.
  203. again
    anew
    The captain glared at him for a while, flapped his hand again,
    glared still harder, and at last broke out with a villainous, low oath,
    "Silence, there, between decks!"
  204. stabling
    accommodation for animals (especially for horses)
    Dr. Livesey came
    late one afternoon to see the patient, took a bit of dinner from my
    mother, and went into the parlour to smoke a pipe until his horse should
    come down from the hamlet, for we had no stabling at the old Benbow.
  205. wig
    hairpiece covering the head and made of real or synthetic hair
    "It's the name of a buccaneer of my
    acquaintance; and I call you by it for the sake of shortness, and what I
    have to say to you is this; one glass of rum won't kill you, but if
    you take one you'll take another and another, and I stake my wig if you
    don't break off short, you'll die--do you understand that?--die, and go
    to your own place, like the man in the Bible.
  206. back
    the posterior part of a human (or animal) body
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  207. men
    the force of workers available
    I remember him looking round the cover and whistling to himself
    as he did so, and then breaking out in that old sea-song that he sang so
    often afterwards:

    "Fifteen men on the dead man's chest--
    Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!"

    in the high, old tottering voice that seemed to have been tuned and
    broken at the capstan bars.
  208. drink
    take in liquids
    This, when it was brought to him,
    he drank slowly, like a connoisseur, lingering on the taste and still
    looking about him at the cliffs and up at our signboard.
  209. undulate
    move in a wavy pattern or with a rising and falling motion
    I had crossed a marshy tract full of willows, bulrushes, and odd,
    outlandish, swampy trees; and I had now come out upon the skirts of an
    open piece of undulating, sandy country, about a mile long, dotted with
    a few pines and a great number of contorted trees, not unlike the oak
    in growth, but pale in the foliage, like willows.
  210. priming
    the act of making something ready
    He looked to the priming of his gun.
  211. dead
    no longer having or seeming to have or expecting to have life
    I remember him looking round the cover and whistling to himself
    as he did so, and then breaking out in that old sea-song that he sang so
    often afterwards:

    "Fifteen men on the dead man's chest--
    Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!"

    in the high, old tottering voice that seemed to have been tuned and
    broken at the capstan bars.
  212. man jack
    a single individual
    But I am responsible for the ship's
    safety and the life of every man Jack aboard of her.
  213. plumping
    very large; of exceptional size for its kind
    I could hear as well as see that brandy-faced rascal Israel Hands
    plumping down a round-shot on the deck.
  214. firewood
    wood used for fuel
    Tired
    though we all were, two were sent out for firewood; two more were set to
    dig a grave for Redruth; the doctor was named cook; I was put sentry at
    the door; and the captain himself went from one to another, keeping up
    our spirits and lending a hand wherever it was wanted.
  215. Morgan
    United States biologist who formulated the chromosome theory of heredity (1866-1945)
    Was that you drinking with him, Morgan?
  216. fore
    situated at or toward the bow of a vessel
    They are
    putting the powder and the arms in the fore hold.
  217. know
    be cognizant or aware of a fact or a piece of information
    He had taken me aside one day
    and promised me a silver fourpenny on the first of every month if I
    would only keep my "weather-eye open for a seafaring man with one leg"
    and let him know the moment he appeared.
  218. barrel
    a bulging cylindrical shape; hollow with flat ends
    Double grog was going on the least excuse; there was duff on odd days,
    as, for instance, if the squire heard it was any man's birthday, and
    always a barrel of apples standing broached in the waist for anyone to
    help himself that had a fancy.
  219. skulk
    avoid responsibilities and duties
    "Budge, you skulk!" cried Pew. "Dirk was a fool and a coward from the
    first--you wouldn't mind him.
  220. keep
    continue a certain state, condition, or activity
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  221. rammer
    a tool for driving something with force
    They had the gun, by this time, slewed round upon the swivel, and Hands,
    who was at the muzzle with the rammer, was in consequence the most
    exposed.
  222. modulate
    fix or adjust the time, amount, degree, or rate of
    But now John put his hand into his pocket, brought out a whistle, and
    blew upon it several modulated blasts that rang far across the heated
    air.
  223. meantime
    the time between one event, process, or period and another
    In the meantime, the captain gradually
    brightened up at his own music, and at last flapped his hand upon
    the table before him in a way we all knew to mean silence.
  224. supervisor
    one who has charge and direction of
    Some
    news of the lugger in Kitt's Hole had found its way to Supervisor Dance
    and set him forth that night in our direction, and to that circumstance
    my mother and I owed our preservation from death.
  225. exclamatory
    sudden and strong
    "But you are so
    confoundedly hot-headed and exclamatory that I cannot get a word in.
  226. put
    cause to be in a certain state
    When a seaman did put up at the Admiral Benbow
    (as now and then some did, making by the coast road for Bristol) he
    would look in at him through the curtained door before he entered the
    parlour; and he was always sure to be as silent as a mouse when any such
    was present.
  227. crosse
    a long racket with a triangular frame
    There was a date at one end of the line and at the other a
    sum of money, as in common account-books, but instead of explanatory
    writing, only a varying number of crosses between the two.
  228. Union Jack
    national flag of the United Kingdom
    Another pause, and then, not a quarter of a mile in front of me, I
    beheld the Union Jack flutter in the air above a wood.
  229. eyeless
    lacking eyes or eyelike features
    I held out my hand, and the horrible, soft-spoken, eyeless creature
    gripped it in a moment like a vise.
  230. landsman
    a person who lives and works on land
    The captain sat down to his log, and here is the beginning of the entry:

    Alexander Smollett, master; David Livesey, ship's
    doctor; Abraham Gray, carpenter's mate; John
    Trelawney, owner; John Hunter and Richard Joyce,
    owner's servants, landsmen--being all that is left
    faithful of the ship's company--with stores for ten
    days at short rations, came ashore this day and flew
    British colours on the log-house in Treasure Island.
  231. perked up
    made or become more cheerful or lively
    But at my last words he perked up into a kind of startled
    slyness.
  232. look
    perceive with attention; direct one's gaze towards
    I remember him looking round the cover and whistling to himself
    as he did so, and then breaking out in that old sea-song that he sang so
    often afterwards:

    "Fifteen men on the dead man's chest--
    Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!"

    in the high, old tottering voice that seemed to have been tuned and
    broken at the capstan bars.
  233. side
    a place within a region identified relative to a center or reference location
    When I returned with the rum, they were already seated on either side
    of the captain's breakfast-table--Black Dog next to the door and
    sitting sideways so as to have one eye on his old shipmate and one, as I
    thought, on his retreat.
  234. frosty
    covered with a thin layer of ice
    It was one January morning, very early--a pinching, frosty morning--the
    cove all grey with hoar-frost, the ripple lapping softly on the stones,
    the sun still low and only touching the hilltops and shining far to
    seaward.
  235. sailor
    any member of a ship's crew
    He sprang to his feet, drew and opened
    a sailor's clasp-knife, and balancing it open on the palm of his hand,
    threatened to pin the doctor to the wall.
  236. make no bones about
    acknowledge freely and openly
    The squire made no bones about the
    matter; he despised the captain.
  237. plump down
    set (something or oneself) down with or as if with a noise
    I could hear as well as see that brandy-faced rascal Israel Hands
    plumping down a round-shot on the deck.
  238. mistily
    in a misty manner
    A great deal of blood was taken before the captain opened his eyes
    and looked mistily about him.
  239. destine
    decree or designate beforehand
    But he was not destined to go far.
  240. shoot
    fire a shot
    Almost at the same time a
    pistol- shot, flash and report, came from the hedge side.
  241. tumble
    fall down, as if collapsing
    I could hear people
    tumbling up from the cabin and the forecastle, and slipping in an
    instant outside my barrel, I dived behind the fore-sail, made a double
    towards the stern, and came out upon the open deck in time to join
    Hunter and Dr. Livesey in the rush for the weather bow.
  242. schooner
    sailing vessel used in former times
    You never imagined a
    sweeter schooner--a child might sail her--two
    hundred tons; name, HISPANIOLA.
  243. thimbleful
    as much as a thimble will hold
    You don't catch me tasting rum so much, but just
    a thimbleful for luck, of course, the first chance I have.
  244. dance
    taking a series of rhythmical steps in time to music
    Some
    news of the lugger in Kitt's Hole had found its way to Supervisor Dance
    and set him forth that night in our direction, and to that circumstance
    my mother and I owed our preservation from death.
  245. red ink
    the amount by which the cost of a business exceeds its revenue
    There were several additions of a
    later date, but above all, three crosses of red ink--two on the north
    part of the island, one in the southwest--and beside this last, in
    the same red ink, and in a small, neat hand, very different from the
    captain's tottery characters, these words: "Bulk of treasure here."
  246. cockerel
    a young domestic cock; not older than one year
    I'll put on my old cockerel hat,
    and step along of you to Cap'n Trelawney, and report this here affair.
  247. bacon and eggs
    eggs (fried or scrambled) served with bacon
    "I'm a plain man; rum
    and bacon and eggs is what I want, and that head up there for to watch
    ships off.
  248. blessed
    highly favored or fortunate (as e.g. by divine grace)
    I been in places hot as pitch, and mates
    dropping round with Yellow Jack, and the blessed land a-heaving like the
    sea with earthquakes--what to the doctor know of lands like that?--and I
    lived on rum, I tell you.
  249. pirate
    someone who robs at sea or plunders the land from the sea without having a commission from any sovereign nation
    I
    followed him in, and I remember observing the contrast the neat, bright
    doctor, with his powder as white as snow and his bright, black eyes and
    pleasant manners, made with the coltish country folk, and above all,
    with that filthy, heavy, bleared scarecrow of a pirate of ours, sitting,
    far gone in rum, with his arms on the table.
  250. all of a sudden
    happening unexpectedly
    And again, "If it
    comes to swinging, swing all, say I."

    Then all of a sudden there was a tremendous explosion of oaths and
    other noises--the chair and table went over in a lump, a clash of steel
    followed, and then a cry of pain, and the next instant I saw Black
    Dog in full flight, and the captain hotly pursuing, both with drawn
    cutlasses, and the former streaming blood from the left shoulder.
  251. tap
    strike lightly
    Rum! Rum!"

    I ran to fetch it, but I was quite unsteadied by all that had fallen
    out, and I broke one glass and fouled the tap, and while I was still
    getting in my own way, I heard a loud fall in the parlour, and running
    in, beheld the captain lying full length upon the floor.
  252. another
    any of various alternatives; some other
    "Were you addressing me, sir?" says the doctor; and when the ruffian had
    told him, with another oath, that this was so, "I have only one thing to
    say to you, sir," replies the doctor, "that if you keep on drinking rum,
    the world will soon be quit of a very dirty scoundrel!"
  253. behind
    in or to or toward the rear
    I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the
    inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow--a
    tall, strong, heavy, nut-brown man, his tarry pigtail falling over the
    shoulder of his soiled blue coat, his hands ragged and scarred, with
    black, broken nails, and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid
    white.
  254. at once
    without delay or hesitation; with no time intervening
    The voices
    stopped at once, all but Dr. Livesey's; he went on as before speaking
    clear and kind and drawing briskly at his pipe between every word or
    two.
  255. heard
    detected or perceived via the auditory sense
    Often I have heard the house
    shaking with "Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum," all the neighbours joining
    in for dear life, with the fear of death upon them, and each singing
    louder than the other to avoid remark.
  256. about
    (of quantities) imprecise but fairly close to correct
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  257. speak
    use language
    And indeed bad as his clothes were and coarsely as he spoke, he had none
    of the appearance of a man who sailed before the mast, but seemed like
    a mate or skipper accustomed to be obeyed or to strike.
  258. think
    judge or regard; look upon; judge
    At first we thought it was the want of company of his own kind
    that made him ask this question, but at last we began to see he was
    desirous to avoid them.
  259. leg
    a human limb
    He had taken me aside one day
    and promised me a silver fourpenny on the first of every month if I
    would only keep my "weather-eye open for a seafaring man with one leg"
    and let him know the moment he appeared.
  260. giddily
    in a giddy light-headed manner
    I had
    to cling tight to the backstay, and the world turned giddily before my
    eyes, for though I was a good enough sailor when there was way on, this
    standing still and being rolled about like a bottle was a thing I never
    learned to stand without a qualm or so, above all in the morning, on an
    empty stomach.
  261. redly
    displaying a red color
    A full moon was beginning to rise and peered
    redly through the upper edges of the fog, and this increased our haste,
    for it was plain, before we came forth again, that all would be as
    bright as day, and our departure exposed to the eyes of any watchers.
  262. mother
    a woman who has given birth to a child
    Dr. Livesey came
    late one afternoon to see the patient, took a bit of dinner from my
    mother, and went into the parlour to smoke a pipe until his horse should
    come down from the hamlet, for we had no stabling at the old Benbow.
  263. on the road
    travelling about
    We were not many
    minutes on the road, though we sometimes stopped to lay hold of each
    other and hearken.
  264. manned
    having a crew
    God help the poor souls that manned her--coral
    long ago."
  265. along
    in line with a length or direction
    The man who came
    with the barrow told us the mail had set him down the morning before at
    the Royal George, that he had inquired what inns there were along the
    coast, and hearing ours well spoken of, I suppose, and described as
    lonely, had chosen it from the others for his place of residence.
  266. out of
    motivated by
    If ever he mentioned it, the captain blew through
    his nose so loudly that you might say he roared, and stared my poor
    father out of the room.
  267. brass
    an alloy of copper and zinc
    All day he hung round the cove or
    upon the cliffs with a brass telescope; all evening he sat in a corner
    of the parlour next the fire and drank rum and water very strong.
  268. tapping
    the sound of light blow or knock
    "And now that's done," said the blind man; and at the words he suddenly
    left hold of me, and with incredible accuracy and nimbleness,
    skipped out of the parlour and into the road, where, as I still stood
    motionless, I could hear his stick go tap-tap- tapping into the distance.
  269. off
    from a particular thing or place or position
    "I'm a plain man; rum
    and bacon and eggs is what I want, and that head up there for to watch
    ships off.
  270. slyness
    shrewdness as demonstrated by being skilled in deception
    But at my last words he perked up into a kind of startled
    slyness.
  271. cruise
    travel about for pleasure, relaxation, or sightseeing
    I don't like this cruise; I don't like the men; and
    I don't like my officer.
  272. once
    on one occasion
    He was only once crossed, and that was towards the end, when my poor
    father was far gone in a decline that took him off.
  273. gentleman
    a man of refinement
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  274. bones
    a percussion instrument consisting of a pair of hollow pieces of wood or bone (usually held between the thumb and fingers) that are made to click together (as by Spanish dancers) in rhythm with the dance
    "Here's luck," "A fair wind," and "Billy Bones his
    fancy," were very neatly and clearly executed on the forearm; and up
    near the shoulder there was a sketch of a gallows and a man hanging from
    it--done, as I thought, with great spirit.
  275. piping
    a long tube made of metal or plastic that is used to carry water or oil or gas etc.
    And I was going to sea myself, to sea in a schooner, with a piping
    boatswain and pig-tailed singing seamen, to sea, bound for an unknown
    island, and to seek for buried treasure!
  276. mizzen
    fore-and-aft sail set on the mizzenmast
    Just then a sort of brightness fell upon me in the barrel, and looking
    up, I found the moon had risen and was silvering the mizzen-top and
    shining white on the luff of the fore-sail; and almost at the same time
    the voice of the lookout shouted, "Land ho!"




    12

    Council of War

    THERE was a great rush of feet across the deck.
  277. even chance
    an unpredictable phenomenon
    With the men in the temper they were in, it seemed an even
    chance
    if we should see the lad again.
  278. two
    the cardinal number that is the sum of one and one
    The voices
    stopped at once, all but Dr. Livesey's; he went on as before speaking
    clear and kind and drawing briskly at his pipe between every word or
    two.
  279. Surinam
    a republic in northeastern South America on the Atlantic
    She's been at Madagascar, and at
    Malabar, and Surinam, and Providence, and Portobello.
  280. lanyard
    a cord worn around the neck to hold a knife or whistle
    Aboard ship he carried his crutch by a lanyard round his neck, to have
    both hands as free as possible.
  281. tree
    a tall perennial woody plant having a main trunk and branches forming a distinct elevated crown; includes both gymnosperms and angiosperms
    Over on the back the same hand had written this further information:

    Tall tree, Spy-glass shoulder, bearing a point to
    the N. of N.N.E.

    Skeleton Island E.S.E. and by E.

    Ten feet.
  282. stern
    of a strict bearing or demeanor; forbidding in aspect
    "Take your hat, Hawkins, and we'll see
    the ship."




    9

    Powder and Arms

    THE HISPANIOLA lay some way out, and we went under the figureheads and
    round the sterns of many other ships, and their cables sometimes grated
    underneath our keel, and sometimes swung above us.
  283. fear
    an emotion in anticipation of some specific pain or danger
    Often I have heard the house
    shaking with "Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum," all the neighbours joining
    in for dear life, with the fear of death upon them, and each singing
    louder than the other to avoid remark.
  284. enough
    sufficient for the purpose
    Often enough when the first
    of the month came round and I applied to him for my wage, he would only
    blow through his nose at me and stare me down, but before the week was
    out he was sure to think better of it, bring me my four-penny piece, and
    repeat his orders to look out for "the seafaring man with one leg."
  285. wring
    a twisting squeeze
    I have seen him wringing his hands after such a
    rebuff, and I am sure the annoyance and the terror he lived in must have
    greatly hastened his early and unhappy death.
  286. billy
    male goat
    "Black
    Dog as ever was, come for to see his old shipmate Billy, at the Admiral
    Benbow inn.
  287. head
    the upper part of the human body or the body in animals
    "I'm a plain man; rum
    and bacon and eggs is what I want, and that head up there for to watch
    ships off.
  288. shore
    the land along the edge of a body of water
    It's been meat and drink, and man and wife,
    to me; and if I'm not to have my rum now I'm a poor old hulk on a lee
    shore, my blood'll be on you, Jim, and that doctor swab"; and he ran on
    again for a while with curses.
  289. buccaneering
    hijacking on the high seas or in similar contexts
    It's always a ship, and they can get to
    buccaneering again, I suppose."
  290. off and on
    not regularly
    "But look here," he went on, "here's what I want to know, Barbecue: how
    long are we a-going to stand off and on like a blessed bumboat?
  291. Tom
    (ethnic slur) offensive and derogatory name for a Black man who is abjectly servile and deferential to Whites
    So the weeks passed on, till one fine day there came a letter addressed
    to Dr. Livesey, with this addition, "To be opened, in the case of his
    absence, by Tom Redruth or young Hawkins."
  292. whistling
    the sound made by something moving rapidly or by steam coming out of a small aperture
    I remember him looking round the cover and whistling to himself
    as he did so, and then breaking out in that old sea-song that he sang so
    often afterwards:

    "Fifteen men on the dead man's chest--
    Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!"

    in the high, old tottering voice that seemed to have been tuned and
    broken at the capstan bars.
  293. make
    perform or carry out
    At first we thought it was the want of company of his own kind
    that made him ask this question, but at last we began to see he was
    desirous to avoid them.
  294. tarry
    leave slowly and hesitantly
    I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the
    inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow--a
    tall, strong, heavy, nut-brown man, his tarry pigtail falling over the
    shoulder of his soiled blue coat, his hands ragged and scarred, with
    black, broken nails, and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid
    white.
  295. aloft
    at or on or to the masthead or upper rigging of a ship
    "Search him, some of you shirking lubbers, and the rest of you aloft and
    get the chest," he cried.
  296. little
    limited or below average in number or quantity or magnitude
    My father told him no, very little company, the more was the pity.
  297. dirk
    a relatively long dagger with a straight blade
    "There's Dirk again," said one.
  298. way
    how something is done or how it happens
    For me, at least, there was no secret about the matter, for
    I was, in a way, a sharer in his alarms.
  299. bill
    an itemized statement of money owed for goods or services
    "Is this here table for my mate Bill?" he asked with a kind of leer.
  300. still
    not in physical motion
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  301. more
    greater in size or amount or extent or degree
    My father told him no, very little company, the more was the pity.
  302. honest
    marked by truth
    "I'll show these rogues that I'm an honest woman," said my mother.
  303. between decks
    in the space between decks, on a ship
    The captain glared at him for a while, flapped his hand again,
    glared still harder, and at last broke out with a villainous, low oath,
    "Silence, there, between decks!"
  304. arrow
    projectile with a thin shaft intended to be shot from a bow
    Long John Silver unearthed a very
    competent man for a mate, a man named Arrow.
  305. duff
    a stiff flour pudding steamed or boiled usually and containing e.g. currants and raisins and citron
    Double grog was going on the least excuse; there was duff on odd days,
    as, for instance, if the squire heard it was any man's birthday, and
    always a barrel of apples standing broached in the waist for anyone to
    help himself that had a fancy.
  306. leave
    go away from a place
    Nor would he allow anyone to leave the inn till he
    had drunk himself sleepy and reeled off to bed.
  307. manlike
    resembling human beings
    From trunk to trunk the creature flitted like a deer, running
    manlike on two legs, but unlike any man that I had ever seen, stooping
    almost double as it ran.
  308. cannonball
    a solid projectile that in former times was fired from a cannon
    Here he was interrupted by a loud report, and a cannonball came tearing
    through the trees and pitched in the sand not a hundred yards from where
    we two were talking.
  309. pistol
    a firearm that is held and fired with one hand
    All they would do was to give me a loaded pistol lest we were
    attacked, and to promise to have horses ready saddled in case we were
    pursued on our return, while one lad was to ride forward to the doctor's
    in search of armed assistance.
  310. return
    go or come back to place, condition, or activity where one has been before
    Well, mother was upstairs with father and I was laying the
    breakfast-table against the captain's return when the parlour door
    opened and a man stepped in on whom I had never set my eyes before.
  311. sound
    mechanical vibrations transmitted by an elastic medium
    I
    remember his breath hanging like smoke in his wake as he strode off, and
    the last sound I heard of him as he turned the big rock was a loud snort
    of indignation, as though his mind was still running upon Dr. Livesey.
  312. moment
    an indefinitely short time
    He had taken me aside one day
    and promised me a silver fourpenny on the first of every month if I
    would only keep my "weather-eye open for a seafaring man with one leg"
    and let him know the moment he appeared.
  313. shove off
    leave; informal or rude
    In a jiffy I had slipped over the side and curled up in the
    fore-sheets of the nearest boat, and almost at the same moment she
    shoved off.
  314. cheese
    a solid food prepared from the pressed curd of milk
    You
    mightn't happen to have a piece of cheese about you, now?
  315. sit
    take a seat
    All day he hung round the cove or
    upon the cliffs with a brass telescope; all evening he sat in a corner
    of the parlour next the fire and drank rum and water very strong.
  316. very
    being the exact same one; not any other:
    My father told him no, very little company, the more was the pity.
  317. six
    the cardinal number that is the sum of five and one
    " Six hours.
  318. mast
    a vertical spar for supporting sails
    And indeed bad as his clothes were and coarsely as he spoke, he had none
    of the appearance of a man who sailed before the mast, but seemed like
    a mate or skipper accustomed to be obeyed or to strike.
  319. stand
    be standing; be upright
    Now, if you had sailed
    along of Bill, you wouldn't have stood there to be spoke to twice--not
    you.
  320. at last
    as the end result of a succession or process
    At first we thought it was the want of company of his own kind
    that made him ask this question, but at last we began to see he was
    desirous to avoid them.
  321. abeam
    at right angles to the length of a ship or airplane
    We were heading S.S.W. and had a steady breeze abeam and a quiet sea.
  322. medicine chest
    cabinet that holds medicines and toiletries
    Hunter
    brought the boat round under the stern-port, and Joyce and I set to work
    loading her with powder tins, muskets, bags of biscuits, kegs of pork, a
    cask of cognac, and my invaluable medicine chest.
  323. haul
    draw slowly or heavily
    "We was a-talkin' of keel- hauling," answered Morgan.
  324. time
    the continuum of experience in which events pass to the past
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  325. safe and sound
    free from danger or injury
    And I ran to the door in time to see Jim Hawkins, safe and sound, come
    climbing over the stockade.




    19

    Narrative Resumed by Jim Hawkins: The Garrison in the Stockade

    AS soon as Ben Gunn saw the colours he came to a halt, stopped me by the
    arm, and sat down.
  326. eye
    the organ of sight
    He had taken me aside one day
    and promised me a silver fourpenny on the first of every month if I
    would only keep my "weather- eye open for a seafaring man with one leg"
    and let him know the moment he appeared.
  327. one at a time
    in single file
    " One at a time, one at a time," laughed Dr. Livesey.
  328. overhear
    hear, usually without the knowledge of the speakers
    Meantime, he ran on, little supposing he was
    overheard.
  329. may
    thorny shrub of a small tree having white to scarlet flowers
    If ever he mentioned it, the captain blew through
    his nose so loudly that you might say he roared, and stared my poor
    father out of the room.
  330. hill
    a local and well-defined elevation of the land
    Once out upon the road, Black
    Dog, in spite of his wound, showed a wonderful clean pair of heels and
    disappeared over the edge of the hill in half a minute.
  331. tarpaulin
    waterproofed canvas
    I am in the most magnificent health and
    spirits, eating like a bull, sleeping like a tree,
    yet I shall not enjoy a moment till I hear my old
    tarpaulins tramping round the capstan.
  332. till
    work land as by ploughing to make it ready for cultivation
    Nor would he allow anyone to leave the inn till he
    had drunk himself sleepy and reeled off to bed.
  333. ripple
    a small wave on the surface of a liquid
    It was one January morning, very early--a pinching, frosty morning--the
    cove all grey with hoar-frost, the ripple lapping softly on the stones,
    the sun still low and only touching the hilltops and shining far to
    seaward.
  334. buried
    placed in a grave
    What I want to know is this: Supposing that I have here in my pocket
    some clue to where Flint buried his treasure, will that treasure amount
    to much?"
  335. reassure
    cause to feel confident
    I'll give you a golden guinea for a noggin, Jim."

    He was growing more and more excited, and this alarmed me for my father,
    who was very low that day and needed quiet; besides, I was reassured by
    the doctor's words, now quoted to me, and rather offended by the offer
    of a bribe.
  336. tailing
    the act of following someone secretly
    One,
    tailing out behind the rest, was a lad that had gone from the hamlet to
    Dr. Livesey's; the rest were revenue officers, whom he had met by the
    way, and with whom he had had the intelligence to return at once.
  337. please
    give enjoyment to
    I'll have a glass of rum from this dear child here, as I've took
    such a liking to; and we'll sit down, if you please, and talk square,
    like old shipmates."
  338. to that
    to that
    Well, then, you get on a horse, and go to--well, yes,
    I will!-- to that eternal doctor swab, and tell him to pipe all
    hands--magistrates and sich--and he'll lay 'em aboard at the Admiral
    Benbow--all old Flint's crew, man and boy, all on 'em that's left.
  339. money
    the most common medium of exchange
    In one way, indeed, he bade fair to ruin us, for he kept on staying week
    after week, and at last month after month, so that all the money had
    been long exhausted, and still my father never plucked up the heart to
    insist on having more.
  340. tree trunk
    the main stem of a tree
    A peculiar stagnant smell hung over the anchorage--a smell of
    sodden leaves and rotting tree trunks.
  341. tumbling
    the gymnastic moves of an acrobat
    I could hear people
    tumbling up from the cabin and the forecastle, and slipping in an
    instant outside my barrel, I dived behind the fore-sail, made a double
    towards the stern, and came out upon the open deck in time to join
    Hunter and Dr. Livesey in the rush for the weather bow.
  342. find
    discover or determine the existence, presence, or fact of
    I could not
    doubt that this was the BLACK SPOT; and taking it up, I found written
    on the other side, in a very good, clear hand, this short message: "You
    have till ten tonight."
  343. dock
    landing in a harbor next to a pier where ships are loaded and unloaded or repaired; may have gates to let water in or out
    "It will amount to this: If we have the
    clue you talk about, I fit out a ship in Bristol dock, and take you and
    Hawkins here along, and I'll have that treasure if I search a year."
  344. pause
    cease an action temporarily
    I paused where I was, with my napkin in my
    hand.
  345. over
    beyond the top or upper surface or edge
    I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the
    inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow--a
    tall, strong, heavy, nut-brown man, his tarry pigtail falling over the
    shoulder of his soiled blue coat, his hands ragged and scarred, with
    black, broken nails, and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid
    white.
  346. rattle
    make short successive sounds
    Then it struck sharp on the inn door, and then we could hear the handle
    being turned and the bolt rattling as the wretched being tried to enter;
    and then there was a long time of silence both within and without.
  347. ringleader
    a person who leads (especially in illicit activities)
    Or rather, I suppose the
    truth was this, that all hands were disaffected by the example of the
    ringleaders--only some more, some less; and a few, being good fellows in
    the main, could neither be led nor driven any further.
  348. tyrannize
    rule or exercise power over in a cruel and autocratic manner
    My father was always saying the inn would be
    ruined, for people would soon cease coming there to be tyrannized over
    and put down, and sent shivering to their beds; but I really believe his
    presence did us good.
  349. dress out
    kill and prepare for market or consumption
    While I was still in this delightful dream, we came suddenly in front
    of a large inn and met Squire Trelawney, all dressed out like a
    sea-officer, in stout blue cloth, coming out of the door with a smile on
    his face and a capital imitation of a sailor's walk.
  350. first mate
    the officer below the master on a commercial ship
    I was
    first mate, I was, old Flint's first mate, and I'm the on'y one as knows
    the place.
  351. never
    not ever; at no time in the past or future
    Now the leg
    would be cut off at the knee, now at the hip; now he was a monstrous
    kind of a creature who had never had but the one leg, and that in the
    middle of his body.
  352. nimbleness
    the gracefulness of a person or animal that is quick and nimble
    "And now that's done," said the blind man; and at the words he suddenly
    left hold of me, and with incredible accuracy and nimbleness,
    skipped out of the parlour and into the road, where, as I still stood
    motionless, I could hear his stick go tap-tap-tapping into the distance.
  353. at sea
    perplexed by many conflicting situations or statements
    Dreadful stories
    they were--about hanging, and walking the plank, and storms at sea, and
    the Dry Tortugas, and wild deeds and places on the Spanish Main.
  354. abominable
    unequivocally detestable
    And altogether I paid pretty dear for
    my monthly fourpenny piece, in the shape of these abominable fancies.
  355. nearer
    (comparative of `near' or `close') within a shorter distance
    "Come nearer here."
  356. some
    quantifier
    When a seaman did put up at the Admiral Benbow
    (as now and then some did, making by the coast road for Bristol) he
    would look in at him through the curtained door before he entered the
    parlour; and he was always sure to be as silent as a mouse when any such
    was present.
  357. shoulder
    a ball-and-socket joint between the head of the humerus and a cavity of the scapula
    I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the
    inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow--a
    tall, strong, heavy, nut-brown man, his tarry pigtail falling over the
    shoulder of his soiled blue coat, his hands ragged and scarred, with
    black, broken nails, and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid
    white.
  358. rough-and-ready
    crude but effective for the purpose at hand
    He was a tall man, over six
    feet high, and broad in proportion, and he had a bluff, rough-and-ready
    face, all roughened and reddened and lined in his long travels.
  359. first
    preceding all others in time or space or degree
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old seaman wi...
  360. observe
    watch attentively
    I
    followed him in, and I remember observing the contrast the neat, bright
    doctor, with his powder as white as snow and his bright, black eyes and
    pleasant manners, made with the coltish country folk, and above all,
    with that filthy, heavy, bleared scarecrow of a pirate of ours, sitting,
    far gone in rum, with his arms on the table.
  361. alarm
    a device signaling the occurrence of some undesirable event
    For me, at least, there was no secret about the matter, for
    I was, in a way, a sharer in his alarms.
  362. plain
    simple
    "I'm a plain man; rum
    and bacon and eggs is what I want, and that head up there for to watch
    ships off.
  363. rigger
    someone who rigs ships
    The
    workpeople, to be sure-- riggers and what not--were
    most annoyingly slow; but time cured that.
  364. speak up
    express one's opinion openly and without fear or hesitation
    "Now, look here," said the captain; "you've run me down; here I am;
    well, then, speak up; what is it?"
  365. cannonade
    intense and continuous artillery fire
    For it was
    not only a piece of stout, seamanly, good feeling; it was good policy
    besides and showed our enemies that we despised their cannonade.
  366. longish
    somewhat long
    He had found a longish fir-tree
    lying felled and trimmed in the enclosure, and with the help of Hunter
    he had set it up at the corner of the log-house where the trunks crossed
    and made an angle.
  367. goatskin
    the hide of a goat
    And I began to run towards the anchorage, my terrors all forgotten,
    while close at my side the marooned man in his goatskins trotted easily
    and lightly.
  368. quite
    to the greatest extent; completely
    But by this
    time we had all long ceased to pay any particular notice to the song; it
    was new, that night, to nobody but Dr. Livesey, and on him I observed it
    did not produce an agreeable effect, for he looked up for a moment quite
    angrily before he went on with his talk to old Taylor, the gardener, on
    a new cure for the rheumatics.
  369. Here
    queen of the Olympian gods in ancient Greek mythology
    Here you, matey," he
    cried to the man who trundled the barrow; "bring up alongside and help
    up my chest.
  370. poor
    having little money or few possessions
    If ever he mentioned it, the captain blew through
    his nose so loudly that you might say he roared, and stared my poor
    father out of the room.
  371. ask
    make a request or demand for something to somebody
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  372. fell
    cause to go down by or as if by delivering a blow
    First he recognized the doctor with
    an unmistakable frown; then his glance fell upon me, and he looked
    relieved.
  373. open
    affording free passage or access
    He had taken me aside one day
    and promised me a silver fourpenny on the first of every month if I
    would only keep my "weather-eye open for a seafaring man with one leg"
    and let him know the moment he appeared.
  374. year of grace
    any year of the Christian era
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  375. Israel
    an ancient kingdom of the Hebrew tribes at the southeastern end of the Mediterranean Sea; founded by Saul around 1025 BC and destroyed by the Assyrians in 721 BC
    And the
    coxswain, Israel Hands, was a careful, wily, old, experienced seaman who
    could be trusted at a pinch with almost anything.
  376. Parmesan
    hard dry sharp-flavored Italian cheese; often grated
    And you never saw me
    take snuff, the reason being that in my snuff-box I carry a piece of
    Parmesan cheese--a cheese made in Italy, very nutritious.
  377. thicket
    a dense growth of bushes
    The crews raced for the beach, but the boat I was in, having some start
    and being at once the lighter and the better manned, shot far ahead of
    her consort, and the bow had struck among the shore-side trees and I
    had caught a branch and swung myself out and plunged into the nearest
    thicket while Silver and the rest were still a hundred yards behind.
  378. after
    happening at a time subsequent to a reference time
    In one way, indeed, he bade fair to ruin us, for he kept on staying week
    after week, and at last month after month, so that all the money had
    been long exhausted, and still my father never plucked up the heart to
    insist on having more.
  379. anchor
    a mechanical device that prevents a vessel from moving
    Obeying this order, we
    found, or rather I found--for the gamekeeper was a poor hand at reading
    anything but print--the following important news:

    Old Anchor Inn, Bristol, March 1, 17--

    Dear Livesey--As I do not know whether you
    are at the hall or still in London, I send this in
    double to both places.
  380. crawl
    move slowly
    Farther I could not move
    her, for the bridge was too low to let me do more than crawl below it.
  381. messmate
    an associate with whom you share meals in the same mess
    Dooty is dooty, messmates.
  382. bless
    make the sign of the cross to call on God for protection
    And here, sure enough, is my mate Bill, with a spy-glass under his arm,
    bless his old 'art, to be sure.
  383. much
    great in quantity or degree or extent
    Much company, mate?"
  384. left
    being or located on or directed toward the side of the body to the west when facing north
    He
    was a pale, tallowy creature, wanting two fingers of the left hand, and
    though he wore a cutlass, he did not look much like a fighter.
  385. louis d'or
    a former French gold coin
    It was a long, difficult business, for the coins were of all countries
    and sizes--doubloons, and louis d'ors, and guineas, and pieces of eight,
    and I know not what besides, all shaken together at random.
  386. short-handed
    inadequate in number of workers or assistants etc.
    It weren't quite a chapel,
    but it seemed more solemn like; and then, says you, Ben Gunn was
    short-handed--no chapling, nor so much as a Bible and a flag, you says."
  387. pinch
    squeeze tightly between the fingers
    It was one January morning, very early--a pinching, frosty morning--the
    cove all grey with hoar-frost, the ripple lapping softly on the stones,
    the sun still low and only touching the hilltops and shining far to
    seaward.
  388. hold
    have in one's hands or grip
    Soon after, Dr. Livesey's horse came to the door and he rode away, but
    the captain held his peace that evening, and for many evenings to come.




    2

    Black Dog Appears and Disappears


    IT was not very long after this that there occurred the first of the
    mysterious events that rid us at last of the captain, though not, as you
    will see, of his affairs.
  389. alongside
    side by side
    Here you, matey," he
    cried to the man who trundled the barrow; "bring up alongside and help
    up my chest.
  390. swivel
    turn on a pivot
    "Easy with that,
    men--easy," he ran on, to the fellows who were shifting the powder; and
    then suddenly observing me examining the swivel we carried amidships,
    a long brass nine, "Here you, ship's boy," he cried, "out o' that!
  391. toon
    a film made by photographing a series of cartoon drawings to give the illusion of movement when projected in rapid sequence
    "Aye, but you see," returned Ben Gunn, "I didn't mean giving me a gate
    to keep, and a suit of livery clothes, and such; that's not my mark,
    Jim. What I mean is, would he be likely to come down to the toon of, say
    one thousand pounds out of money that's as good as a man's own already?"
  392. uncover
    make visible
    The ebb has made a good while; our
    stores should be uncovered.
  393. stay
    continue in a place, position, or situation
    I'll stay here a bit," he continued.
  394. wood
    the hard fibrous lignified substance under the bark of trees
    But there was no unusual sound--nothing but the low
    wash of the ripple and the croaking of the inmates of the wood.
  395. steepness
    the property possessed by a slope that is very steep
    What with the
    steepness of the incline, the thick tree stumps, and the soft sand, he
    and his crutch were as helpless as a ship in stays.
  396. trying on
    putting clothes on to see whether they fit
    It's
    trying on a man, I know.
  397. obey
    comply with; do what one is told
    And indeed bad as his clothes were and coarsely as he spoke, he had none
    of the appearance of a man who sailed before the mast, but seemed like
    a mate or skipper accustomed to be obeyed or to strike.
  398. barn door
    the large sliding door of a barn
    But the worst of it was that with the
    course I now held we turned our broadside instead of our stern to the
    HISPANIOLA and offered a target like a barn door.
  399. missis
    informal term of address for someone's wife
    But my old
    missis has it all by now.
  400. cast about
    search anxiously
    While I was still casting about in my
    thoughts to find some probable excuse, Dr. Livesey called me to his
    side.
  401. board
    a stout length of sawn timber
    'Offe Caraccas,' now; you see, here was some unhappy vessel
    boarded off that coast.
  402. quartermaster
    an officer who provides clothing and subsistence for troops
    "Flint was cap'n; I was quartermaster, along
    of my timber leg.
  403. rout out
    force or drive out
    I'm not a doctor only; I'm a magistrate; and if I catch a breath
    of complaint against you, if it's only for a piece of incivility like
    tonight's, I'll take effectual means to have you hunted down and routed
    out
    of this.
  404. Doctor
    (Roman Catholic Church) a title conferred on 33 saints who distinguished themselves through the orthodoxy of their theological teaching
    It was a happy relief for us when the door opened and Doctor Livesey
    came in, on his visit to my father.
  405. sun-dried
    dried naturally by the sun
    It was a master surgeon, him that ampytated me--out of
    college and all--Latin by the bucket, and what not; but he was hanged
    like a dog, and sun-dried like the rest, at Corso Castle.
  406. skeleton
    the structure providing a frame for the body of an animal
    Over on the back the same hand had written this further information:

    Tall tree, Spy-glass shoulder, bearing a point to
    the N. of N.N.E.

    Skeleton Island E.S.E. and by E.

    Ten feet.
  407. passably
    to a moderately sufficient extent or degree
    Sometimes he fell and cut himself;
    sometimes he lay all day long in his little bunk at one side of the
    companion; sometimes for a day or two he would be almost sober and
    attend to his work at least passably.
  408. walrus
    either of two large northern marine mammals having ivory tusks and tough hide over thick blubber
    So it was with the CASSANDRA, as brought us all safe
    home from Malabar, after England took the viceroy of the Indies; so it
    was with the old WALRUS, Flint's old ship, as I've seen amuck with the
    red blood and fit to sink with gold."
  409. help
    give assistance; be of service
    Here you, matey," he
    cried to the man who trundled the barrow; "bring up alongside and help
    up my chest.
  410. seaworthy
    fit for a sea voyage
    All well, I hope; all
    shipshape and seaworthy?"
  411. score
    a number that expresses accomplishment in a game or contest
    And
    she began to count over the amount of the captain's score from the
    sailor's bag into the one that I was holding.
  412. broached
    of a cask or barrel
    When I was an
    A B master mariner I'd have come up alongside of him, hand over hand,
    and broached him to in a brace of old shakes, I would; but now--"

    And then, all of a sudden, he stopped, and his jaw dropped as though he
    had remembered something.
  413. shake
    move or cause to move back and forth
    On
    stormy nights, when the wind shook the four corners of the house and
    the surf roared along the cove and up the cliffs, I would see him in a
    thousand forms, and with a thousand diabolical expressions.
  414. mutilate
    destroy or injure severely
    Ah, Bill, Bill, we have seen a sight of times, us two, since
    I lost them two talons," holding up his mutilated hand.
  415. hauling
    the activity of transporting goods by truck
    "We was a-talkin' of keel- hauling," answered Morgan.
  416. fellow
    a boy or man
    The old fellow's fury was awful.
  417. hitch
    to hook or entangle
    So far there was not a hitch.
  418. half
    one of two equal parts of a divisible whole
    As soon as I
    was back again he returned to his former manner, half fawning, half
    sneering, patted me on the shoulder, told me I was a good boy and he had
    taken quite a fancy to me.
  419. tavern
    a building with a bar licensed to sell alcoholic drinks
    The fog was rapidly
    dispersing; already the moon shone quite clear on the high ground on
    either side; and it was only in the exact bottom of the dell and round
    the tavern door that a thin veil still hung unbroken to conceal the
    first steps of our escape.
  420. misgive
    suggest fear or doubt
    I should have leaped out and run for
    it if I had found the strength, but my limbs and heart alike misgave me.
  421. bar
    a rigid piece of metal or wood
    I remember him looking round the cover and whistling to himself
    as he did so, and then breaking out in that old sea-song that he sang so
    often afterwards:

    "Fifteen men on the dead man's chest--
    Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!"

    in the high, old tottering voice that seemed to have been tuned and
    broken at the capstan bars.
  422. tiff
    a petty quarrel
    This is a tiff; he'd soon talk 'em out of it if he
    had the chance, and what I propose to do is to give him the chance.
  423. galley
    a large medieval vessel with guns at stern and prow
    The whole schooner had been
    overhauled; six berths had been made astern out of what had been the
    after-part of the main hold; and this set of cabins was only joined to
    the galley and forecastle by a sparred passage on the port side.
  424. expose
    show; make visible or apparent
    When I got back with the basin, the doctor had already ripped up the
    captain's sleeve and exposed his great sinewy arm.
  425. none
    not at all or in no way
    And indeed bad as his clothes were and coarsely as he spoke, he had none
    of the appearance of a man who sailed before the mast, but seemed like
    a mate or skipper accustomed to be obeyed or to strike.
  426. direction
    a line leading to a place or point
    The hamlet lay not many hundred yards away, though out of view, on the
    other side of the next cove; and what greatly encouraged me, it was
    in an opposite direction from that whence the blind man had made his
    appearance and whither he had presumably returned.
  427. reload
    load anew
    After reloading, we walked down the outside of the palisade to see to
    the fallen enemy.
  428. manage
    be in charge of, act on, or dispose of
    Between us, with much trouble, we managed to hoist him upstairs, and
    laid him on his bed, where his head fell back on the pillow as if he
    were almost fainting.
  429. much as
    in a similar way
    By his
    own account he must have lived his life among some of the wickedest men
    that God ever allowed upon the sea, and the language in which he told
    these stories shocked our plain country people almost as much as the
    crimes that he described.
  430. house
    a dwelling that serves as living quarters for a family
    Mostly
    he would not speak when spoken to, only look up sudden and fierce and
    blow through his nose like a fog-horn; and we and the people who came
    about our house soon learned to let him be.
  431. wade
    walk through relatively shallow water
    No lives were lost, and we could wade
    ashore in safety.
  432. fall
    descend freely under the influence of gravity
    I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the
    inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow--a
    tall, strong, heavy, nut-brown man, his tarry pigtail falling over the
    shoulder of his soiled blue coat, his hands ragged and scarred, with
    black, broken nails, and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid
    white.
  433. place
    a point located with respect to surface features of a region
    The man who came
    with the barrow told us the mail had set him down the morning before at
    the Royal George, that he had inquired what inns there were along the
    coast, and hearing ours well spoken of, I suppose, and described as
    lonely, had chosen it from the others for his place of residence.
  434. flowering plant
    plants having seeds in a closed ovary
    Here and there were flowering plants, unknown to me; here and
    there I saw snakes, and one raised his head from a ledge of rock and
    hissed at me with a noise not unlike the spinning of a top.
  435. low
    less than normal in degree or intensity or amount
    The captain glared at him for a while, flapped his hand again,
    glared still harder, and at last broke out with a villainous, low oath,
    "Silence, there, between decks!"
  436. smell
    the faculty that enables us to distinguish scents
    He clambered up
    and down stairs, and went from the parlour to the bar and back again,
    and sometimes put his nose out of doors to smell the sea, holding on to
    the walls as he went for support and breathing hard and fast like a man
    on a steep mountain.
  437. bury
    place in a grave or tomb
    What I want to know is this: Supposing that I have here in my pocket
    some clue to where Flint buried his treasure, will that treasure amount
    to much?"
  438. make headway
    obtain advantages, such as points, etc.
    In the meanwhile we had been making headway at a good pace for a boat so
    overloaded, and we had shipped but little water in the process.
  439. fen
    low-lying wet land with grassy vegetation
    The thicket stretched down from the top of
    one of the sandy knolls, spreading and growing taller as it went, until
    it reached the margin of the broad, reedy fen, through which the nearest
    of the little rivers soaked its way into the anchorage.
  440. incivility
    deliberate discourtesy
    I'm not a doctor only; I'm a magistrate; and if I catch a breath
    of complaint against you, if it's only for a piece of incivility like
    tonight's, I'll take effectual means to have you hunted down and routed
    out of this.
  441. slap
    a blow from a flat object (as an open hand)
    For in these fits he was the most
    overriding companion ever known; he would slap his hand on the table for
    silence all round; he would fly up in a passion of anger at a question,
    or sometimes because none was put, and so he judged the company was not
    following his story.
  442. fog
    droplets of water vapor suspended in the air near the ground
    Mostly
    he would not speak when spoken to, only look up sudden and fierce and
    blow through his nose like a fog-horn; and we and the people who came
    about our house soon learned to let him be.
  443. give
    transfer possession of something concrete or abstract
    You and me'll just go back into the
    parlour, sonny, and get behind the door, and we'll give Bill a little
    surprise--bless his 'art, I say again."
  444. last
    coming after all others in time or space or degree or being the only one remaining
    At first we thought it was the want of company of his own kind
    that made him ask this question, but at last we began to see he was
    desirous to avoid them.
  445. astern
    at, near, or toward the stern of a ship or airplane
    The whole schooner had been
    overhauled; six berths had been made astern out of what had been the
    after-part of the main hold; and this set of cabins was only joined to
    the galley and forecastle by a sparred passage on the port side.
  446. thunder
    a booming or crashing noise along the path of lightning
    "A week at least," said I.

    " Thunder!" he cried.
  447. earring
    jewelry to ornament the ear
    At last, however,
    we got alongside, and were met and saluted as we stepped aboard by the
    mate, Mr. Arrow, a brown old sailor with earrings in his ears and a
    squint.
  448. oar
    an implement used to propel or steer a boat
    No one took notice of me, only the bow oar saying, "Is that you, Jim?
    Keep your head down."
  449. upstairs
    on a floor above
    I remember the appearance of his
    coat, which he patched himself upstairs in his room, and which, before
    the end, was nothing but patches.
  450. scuffle
    fight or struggle in a confused way at close quarters
    In the meantime, we had no idea what to do to help the captain, nor any
    other thought but that he had got his death-hurt in the scuffle with
    the stranger.
  451. continue
    keep or maintain in unaltered condition
    I'll stay here a bit," he continued.
  452. a little
    to a small degree; somewhat
    You and me'll just go back into the
    parlour, sonny, and get behind the door, and we'll give Bill a little
    surprise--bless his 'art, I say again."
  453. bell ringing
    playing a set of bells that are (usually) hung in a tower
    I do not know what it rightly is to faint, but I do know that for the
    next little while the whole world swam away from before me in a whirling
    mist; Silver and the birds, and the tall Spy-glass hilltop, going
    round and round and topsy-turvy before my eyes, and all manner of bells
    ringing
    and distant voices shouting in my ear.
  454. bad
    having undesirable or negative qualities
    And indeed bad as his clothes were and coarsely as he spoke, he had none
    of the appearance of a man who sailed before the mast, but seemed like
    a mate or skipper accustomed to be obeyed or to strike.
  455. Fontenoy
    a battle in 1745 in which the French army under Marshal Saxe defeated the English army and their allies under the duke of Cumberland
    I was not new to violent death--I have served his Royal Highness
    the Duke of Cumberland, and got a wound myself at Fontenoy--but I know
    my pulse went dot and carry one.
  456. blow
    be in motion due to some air or water current
    Mostly
    he would not speak when spoken to, only look up sudden and fierce and
    blow through his nose like a fog-horn; and we and the people who came
    about our house soon learned to let him be.
  457. of a sudden
    happening unexpectedly
    And again, "If it
    comes to swinging, swing all, say I."

    Then all of a sudden there was a tremendous explosion of oaths and
    other noises--the chair and table went over in a lump, a clash of steel
    followed, and then a cry of pain, and the next instant I saw Black
    Dog in full flight, and the captain hotly pursuing, both with drawn
    cutlasses, and the former streaming blood from the left shoulder.
  458. barrow
    a cart for carrying small loads
    I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the
    inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand- barrow--a
    tall, strong, heavy, nut-brown man, his tarry pigtail falling over the
    shoulder of his soiled blue coat, his hands ragged and scarred, with
    black, broken nails, and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid
    white.
  459. sabre
    a stout sword with a curved blade and thick back
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old seaman wi...
  460. spit
    the act of spitting (forcefully expelling saliva)
    And he turned his quid and spat.
  461. interrupt
    make a break in
    Now, Mr. Bones--"

    "That's not my name," he interrupted.
  462. turned
    moved around an axis or center
    I
    remember his breath hanging like smoke in his wake as he strode off, and
    the last sound I heard of him as he turned the big rock was a loud snort
    of indignation, as though his mind was still running upon Dr. Livesey.
  463. drunk
    someone who is intoxicated
    Nor would he allow anyone to leave the inn till he
    had drunk himself sleepy and reeled off to bed.
  464. flag
    a rectangular piece of cloth of distinctive design
    It weren't quite a chapel,
    but it seemed more solemn like; and then, says you, Ben Gunn was
    short-handed--no chapling, nor so much as a Bible and a flag, you says."
  465. thundering
    sounding like thunder
    The captain had been struck dead by thundering apoplexy.
  466. bone
    rigid tissue that makes up the skeleton of vertebrates
    "Here's luck," "A fair wind," and "Billy Bones his
    fancy," were very neatly and clearly executed on the forearm; and up
    near the shoulder there was a sketch of a gallows and a man hanging from
    it--done, as I thought, with great spirit.
  467. telescope
    a magnifier of images of distant objects
    All day he hung round the cove or
    upon the cliffs with a brass telescope; all evening he sat in a corner
    of the parlour next the fire and drank rum and water very strong.
  468. hard to please
    (of persons) "his father was a hard-to-please taskmaster"
    Every man on board seemed well content, and they must have
    been hard to please if they had been otherwise, for it is my belief
    there was never a ship's company so spoiled since Noah put to sea.
  469. raise
    move upwards
    Between us we raised his head.
  470. pinched
    as if squeezed uncomfortably tight
    And with that he winked and pinched me hard.
  471. smoke out
    drive out with smoke
    From time to time the doctor came to the door for a little air and to
    rest his eyes, which were almost smoked out of his head, and whenever he
    did so, he had a word for me.
  472. gone
    no longer retained
    Every day when he came back
    from his stroll he would ask if any seafaring men had gone by along the
    road.
  473. away
    at a distance in space or time
    Soon after, Dr. Livesey's horse came to the door and he rode away, but
    the captain held his peace that evening, and for many evenings to come.




    2

    Black Dog Appears and Disappears


    IT was not very long after this that there occurred the first of the
    mysterious events that rid us at last of the captain, though not, as you
    will see, of his affairs.
  474. smelt
    extract by heating, as a metal
    But
    you smelt powder--didn't you, cap'n?"
  475. found
    food and lodging provided in addition to money
    I could not
    doubt that this was the BLACK SPOT; and taking it up, I found written
    on the other side, in a very good, clear hand, this short message: "You
    have till ten tonight."
  476. trick out
    put on special clothes to appear particularly appealing and attractive
    He was tricked out in his best;
    an immense blue coat, thick with brass buttons, hung as low as to his
    knees, and a fine laced hat was set on the back of his head.
  477. reassured
    having confidence restored; freed from anxiety
    I'll give you a golden guinea for a noggin, Jim."

    He was growing more and more excited, and this alarmed me for my father,
    who was very low that day and needed quiet; besides, I was reassured by
    the doctor's words, now quoted to me, and rather offended by the offer
    of a bribe.
  478. thought
    the content of cognition
    At first we thought it was the want of company of his own kind
    that made him ask this question, but at last we began to see he was
    desirous to avoid them.
  479. like the devil
    with great speed or effort or intensity
    When I'm in
    Parlyment and riding in my coach, I don't want none of these sea-lawyers
    in the cabin a-coming home, unlooked for, like the devil at prayers.
  480. reel off
    recite volubly or extravagantly
    Nor would he allow anyone to leave the inn till he
    had drunk himself sleepy and reeled off to bed.
  481. kept
    not violated or disregarded
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  482. squall
    utter a sudden loud cry
    "Take the
    Georges, Pew, and don't stand here squalling."
  483. sight
    the ability to see; the visual faculty
    Ah, Bill, Bill, we have seen a sight of times, us two, since
    I lost them two talons," holding up his mutilated hand.
  484. miscreant
    a person without moral scruples
    These, in their turn, cursed back at the blind miscreant, threatened him
    in horrid terms, and tried in vain to catch the stick and wrest it from
    his grasp.
  485. gun
    a weapon that discharges a missile at high velocity
    I'll fire a gun half an hour before sundown."
  486. faint-hearted
    lacking conviction or boldness or courage
    And the head popped back again; and we heard no more, for the time, of
    these six very faint-hearted seamen.
  487. for all the world
    under any circumstances
    It was Silver's voice, and before I had heard a dozen words, I would
    not have shown myself for all the world, but lay there, trembling and
    listening, in the extreme of fear and curiosity, for from these dozen
    words I understood that the lives of all the honest men aboard depended
    upon me alone.




    11

    What I Heard in the Apple Barrel

    "NO, not I," said Silver.
  488. only
    without any others being included or involved
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  489. three
    the cardinal number that is the sum of one and one and one
    Oh, I
    see what you're at--there"; and he threw down three or four gold pieces
    on the threshold.
  490. grand total
    the sum of the sums of several groups of numbers
    The record lasted over nearly twenty years, the amount of the separate
    entries growing larger as time went on, and at the end a grand total
    had been made out after five or six wrong additions, and these words
    appended, "Bones, his pile."
  491. perk up
    gain or regain energy
    But at my last words he perked up into a kind of startled
    slyness.
  492. close
    at or within a short distance in space or time
    He was breathing
    very loud and hard, but his eyes were closed and his face a horrible
    colour.
  493. headpiece
    a protective helmet for the head
    Ah, he was
    the man to have a headpiece, was Flint!
  494. jump
    move forward by leaps and bounds
    Once I stepped out myself into
    the road, but he immediately called me back, and as I did not obey quick
    enough for his fancy, a most horrible change came over his tallowy face,
    and he ordered me in with an oath that made me jump.
  495. already
    prior to a specified or implied time
    When I returned with the rum, they were already seated on either side
    of the captain's breakfast-table--Black Dog next to the door and
    sitting sideways so as to have one eye on his old shipmate and one, as I
    thought, on his retreat.
  496. made
    produced by a manufacturing process
    At first we thought it was the want of company of his own kind
    that made him ask this question, but at last we began to see he was
    desirous to avoid them.
  497. get it on
    have sexual intercourse with
    Rum wouldn't
    bring me there, where you're going--not rum wouldn't, till I see your
    born gen'leman and gets it on his word of honour.
  498. stick
    a long thin implement resembling a length of wood
    Then he rapped on the door with a bit of
    stick like a handspike that he carried, and when my father appeared,
    called roughly for a glass of rum.
  499. corner
    the point where three areas or surfaces meet or intersect
    All day he hung round the cove or
    upon the cliffs with a brass telescope; all evening he sat in a corner
    of the parlour next the fire and drank rum and water very strong.
  500. sit down
    take a seat
    I asked him what was for his service, and he said he would take rum; but
    as I was going out of the room to fetch it, he sat down upon a table
    and motioned me to draw near.
  501. sew together
    fasten by sewing; do needlework
    The bundle was sewn together, and the doctor had to get out his
    instrument case and cut the stitches with his medical scissors.
  502. take aback
    surprise greatly; knock someone's socks off
    They were a good deal taken aback, and after a little consultation one
    and all tumbled down the fore companion, thinking no doubt to take us
    on the rear.
  503. bring
    take something or somebody with oneself somewhere
    This, when it was brought to him,
    he drank slowly, like a connoisseur, lingering on the taste and still
    looking about him at the cliffs and up at our signboard.
  504. apple
    a tree widely cultivated for its firm rounded edible fruits
    Double grog was going on the least excuse; there was duff on odd days,
    as, for instance, if the squire heard it was any man's birthday, and
    always a barrel of apples standing broached in the waist for anyone to
    help himself that had a fancy.
  505. hold water
    resist or withstand wear, criticism, etc.
    Tell us, squire, when you see the match, and we'll
    hold water."
  506. black flag
    a flag usually bearing a white skull and crossbones on a black background; indicates a pirate ship
    The HISPANIOLA still lay where she had anchored; but, sure enough, there
    was the Jolly Roger--the black flag of piracy--flying from her peak.
  507. oilcloth
    cloth treated on one side with a drying oil or synthetic resin
    My
    mother pulled it up with impatience, and there lay before us, the last
    things in the chest, a bundle tied up in oilcloth, and looking like
    papers, and a canvas bag that gave forth, at a touch, the jingle of
    gold.
  508. roughened
    used of skin roughened as a result of cold or exposure
    He was a tall man, over six
    feet high, and broad in proportion, and he had a bluff, rough-and-ready
    face, all roughened and reddened and lined in his long travels.
  509. cage in
    confine in a cage
    To me he was
    unweariedly kind, and always glad to see me in the galley, which he kept
    as clean as a new pin, the dishes hanging up burnished and his parrot in
    a cage in one corner.
  510. out of view
    no longer visible
    The hamlet lay not many hundred yards away, though out of view, on the
    other side of the next cove; and what greatly encouraged me, it was
    in an opposite direction from that whence the blind man had made his
    appearance and whither he had presumably returned.
  511. words
    language that is spoken or written
    The expression of his face as he said these words was not at all
    pleasant, and I had my own reasons for thinking that the stranger was
    mistaken, even supposing he meant what he said.
  512. put back
    put something back where it belongs
    I've seen his top-sails with
    these eyes, off Trinidad, and the cowardly son of a rum-puncheon that I
    sailed with put back--put back, sir, into Port of Spain."
  513. jingle
    a metallic sound
    My
    mother pulled it up with impatience, and there lay before us, the last
    things in the chest, a bundle tied up in oilcloth, and looking like
    papers, and a canvas bag that gave forth, at a touch, the jingle of
    gold.
  514. hail
    precipitation of ice pellets
    I leaped to my feet and hailed the riders.
  515. cut
    separate with or as if with an instrument
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old seaman wi...
  516. load
    weight to be borne or conveyed
    All they would do was to give me a loaded pistol lest we were
    attacked, and to promise to have horses ready saddled in case we were
    pursued on our return, while one lad was to ride forward to the doctor's
    in search of armed assistance.
  517. rough
    having or caused by an irregular surface
    I seen old Flint in the corner there, behind you; as
    plain as print, I seen him; and if I get the horrors, I'm a man that
    has lived rough, and I'll raise Cain.
  518. holding
    the act of retaining something
    Ah, Bill, Bill, we have seen a sight of times, us two, since
    I lost them two talons," holding up his mutilated hand.
  519. bolt
    a screw that screws into a nut to form a fastener
    Some of the men who
    had been to field-work on the far side of the Admiral Benbow remembered,
    besides, to have seen several strangers on the road, and taking them to
    be smugglers, to have bolted away; and one at least had seen a little
    lugger in what we called Kitt's Hole.
  520. sitting
    the act of assuming or maintaining a seated position
    I
    followed him in, and I remember observing the contrast the neat, bright
    doctor, with his powder as white as snow and his bright, black eyes and
    pleasant manners, made with the coltish country folk, and above all,
    with that filthy, heavy, bleared scarecrow of a pirate of ours, sitting,
    far gone in rum, with his arms on the table.
  521. terror
    an overwhelming feeling of fear and anxiety
    I have seen him wringing his hands after such a
    rebuff, and I am sure the annoyance and the terror he lived in must have
    greatly hastened his early and unhappy death.
  522. deary
    a special loved one
    "Dear, deary me," cried my mother, "what a disgrace upon the house!
  523. Duke of Cumberland
    English general
    I was not new to violent death--I have served his Royal Highness
    the Duke of Cumberland, and got a wound myself at Fontenoy--but I know
    my pulse went dot and carry one.
  524. arm
    a human limb
    I
    followed him in, and I remember observing the contrast the neat, bright
    doctor, with his powder as white as snow and his bright, black eyes and
    pleasant manners, made with the coltish country folk, and above all,
    with that filthy, heavy, bleared scarecrow of a pirate of ours, sitting,
    far gone in rum, with his arms on the table.
  525. mind
    that which is responsible for one's thoughts and feelings
    There were nights when he took a deal more rum and water
    than his head would carry; and then he would sometimes sit and sing his
    wicked, old, wild sea-songs, minding nobody; but sometimes he would call
    for glasses round and force all the trembling company to listen to his
    stories or bear a chorus to his singing.
  526. breaking away
    the act of breaking away or withdrawing from
    Add to this that Gray, the new man, had his face tied up in a bandage
    for a cut he had got in breaking away from the mutineers and that poor
    old Tom Redruth, still unburied, lay along the wall, stiff and stark,
    under the Union Jack.
  527. amuck
    wildly; without self-control
    So it was with the CASSANDRA, as brought us all safe
    home from Malabar, after England took the viceroy of the Indies; so it
    was with the old WALRUS, Flint's old ship, as I've seen amuck with the
    red blood and fit to sink with gold."
  528. pop in
    enter briefly
    We had no ricochet to fear, and though one popped in through the
    roof of the log-house and out again through the floor, we soon got used
    to that sort of horse-play and minded it no more than cricket.
  529. scupper
    drain that allows water on the deck of a vessel to flow overboard
    The HISPANIOLA was rolling scuppers under in the ocean swell.
  530. mostly
    in large part; mainly or chiefly
    Mostly
    he would not speak when spoken to, only look up sudden and fierce and
    blow through his nose like a fog-horn; and we and the people who came
    about our house soon learned to let him be.
  531. trump
    get the better of
    This lad Hawkins is a trump,
    I perceive.
  532. road
    an open way (generally public) for travel or transportation
    Every day when he came back
    from his stroll he would ask if any seafaring men had gone by along the
    road.
  533. shoreward
    (of winds) coming from the sea toward the land
    Then I skirted among the woods until I had regained the rear, or
    shoreward side, of the stockade, and was soon warmly welcomed by the
    faithful party.
  534. mean
    denote or connote
    In the meantime, the captain gradually
    brightened up at his own music, and at last flapped his hand upon
    the table before him in a way we all knew to mean silence.
  535. hanging
    the act of suspending something
    Dreadful stories
    they were--about hanging, and walking the plank, and storms at sea, and
    the Dry Tortugas, and wild deeds and places on the Spanish Main.
  536. suppose
    expect or believe
    The man who came
    with the barrow told us the mail had set him down the morning before at
    the Royal George, that he had inquired what inns there were along the
    coast, and hearing ours well spoken of, I suppose, and described as
    lonely, had chosen it from the others for his place of residence.
  537. turn
    move around an axis or a center
    I
    remember his breath hanging like smoke in his wake as he strode off, and
    the last sound I heard of him as he turned the big rock was a loud snort
    of indignation, as though his mind was still running upon Dr. Livesey.
  538. pipe in
    transport to a destiny through pipes
    The servant led us down a matted passage and showed us at the end into a
    great library, all lined with bookcases and busts upon the top of them,
    where the squire and Dr. Livesey sat, pipe in hand, on either side of a
    bright fire.
  539. dare
    a challenge to do something dangerous or foolhardy
    He got downstairs next morning, to be sure, and had his meals as usual,
    though he ate little and had more, I am afraid, than his usual supply of
    rum, for he helped himself out of the bar, scowling and blowing through
    his nose, and no one dared to cross him.
  540. nose out
    recognize or detect by or as if by smelling
    He clambered up
    and down stairs, and went from the parlour to the bar and back again,
    and sometimes put his nose out of doors to smell the sea, holding on to
    the walls as he went for support and breathing hard and fast like a man
    on a steep mountain.
  541. just
    and nothing more
    The
    stranger kept hanging about just inside the inn door, peering round the
    corner like a cat waiting for a mouse.
  542. must
    a necessary or essential thing
    By his
    own account he must have lived his life among some of the wickedest men
    that God ever allowed upon the sea, and the language in which he told
    these stories shocked our plain country people almost as much as the
    crimes that he described.
  543. due east
    the cardinal compass point that is at 90 degrees
    I tried and found by experiment that the tide kept sweeping us westward
    until I had laid her head due east, or just about right angles to the
    way we ought to go.
  544. dick
    someone who is a detective
    " Dick's square," said Silver.
  545. surprise
    come upon or take unawares
    You and me'll just go back into the
    parlour, sonny, and get behind the door, and we'll give Bill a little
    surprise--bless his 'art, I say again."
  546. interrupted
    discontinued temporarily
    Now, Mr. Bones--"

    "That's not my name," he interrupted.
  547. draw
    cause to move by pulling
    The voices
    stopped at once, all but Dr. Livesey's; he went on as before speaking
    clear and kind and drawing briskly at his pipe between every word or
    two.
  548. call
    utter a sudden loud cry
    Then he rapped on the door with a bit of
    stick like a handspike that he carried, and when my father appeared,
    called roughly for a glass of rum.
  549. tobacco
    aromatic annual or perennial herbs and shrubs
    A few small coins, a thimble,
    and some thread and big needles, a piece of pigtail tobacco bitten away
    at the end, his gully with the crooked handle, a pocket compass, and a
    tinder box were all that they contained, and I began to despair.
  550. swamp
    low land that is seasonally flooded
    Two little rivers, or rather two swamps, emptied out into this
    pond, as you might call it; and the foliage round that part of the shore
    had a kind of poisonous brightness.
  551. stumping
    campaigning for something by making political speeches
    All the time he was jerking out these phrases he was stumping up and
    down the tavern on his crutch, slapping tables with his hand, and giving
    such a show of excitement as would have convinced an Old Bailey judge
    or a Bow Street runner.
  552. trundle
    small wheel or roller
    Here you, matey," he
    cried to the man who trundled the barrow; "bring up alongside and help
    up my chest.
  553. top
    the upper part of anything
    It was like any other seaman's chest on the outside, the initial "B"
    burned on the top of it with a hot iron, and the corners somewhat
    smashed and broken as by long, rough usage.
  554. other
    not the same one or ones already mentioned or implied
    Often I have heard the house
    shaking with "Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum," all the neighbours joining
    in for dear life, with the fear of death upon them, and each singing
    louder than the other to avoid remark.
  555. a bit
    to a small degree; somewhat
    Then he rapped on the door with a bit of
    stick like a handspike that he carried, and when my father appeared,
    called roughly for a glass of rum.
  556. eyes
    opinion or judgment
    I
    followed him in, and I remember observing the contrast the neat, bright
    doctor, with his powder as white as snow and his bright, black eyes and
    pleasant manners, made with the coltish country folk, and above all,
    with that filthy, heavy, bleared scarecrow of a pirate of ours, sitting,
    far gone in rum, with his arms on the table.
  557. running
    the act of running; traveling on foot at a fast pace
    I
    remember his breath hanging like smoke in his wake as he strode off, and
    the last sound I heard of him as he turned the big rock was a loud snort
    of indignation, as though his mind was still running upon Dr. Livesey.
  558. clap
    strike one's hands together
    "Now, Morgan," said Long John very sternly, "you never clapped your eyes
    on that Black--Black Dog before, did you, now?"
  559. overdraw
    draw more money from than is available
    I forgot to tell you that Silver is a man of
    substance; I know of my own knowledge that he has
    a banker's account, which has never been
    overdrawn.
  560. colour
    a visual attribute of things from the light they emit
    He was breathing
    very loud and hard, but his eyes were closed and his face a horrible
    colour.
  561. luck
    an unknown and unpredictable phenomenon that causes an event to result one way rather than another
    "Here's luck," "A fair wind," and "Billy Bones his
    fancy," were very neatly and clearly executed on the forearm; and up
    near the shoulder there was a sketch of a gallows and a man hanging from
    it--done, as I thought, with great spirit.
  562. trunk
    the main stem of a tree
    A peculiar stagnant smell hung over the anchorage--a smell of
    sodden leaves and rotting tree trunks.
  563. tasting
    a kind of sensing
    I observed the doctor sniffing
    and sniffing, like someone tasting a bad egg.
  564. basin
    a bowl-shaped vessel used for holding food or liquids
    For my part, I must do my best to save this fellow's trebly
    worthless life; Jim, you get me a basin."
  565. break out
    begin suddenly and sometimes violently
    I remember him looking round the cover and whistling to himself
    as he did so, and then breaking out in that old sea-song that he sang so
    often afterwards:

    "Fifteen men on the dead man's chest--
    Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!"

    in the high, old tottering voice that seemed to have been tuned and
    broken at the capstan bars.
  566. want
    the state of needing something that is absent or unavailable
    "I'm a plain man; rum
    and bacon and eggs is what I want, and that head up there for to watch
    ships off.
  567. why
    the cause or intention underlying an action or situation, especially in the phrase `the whys and wherefores'
    "Doctors is all swabs," he said; "and that doctor there, why, what do
    he know about seafaring men?
  568. break
    destroy the integrity of
    I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the
    inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow--a
    tall, strong, heavy, nut-brown man, his tarry pigtail falling over the
    shoulder of his soiled blue coat, his hands ragged and scarred, with
    black, broken nails, and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid
    white.
  569. one after another
    in single file
    I felt in his pockets, one after another.
  570. account book
    a record in which commercial accounts are recorded
    There was a date at one end of the line and at the other a
    sum of money, as in common account-books, but instead of explanatory
    writing, only a varying number of crosses between the two.
  571. woods
    the trees and other plants in a large densely wooded area
    Grey-coloured woods covered a large part of the surface.
  572. dead weight
    a heavy motionless weight
    As he was thus speaking, he had risen from bed with great difficulty,
    holding to my shoulder with a grip that almost made me cry out, and
    moving his legs like so much dead weight.
  573. above all
    above and beyond all other consideration
    I
    followed him in, and I remember observing the contrast the neat, bright
    doctor, with his powder as white as snow and his bright, black eyes and
    pleasant manners, made with the coltish country folk, and above all,
    with that filthy, heavy, bleared scarecrow of a pirate of ours, sitting,
    far gone in rum, with his arms on the table.
  574. confoundedly
    in a perplexed manner
    "But you are so
    confoundedly hot-headed and exclamatory that I cannot get a word in.
  575. pocket
    a small pouch inside a garment for carrying small articles
    He spoke to him as before, over his
    shoulder and in the same tone of voice, rather high, so that all the
    room might hear, but perfectly calm and steady: "If you do not put that
    knife this instant in your pocket, I promise, upon my honour, you shall
    hang at the next assizes."
  576. face
    the front of the human head from the forehead to the chin
    The expression of his face as he said these words was not at all
    pleasant, and I had my own reasons for thinking that the stranger was
    mistaken, even supposing he meant what he said.
  577. point
    a distinguishing or individuating characteristic
    And when I had pointed out the rock and told him how the captain was
    likely to return, and how soon, and answered a few other questions,
    "Ah," said he, "this'll be as good as drink to my mate Bill."
  578. just then
    at a particular time in the past
    Finally he took a wrong turn and ran a few
    steps past me, towards the hamlet, crying, "Johnny, Black Dog, Dirk,"
    and other names, "you won't leave old Pew, mates--not old Pew!"

    Just then the noise of horses topped the rise, and four or five riders
    came in sight in the moonlight and swept at full gallop down the slope.
  579. right
    free from error; especially conforming to fact or truth
    We'll put it, for argument
    like, that your captain has a cut on one cheek--and we'll put it, if you
    like, that that cheek's the right one.
  580. far
    at or to or from a great distance in space
    But though I was so terrified by the idea of the seafaring man with one
    leg, I was far less afraid of the captain himself than anybody else who
    knew him.
  581. truce
    a state of peace agreed to between opponents
    "Flag of truce!"
  582. nothing
    in no respect; to no degree
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  583. cease
    put an end to a state or an activity
    My father was always saying the inn would be
    ruined, for people would soon cease coming there to be tyrannized over
    and put down, and sent shivering to their beds; but I really believe his
    presence did us good.
  584. demolishing
    complete destruction of a building
    Men
    were demolishing something with axes on the beach near the stockade--the
    poor jolly-boat, I afterwards discovered.
  585. go about
    begin to deal with
    The lubbers is going about to get the wind of me
    this blessed moment; lubbers as couldn't keep what they got, and want to
    nail what is another's.
  586. take up
    turn one's interest to
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  587. shook
    a disassembled barrel
    On
    stormy nights, when the wind shook the four corners of the house and
    the surf roared along the cove and up the cliffs, I would see him in a
    thousand forms, and with a thousand diabolical expressions.
  588. might
    physical strength
    If ever he mentioned it, the captain blew through
    his nose so loudly that you might say he roared, and stared my poor
    father out of the room.
  589. lose
    fail to keep or to maintain
    Ah, Bill, Bill, we have seen a sight of times, us two, since
    I lost them two talons," holding up his mutilated hand.
  590. whiff
    a short light gust of air
    The HISPANIOLA rolled steadily, dipping her bowsprit now and then with
    a whiff of spray.
  591. sound out
    speak, pronounce, or utter in a certain way
    All I ask is your word, Cap'n Smollett, to let me
    safe and sound out of this here stockade, and one minute to get out o'
    shot before a gun is fired."
  592. peck at
    eat like a bird
    "Ah, she's a handsome craft, she is," the cook would say, and give her
    sugar from his pocket, and then the bird would peck at the bars and
    swear straight on, passing belief for wickedness.
  593. lost
    confused as to time or place or personal identity
    Ah, Bill, Bill, we have seen a sight of times, us two, since
    I lost them two talons," holding up his mutilated hand.
  594. punch in
    register one's arrival at work
    I was
    wedged in between Redruth and a stout old gentleman, and in spite of the
    swift motion and the cold night air, I must have dozed a great deal from
    the very first, and then slept like a log up hill and down dale through
    stage after stage, for when I was awakened at last it was by a punch
    in
    the ribs, and I opened my eyes to find that we were standing still
    before a large building in a city street and that the day had already
    broken a long time.
  595. thing
    a separate and self-contained entity
    "Were you addressing me, sir?" says the doctor; and when the ruffian had
    told him, with another oath, that this was so, "I have only one thing to
    say to you, sir," replies the doctor, "that if you keep on drinking rum,
    the world will soon be quit of a very dirty scoundrel!"
  596. reckon
    expect, believe, or suppose
    But
    you're able to hear, I reckon; leastways, your ears is big enough.
  597. name
    a language unit by which a person or thing is known
    People were frightened at the time, but on looking
    back they rather liked it; it was a fine excitement in a quiet country
    life, and there was even a party of the younger men who pretended to
    admire him, calling him a "true sea-dog" and a "real old salt" and
    such like names, and saying there was the sort of man that made England
    terrible at sea.
  598. together
    in contact with each other or in proximity
    "None of your keyholes for
    me, sonny," he said; and I left them together and retired into the bar.
  599. bite
    to grip, cut off, or tear with or as if with the teeth or jaws
    Then he rapped on the door with a bit of
    stick like a handspike that he carried, and when my father appeared,
    called roughly for a glass of rum.
  600. timber
    the wood of trees prepared for use as building material
    Now, here
    it is: What could I do, with this old timber I hobble on?
  601. own
    belonging to or on behalf of a specified person
    At first we thought it was the want of company of his own kind
    that made him ask this question, but at last we began to see he was
    desirous to avoid them.
  602. stand by
    be available or ready for a certain function or service
    But come now, stand by to go about.
  603. shirking
    the evasion of work or duty
    "Search him, some of you shirking lubbers, and the rest of you aloft and
    get the chest," he cried.
  604. defenceless
    lacking protection or support
    Silver, agile as a monkey even without
    leg or crutch, was on the top of him next moment and had twice buried
    his knife up to the hilt in that defenceless body.
  605. under
    below some quantity or limit
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old seaman wi...
  606. great
    a person who has achieved distinction in some field
    One of the cocks of his
    hat having fallen down, he let it hang from that day forth, though it
    was a great annoyance when it blew.
  607. map
    a diagrammatic representation of the earth's surface
    The doctor opened the seals with great care, and there fell out
    the map of an island, with latitude and longitude, soundings, names of
    hills and bays and inlets, and every particular that would be needed
    to bring a ship to a safe anchorage upon its shores.
  608. draw near
    move towards
    I asked him what was for his service, and he said he would take rum; but
    as I was going out of the room to fetch it, he sat down upon a table
    and motioned me to draw near.
  609. header
    a machine that cuts the tops off grain
    The other three took complete headers, and came up again drenched and
    bubbling.
  610. saw
    hand tool having a toothed blade for cutting
    And again, "If it
    comes to swinging, swing all, say I."

    Then all of a sudden there was a tremendous explosion of oaths and
    other noises--the chair and table went over in a lump, a clash of steel
    followed, and then a cry of pain, and the next instant I saw Black
    Dog in full flight, and the captain hotly pursuing, both with drawn
    cutlasses, and the former streaming blood from the left shoulder.
  611. consort
    keep company with; hang out with
    John Trelawney

    Postscript--I did not tell you that Blandly,
    who, by the way, is to send a consort after us if
    we don't turn up by the end of August, had found
    an admirable fellow for sailing master--a stiff
    man, which I regret, but in all other respects a
    treasure.
  612. shine
    emit light; be bright, as of the sun or a light
    It was one January morning, very early--a pinching, frosty morning--the
    cove all grey with hoar-frost, the ripple lapping softly on the stones,
    the sun still low and only touching the hilltops and shining far to
    seaward.
  613. snuff
    inhale audibly through the nose
    You've seen my snuff-box, haven't you?
  614. sniff
    perceive by inhaling through the nose
    I observed the doctor sniffing
    and sniffing, like someone tasting a bad egg.
  615. spot
    a point located with respect to surface features of some region
    "I have
    drawn blood enough to keep him quiet awhile; he should lie for a week
    where he is--that is the best thing for him and you; but another stroke
    would settle him."




    3

    The Black Spot

    ABOUT noon I stopped at the captain's door with some cooling drinks
    and medicines.
  616. kettle
    a metal pot for stewing or boiling; usually has a lid
    There was a porch at the door, and under this porch
    the little spring welled up into an artificial basin of a rather odd
    kind--no other than a great ship's kettle of iron, with the bottom
    knocked out, and sunk "to her bearings," as the captain said, among the
    sand.
  617. recommence
    cause to start anew
    At last the tapping recommenced, and, to our indescribable joy and
    gratitude, died slowly away again until it ceased to be heard.
  618. talk
    use language
    But by this
    time we had all long ceased to pay any particular notice to the song; it
    was new, that night, to nobody but Dr. Livesey, and on him I observed it
    did not produce an agreeable effect, for he looked up for a moment quite
    angrily before he went on with his talk to old Taylor, the gardener, on
    a new cure for the rheumatics.
  619. though
    (postpositive) however
    But though I was so terrified by the idea of the seafaring man with one
    leg, I was far less afraid of the captain himself than anybody else who
    knew him.
  620. tall
    great in vertical dimension; high in stature
    I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the
    inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow--a
    tall, strong, heavy, nut-brown man, his tarry pigtail falling over the
    shoulder of his soiled blue coat, his hands ragged and scarred, with
    black, broken nails, and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid
    white.
  621. shining
    the work of making something smooth and shiny by rubbing or waxing it
    It was one January morning, very early--a pinching, frosty morning--the
    cove all grey with hoar-frost, the ripple lapping softly on the stones,
    the sun still low and only touching the hilltops and shining far to
    seaward.
  622. for sure
    definitely or positively
    These fellows who attacked the
    inn tonight--bold, desperate blades, for sure--and the rest who stayed
    aboard that lugger, and more, I dare say, not far off, are, one and all,
    through thick and thin, bound that they'll get that money.
  623. white line
    a white stripe in the middle of a road to mark traffic lanes
    This time, as the distance was short, I did not mount, but ran with
    Dogger's stirrup-leather to the lodge gates and up the long, leafless,
    moonlit avenue to where the white line of the hall buildings looked on
    either hand on great old gardens.
  624. wind
    air moving from high pressure to low pressure
    On
    stormy nights, when the wind shook the four corners of the house and
    the surf roared along the cove and up the cliffs, I would see him in a
    thousand forms, and with a thousand diabolical expressions.
  625. sea breeze
    a cooling breeze from the sea (during the daytime)
    The sun had just set, the sea breeze was rustling and tumbling in the
    woods and ruffling the grey surface of the anchorage; the tide, too, was
    far out, and great tracts of sand lay uncovered; the air, after the heat
    of the day, chilled me through my jacket.
  626. for dear life
    as though your life was at stake
    Often I have heard the house
    shaking with "Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum," all the neighbours joining
    in for dear life, with the fear of death upon them, and each singing
    louder than the other to avoid remark.
  627. below
    in or to a place that is lower
    Farther I could not move
    her, for the bridge was too low to let me do more than crawl below it.
  628. seem
    give a certain impression or have a certain outward aspect
    I remember him looking round the cover and whistling to himself
    as he did so, and then breaking out in that old sea-song that he sang so
    often afterwards:

    "Fifteen men on the dead man's chest--
    Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!"

    in the high, old tottering voice that seemed to have been tuned and
    broken at the capstan bars.
  629. curse
    an appeal to some supernatural power to inflict evil
    But he broke in cursing the doctor, in a feeble voice but heartily.
  630. too
    to a degree exceeding normal or proper limits
    He was not sailorly, and yet he had a
    smack of the sea about him too.
  631. to the hilt
    in full
    Silver, agile as a monkey even without
    leg or crutch, was on the top of him next moment and had twice buried
    his knife up to the hilt in that defenceless body.
  632. hurtle
    move with or as if with a rushing sound
    With a cry John seized the branch of a tree, whipped the crutch out of
    his armpit, and sent that uncouth missile hurtling through the air.
  633. beach
    an area of sand sloping down to the water of a sea or lake
    The captain had risen earlier than usual and set out down the
    beach, his cutlass swinging under the broad skirts of the old blue coat,
    his brass telescope under his arm, his hat tilted back upon his head.
  634. swing
    change direction with a swinging motion; turn
    The captain had risen earlier than usual and set out down the
    beach, his cutlass swinging under the broad skirts of the old blue coat,
    his brass telescope under his arm, his hat tilted back upon his head.
  635. roughen
    make rough or rougher
    He was a tall man, over six
    feet high, and broad in proportion, and he had a bluff, rough-and-ready
    face, all roughened and reddened and lined in his long travels.
  636. trinket
    cheap showy jewelry or ornament on clothing
    Under
    that, the miscellany began--a quadrant, a tin canikin, several sticks of
    tobacco, two brace of very handsome pistols, a piece of bar silver, an
    old Spanish watch and some other trinkets of little value and mostly of
    foreign make, a pair of compasses mounted with brass, and five or six
    curious West Indian shells.
  637. afraid
    filled with fear or apprehension
    But though I was so terrified by the idea of the seafaring man with one
    leg, I was far less afraid of the captain himself than anybody else who
    knew him.
  638. water
    compound that occurs at room temperature as a clear liquid
    All day he hung round the cove or
    upon the cliffs with a brass telescope; all evening he sat in a corner
    of the parlour next the fire and drank rum and water very strong.
  639. next
    immediately following in time or order
    All day he hung round the cove or
    upon the cliffs with a brass telescope; all evening he sat in a corner
    of the parlour next the fire and drank rum and water very strong.
  640. volley
    rapid simultaneous discharge of firearms
    The cannon-shot was followed after a considerable interval by a volley
    of small arms.
  641. neither
    not either; not one or the other
    I never wasted good money of mine, nor lost it
    neither; and I'll trick 'em again.
  642. rattling
    quick and energetic
    Then it struck sharp on the inn door, and then we could hear the handle
    being turned and the bolt rattling as the wretched being tried to enter;
    and then there was a long time of silence both within and without.
  643. through
    having finished or arrived at completion
    "You can tell me when I've worked through that," says
    he, looking as fierce as a commander.
  644. loophole
    an ambiguity that makes it possible to evade an obligation
    And at that, up I jumped, and rubbing my eyes, ran to a loophole in the
    wall.




    20

    Silver's Embassy

    SURE enough, there were two men just outside the stockade, one of them
    waving a white cloth, the other, no less a person than Silver himself,
    standing placidly by.
  645. ambush
    concealing yourself and lying in wait to attack by surprise
    In the meantime the
    supervisor rode on, as fast as he could, to Kitt's Hole; but his men
    had to dismount and grope down the dingle, leading, and sometimes
    supporting, their horses, and in continual fear of ambushes; so it was
    no great matter for surprise that when they got down to the Hole the
    lugger was already under way, though still close in.
  646. broach
    bring up a topic for discussion
    When I was an
    A B master mariner I'd have come up alongside of him, hand over hand,
    and broached him to in a brace of old shakes, I would; but now--"

    And then, all of a sudden, he stopped, and his jaw dropped as though he
    had remembered something.
  647. maybe
    by chance
    "Now, that bird," he would say, "is, maybe, two hundred years
    old, Hawkins--they live forever mostly; and if anybody's seen more
    wickedness, it must be the devil himself.
  648. foot
    the pedal extremity of vertebrates other than human beings
    He sprang to his feet, drew and opened
    a sailor's clasp-knife, and balancing it open on the palm of his hand,
    threatened to pin the doctor to the wall.
  649. going
    the act of departing
    I asked him what was for his service, and he said he would take rum; but
    as I was going out of the room to fetch it, he sat down upon a table
    and motioned me to draw near.
  650. worst
    the least favorable outcome
    To see him leap and run and pursue me over hedge and
    ditch was the worst of nightmares.
  651. whirr
    sound of something in rapid motion
    The rocks of the Spy-glass re-echoed it a
    score of times; the whole troop of marsh-birds rose again, darkening
    heaven, with a simultaneous whirr; and long after that death yell was
    still ringing in my brain, silence had re-established its empire, and
    only the rustle of the redescending birds and the boom of the distant
    surges disturbed the languor of the afternoon.
  652. weevil
    any of several families of mostly small beetles that feed on plants and plant products; especially snout beetles and seed beetles
    If you had the pluck of a weevil in a biscuit you would catch
    them still."
  653. someone
    a human being
    So things passed until, the day after the funeral, and about three
    o'clock of a bitter, foggy, frosty afternoon, I was standing at the door
    for a moment, full of sad thoughts about my father, when I saw someone
    drawing slowly near along the road.
  654. Blackbeard
    an English pirate who operated in the Caribbean and off the Atlantic coast of North America (died in 1718)
    Blackbeard was a child to Flint.
  655. gunnery
    guns collectively
    The mutineers were
    bolder than we fancied or they put more trust in Israel's gunnery.
  656. bear up
    endure cheerfully
    "You must bear up, sir, if you
    please--bear up until you see you're gaining."
  657. short
    having little length or lacking in length
    "It's the name of a buccaneer of my
    acquaintance; and I call you by it for the sake of shortness, and what I
    have to say to you is this; one glass of rum won't kill you, but if
    you take one you'll take another and another, and I stake my wig if you
    don't break off short, you'll die--do you understand that?--die, and go
    to your own place, like the man in the Bible.
  658. honest woman
    a wife who has married a man with whom she has been living for some time (especially if she is pregnant at the time)
    "I'll show these rogues that I'm an honest woman," said my mother.
  659. left hand
    the hand that is on the left side of the body
    He
    was a pale, tallowy creature, wanting two fingers of the left hand, and
    though he wore a cutlass, he did not look much like a fighter.
  660. aback
    by surprise
    They were a good deal taken aback, and after a little consultation one
    and all tumbled down the fore companion, thinking no doubt to take us
    on the rear.
  661. gymnast
    an athlete who is skilled in gymnastics
    "Hands off!" cried Silver, leaping back a yard, as it seemed to me, with
    the speed and security of a trained gymnast.
  662. haze
    atmospheric dust or smoke that causes reduced visibility
    I've had
    a'most enough o' Cap'n Smollett; he's hazed me long enough, by thunder!
  663. same
    same in identity
    He spoke to him as before, over his
    shoulder and in the same tone of voice, rather high, so that all the
    room might hear, but perfectly calm and steady: "If you do not put that
    knife this instant in your pocket, I promise, upon my honour, you shall
    hang at the next assizes."
  664. rest
    take a short break from one's activities in order to relax
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  665. cheerily
    in a cheerful manner
    "Perfectly right," he interrupted very cheerily, "perfectly right--a
    gentleman and a magistrate.
  666. palisade
    a strong fence made of stakes driven into the ground
    All three made the first journey, heavily
    laden, and tossed our stores over the palisade.
  667. reawaken
    awaken once again
    My suspicions had been thoroughly reawakened on
    finding Black Dog at the Spy-glass, and I watched the cook narrowly.
  668. straight
    having no deviations
    At last in strode the captain, slammed the door behind him, without
    looking to the right or left, and marched straight across the room to
    where his breakfast awaited him.
  669. bright
    emitting or reflecting light readily or in large amounts
    I
    followed him in, and I remember observing the contrast the neat, bright
    doctor, with his powder as white as snow and his bright, black eyes and
    pleasant manners, made with the coltish country folk, and above all,
    with that filthy, heavy, bleared scarecrow of a pirate of ours, sitting,
    far gone in rum, with his arms on the table.
  670. echo
    the repetition of a sound from reflection of the sound waves
    Then there followed a great to-do through all our old inn, heavy feet
    pounding to and fro, furniture thrown over, doors kicked in, until the
    very rocks re- echoed and the men came out again, one after another, on
    the road and declared that we were nowhere to be found.
  671. smart
    characterized by quickness and ease in learning
    You're a lad, you are, but
    you're as smart as paint.
  672. carry
    physically move while supporting, by vehicle, hands, or body
    Then he rapped on the door with a bit of
    stick like a handspike that he carried, and when my father appeared,
    called roughly for a glass of rum.
  673. almost
    slightly short of or not quite accomplished; all but
    By his
    own account he must have lived his life among some of the wickedest men
    that God ever allowed upon the sea, and the language in which he told
    these stories shocked our plain country people almost as much as the
    crimes that he described.
  674. clear
    readily apparent to the mind
    The voices
    stopped at once, all but Dr. Livesey's; he went on as before speaking
    clear and kind and drawing briskly at his pipe between every word or
    two.
  675. come forward
    make oneself visible; take action
    The man whom he called Morgan--an old, grey-haired, mahogany-faced
    sailor-- came forward pretty sheepishly, rolling his quid.
  676. bird
    warm-blooded egg-laying vertebrate with feathers and wings
    His left leg was cut off close by the hip,
    and under the left shoulder he carried a crutch, which he managed with
    wonderful dexterity, hopping about upon it like a bird.
  677. keg
    small cask or barrel
    I've a gauge on the keg, mind.
  678. cursed
    in danger of the eternal punishment of Hell
    How I cursed the
    cowardice of the neighbours; how I blamed my poor mother for her honesty
    and her greed, for her past foolhardiness and present weakness!
  679. Old Bailey
    the central criminal court in London
    All the time he was jerking out these phrases he was stumping up and
    down the tavern on his crutch, slapping tables with his hand, and giving
    such a show of excitement as would have convinced an Old Bailey judge
    or a Bow Street runner.
  680. come about
    come to pass
    Mostly
    he would not speak when spoken to, only look up sudden and fierce and
    blow through his nose like a fog-horn; and we and the people who came
    about
    our house soon learned to let him be.
  681. the Indies
    the string of islands between North America and South America; a popular resort area
    She was at the boarding of the viceroy of the Indies out of
    Goa, she was; and to look at her you would think she was a babby.
  682. colours
    a distinguishing emblem
    In the meantime the captain, whom I had observed to be wonderfully
    swollen about the chest and pockets, had turned out a great many various
    stores--the British colours, a Bible, a coil of stoutish rope, pen, ink,
    the log-book, and pounds of tobacco.
  683. ricochet
    spring back; spring away from an impact
    We had no ricochet to fear, and though one popped in through the
    roof of the log-house and out again through the floor, we soon got used
    to that sort of horse-play and minded it no more than cricket.
  684. reply
    react verbally
    "Were you addressing me, sir?" says the doctor; and when the ruffian had
    told him, with another oath, that this was so, "I have only one thing to
    say to you, sir," replies the doctor, "that if you keep on drinking rum,
    the world will soon be quit of a very dirty scoundrel!"
  685. for a while
    for a short time
    The captain glared at him for a while, flapped his hand again,
    glared still harder, and at last broke out with a villainous, low oath,
    "Silence, there, between decks!"
  686. high-water mark
    a line marking the highest level reached
    The place was entirely land-locked, buried in woods, the trees coming
    right down to high-water mark, the shores mostly flat, and the hilltops
    standing round at a distance in a sort of amphitheatre, one here, one
    there.
  687. even
    being level or straight or regular and without variation
    All day he hung round the cove or
    upon the cliffs with a brass telescope; all evening he sat in a corner
    of the parlour next the fire and drank rum and water very strong.
  688. table
    furniture having a smooth flat top supported by legs
    For in these fits he was the most
    overriding companion ever known; he would slap his hand on the table for
    silence all round; he would fly up in a passion of anger at a question,
    or sometimes because none was put, and so he judged the company was not
    following his story.
  689. pretty
    pleasing by delicacy or grace; not imposing
    And altogether I paid pretty dear for
    my monthly fourpenny piece, in the shape of these abominable fancies.
  690. unintentional
    without deliberate intent
    "My friend should, perhaps,
    have taken you along with him; but the slight, if there be one, was
    unintentional.
  691. blear
    make dim or indistinct
    I
    followed him in, and I remember observing the contrast the neat, bright
    doctor, with his powder as white as snow and his bright, black eyes and
    pleasant manners, made with the coltish country folk, and above all,
    with that filthy, heavy, bleared scarecrow of a pirate of ours, sitting,
    far gone in rum, with his arms on the table.
  692. bubbling
    emitting or filled with bubbles as from carbonation or fermentation
    The pitch was
    bubbling in the seams; the nasty stench of the place turned me sick;
    if ever a man smelt fever and dysentery, it was in that abominable
    anchorage.
  693. sun
    the star that is the source of light and heat for the planets in the solar system
    It was one January morning, very early--a pinching, frosty morning--the
    cove all grey with hoar-frost, the ripple lapping softly on the stones,
    the sun still low and only touching the hilltops and shining far to
    seaward.
  694. resume
    take up or begin anew
    Then followed a battle of looks between them, but the captain soon
    knuckled under, put up his weapon, and resumed his seat, grumbling like
    a beaten dog.
  695. nearest
    within the shortest distance
    But he was on his feet again in a
    second and made another dash, now utterly bewildered, right under the
    nearest of the coming horses.
  696. precious
    of high worth or cost
    He stopped a little from the inn, and raising his voice in an odd
    sing-song, addressed the air in front of him, "Will any kind friend
    inform a poor blind man, who has lost the precious sight of his eyes in
    the gracious defence of his native country, England--and God bless King
    George!--where or in what part of this country he may now be?"
  697. breast pocket
    a pocket inside of a man's coat
    "No, sir; not money, I think," replied I. "In fact, sir, I believe I
    have the thing in my breast pocket; and to tell you the truth, I should
    like to get it put in safety."
  698. stick together
    be loyal to one another, especially in times of trouble
    Jim and I shall stick together in the
    meanwhile; you'll take Joyce and Hunter when you ride to Bristol, and
    from first to last, not one of us must breathe a word of what we've
    found."
  699. rip up
    tear into shreds
    When I got back with the basin, the doctor had already ripped up the
    captain's sleeve and exposed his great sinewy arm.
  700. sober
    not affected by a chemical substance, especially alcohol
    The poor captain raised his eyes, and at one look the rum went out of
    him and left him staring sober.
  701. bilge
    where the sides of the vessel curve in to form the bottom
    Don't you get sucking of
    that bilge, John.
  702. tottering
    unsteady in gait as from infirmity or old age
    I remember him looking round the cover and whistling to himself
    as he did so, and then breaking out in that old sea-song that he sang so
    often afterwards:

    "Fifteen men on the dead man's chest--
    Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!"

    in the high, old tottering voice that seemed to have been tuned and
    broken at the capstan bars.
  703. enclosure
    a structure consisting of an area that has been confined
    We struck the enclosure about the middle of the south
    side, and almost at the same time, seven mutineers--Job Anderson, the
    boatswain, at their head--appeared in full cry at the southwestern
    corner.
  704. boy
    a youthful male person
    As soon as I
    was back again he returned to his former manner, half fawning, half
    sneering, patted me on the shoulder, told me I was a good boy and he had
    taken quite a fancy to me.
  705. jiffy
    a very short time
    In a jiffy I had slipped over the side and curled up in the
    fore-sheets of the nearest boat, and almost at the same moment she
    shoved off.
  706. agone
    gone by; or in the past
    "Marooned three years agone," he continued, "and lived on goats since
    then, and berries, and oysters.
  707. cheek
    either side of the face below the eyes
    I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the
    inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow--a
    tall, strong, heavy, nut-brown man, his tarry pigtail falling over the
    shoulder of his soiled blue coat, his hands ragged and scarred, with
    black, broken nails, and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid
    white.
  708. excite
    act as a stimulant
    He was lying very much as we had left him, only a little
    higher, and he seemed both weak and excited.
  709. declare
    state emphatically and authoritatively
    She would not, she declared, lose money that
    belonged to her fatherless boy; "If none of the rest of you dare,"
    she said, "Jim and I dare.
  710. blaze away
    shoot rapidly and repeatedly
    " Blaze away!
  711. fall out
    come off
    Rum! Rum!"

    I ran to fetch it, but I was quite unsteadied by all that had fallen
    out
    , and I broke one glass and fouled the tap, and while I was still
    getting in my own way, I heard a loud fall in the parlour, and running
    in, beheld the captain lying full length upon the floor.
  712. nobody
    a person of no influence
    There were nights when he took a deal more rum and water
    than his head would carry; and then he would sometimes sit and sing his
    wicked, old, wild sea-songs, minding nobody; but sometimes he would call
    for glasses round and force all the trembling company to listen to his
    stories or bear a chorus to his singing.
  713. enclose
    surround completely
    Well, on the knoll, and enclosing the spring, they had clapped a
    stout loghouse fit to hold two score of people on a pinch and loopholed
    for musketry on either side.
  714. done
    having finished or arrived at completion
    Drink and the devil had done for the rest--
    Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!"
  715. tremble
    move quickly and involuntarily up and down or sideways
    There were nights when he took a deal more rum and water
    than his head would carry; and then he would sometimes sit and sing his
    wicked, old, wild sea-songs, minding nobody; but sometimes he would call
    for glasses round and force all the trembling company to listen to his
    stories or bear a chorus to his singing.
  716. sometimes
    on certain occasions or in certain cases but not always
    There were nights when he took a deal more rum and water
    than his head would carry; and then he would sometimes sit and sing his
    wicked, old, wild sea-songs, minding nobody; but sometimes he would call
    for glasses round and force all the trembling company to listen to his
    stories or bear a chorus to his singing.
  717. fouled
    made dirty or foul
    Rum! Rum!"

    I ran to fetch it, but I was quite unsteadied by all that had fallen
    out, and I broke one glass and fouled the tap, and while I was still
    getting in my own way, I heard a loud fall in the parlour, and running
    in, beheld the captain lying full length upon the floor.
  718. watch
    look attentively
    "I'm a plain man; rum
    and bacon and eggs is what I want, and that head up there for to watch
    ships off.
  719. no more
    referring to the degree to which a certain quality is present
    " No more wounded than
    you or I. The man has had a stroke, as I warned him.
  720. mutiny
    open rebellion against constituted authority
    In other
    words, you fear a mutiny."
  721. thirty-second
    one part in thirty-two equal parts
    I have my watch here in my hand; I give you thirty seconds to join
    me in."
  722. make out
    detect with the senses
    Three men ran
    together, hand in hand; and I made out, even through the mist, that the
    middle man of this trio was the blind beggar.
  723. bring round
    cause to adopt an opinion or course of action
    Redruth retreated from his place in the gallery and dropped into the
    boat, which we then brought round to the ship's counter, to be handier
    for Captain Smollett.
  724. drake
    adult male of a wild or domestic duck
    We'll have favourable
    winds, a quick passage, and not the least difficulty in finding the
    spot, and money to eat, to roll in, to play duck and drake with ever
    after."
  725. alarmed
    experiencing a sudden sense of danger
    I
    was very uneasy and alarmed, as you may fancy, and it rather added to my
    fears to observe that the stranger was certainly frightened himself.
  726. set
    put into a certain place or abstract location
    The man who came
    with the barrow told us the mail had set him down the morning before at
    the Royal George, that he had inquired what inns there were along the
    coast, and hearing ours well spoken of, I suppose, and described as
    lonely, had chosen it from the others for his place of residence.
  727. briskly
    in a brisk manner
    The voices
    stopped at once, all but Dr. Livesey's; he went on as before speaking
    clear and kind and drawing briskly at his pipe between every word or
    two.
  728. relinquishing
    the act of giving up and abandoning a struggle or task etc.
    "If he were Admiral Hawke he shall pay his score," cried Silver; and
    then, relinquishing my hand, "Who did you say he was?" he asked.
  729. swinging
    characterized by a buoyant rhythm
    The captain had risen earlier than usual and set out down the
    beach, his cutlass swinging under the broad skirts of the old blue coat,
    his brass telescope under his arm, his hat tilted back upon his head.
  730. starve
    die of food deprivation
    Well, he's dead now
    and under hatches; but for two year before that, shiver my timbers,
    the man was starving!
  731. quadrant
    any of the four areas into which a plane is divided
    Under
    that, the miscellany began--a quadrant, a tin canikin, several sticks of
    tobacco, two brace of very handsome pistols, a piece of bar silver, an
    old Spanish watch and some other trinkets of little value and mostly of
    foreign make, a pair of compasses mounted with brass, and five or six
    curious West Indian shells.
  732. likely
    having a good chance of being the case or of coming about
    It was a bitter cold winter, with long, hard
    frosts and heavy gales; and it was plain from the first that my poor
    father was little likely to see the spring.
  733. fortune
    your overall circumstances or condition in life
    We were
    just at the little bridge, by good fortune; and I helped her, tottering
    as she was, to the edge of the bank, where, sure enough, she gave a sigh
    and fell on my shoulder.
  734. loaded
    filled with a great quantity
    All they would do was to give me a loaded pistol lest we were
    attacked, and to promise to have horses ready saddled in case we were
    pursued on our return, while one lad was to ride forward to the doctor's
    in search of armed assistance.
  735. good health
    the state of being vigorous and free from bodily or mental disease
    The next morning he and I set out on foot for the Admiral Benbow, and
    there I found my mother in good health and spirits.
  736. hulk
    a ship that has been wrecked and abandoned
    It's been meat and drink, and man and wife,
    to me; and if I'm not to have my rum now I'm a poor old hulk on a lee
    shore, my blood'll be on you, Jim, and that doctor swab"; and he ran on
    again for a while with curses.
  737. cleverness
    intelligence, especially quickness and wittiness
    The cook came up the side like a monkey for cleverness, and as soon as
    he saw what was doing, "So ho, mates!" says he.
  738. upstream
    toward the source or against the current
    "We must keep upstream.
  739. all clear
    a signal (usually a siren) that danger is over
    "That is all clear, and, I dare say, true enough," replied Dr. Livesey.
  740. answer
    a statement made to reply to a question or criticism
    And when I had pointed out the rock and told him how the captain was
    likely to return, and how soon, and answered a few other questions,
    "Ah," said he, "this'll be as good as drink to my mate Bill."
  741. hark back
    go back to something earlier
    Had they gone and told Silver, all might have turned
    out differently; but they had their orders, I suppose, and decided to
    sit quietly where they were and hark back again to "Lillibullero."
  742. slip
    move obliquely or sideways, usually in an uncontrolled manner
    We slipped along the hedges, noiseless and swift, nor did we see or hear
    anything to increase our terrors, till, to our relief, the door of the
    Admiral Benbow had closed behind us.
  743. Budge
    United States tennis player who in 1938 was the first to win the Australian and French and English and United States singles championship in the same year (1915-2000)
    " Budge, you skulk!" cried Pew. "Dirk was a fool and a coward from the
    first--you wouldn't mind him.
  744. seal in
    close with or as if with a tight seal
    The paper had been sealed in several places with a thimble by way of
    seal; the very thimble, perhaps, that I had found in the captain's
    pocket.
  745. run up
    pile up (debts or scores)
    We had run up the trades to get the wind of the island we were after--I
    am not allowed to be more plain--and now we were running down for it
    with a bright lookout day and night.
  746. contorted
    twisted, especially as in pain or struggle
    I had crossed a marshy tract full of willows, bulrushes, and odd,
    outlandish, swampy trees; and I had now come out upon the skirts of an
    open piece of undulating, sandy country, about a mile long, dotted with
    a few pines and a great number of contorted trees, not unlike the oak
    in growth, but pale in the foliage, like willows.
  747. while
    a period of indeterminate length marked by some action
    The captain glared at him for a while, flapped his hand again,
    glared still harder, and at last broke out with a villainous, low oath,
    "Silence, there, between decks!"
  748. unburied
    not buried
    Add to this that Gray, the new man, had his face tied up in a bandage
    for a cut he had got in breaking away from the mutineers and that poor
    old Tom Redruth, still unburied, lay along the wall, stiff and stark,
    under the Union Jack.
  749. pull
    apply force so as to cause motion towards the source of the motion
    I was so much startled that I
    struggled to withdraw, but the blind man pulled me close up to him with
    a single action of his arm.
  750. piece
    a separate part of a whole
    Oh, I
    see what you're at--there"; and he threw down three or four gold pieces
    on the threshold.
  751. faraway
    very far away in space or time
    I believe the silly fellows must have thought they would break their
    shins over treasure as soon as they were landed, for they all came out
    of their sulks in a moment and gave a cheer that started the echo in a
    faraway hill and sent the birds once more flying and squalling round the
    anchorage.
  752. clean
    free from dirt or impurities
    Once out upon the road, Black
    Dog, in spite of his wound, showed a wonderful clean pair of heels and
    disappeared over the edge of the hill in half a minute.
  753. scatter
    cause to separate and go in different directions
    Scatter, lads, and find 'em."
  754. miscalculation
    a mistake in calculating
    If I had my way, I'd have Cap'n Smollett work us back
    into the trades at least; then we'd have no blessed miscalculations and
    a spoonful of water a day.
  755. flighty
    guided by whim and fancy
    He never particularly addressed me, and it is my
    belief he had as good as forgotten his confidences; but his temper was
    more flighty, and allowing for his bodily weakness, more violent than
    ever.
  756. run down
    injure or kill by running over, as with a vehicle
    If we run down this Black Dog,
    now, there'll be news for Cap'n Trelawney!
  757. ear
    the sense organ for hearing and equilibrium
    "My ears is singing.
  758. raisin
    dried grape
    I found them all three seated round the table, a bottle of Spanish wine
    and some raisins before them, and the doctor smoking away, with his wig
    on his lap, and that, I knew, was a sign that he was agitated.
  759. land
    the solid part of the earth's surface
    I been in places hot as pitch, and mates
    dropping round with Yellow Jack, and the blessed land a-heaving like the
    sea with earthquakes--what to the doctor know of lands like that?--and I
    lived on rum, I tell you.
  760. breath
    the process of taking in and expelling air during breathing
    I'm not a doctor only; I'm a magistrate; and if I catch a breath
    of complaint against you, if it's only for a piece of incivility like
    tonight's, I'll take effectual means to have you hunted down and routed
    out of this.
  761. terrify
    frighten greatly
    But though I was so terrified by the idea of the seafaring man with one
    leg, I was far less afraid of the captain himself than anybody else who
    knew him.
  762. rightly
    with honesty
    "I don't rightly know, sir," answered Morgan.
  763. sundown
    the time in the evening at which the sun begins to fall below the horizon
    Now, just after sundown, when all my work was over and I was on my way
    to my berth, it occurred to me that I should like an apple.
  764. spoke
    support consisting of a radial member of a wheel joining the hub to the rim
    And indeed bad as his clothes were and coarsely as he spoke, he had none
    of the appearance of a man who sailed before the mast, but seemed like
    a mate or skipper accustomed to be obeyed or to strike.
  765. besides
    in addition
    But it was no affair of
    mine, I thought; and besides, it was difficult to know what to do.
  766. give ear
    give heed (to)
    Nor was I deceived, for soon
    I heard the very distant and low tones of a human voice, which, as I
    continued to give ear, grew steadily louder and nearer.
  767. tomorrow
    the day after today
    Tomorrow I start for Bristol.
  768. cockroach
    any of numerous chiefly nocturnal insects
    And as for
    riding down that black, atrocious miscreant, I regard it as an act of
    virtue, sir, like stamping on a cockroach.
  769. ever
    at all times; all the time and on every occasion
    For in these fits he was the most
    overriding companion ever known; he would slap his hand on the table for
    silence all round; he would fly up in a passion of anger at a question,
    or sometimes because none was put, and so he judged the company was not
    following his story.
  770. overriding
    having superior power and influence
    For in these fits he was the most
    overriding companion ever known; he would slap his hand on the table for
    silence all round; he would fly up in a passion of anger at a question,
    or sometimes because none was put, and so he judged the company was not
    following his story.
  771. sheepishly
    in a sheepish manner
    The man whom he called Morgan--an old, grey-haired, mahogany-faced
    sailor--came forward pretty sheepishly, rolling his quid.
  772. oath
    a solemn promise regarding your future acts or behavior
    The captain glared at him for a while, flapped his hand again,
    glared still harder, and at last broke out with a villainous, low oath,
    "Silence, there, between decks!"
  773. modulated
    changed or adjusted in pitch, tone, or volume
    But now John put his hand into his pocket, brought out a whistle, and
    blew upon it several modulated blasts that rang far across the heated
    air.
  774. bottle
    a vessel used for storing drinks or other liquids
    I remember him looking round the cover and whistling to himself
    as he did so, and then breaking out in that old sea-song that he sang so
    often afterwards:

    "Fifteen men on the dead man's chest--
    Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!"

    in the high, old tottering voice that seemed to have been tuned and
    broken at the capstan bars.
  775. singing
    the act of singing vocal music
    There were nights when he took a deal more rum and water
    than his head would carry; and then he would sometimes sit and sing his
    wicked, old, wild sea-songs, minding nobody; but sometimes he would call
    for glasses round and force all the trembling company to listen to his
    stories or bear a chorus to his singing.
  776. heel
    the back part of the human foot
    The captain spun round on his heel and fronted us; all the brown had
    gone out of his face, and even his nose was blue; he had the look of a
    man who sees a ghost, or the evil one, or something worse, if anything
    can be; and upon my word, I felt sorry to see him all in a moment turn
    so old and sick.
  777. grope
    feel about uncertainly or blindly
    Next moment we were both groping downstairs, leaving the candle by
    the empty chest; and the next we had opened the door and were in full
    retreat.
  778. ale
    a general name for beer made with a top fermenting yeast
    Mr. Dance must have some
    ale."
  779. week after week
    for an indefinite number of successive weeks
    In one way, indeed, he bade fair to ruin us, for he kept on staying week
    after week
    , and at last month after month, so that all the money had
    been long exhausted, and still my father never plucked up the heart to
    insist on having more.
  780. voyage
    a journey to some distant place
    Now, treasure is ticklish work; I don't
    like treasure voyages on any account, and I don't like them, above all,
    when they are secret and when (begging your pardon, Mr. Trelawney) the
    secret has been told to the parrot."
  781. cry out
    utter aloud; often with surprise, horror, or joy
    As he was thus speaking, he had risen from bed with great difficulty,
    holding to my shoulder with a grip that almost made me cry out, and
    moving his legs like so much dead weight.
  782. singe
    burn superficially or lightly
    There were nights when he took a deal more rum and water
    than his head would carry; and then he would sometimes sit and sing his
    wicked, old, wild sea-songs, minding nobody; but sometimes he would call
    for glasses round and force all the trembling company to listen to his
    stories or bear a chorus to his singing.
  783. hilt
    the handle of a sword or dagger
    He
    cleared the hilt of his cutlass and loosened the blade in the sheath;
    and all the time we were waiting there he kept swallowing as if he felt
    what we used to call a lump in the throat.
  784. longitude
    the angular distance from the prime meridian at Greenwich
    In a few cases, to be sure, the name of a place would be added,
    as "Offe Caraccas," or a mere entry of latitude and longitude, as "62o
    17' 20", 19o 2' 40"."
  785. get down
    lower (one's body) as by kneeling
    In the meantime the
    supervisor rode on, as fast as he could, to Kitt's Hole; but his men
    had to dismount and grope down the dingle, leading, and sometimes
    supporting, their horses, and in continual fear of ambushes; so it was
    no great matter for surprise that when they got down to the Hole the
    lugger was already under way, though still close in.
  786. opened
    not sealed or having been unsealed
    He sprang to his feet, drew and opened
    a sailor's clasp-knife, and balancing it open on the palm of his hand,
    threatened to pin the doctor to the wall.
  787. stout
    having rugged physical strength
    I was
    wedged in between Redruth and a stout old gentleman, and in spite of the
    swift motion and the cold night air, I must have dozed a great deal from
    the very first, and then slept like a log up hill and down dale through
    stage after stage, for when I was awakened at last it was by a punch
    in the ribs, and I opened my eyes to find that we were standing still
    before a large building in a city street and that the day had already
    broken a long time.
  788. nose
    the organ of smell and entrance to the respiratory tract
    Mostly
    he would not speak when spoken to, only look up sudden and fierce and
    blow through his nose like a fog-horn; and we and the people who came
    about our house soon learned to let him be.
  789. speaking
    capable of or involving speech or speaking
    The voices
    stopped at once, all but Dr. Livesey's; he went on as before speaking
    clear and kind and drawing briskly at his pipe between every word or
    two.
  790. sharer
    someone who has or gives or receives a part or a share
    For me, at least, there was no secret about the matter, for
    I was, in a way, a sharer in his alarms.
  791. bit
    a small piece or quantity of something
    Then he rapped on the door with a bit of
    stick like a handspike that he carried, and when my father appeared,
    called roughly for a glass of rum.
  792. leave behind
    depart and not take along
    The isle was
    uninhabited; my shipmates I had left behind, and nothing lived in front
    of me but dumb brutes and fowls.
  793. tattoo
    a design on the skin made by pricking and staining
    It was tattooed
    in several places.
  794. forward
    at or to or toward the front
    All they would do was to give me a loaded pistol lest we were
    attacked, and to promise to have horses ready saddled in case we were
    pursued on our return, while one lad was to ride forward to the doctor's
    in search of armed assistance.
  795. night
    the time after sunset and before sunrise while it is dark outside
    On
    stormy nights, when the wind shook the four corners of the house and
    the surf roared along the cove and up the cliffs, I would see him in a
    thousand forms, and with a thousand diabolical expressions.
  796. rudder
    (nautical) steering mechanism consisting of a hinged vertical plate mounted at the stern of a vessel
    The booms
    were tearing at the blocks, the rudder was banging to and fro, and the
    whole ship creaking, groaning, and jumping like a manufactory.
  797. rig
    equip with sails or masts
    Thither we had now to walk, and
    our way, to my great delight, lay along the quays and beside the great
    multitude of ships of all sizes and rigs and nations.
  798. clove
    moderate sized very symmetrical red-flowered evergreen widely cultivated in the tropics for its flower buds which are source of cloves
    "You're a good lad, Jim," he said; "and you're all in a clove hitch,
    ain't you?
  799. stiff
    incapable of or resistant to bending
    "Give me the key," said my mother; and though the lock was very stiff,
    she had turned it and thrown back the lid in a twinkling.
  800. streamlet
    a small stream
    Most of the soil had
    been washed away or buried in drift after the removal of the trees; only
    where the streamlet ran down from the kettle a thick bed of moss and
    some ferns and little creeping bushes were still green among the sand.
  801. Savannah
    a port in eastern Georgia near the mouth of the Savannah river
    He gave it me at Savannah, when he lay a-dying, like as if I
    was to now, you see.
  802. be on
    appear in a show, on T.V. or radio
    It's been meat and drink, and man and wife,
    to me; and if I'm not to have my rum now I'm a poor old hulk on a lee
    shore, my blood'll be on you, Jim, and that doctor swab"; and he ran on
    again for a while with curses.
  803. scarce
    deficient in quantity or number compared with the demand
    The guineas,
    too, were about the scarcest, and it was with these only that my mother
    knew how to make her count.
  804. Job
    a Jewish hero in the Old Testament who maintained his faith in God in spite of afflictions that tested him
    The boatswain, Job Anderson, was the likeliest
    man aboard, and though he kept his old title, he served in a way as
    mate.
  805. brace
    a support that steadies or strengthens something else
    Under
    that, the miscellany began--a quadrant, a tin canikin, several sticks of
    tobacco, two brace of very handsome pistols, a piece of bar silver, an
    old Spanish watch and some other trinkets of little value and mostly of
    foreign make, a pair of compasses mounted with brass, and five or six
    curious West Indian shells.
  806. mainstay
    a prominent supporter
    Reasons of his own; that's the mainstay; as
    between man and man.
  807. topsy-turvy
    in utter disorder
    I do not know what it rightly is to faint, but I do know that for the
    next little while the whole world swam away from before me in a whirling
    mist; Silver and the birds, and the tall Spy-glass hilltop, going
    round and round and topsy-turvy before my eyes, and all manner of bells
    ringing and distant voices shouting in my ear.
  808. shockingly
    extremely
    This sudden noise startled us shockingly; but the news
    was good, for it was only six.
  809. looking
    appearing to be as specified
    I remember him looking round the cover and whistling to himself
    as he did so, and then breaking out in that old sea-song that he sang so
    often afterwards:

    "Fifteen men on the dead man's chest--
    Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!"

    in the high, old tottering voice that seemed to have been tuned and
    broken at the capstan bars.
  810. pluck
    pull lightly but sharply
    In one way, indeed, he bade fair to ruin us, for he kept on staying week
    after week, and at last month after month, so that all the money had
    been long exhausted, and still my father never plucked up the heart to
    insist on having more.
  811. armpit
    the hollow under the arm where it is joined to the shoulder
    With a cry John seized the branch of a tree, whipped the crutch out of
    his armpit, and sent that uncouth missile hurtling through the air.
  812. continued
    without stop or interruption
    I'll stay here a bit," he continued.
  813. nip
    sever or remove by pinching
    And then you'll give him a nip, like I do."
  814. packet
    a small package or bundle
    "And I'll take this to square the count," said I, picking up the oilskin
    packet.
  815. weigh anchor
    heave up an anchor in preparation for sailing
    "It were," said the cook; "it were when we weighed anchor.
  816. sentry
    a person employed to keep watch for some anticipated event
    Tired
    though we all were, two were sent out for firewood; two more were set to
    dig a grave for Redruth; the doctor was named cook; I was put sentry at
    the door; and the captain himself went from one to another, keeping up
    our spirits and lending a hand wherever it was wanted.
  817. slap on
    apply carelessly
    Indeed, he seemed in the most cheerful spirits, whistling
    as he moved about among the tables, with a merry word or a slap on the
    shoulder for the more favoured of his guests.
  818. companion
    a friend who is frequently with another
    For in these fits he was the most
    overriding companion ever known; he would slap his hand on the table for
    silence all round; he would fly up in a passion of anger at a question,
    or sometimes because none was put, and so he judged the company was not
    following his story.
  819. black
    being of the achromatic color of maximum darkness
    I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the
    inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow--a
    tall, strong, heavy, nut-brown man, his tarry pigtail falling over the
    shoulder of his soiled blue coat, his hands ragged and scarred, with
    black, broken nails, and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid
    white.
  820. sweltering
    excessively hot and humid; marked by sweating and faintness
    The heat was sweltering,
    and the men grumbled fiercely over their work.
  821. farthing
    a former British bronze coin worth a quarter of a penny
    "I'll
    have my dues, and not a farthing over.
  822. gully
    deep ditch cut by running water
    A few small coins, a thimble,
    and some thread and big needles, a piece of pigtail tobacco bitten away
    at the end, his gully with the crooked handle, a pocket compass, and a
    tinder box were all that they contained, and I began to despair.
  823. rig up
    erect or construct, especially as a temporary measure
    He had a line or two rigged up to help him across the
    widest spaces--Long John's earrings, they were called; and he would hand
    himself from one place to another, now using the crutch, now trailing it
    alongside by the lanyard, as quickly as another man could walk.
  824. violent death
    an event that causes someone to die
    I was not new to violent death--I have served his Royal Highness
    the Duke of Cumberland, and got a wound myself at Fontenoy--but I know
    my pulse went dot and carry one.
  825. rustle
    make a dry crackling sound
    The rocks of the Spy-glass re-echoed it a
    score of times; the whole troop of marsh-birds rose again, darkening
    heaven, with a simultaneous whirr; and long after that death yell was
    still ringing in my brain, silence had re-established its empire, and
    only the rustle of the redescending birds and the boom of the distant
    surges disturbed the languor of the afternoon.
  826. bravo
    a cry of approval as from an audience at the end of great performance
    When they heard how my mother went back to the inn, Dr.
    Livesey fairly slapped his thigh, and the squire cried " Bravo!" and
    broke his long pipe against the grate.
  827. pop out
    appear suddenly
    But when they saw Redruth waiting for them in the sparred
    galley, they went about ship at once, and a head popped out again on
    deck.
  828. grumbling
    a complaint uttered in a low and indistinct tone
    Then followed a battle of looks between them, but the captain soon
    knuckled under, put up his weapon, and resumed his seat, grumbling like
    a beaten dog.
  829. deuce
    two
    I wished a round score of men--in case of
    natives, buccaneers, or the odious French--and I
    had the worry of the deuce itself to find so much
    as half a dozen, till the most remarkable stroke
    of fortune brought me the very man that I
    required.
  830. bag
    a flexible container with a single opening
    And I'll thank you for that bag, Mrs. Crossley,
    to bring back our lawful money in."
  831. risk
    a source of danger
    For what
    would they risk their rascal carcasses but money?"
  832. day
    time for Earth to make a complete rotation on its axis
    All day he hung round the cove or
    upon the cliffs with a brass telescope; all evening he sat in a corner
    of the parlour next the fire and drank rum and water very strong.
  833. all in
    very tired
    The captain spun round on his heel and fronted us; all the brown had
    gone out of his face, and even his nose was blue; he had the look of a
    man who sees a ghost, or the evil one, or something worse, if anything
    can be; and upon my word, I felt sorry to see him all in a moment turn
    so old and sick.
  834. fawning
    attempting to win favor by flattery
    As soon as I
    was back again he returned to his former manner, half fawning, half
    sneering, patted me on the shoulder, told me I was a good boy and he had
    taken quite a fancy to me.
  835. stirrup
    support consisting of metal loops into which rider's feet go
    Mr. Dance told me to jump down and knock, and Dogger gave me a stirrup
    to descend by.
  836. sing
    produce tones with the voice
    I remember him looking round the cover and whistling to himself
    as he did so, and then breaking out in that old sea-song that he sang so
    often afterwards:

    "Fifteen men on the dead man's chest--
    Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!"

    in the high, old tottering voice that seemed to have been tuned and
    broken at the capstan bars.
  837. vise
    a holding device attached to a workbench
    I held out my hand, and the horrible, soft-spoken, eyeless creature
    gripped it in a moment like a vise.
  838. adventure
    a wild and exciting undertaking
    The doctor had to go
    to London for a physician to take charge of his practice; the squire was
    hard at work at Bristol; and I lived on at the hall under the charge of
    old Redruth, the gamekeeper, almost a prisoner, but full of sea-dreams
    and the most charming anticipations of strange islands and adventures.
  839. groping
    acting with uncertainty or hesitance or lack of confidence
    Next moment we were both groping downstairs, leaving the candle by
    the empty chest; and the next we had opened the door and were in full
    retreat.
  840. get wind
    get to know or become aware of, usually accidentally
    The admirable fellow literally slaved in
    my interest, and so, I may say, did everyone in
    Bristol, as soon as they got wind of the port we
    sailed for--treasure, I mean.
  841. stay on
    continue in a place, position, or situation
    Six fellows were to stay on
    board, and the remaining thirteen, including Silver, began to embark.
  842. knee-deep
    coming only to the ankle or knee
    But where Silver stood with his lieutenant, all was still in
    shadow, and they waded knee-deep in a low white vapour that had crawled
    during the night out of the morass.
  843. love-song
    a song about love or expressing love for another person
    Once, for instance, to our extreme wonder, he piped up to a
    different air, a king of country love-song that he must have learned in
    his youth before he had begun to follow the sea.
  844. derisively
    in a disrespectful and mocking manner
    "Why, where might you suppose it was?" asked Silver derisively.
  845. can
    airtight sealed metal container for food or drink, etc.
    "You can tell me when I've worked through that," says
    he, looking as fierce as a commander.
  846. congregate
    come together, usually for a purpose
    There all hands were already congregated.
  847. saying
    a word or phrase that particular people use in particular situations
    My father was always saying the inn would be
    ruined, for people would soon cease coming there to be tyrannized over
    and put down, and sent shivering to their beds; but I really believe his
    presence did us good.
  848. on all fours
    on hands and knees
    Crawling on all fours, I made steadily but slowly towards them, till at
    last, raising my head to an aperture among the leaves, I could see clear
    down into a little green dell beside the marsh, and closely set about
    with trees, where Long John Silver and another of the crew stood face to
    face in conversation.
  849. knee
    hinge joint in the human leg connecting the tibia and fibula with the femur and protected in front by the patella
    Now the leg
    would be cut off at the knee, now at the hip; now he was a monstrous
    kind of a creature who had never had but the one leg, and that in the
    middle of his body.
  850. suddenly
    happening unexpectedly
    Suddenly he--the captain,
    that is--began to pipe up his eternal song:

    "Fifteen men on the dead man's chest--
    Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!
  851. in the same breath
    simultaneously
    "And now, Livesey," said the squire in the same breath.
  852. foolhardy
    marked by defiant disregard for danger or consequences
    And now I began to feel that I was neglecting my business, that since
    I had been so foolhardy as to come ashore with these desperadoes, the
    least I could do was to overhear them at their councils, and that my
    plain and obvious duty was to draw as close as I could manage, under the
    favourable ambush of the crouching trees.
  853. kind
    having a tender and considerate and helpful nature
    At first we thought it was the want of company of his own kind
    that made him ask this question, but at last we began to see he was
    desirous to avoid them.
  854. scoundrel
    someone who does evil deliberately
    "Were you addressing me, sir?" says the doctor; and when the ruffian had
    told him, with another oath, that this was so, "I have only one thing to
    say to you, sir," replies the doctor, "that if you keep on drinking rum,
    the world will soon be quit of a very dirty scoundrel!"
  855. rogue
    a deceitful and unreliable scoundrel
    "I'll show these rogues that I'm an honest woman," said my mother.
  856. lantern
    a light in a transparent protective case
    Nor was this all, for the sound of several footsteps running
    came already to our ears, and as we looked back in their direction, a
    light tossing to and fro and still rapidly advancing showed that one of
    the newcomers carried a lantern.
  857. safe
    free from danger or the risk of harm
    The doctor opened the seals with great care, and there fell out
    the map of an island, with latitude and longitude, soundings, names of
    hills and bays and inlets, and every particular that would be needed
    to bring a ship to a safe anchorage upon its shores.
  858. coarsely
    in coarse pieces
    And indeed bad as his clothes were and coarsely as he spoke, he had none
    of the appearance of a man who sailed before the mast, but seemed like
    a mate or skipper accustomed to be obeyed or to strike.
  859. Anchorage
    a city in south central Alaska
    Kidd's Anchorage'--just
    the name my shipmate called it.
  860. kill off
    kill en masse; kill on a large scale; kill many
    But our best hope, it was decided, was to kill off the buccaneers until
    they either hauled down their flag or ran away with the HISPANIOLA.
  861. relieve
    free from a burden, evil, or distress
    First he recognized the doctor with
    an unmistakable frown; then his glance fell upon me, and he looked
    relieved.
  862. air
    a mixture of gases required for breathing
    Once, for instance, to our extreme wonder, he piped up to a
    different air, a king of country love-song that he must have learned in
    his youth before he had begun to follow the sea.
  863. overhaul
    make repairs, renovations, revisions or adjustments to
    "Bill's been overhauled
    a'ready," said he; "nothin' left."
  864. reedy
    resembling a reed in being upright and slender
    The thicket stretched down from the top of
    one of the sandy knolls, spreading and growing taller as it went, until
    it reached the margin of the broad, reedy fen, through which the nearest
    of the little rivers soaked its way into the anchorage.
  865. tonight
    during the night of the present day
    I'm not a doctor only; I'm a magistrate; and if I catch a breath
    of complaint against you, if it's only for a piece of incivility like
    tonight's, I'll take effectual means to have you hunted down and routed
    out of this.
  866. biscuit
    small round bread leavened with baking-powder or soda
    If you had the pluck of a weevil in a biscuit you would catch
    them still."
  867. bubble
    a hollow globule of gas (e.g., air or carbon dioxide)
    The pitch was
    bubbling in the seams; the nasty stench of the place turned me sick;
    if ever a man smelt fever and dysentery, it was in that abominable
    anchorage.
  868. contort
    twist and press out of shape
    I had crossed a marshy tract full of willows, bulrushes, and odd,
    outlandish, swampy trees; and I had now come out upon the skirts of an
    open piece of undulating, sandy country, about a mile long, dotted with
    a few pines and a great number of contorted trees, not unlike the oak
    in growth, but pale in the foliage, like willows.
  869. guinea
    a former British gold coin worth 21 shillings
    I'll give you a golden guinea for a noggin, Jim."

    He was growing more and more excited, and this alarmed me for my father,
    who was very low that day and needed quiet; besides, I was reassured by
    the doctor's words, now quoted to me, and rather offended by the offer
    of a bribe.
  870. loudly
    with relatively high volume
    If ever he mentioned it, the captain blew through
    his nose so loudly that you might say he roared, and stared my poor
    father out of the room.
  871. tide
    the periodic rise and fall of the sea level
    "Why, by the powers," cried Long John, "if we do, we'll miss the morning
    tide!"
  872. chine
    backbone of an animal
    Just
    at the door the captain aimed at the fugitive one last tremendous
    cut, which would certainly have split him to the chine had it not been
    intercepted by our big signboard of Admiral Benbow.
  873. get on
    get on board of (trains, buses, ships, aircraft, etc.)
    Now, if I can't get away nohow, and they tip me the black spot, mind
    you, it's my old sea-chest they're after; you get on a horse--you can,
    can't you?
  874. keep company
    be a companion to somebody
    Well now, I tell you, I'm not a boasting man, and you
    seen yourself how easy I keep company, but when I was quartermaster,
    LAMBS wasn't the word for Flint's old buccaneers.
  875. goat
    any of numerous agile ruminants related to sheep but having a beard and straight horns
    You'll bathe, and you'll climb trees, and you'll
    hunt goats, you will; and you'll get aloft on them hills like a goat
    yourself.
  876. pick off
    pull or pull out sharply
    "If I durst," said the captain, "I'd stop and pick off another man."
  877. story
    a record or narrative description of past events
    There were nights when he took a deal more rum and water
    than his head would carry; and then he would sometimes sit and sing his
    wicked, old, wild sea-songs, minding nobody; but sometimes he would call
    for glasses round and force all the trembling company to listen to his
    stories or bear a chorus to his singing.
  878. stranger
    an individual that one is not acquainted with
    The expression of his face as he said these words was not at all
    pleasant, and I had my own reasons for thinking that the stranger was
    mistaken, even supposing he meant what he said.
  879. silent
    marked by absence of sound
    He was a very silent man by custom.
  880. moonlight
    the light of the Moon
    Far less than half-way to the hamlet, very
    little beyond the bottom of the hill, we must come forth into the
    moonlight.
  881. scattering
    a small number (of something) dispersed haphazardly
    The four shots came in rather a scattering volley, but they did
    the business: one of the enemy actually fell, and the rest, without
    hesitation, turned and plunged into the trees.
  882. hat
    headdress that protects the head from bad weather
    One of the cocks of his
    hat having fallen down, he let it hang from that day forth, though it
    was a great annoyance when it blew.
  883. jumping
    the act of jumping; propelling yourself off the ground
    "I'll take what I have," she said, jumping to her feet.
  884. hard
    resisting weight or pressure
    It was a bitter cold winter, with long, hard
    frosts and heavy gales; and it was plain from the first that my poor
    father was little likely to see the spring.
  885. sheet
    any broad thin expanse or surface
    "And now, men," said the captain, when all was sheeted home, "has any
    one of you ever seen that land ahead?"
  886. fallen
    having dropped by the force of gravity
    One of the cocks of his
    hat having fallen down, he let it hang from that day forth, though it
    was a great annoyance when it blew.
  887. rock
    material consisting of the aggregate of minerals
    I
    remember his breath hanging like smoke in his wake as he strode off, and
    the last sound I heard of him as he turned the big rock was a loud snort
    of indignation, as though his mind was still running upon Dr. Livesey.
  888. crying
    the process of shedding tears
    But suddenly his colour changed, and he tried to raise
    himself, crying, "Where's Black Dog?"

    "There is no Black Dog here," said the doctor, "except what you have
    on your own back.
  889. or so
    (of quantities) imprecise but fairly close to correct
    They
    spoke together for a little, and though none of them started, or raised
    his voice, or so much as whistled, it was plain enough that Dr. Livesey
    had communicated my request, for the next thing that I heard was the
    captain giving an order to Job Anderson, and all hands were piped on
    deck.
  890. hearken
    listen; used mostly in the imperative
    We were not many
    minutes on the road, though we sometimes stopped to lay hold of each
    other and hearken.
  891. Anderson
    United States author whose works were frequently autobiographical (1876-1941)
    The boatswain, Job Anderson, was the likeliest
    man aboard, and though he kept his old title, he served in a way as
    mate.
  892. and then some
    and considerably more in addition
    When a seaman did put up at the Admiral Benbow
    (as now and then some did, making by the coast road for Bristol) he
    would look in at him through the curtained door before he entered the
    parlour; and he was always sure to be as silent as a mouse when any such
    was present.
  893. stroke
    a single complete movement
    "No more wounded than
    you or I. The man has had a stroke, as I warned him.
  894. steaming
    filled with steam or emitting moisture in the form of vapor or mist
    The marsh was
    steaming in the strong sun, and the outline of the Spy-glass trembled
    through the haze.
  895. soft-spoken
    having a speaking manner that is not loud or harsh
    I held out my hand, and the horrible, soft-spoken, eyeless creature
    gripped it in a moment like a vise.
  896. trunks
    trousers that end at or above the knee
    A peculiar stagnant smell hung over the anchorage--a smell of
    sodden leaves and rotting tree trunks.
  897. hulking
    of great size and bulk
    Back we will go, the way we came, and small
    thanks to you big, hulking, chicken-hearted men.
  898. any
    one or some or every or all without specification
    Every day when he came back
    from his stroll he would ask if any seafaring men had gone by along the
    road.
  899. now and again
    now and then or here and there
    "That was how it were, now, weren't it,
    Hawkins?" he would say, now and again, and I could always bear him
    entirely out.
  900. settle on
    become fixed (on)
    I told my plan to the captain, and between us we settled on the details
    of its accomplishment.
  901. whole
    all of something including its component elements or parts
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  902. wedge
    something solid that can be pushed between two things
    I was
    wedged in between Redruth and a stout old gentleman, and in spite of the
    swift motion and the cold night air, I must have dozed a great deal from
    the very first, and then slept like a log up hill and down dale through
    stage after stage, for when I was awakened at last it was by a punch
    in the ribs, and I opened my eyes to find that we were standing still
    before a large building in a city street and that the day had already
    broken a long time.
  903. broadside
    with a side facing an object
    The same broadside I lost my leg, old Pew lost his
    deadlights.
  904. death
    the permanent end of all life functions in an organism
    Often I have heard the house
    shaking with "Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum," all the neighbours joining
    in for dear life, with the fear of death upon them, and each singing
    louder than the other to avoid remark.
  905. bottom
    the lower side of anything
    The fog was rapidly
    dispersing; already the moon shone quite clear on the high ground on
    either side; and it was only in the exact bottom of the dell and round
    the tavern door that a thin veil still hung unbroken to conceal the
    first steps of our escape.
  906. leap
    move forward by bounds
    To see him leap and run and pursue me over hedge and
    ditch was the worst of nightmares.
  907. inlet
    an arm off of a larger body of water
    The doctor opened the seals with great care, and there fell out
    the map of an island, with latitude and longitude, soundings, names of
    hills and bays and inlets, and every particular that would be needed
    to bring a ship to a safe anchorage upon its shores.
  908. mouse
    small rodent having a pointed snout and small ears
    When a seaman did put up at the Admiral Benbow
    (as now and then some did, making by the coast road for Bristol) he
    would look in at him through the curtained door before he entered the
    parlour; and he was always sure to be as silent as a mouse when any such
    was present.
  909. becalmed
    rendered motionless for lack of wind
    Although the breeze had now utterly ceased, we had
    made a great deal of way during the night and were now lying becalmed
    about half a mile to the south-east of the low eastern coast.
  910. minded
    mentally oriented toward something specified
    But with all that,
    he minded people less and seemed shut up in his own thoughts and rather
    wandering.
  911. quid
    a wad of something chewable as tobacco
    The man whom he called Morgan--an old, grey-haired, mahogany-faced
    sailor--came forward pretty sheepishly, rolling his quid.
  912. rowing
    the act of rowing as a sport
    By
    this time we had got so far out of the run of the current that we kept
    steerage way even at our necessarily gentle rate of rowing, and I could
    keep her steady for the goal.
  913. cross
    a marking that consists of lines that intersect each other
    He was only once crossed, and that was towards the end, when my poor
    father was far gone in a decline that took him off.
  914. heartily
    with gusto and without reservation
    But he broke in cursing the doctor, in a feeble voice but heartily.
  915. oak
    a deciduous tree of the genus Quercus
    I had crossed a marshy tract full of willows, bulrushes, and odd,
    outlandish, swampy trees; and I had now come out upon the skirts of an
    open piece of undulating, sandy country, about a mile long, dotted with
    a few pines and a great number of contorted trees, not unlike the oak
    in growth, but pale in the foliage, like willows.
  916. spring
    move forward by leaps and bounds
    He sprang to his feet, drew and opened
    a sailor's clasp-knife, and balancing it open on the palm of his hand,
    threatened to pin the doctor to the wall.
  917. taken
    understood in a certain way; made sense of
    He had taken me aside one day
    and promised me a silver fourpenny on the first of every month if I
    would only keep my "weather-eye open for a seafaring man with one leg"
    and let him know the moment he appeared.
  918. dell
    a small wooded hollow
    The fog was rapidly
    dispersing; already the moon shone quite clear on the high ground on
    either side; and it was only in the exact bottom of the dell and round
    the tavern door that a thin veil still hung unbroken to conceal the
    first steps of our escape.
  919. hunched
    having the back and shoulders rounded; not erect
    He was plainly blind, for he tapped
    before him with a stick and wore a great green shade over his eyes and
    nose; and he was hunched, as if with age or weakness, and wore a huge
    old tattered sea-cloak with a hood that made him appear positively
    deformed.
  920. four
    the cardinal number that is the sum of three and one
    Oh, I
    see what you're at--there"; and he threw down three or four gold pieces
    on the threshold.
  921. shout
    utter in a loud voice; talk in a loud voice
    "In, in, in!" he shouted, and cursed them for their delay.
  922. think up
    devise or invent
    I had thought up to that moment of the adventures before me,
    not at all of the home that I was leaving; and now, at sight of this
    clumsy stranger, who was to stay here in my place beside my mother, I
    had my first attack of tears.
  923. under that
    under that
    Under
    that
    , the miscellany began--a quadrant, a tin canikin, several sticks of
    tobacco, two brace of very handsome pistols, a piece of bar silver, an
    old Spanish watch and some other trinkets of little value and mostly of
    foreign make, a pair of compasses mounted with brass, and five or six
    curious West Indian shells.
  924. pious
    having or showing or expressing reverence for a deity
    Now, for instance, you
    wouldn't think I had had a pious mother--to look at me?" he asked.
  925. shouting
    uttering a loud inarticulate cry as of pain or excitement
    There was a pause, then a cry of surprise, and then a
    voice shouting from the house, "Bill's dead."
  926. kind of
    to some (great or small) extent
    Now the leg
    would be cut off at the knee, now at the hip; now he was a monstrous
    kind of a creature who had never had but the one leg, and that in the
    middle of his body.
  927. bowsprit
    a spar projecting from the bow of a vessel
    The HISPANIOLA rolled steadily, dipping her bowsprit now and then with
    a whiff of spray.
  928. salt
    white crystalline form of especially sodium chloride used to season and preserve food
    People were frightened at the time, but on looking
    back they rather liked it; it was a fine excitement in a quiet country
    life, and there was even a party of the younger men who pretended to
    admire him, calling him a "true sea-dog" and a "real old salt" and
    such like names, and saying there was the sort of man that made England
    terrible at sea.
  929. hunted
    reflecting the fear or terror of one who is hunted
    I'm not a doctor only; I'm a magistrate; and if I catch a breath
    of complaint against you, if it's only for a piece of incivility like
    tonight's, I'll take effectual means to have you hunted down and routed
    out of this.
  930. unarmed
    (used of persons or the military) not having or using arms
    I seen him grapple
    four and knock their heads together--him unarmed."
  931. primed
    on the point of or strongly disposed
    I jumped out and came as near running as I durst, with a big silk
    handkerchief under my hat for coolness' sake and a brace of pistols
    ready primed for safety.
  932. drop
    let fall to the ground
    I been in places hot as pitch, and mates
    dropping round with Yellow Jack, and the blessed land a-heaving like the
    sea with earthquakes--what to the doctor know of lands like that?--and I
    lived on rum, I tell you.
  933. smoke
    a cloud of fine particles suspended in a gas
    Dr. Livesey came
    late one afternoon to see the patient, took a bit of dinner from my
    mother, and went into the parlour to smoke a pipe until his horse should
    come down from the hamlet, for we had no stabling at the old Benbow.
  934. unarm
    take away the weapons from; render harmless
    I seen him grapple
    four and knock their heads together--him unarmed."
  935. near
    near in time or place or relationship
    I asked him what was for his service, and he said he would take rum; but
    as I was going out of the room to fetch it, he sat down upon a table
    and motioned me to draw near.
  936. becalm
    make still, steady, or tranquil
    Although the breeze had now utterly ceased, we had
    made a great deal of way during the night and were now lying becalmed
    about half a mile to the south-east of the low eastern coast.
  937. foliage
    the aggregate of leaves of one or more plants
    Two little rivers, or rather two swamps, emptied out into this
    pond, as you might call it; and the foliage round that part of the shore
    had a kind of poisonous brightness.
  938. downstairs
    on or of lower floors of a building
    At the same
    instant my mother, alarmed by the cries and fighting, came running
    downstairs to help me.
  939. threateningly
    in a menacing manner
    And at this there came suddenly a lowering shadow over his face, and he
    tightened his grasp upon my hand and raised a forefinger threateningly
    before my eyes.
  940. get together
    get people together
    Between
    Silver and myself we got together in a few days a
    company of the toughest old salts imaginable--not
    pretty to look at, but fellows, by their faces, of
    the most indomitable spirit.
  941. store
    a mercantile establishment for the sale of goods or services
    All three made the first journey, heavily
    laden, and tossed our stores over the palisade.
  942. make bold
    take upon oneself; act presumptuously, without permission
    "Bill," said the stranger in a voice that I thought he had tried to make
    bold
    and big.
  943. wild duck
    an undomesticated duck (especially a mallard)
    All at once there began to go a sort of bustle among the bulrushes;
    a wild duck flew up with a quack, another followed, and soon over the
    whole surface of the marsh a great cloud of birds hung screaming and
    circling in the air.
  944. bars
    gymnastic apparatus consisting of two parallel wooden rods supported on uprights
    I remember him looking round the cover and whistling to himself
    as he did so, and then breaking out in that old sea-song that he sang so
    often afterwards:

    "Fifteen men on the dead man's chest--
    Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!"

    in the high, old tottering voice that seemed to have been tuned and
    broken at the capstan bars.
  945. annoyance
    the psychological state of being irritated or annoyed
    I have seen him wringing his hands after such a
    rebuff, and I am sure the annoyance and the terror he lived in must have
    greatly hastened his early and unhappy death.
  946. just about
    (of quantities) imprecise but fairly close to correct
    "And that," said he,
    "is just about as good as nothing.
  947. skulking
    evading duty or work by pretending to be incapacitated
    You'd
    be as rich as kings if you could find it, and you know it's here, and
    you stand there skulking.
  948. cut off
    remove by or as if by cutting
    Now the leg
    would be cut off at the knee, now at the hip; now he was a monstrous
    kind of a creature who had never had but the one leg, and that in the
    middle of his body.
  949. bombardment
    an attack by dropping explosive devices
    "I have thought of that," said I, for I made sure he was thinking of a
    bombardment of the fort.
  950. ticklish
    difficult to handle; requiring great tact
    Now, treasure is ticklish work; I don't
    like treasure voyages on any account, and I don't like them, above all,
    when they are secret and when (begging your pardon, Mr. Trelawney) the
    secret has been told to the parrot."
  951. die
    lose all bodily functions necessary to sustain life
    "It's the name of a buccaneer of my
    acquaintance; and I call you by it for the sake of shortness, and what I
    have to say to you is this; one glass of rum won't kill you, but if
    you take one you'll take another and another, and I stake my wig if you
    don't break off short, you'll die--do you understand that?--die, and go
    to your own place, like the man in the Bible.
  952. dingle
    a small wooded hollow
    In the meantime the
    supervisor rode on, as fast as he could, to Kitt's Hole; but his men
    had to dismount and grope down the dingle, leading, and sometimes
    supporting, their horses, and in continual fear of ambushes; so it was
    no great matter for surprise that when they got down to the Hole the
    lugger was already under way, though still close in.
  953. rise
    move upward
    The captain had risen earlier than usual and set out down the
    beach, his cutlass swinging under the broad skirts of the old blue coat,
    his brass telescope under his arm, his hat tilted back upon his head.
  954. delay
    time during which some action is awaited
    At this triumph we were filled with
    hope and hurried upstairs without delay to the little room where he had
    slept so long and where his box had stood since the day of his arrival.
  955. broke
    lacking funds
    The captain glared at him for a while, flapped his hand again,
    glared still harder, and at last broke out with a villainous, low oath,
    "Silence, there, between decks!"
  956. pleased
    experiencing or manifesting pleasure
    You are our
    new cabin-boy; pleased I am to see you."
  957. standing
    social or financial or professional status or reputation
    So things passed until, the day after the funeral, and about three
    o'clock of a bitter, foggy, frosty afternoon, I was standing at the door
    for a moment, full of sad thoughts about my father, when I saw someone
    drawing slowly near along the road.
  958. all fours
    card games in which points are won for taking the high or low or jack or game
    Crawling on all fours, I made steadily but slowly towards them, till at
    last, raising my head to an aperture among the leaves, I could see clear
    down into a little green dell beside the marsh, and closely set about
    with trees, where Long John Silver and another of the crew stood face to
    face in conversation.
  959. configuration
    an arrangement of parts or elements
    All were strangely shaped, and the Spy-glass, which was by three or four
    hundred feet the tallest on the island, was likewise the strangest in
    configuration, running up sheer from almost every side and then suddenly
    cut off at the top like a pedestal to put a statue on.
  960. mattress
    a large thick pad filled with resilient material and often incorporating coiled springs, used as a bed or part of a bed
    We put old Redruth in the gallery between the cabin and the forecastle,
    with three or four loaded muskets and a mattress for protection.
  961. amidships
    at or near or toward the center of a ship
    "Easy with that,
    men--easy," he ran on, to the fellows who were shifting the powder; and
    then suddenly observing me examining the swivel we carried amidships,
    a long brass nine, "Here you, ship's boy," he cried, "out o' that!
  962. course
    a connected series of events or actions or developments
    It was the second death I had known, and
    the sorrow of the first was still fresh in my heart.




    4

    The Sea-chest

    I LOST no time, of course, in telling my mother all that I knew, and
    perhaps should have told her long before, and we saw ourselves at once
    in a difficult and dangerous position.
  963. hummock
    a small natural hill
    The bar silver is in the north cache; you can find
    it by the trend of the east hummock, ten fathoms
    south of the black crag with the face on it.
  964. breeze
    a slight and usually refreshing wind
    We were heading S.S.W. and had a steady breeze abeam and a quiet sea.
  965. song
    a short musical composition with words
    I remember him looking round the cover and whistling to himself
    as he did so, and then breaking out in that old sea- song that he sang so
    often afterwards:

    "Fifteen men on the dead man's chest--
    Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!"

    in the high, old tottering voice that seemed to have been tuned and
    broken at the capstan bars.
  966. unmanly
    not possessing qualities befitting a man
    "Silver, if you like," cried the squire; "but as for that intolerable
    humbug, I declare I think his conduct unmanly, unsailorly, and downright
    un-English."
  967. accoutrement
    clothing that is not part of one's main clothing
    About his waist he wore an old brass-buckled leather belt, which was the
    one thing solid in his whole accoutrement.
  968. Split
    an old Croatian city on the Adriatic Sea
    Split my sides, I've a sick heart
    to sail with the likes of you!"
  969. tied up
    kept occupied or engaged
    My
    mother pulled it up with impatience, and there lay before us, the last
    things in the chest, a bundle tied up in oilcloth, and looking like
    papers, and a canvas bag that gave forth, at a touch, the jingle of
    gold.
  970. scraps
    food that is discarded (as from a kitchen)
    On the first page there were only some scraps of writing, such as a man
    with a pen in his hand might make for idleness or practice.
  971. downright
    complete and without restriction or qualification
    "Silver, if you like," cried the squire; "but as for that intolerable
    humbug, I declare I think his conduct unmanly, unsailorly, and downright
    un-English."
  972. steersman
    the person who steers a ship
    All the way in, Long John stood by the steersman and conned the ship.
  973. shoot down
    shoot at and force to come down
    "All's
    well with him; no fear for a hand that's been shot down in his duty to
    captain and owner.
  974. desertion
    withdrawing support or help despite allegiance or responsibility
    These poor lads have chosen me
    cap'n, after your desertion, sir"--laying a particular emphasis upon the
    word "desertion."
  975. swelter
    be uncomfortably hot
    The heat was sweltering,
    and the men grumbled fiercely over their work.
  976. stand still
    remain in place; hold still; remain fixed or immobile
    I was
    wedged in between Redruth and a stout old gentleman, and in spite of the
    swift motion and the cold night air, I must have dozed a great deal from
    the very first, and then slept like a log up hill and down dale through
    stage after stage, for when I was awakened at last it was by a punch
    in the ribs, and I opened my eyes to find that we were standing still
    before a large building in a city street and that the day had already
    broken a long time.
  977. remember
    recall knowledge; have a recollection
    I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the
    inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow--a
    tall, strong, heavy, nut-brown man, his tarry pigtail falling over the
    shoulder of his soiled blue coat, his hands ragged and scarred, with
    black, broken nails, and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid
    white.
  978. entry
    the act of going in
    The next ten or twelve pages were filled with a curious series of
    entries.
  979. croaking
    a harsh hoarse utterance (as of a frog)
    But there was no unusual sound--nothing but the low
    wash of the ripple and the croaking of the inmates of the wood.
  980. breaking off
    an instance of sudden interruption
    I'll wring his calf's head off his body with
    these hands, Dick!" he added, breaking off.
  981. lapping
    covering with a design in which one element covers a part of another (as with tiles or shingles)
    It was one January morning, very early--a pinching, frosty morning--the
    cove all grey with hoar-frost, the ripple lapping softly on the stones,
    the sun still low and only touching the hilltops and shining far to
    seaward.
  982. roll in
    pour or flow in a steady stream
    I'm to be a
    poor, crawling beggar, sponging for rum, when I might be rolling in a
    coach!
  983. reel
    a winder around which flexible materials can be wound
    Nor would he allow anyone to leave the inn till he
    had drunk himself sleepy and reeled off to bed.
  984. knife
    edge tool used as a cutting instrument
    He sprang to his feet, drew and opened
    a sailor's clasp- knife, and balancing it open on the palm of his hand,
    threatened to pin the doctor to the wall.
  985. worse
    inferior to another in quality or condition or desirability
    The captain spun round on his heel and fronted us; all the brown had
    gone out of his face, and even his nose was blue; he had the look of a
    man who sees a ghost, or the evil one, or something worse, if anything
    can be; and upon my word, I felt sorry to see him all in a moment turn
    so old and sick.
  986. assizes
    the county courts of England
    He spoke to him as before, over his
    shoulder and in the same tone of voice, rather high, so that all the
    room might hear, but perfectly calm and steady: "If you do not put that
    knife this instant in your pocket, I promise, upon my honour, you shall
    hang at the next assizes."
  987. passage
    the act of moving from one state or place to the next
    The servant led us down a matted passage and showed us at the end into a
    great library, all lined with bookcases and busts upon the top of them,
    where the squire and Dr. Livesey sat, pipe in hand, on either side of a
    bright fire.
  988. morning
    the time period between dawn and noon
    The man who came
    with the barrow told us the mail had set him down the morning before at
    the Royal George, that he had inquired what inns there were along the
    coast, and hearing ours well spoken of, I suppose, and described as
    lonely, had chosen it from the others for his place of residence.
  989. get behind
    to lag or linger behind
    You and me'll just go back into the
    parlour, sonny, and get behind the door, and we'll give Bill a little
    surprise--bless his 'art, I say again."
  990. loading
    weight to be borne or conveyed
    Hunter
    brought the boat round under the stern-port, and Joyce and I set to work
    loading her with powder tins, muskets, bags of biscuits, kegs of pork, a
    cask of cognac, and my invaluable medicine chest.
  991. wild horse
    undomesticated or feral domestic horse
    Wild horses wouldn't draw it from you?
  992. shiver
    shake, as from cold
    My father was always saying the inn would be
    ruined, for people would soon cease coming there to be tyrannized over
    and put down, and sent shivering to their beds; but I really believe his
    presence did us good.
  993. despise
    look down on with disdain
    I was half
    beside myself with glee; and if ever I despised a man, it was old
    Tom Redruth, who could do nothing but grumble and lament.
  994. addressed
    (of mail) marked with a destination
    He never particularly addressed me, and it is my
    belief he had as good as forgotten his confidences; but his temper was
    more flighty, and allowing for his bodily weakness, more violent than
    ever.
  995. end
    either extremity of something that has length
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  996. stopped
    (of a nose) blocked
    The voices
    stopped at once, all but Dr. Livesey's; he went on as before speaking
    clear and kind and drawing briskly at his pipe between every word or
    two.
  997. earshot
    the range within which a voice can be heard
    So there we had to stay--my mother almost entirely exposed and both of
    us within earshot of the inn.




    5

    The Last of the Blind Man

    MY curiosity, in a sense, was stronger than my fear, for I could not
    remain where I was, but crept back to the bank again, whence, sheltering
    my head behind a bush of broom, I might command the road before our
    door.
  998. exposed
    with no protection or shield
    When I got back with the basin, the doctor had already ripped up the
    captain's sleeve and exposed his great sinewy arm.
  999. stump
    the base part that remains after a tree has been felled
    All the time he was jerking out these phrases he was stumping up and
    down the tavern on his crutch, slapping tables with his hand, and giving
    such a show of excitement as would have convinced an Old Bailey judge
    or a Bow Street runner.
  1000. cocked hat
    hat with opposing brims turned up and caught together to form points
    One of my last
    thoughts was of the captain, who had so often strode along the beach
    with his cocked hat, his sabre-cut cheek, and his old brass telescope.
  1001. nutritious
    of or providing nourishment
    And you never saw me
    take snuff, the reason being that in my snuff-box I carry a piece of
    Parmesan cheese--a cheese made in Italy, very nutritious.
  1002. vapour
    a visible suspension in the air of particles of some substance
    But where Silver stood with his lieutenant, all was still in
    shadow, and they waded knee-deep in a low white vapour that had crawled
    during the night out of the morass.
  1003. every
    (used of count nouns) each and all of the members of a group considered singly and without exception
    Every day when he came back
    from his stroll he would ask if any seafaring men had gone by along the
    road.
  1004. superintend
    watch and direct
    Mr. Trelawney had taken up his residence at an inn far down the docks to
    superintend the work upon the schooner.
  1005. quay
    wharf usually built parallel to the shoreline
    Thither we had now to walk, and
    our way, to my great delight, lay along the quays and beside the great
    multitude of ships of all sizes and rigs and nations.
  1006. scull
    a long oar that is mounted at the stern of a boat and moved left and right to propel the boat forward
    So
    we proceeded without pausing to take breath, till the whole cargo was
    bestowed, when the two servants took up their position in the block
    house, and I, with all my power, sculled back to the HISPANIOLA.
  1007. palm
    the inner surface of the hand
    He sprang to his feet, drew and opened
    a sailor's clasp-knife, and balancing it open on the palm of his hand,
    threatened to pin the doctor to the wall.
  1008. speed
    a rate at which something happens
    Let young Hawkins go at once to see his
    mother, with Redruth for a guard; and then both
    come full speed to Bristol.
  1009. careen
    pitching dangerously to one side
    Leastways, if such was your intention as to enter and careen, and there
    ain't no better place for that in these waters."
  1010. struck
    (used in combination) affected by something overwhelming
    The captain had been struck dead by thundering apoplexy.
  1011. nondescript
    lacking distinct or individual characteristics
    I was now, it seemed, cut off upon both sides; behind me the murderers,
    before me this lurking nondescript.
  1012. prodigiously
    to a prodigious degree
    The Spaniards were so prodigiously afraid of him that, I tell you, sir,
    I was sometimes proud he was an Englishman.
  1013. on the table
    able to be negotiated or arranged by compromise
    For in these fits he was the most
    overriding companion ever known; he would slap his hand on the table for
    silence all round; he would fly up in a passion of anger at a question,
    or sometimes because none was put, and so he judged the company was not
    following his story.
  1014. re-enter
    enter again
    He re-entered the log-house and set
    about counting up the stores as if nothing else existed.
  1015. strike
    deliver a sharp blow, as with the hand, fist, or weapon
    And indeed bad as his clothes were and coarsely as he spoke, he had none
    of the appearance of a man who sailed before the mast, but seemed like
    a mate or skipper accustomed to be obeyed or to strike.
  1016. despised
    treated with contempt
    I was half
    beside myself with glee; and if ever I despised a man, it was old
    Tom Redruth, who could do nothing but grumble and lament.
  1017. frighten
    cause fear in
    His stories were what frightened people worst of all.
  1018. crawling
    a slow mode of locomotion on hands and knees or dragging the body
    I'm to be a
    poor, crawling beggar, sponging for rum, when I might be rolling in a
    coach!
  1019. ball
    an object with a spherical shape
    However, we had no luck, for just as Trelawney fired, down he
    stooped, the ball whistled over him, and it was one of the other four
    who fell.
  1020. pursue
    follow in an effort to capture
    To see him leap and run and pursue me over hedge and
    ditch was the worst of nightmares.
  1021. strong
    having strength or power greater than average or expected
    I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the
    inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow--a
    tall, strong, heavy, nut-brown man, his tarry pigtail falling over the
    shoulder of his soiled blue coat, his hands ragged and scarred, with
    black, broken nails, and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid
    white.
  1022. order
    logical or comprehensible arrangement of separate elements
    Often enough when the first
    of the month came round and I applied to him for my wage, he would only
    blow through his nose at me and stare me down, but before the week was
    out he was sure to think better of it, bring me my four-penny piece, and
    repeat his orders to look out for "the seafaring man with one leg."
  1023. plunge
    dash violently or with great speed or impetuosity
    The plunge of our anchor sent up
    clouds of birds wheeling and crying over the woods, but in less than a
    minute they were down again and all was once more silent.
  1024. nettled
    aroused to impatience or anger
    He had been
    growing nettled before, but now he pulled himself together.
  1025. trio
    a set of three similar things considered as a unit
    Three men ran
    together, hand in hand; and I made out, even through the mist, that the
    middle man of this trio was the blind beggar.
  1026. salute
    greet in a friendly way
    "Not I, sir," said Morgan with a salute.
  1027. east
    the cardinal compass point that is at 90 degrees
    The bar silver is in the north cache; you can find
    it by the trend of the east hummock, ten fathoms
    south of the black crag with the face on it.
  1028. live
    have life, be alive
    By his
    own account he must have lived his life among some of the wickedest men
    that God ever allowed upon the sea, and the language in which he told
    these stories shocked our plain country people almost as much as the
    crimes that he described.
  1029. fatherless
    having no living male parent
    She would not, she declared, lose money that
    belonged to her fatherless boy; "If none of the rest of you dare,"
    she said, "Jim and I dare.
  1030. sandy
    resembling or containing or abounding in sand
    I had crossed a marshy tract full of willows, bulrushes, and odd,
    outlandish, swampy trees; and I had now come out upon the skirts of an
    open piece of undulating, sandy country, about a mile long, dotted with
    a few pines and a great number of contorted trees, not unlike the oak
    in growth, but pale in the foliage, like willows.
  1031. sudden
    happening without warning or in a short space of time
    Mostly
    he would not speak when spoken to, only look up sudden and fierce and
    blow through his nose like a fog-horn; and we and the people who came
    about our house soon learned to let him be.
  1032. plainly
    in a simple manner without extravagance
    He was plainly blind, for he tapped
    before him with a stick and wore a great green shade over his eyes and
    nose; and he was hunched, as if with age or weakness, and wore a huge
    old tattered sea-cloak with a hood that made him appear positively
    deformed.
  1033. hand over
    to surrender someone or something to another
    Then he
    passed his hand over his eyes several times and at last turned back into
    the house.
  1034. talking
    an exchange of ideas via conversation
    The squire has been talking, after all."
  1035. horse
    solid-hoofed herbivorous quadruped domesticated since prehistoric times
    Dr. Livesey came
    late one afternoon to see the patient, took a bit of dinner from my
    mother, and went into the parlour to smoke a pipe until his horse should
    come down from the hamlet, for we had no stabling at the old Benbow.
  1036. faintness
    the quality of being dim or lacking contrast
    The squire was waiting for me at the stern window, all his faintness
    gone from him.
  1037. front room
    a room in a private house or establishment where people can sit and talk and relax
    At first I had supposed "the dead man's chest" to be that identical big
    box of his upstairs in the front room, and the thought had been mingled
    in my nightmares with that of the one-legged seafaring man.
  1038. glee
    great merriment
    I was half
    beside myself with glee; and if ever I despised a man, it was old
    Tom Redruth, who could do nothing but grumble and lament.
  1039. stride
    walk with long steps
    I
    remember his breath hanging like smoke in his wake as he strode off, and
    the last sound I heard of him as he turned the big rock was a loud snort
    of indignation, as though his mind was still running upon Dr. Livesey.
  1040. high
    being at or having a relatively great or specific elevation
    I remember him looking round the cover and whistling to himself
    as he did so, and then breaking out in that old sea-song that he sang so
    often afterwards:

    "Fifteen men on the dead man's chest--
    Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!"

    in the high, old tottering voice that seemed to have been tuned and
    broken at the capstan bars.
  1041. terrified
    thrown into a state of intense fear or desperation
    But though I was so terrified by the idea of the seafaring man with one
    leg, I was far less afraid of the captain himself than anybody else who
    knew him.
  1042. dally
    behave carelessly or indifferently
    There is no time to dilly- dally in our work.
  1043. steerage
    the act of steering a ship
    By
    this time we had got so far out of the run of the current that we kept
    steerage way even at our necessarily gentle rate of rowing, and I could
    keep her steady for the goal.
  1044. signal
    any nonverbal action or gesture that encodes a message
    I had thought it to be the blind man's
    trumpet, so to speak, summoning his crew to the assault, but I now found
    that it was a signal from the hillside towards the hamlet, and from its
    effect upon the buccaneers, a signal to warn them of approaching danger.
  1045. either
    used as an intensive after a negative meaning "likewise"
    When I returned with the rum, they were already seated on either side
    of the captain's breakfast-table--Black Dog next to the door and
    sitting sideways so as to have one eye on his old shipmate and one, as I
    thought, on his retreat.
  1046. hawker
    someone who travels about selling his wares
    All the time he lived with us the captain made no change whatever in his
    dress but to buy some stockings from a hawker.
  1047. hotly
    in a heated manner
    And again, "If it
    comes to swinging, swing all, say I."

    Then all of a sudden there was a tremendous explosion of oaths and
    other noises--the chair and table went over in a lump, a clash of steel
    followed, and then a cry of pain, and the next instant I saw Black
    Dog in full flight, and the captain hotly pursuing, both with drawn
    cutlasses, and the former streaming blood from the left shoulder.
  1048. most
    quantifier meaning the greatest in number
    For in these fits he was the most
    overriding companion ever known; he would slap his hand on the table for
    silence all round; he would fly up in a passion of anger at a question,
    or sometimes because none was put, and so he judged the company was not
    following his story.
  1049. Kidd
    Scottish sea captain who was hired to protect British shipping in the Indian Ocean and then was accused of piracy and hanged (1645-1701)
    Kidd's Anchorage'--just
    the name my shipmate called it.
  1050. sealed
    closed or secured
    It
    contained two things--a book and a sealed paper.
  1051. southwestern
    situated in or oriented toward the southwest
    We struck the enclosure about the middle of the south
    side, and almost at the same time, seven mutineers--Job Anderson, the
    boatswain, at their head--appeared in full cry at the southwestern
    corner.
  1052. climb on
    get up on the back of
    Then, climbing on the roof, he had with his own hand
    bent and run up the colours.
  1053. grey-haired
    showing characteristics of age, especially having grey or white hair
    The man whom he called Morgan--an old, grey-haired, mahogany-faced
    sailor--came forward pretty sheepishly, rolling his quid.
  1054. ride
    sit and travel on the back of animal, usually while controlling its motions
    Soon after, Dr. Livesey's horse came to the door and he rode away, but
    the captain held his peace that evening, and for many evenings to come.




    2

    Black Dog Appears and Disappears


    IT was not very long after this that there occurred the first of the
    mysterious events that rid us at last of the captain, though not, as you
    will see, of his affairs.
  1055. iron
    a heavy ductile magnetic metallic element
    I got the rum, to be sure, and tried to put it down his
    throat, but his teeth were tightly shut and his jaws as strong as iron.
  1056. kick in
    open violently
    Then there followed a great to-do through all our old inn, heavy feet
    pounding to and fro, furniture thrown over, doors kicked in, until the
    very rocks re-echoed and the men came out again, one after another, on
    the road and declared that we were nowhere to be found.
  1057. good for you
    promoting health; healthful
    "By the powers, Tom Morgan, it's as good for you!" exclaimed the
    landlord.
  1058. common man
    a person who holds no title
    "He's no common man, Barbecue," said the coxswain to me.
  1059. go on
    move forward, also in the metaphorical sense
    But by this
    time we had all long ceased to pay any particular notice to the song; it
    was new, that night, to nobody but Dr. Livesey, and on him I observed it
    did not produce an agreeable effect, for he looked up for a moment quite
    angrily before he went on with his talk to old Taylor, the gardener, on
    a new cure for the rheumatics.
  1060. sort
    a category of things distinguished by some common characteristic or quality
    People were frightened at the time, but on looking
    back they rather liked it; it was a fine excitement in a quiet country
    life, and there was even a party of the younger men who pretended to
    admire him, calling him a "true sea-dog" and a "real old salt" and
    such like names, and saying there was the sort of man that made England
    terrible at sea.
  1061. in front
    at or in the front
    He stopped a little from the inn, and raising his voice in an odd
    sing-song, addressed the air in front of him, "Will any kind friend
    inform a poor blind man, who has lost the precious sight of his eyes in
    the gracious defence of his native country, England--and God bless King
    George!--where or in what part of this country he may now be?"
  1062. hundred
    ten 10s
    The hamlet lay not many hundred yards away, though out of view, on the
    other side of the next cove; and what greatly encouraged me, it was
    in an opposite direction from that whence the blind man had made his
    appearance and whither he had presumably returned.
  1063. ring
    a toroidal shape
    Down went Pew with a cry that
    rang high into the night; and the four hoofs trampled and spurned him
    and passed by.
  1064. leafless
    having no leaves
    This time, as the distance was short, I did not mount, but ran with
    Dogger's stirrup-leather to the lodge gates and up the long, leafless,
    moonlit avenue to where the white line of the hall buildings looked on
    either hand on great old gardens.
  1065. lancet
    a surgical knife with a pointed double-edged blade
    "No, sir," said I.

    "Well, then," said he, "you hold the basin"; and with that he took his
    lancet and opened a vein.
  1066. better
    superior to another in excellence or quality or desirability
    Often enough when the first
    of the month came round and I applied to him for my wage, he would only
    blow through his nose at me and stare me down, but before the week was
    out he was sure to think better of it, bring me my four-penny piece, and
    repeat his orders to look out for "the seafaring man with one leg."
  1067. odd
    not divisible by two
    He stopped a little from the inn, and raising his voice in an odd
    sing-song, addressed the air in front of him, "Will any kind friend
    inform a poor blind man, who has lost the precious sight of his eyes in
    the gracious defence of his native country, England--and God bless King
    George!--where or in what part of this country he may now be?"
  1068. ink
    a liquid used for printing or writing or drawing
    There were several additions of a
    later date, but above all, three crosses of red ink--two on the north
    part of the island, one in the southwest--and beside this last, in
    the same red ink, and in a small, neat hand, very different from the
    captain's tottery characters, these words: "Bulk of treasure here."
  1069. mingle
    to bring or combine together or with something else
    At first I had supposed "the dead man's chest" to be that identical big
    box of his upstairs in the front room, and the thought had been mingled
    in my nightmares with that of the one-legged seafaring man.
  1070. news
    information about recent and important events
    This sudden noise startled us shockingly; but the news
    was good, for it was only six.
  1071. pine
    a coniferous tree
    This even tint
    was indeed broken up by streaks of yellow sand-break in the lower lands,
    and by many tall trees of the pine family, out-topping the others--some
    singly, some in clumps; but the general colouring was uniform and sad.
  1072. dead body
    a natural object consisting of a dead animal or person
    The neighbourhood, to our ears, seemed haunted by
    approaching footsteps; and what between the dead body of the captain
    on the parlour floor and the thought of that detestable blind beggar
    hovering near at hand and ready to return, there were moments when, as
    the saying goes, I jumped in my skin for terror.
  1073. grate
    reduce to shreds by rubbing against a perforated surface
    Indeed, it seemed
    impossible for either of us to remain much longer in the house; the fall
    of coals in the kitchen grate, the very ticking of the clock, filled
    us with alarms.
  1074. get in
    to come or go into
    Rum! Rum!"

    I ran to fetch it, but I was quite unsteadied by all that had fallen
    out, and I broke one glass and fouled the tap, and while I was still
    getting in my own way, I heard a loud fall in the parlour, and running
    in, beheld the captain lying full length upon the floor.
  1075. horrid
    grossly offensive to decency or morality
    These, in their turn, cursed back at the blind miscreant, threatened him
    in horrid terms, and tried in vain to catch the stick and wrest it from
    his grasp.
  1076. frightened
    made afraid
    His stories were what frightened people worst of all.
  1077. dysentery
    an infection of the intestines marked by severe diarrhea
    The pitch was
    bubbling in the seams; the nasty stench of the place turned me sick;
    if ever a man smelt fever and dysentery, it was in that abominable
    anchorage.
  1078. perhaps
    by chance
    It was the second death I had known, and
    the sorrow of the first was still fresh in my heart.




    4

    The Sea-chest

    I LOST no time, of course, in telling my mother all that I knew, and
    perhaps should have told her long before, and we saw ourselves at once
    in a difficult and dangerous position.
  1079. ducking
    hunting ducks
    But you may suppose I paid no heed; jumping, ducking, and breaking
    through, I ran straight before my nose till I could run no longer.




    14

    The First Blow

    I WAS so pleased at having given the slip to Long John that I began to
    enjoy myself and look around me with some interest on the strange land
    that I was in.
  1080. ringing
    the sound of a bell ringing
    The rocks of the Spy-glass re-echoed it a
    score of times; the whole troop of marsh-birds rose again, darkening
    heaven, with a simultaneous whirr; and long after that death yell was
    still ringing in my brain, silence had re-established its empire, and
    only the rustle of the redescending birds and the boom of the distant
    surges disturbed the languor of the afternoon.
  1081. tatter
    a small shred of cloth or paper
    He was clothed with tatters
    of old ship's canvas and old sea-cloth, and this extraordinary patchwork
    was all held together by a system of the most various and incongruous
    fastenings, brass buttons, bits of stick, and loops of tarry gaskin.
  1082. molestation
    the act of subjecting someone to unwanted or improper sexual advances or activity (especially women or children)
    I believe the readiness of our return volley had scattered the mutineers
    once more, for we were suffered without further molestation to get the
    poor old gamekeeper hoisted over the stockade and carried, groaning and
    bleeding, into the log-house.
  1083. bulkhead
    a partition that divides a ship or plane into compartments
    It was something to see him wedge the
    foot of the crutch against a bulkhead, and propped against it, yielding
    to every movement of the ship, get on with his cooking like someone safe
    ashore.
  1084. watcher
    a guard who keeps watch
    A full moon was beginning to rise and peered
    redly through the upper edges of the fog, and this increased our haste,
    for it was plain, before we came forth again, that all would be as
    bright as day, and our departure exposed to the eyes of any watchers.
  1085. pitch
    the high or low quality of a sound
    I been in places hot as pitch, and mates
    dropping round with Yellow Jack, and the blessed land a-heaving like the
    sea with earthquakes--what to the doctor know of lands like that?--and I
    lived on rum, I tell you.
  1086. craggy
    having hills and crags
    On the far side of
    the open stood one of the hills, with two quaint, craggy peaks shining
    vividly in the sun.
  1087. grow
    increase in size by natural process
    For a long time, though I certainly did my best to listen, I could hear
    nothing but a low gattling; but at last the voices began to grow higher,
    and I could pick up a word or two, mostly oaths, from the captain.
  1088. hunt down
    pursue for food or sport (as of wild animals)
    I'm not a doctor only; I'm a magistrate; and if I catch a breath
    of complaint against you, if it's only for a piece of incivility like
    tonight's, I'll take effectual means to have you hunted down and routed
    out of this.
  1089. once more
    anew
    And just
    the same whistle that had alarmed my mother and myself over the dead
    captain's money was once more clearly audible through the night,
    but this time twice repeated.
  1090. dislodge
    remove or force from a position previously occupied
    And here a fresh alarm brought me to a standstill with a thumping heart.




    15

    The Man of the Island

    FROM the side of the hill, which was here steep and stony, a spout of
    gravel was dislodged and fell rattling and bounding through the trees.
  1091. part
    one of the portions into which something is regarded as divided and which together constitute a whole
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  1092. hurry
    move very fast
    At this triumph we were filled with
    hope and hurried upstairs without delay to the little room where he had
    slept so long and where his box had stood since the day of his arrival.
  1093. sewn
    fastened with stitches
    The bundle was sewn together, and the doctor had to get out his
    instrument case and cut the stitches with his medical scissors.
  1094. totter
    move without being stable, as if threatening to fall
    I remember him looking round the cover and whistling to himself
    as he did so, and then breaking out in that old sea-song that he sang so
    often afterwards:

    "Fifteen men on the dead man's chest--
    Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!"

    in the high, old tottering voice that seemed to have been tuned and
    broken at the capstan bars.
  1095. current
    occurring in or belonging to the present time
    There's a strong current runs along the
    south, and then away nor'ard up the west coast.
  1096. believe
    accept as true; take to be true
    My father was always saying the inn would be
    ruined, for people would soon cease coming there to be tyrannized over
    and put down, and sent shivering to their beds; but I really believe his
    presence did us good.
  1097. creature
    a living organism characterized by voluntary movement
    Now the leg
    would be cut off at the knee, now at the hip; now he was a monstrous
    kind of a creature who had never had but the one leg, and that in the
    middle of his body.
  1098. hold over
    hold over goods to be sold for the next season
    Mine I had snatched from my knees and held over my head, by
    a sort of instinct.
  1099. pitch in
    eat heartily
    Here he was interrupted by a loud report, and a cannonball came tearing
    through the trees and pitched in the sand not a hundred yards from where
    we two were talking.
  1100. steady
    securely in position; not shaky
    He spoke to him as before, over his
    shoulder and in the same tone of voice, rather high, so that all the
    room might hear, but perfectly calm and steady: "If you do not put that
    knife this instant in your pocket, I promise, upon my honour, you shall
    hang at the next assizes."
  1101. itching
    an irritating cutaneous sensation that produces a desire to scratch
    The doctor looked it all over, as if his fingers were itching to open
    it; but instead of doing that, he put it quietly in the pocket of his
    coat.
  1102. bodily
    of or relating to or belonging to the body
    He never particularly addressed me, and it is my
    belief he had as good as forgotten his confidences; but his temper was
    more flighty, and allowing for his bodily weakness, more violent than
    ever.
  1103. loud
    characterized by sound of great volume or intensity
    I
    remember his breath hanging like smoke in his wake as he strode off, and
    the last sound I heard of him as he turned the big rock was a loud snort
    of indignation, as though his mind was still running upon Dr. Livesey.
  1104. swaggering
    having or showing arrogant superiority to and disdain of those one views as unworthy
    I saw, besides, many old sailors, with rings in their ears, and
    whiskers curled in ringlets, and tarry pigtails, and their swaggering,
    clumsy sea-walk; and if I had seen as many kings or archbishops I could
    not have been more delighted.
  1105. easy
    posing no difficulty; requiring little effort
    The arms are easy found, in the sand-hill, N.
    point of north inlet cape, bearing E. and a
    quarter N.
    J.F.

    That was all; but brief as it was, and to me incomprehensible, it filled
    the squire and Dr. Livesey with delight.
  1106. bail
    money forfeited if the accused fails to appear in court
    "Trelawney," said the doctor, "I'll go with you; and I'll go bail for
    it, so will Jim, and be a credit to the undertaking.
  1107. safety
    being certain that adverse effects will not be caused
    "No, sir; not money, I think," replied I. "In fact, sir, I believe I
    have the thing in my breast pocket; and to tell you the truth, I should
    like to get it put in safety."
  1108. admixture
    the act of mixing together
    Very close around the stockade--too close for defence, they said--the
    wood still flourished high and dense, all of fir on the land side, but
    towards the sea with a large admixture of live-oaks.
  1109. catch
    take hold of so as to seize or stop the motion of
    I'm not a doctor only; I'm a magistrate; and if I catch a breath
    of complaint against you, if it's only for a piece of incivility like
    tonight's, I'll take effectual means to have you hunted down and routed
    out of this.
  1110. cowardice
    the trait of lacking courage
    They say cowardice is infectious; but then argument is, on the other
    hand, a great emboldener; and so when each had said his say, my mother
    made them a speech.
  1111. wrist
    a joint between the distal end of the radius and the proximal row of carpal bones
    Boy, take his left hand by the wrist and bring it near to my right."
  1112. come to
    cause to experience suddenly
    Soon after, Dr. Livesey's horse came to the door and he rode away, but
    the captain held his peace that evening, and for many evenings to come.




    2

    Black Dog Appears and Disappears


    IT was not very long after this that there occurred the first of the
    mysterious events that rid us at last of the captain, though not, as you
    will see, of his affairs.
  1113. neighbour
    a person who lives (or is located) near another
    Often I have heard the house
    shaking with "Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum," all the neighbours joining
    in for dear life, with the fear of death upon them, and each singing
    louder than the other to avoid remark.
  1114. to and fro
    moving from one place to another and back again
    Nor was this all, for the sound of several footsteps running
    came already to our ears, and as we looked back in their direction, a
    light tossing to and fro and still rapidly advancing showed that one of
    the newcomers carried a lantern.
  1115. faint
    lacking clarity, brightness, or loudness
    Between us, with much trouble, we managed to hoist him upstairs, and
    laid him on his bed, where his head fell back on the pillow as if he
    were almost fainting.
  1116. give forth
    give out (breath or an odor)
    My
    mother pulled it up with impatience, and there lay before us, the last
    things in the chest, a bundle tied up in oilcloth, and looking like
    papers, and a canvas bag that gave forth, at a touch, the jingle of
    gold.
  1117. come out
    appear or become visible; make a showing
    Then there followed a great to-do through all our old inn, heavy feet
    pounding to and fro, furniture thrown over, doors kicked in, until the
    very rocks re-echoed and the men came out again, one after another, on
    the road and declared that we were nowhere to be found.
  1118. desperado
    a bold outlaw
    And now I began to feel that I was neglecting my business, that since
    I had been so foolhardy as to come ashore with these desperadoes, the
    least I could do was to overhear them at their councils, and that my
    plain and obvious duty was to draw as close as I could manage, under the
    favourable ambush of the crouching trees.
  1119. stutter
    speak haltingly
    But that was by no means the worst of it, for after a
    day or two at sea he began to appear on deck with hazy eye, red cheeks,
    stuttering tongue, and other marks of drunkenness.
  1120. noise
    sound of any kind
    And again, "If it
    comes to swinging, swing all, say I."

    Then all of a sudden there was a tremendous explosion of oaths and
    other noises--the chair and table went over in a lump, a clash of steel
    followed, and then a cry of pain, and the next instant I saw Black
    Dog in full flight, and the captain hotly pursuing, both with drawn
    cutlasses, and the former streaming blood from the left shoulder.
  1121. come round
    change one's position or opinion
    Often enough when the first
    of the month came round and I applied to him for my wage, he would only
    blow through his nose at me and stare me down, but before the week was
    out he was sure to think better of it, bring me my four-penny piece, and
    repeat his orders to look out for "the seafaring man with one leg."
  1122. afternoon
    the part of the day between noon and evening
    Dr. Livesey came
    late one afternoon to see the patient, took a bit of dinner from my
    mother, and went into the parlour to smoke a pipe until his horse should
    come down from the hamlet, for we had no stabling at the old Benbow.
  1123. danger
    the condition of being susceptible to harm or injury
    I had thought it to be the blind man's
    trumpet, so to speak, summoning his crew to the assault, but I now found
    that it was a signal from the hillside towards the hamlet, and from its
    effect upon the buccaneers, a signal to warn them of approaching danger.
  1124. spire
    a tall tower that forms the superstructure of a building
    The hills ran up clear above the vegetation in spires of naked rock.
  1125. sit in
    attend as a visitor
    All day he hung round the cove or
    upon the cliffs with a brass telescope; all evening he sat in a corner
    of the parlour next the fire and drank rum and water very strong.
  1126. when the time comes
    at the appropriate time
    Wait is what I say; but when the time comes, why, let her rip!"
  1127. spade
    hand shovel that can be pushed into the earth with the foot
    "There's a strong scour with the ebb," he said, "and this here passage
    has been dug out, in a manner of speaking, with a spade."
  1128. forget
    dismiss from the mind; stop remembering
    He never particularly addressed me, and it is my
    belief he had as good as forgotten his confidences; but his temper was
    more flighty, and allowing for his bodily weakness, more violent than
    ever.
  1129. sane
    mentally healthy; free from mental disorder
    "I do not know, sir," said I. "I am not very sure whether he's sane."
  1130. a great deal
    to a very great degree or extent
    A great deal of blood was taken before the captain opened his eyes
    and looked mistily about him.
  1131. pleasant
    being in harmony with your taste or likings
    "This is a handy cove," says he at length; "and a pleasant sittyated
    grog-shop.
  1132. work
    activity directed toward making or doing something
    "You can tell me when I've worked through that," says
    he, looking as fierce as a commander.
  1133. weather
    atmospheric conditions including temperature, precipitation
    He had taken me aside one day
    and promised me a silver fourpenny on the first of every month if I
    would only keep my " weather-eye open for a seafaring man with one leg"
    and let him know the moment he appeared.
  1134. steer
    be a guiding or motivating force or drive
    "We can steer
    a course, but who's to set one?
  1135. plucked
    of a stringed instrument
    In one way, indeed, he bade fair to ruin us, for he kept on staying week
    after week, and at last month after month, so that all the money had
    been long exhausted, and still my father never plucked up the heart to
    insist on having more.
  1136. shoulder in
    push one's way in with one's shoulders
    It struck poor Tom, point foremost, and with stunning violence, right
    between the shoulders in the middle of his back.
  1137. propose
    present for consideration, examination, or criticism
    "Squire," said he, "when Dance has had his ale he must, of course, be
    off on his Majesty's service; but I mean to keep Jim Hawkins here to
    sleep at my house, and with your permission, I propose we should have up
    the cold pie and let him sup."
  1138. man and wife
    two people who are married to each other
    It's been meat and drink, and man and wife,
    to me; and if I'm not to have my rum now I'm a poor old hulk on a lee
    shore, my blood'll be on you, Jim, and that doctor swab"; and he ran on
    again for a while with curses.
  1139. lean
    incline or bend from a vertical position
    The blind man clung close to me, holding me in one iron fist
    and leaning almost more of his weight on me than I could carry.
  1140. great deal
    (often followed by `of') a large number or amount or extent
    A great deal of blood was taken before the captain opened his eyes
    and looked mistily about him.
  1141. above
    in or to a place that is higher
    I
    followed him in, and I remember observing the contrast the neat, bright
    doctor, with his powder as white as snow and his bright, black eyes and
    pleasant manners, made with the coltish country folk, and above all,
    with that filthy, heavy, bleared scarecrow of a pirate of ours, sitting,
    far gone in rum, with his arms on the table.
  1142. second
    coming next after the first in position in space or time
    It was the second death I had known, and
    the sorrow of the first was still fresh in my heart.




    4

    The Sea-chest

    I LOST no time, of course, in telling my mother all that I knew, and
    perhaps should have told her long before, and we saw ourselves at once
    in a difficult and dangerous position.
  1143. stow
    fill by packing tightly
    I assure you I was quite of the squire's way of thinking, and hated the
    captain deeply.




    10

    The Voyage

    ALL that night we were in a great bustle getting things stowed in their
    place, and boatfuls of the squire's friends, Mr. Blandly and the like,
    coming off to wish him a good voyage and a safe return.
  1144. snack
    a light informal meal
    When you want to go a bit of exploring, you just ask
    old John, and he'll put up a snack for you to take along."
  1145. father
    a male parent
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  1146. drawing
    a representation of forms or objects on a surface by means of lines
    The voices
    stopped at once, all but Dr. Livesey's; he went on as before speaking
    clear and kind and drawing briskly at his pipe between every word or
    two.
  1147. cold
    having a low or inadequate temperature
    It was a bitter cold winter, with long, hard
    frosts and heavy gales; and it was plain from the first that my poor
    father was little likely to see the spring.
  1148. pick
    look for and gather
    For a long time, though I certainly did my best to listen, I could hear
    nothing but a low gattling; but at last the voices began to grow higher,
    and I could pick up a word or two, mostly oaths, from the captain.
  1149. apoplexy
    a loss of consciousness from the lack of oxygen in the brain
    The captain had been struck dead by thundering apoplexy.
  1150. belt
    a band to tie or buckle around the body
    As soon as I was mounted, holding on to Dogger's belt, the supervisor
    gave the word, and the party struck out at a bouncing trot on the road
    to Dr. Livesey's house.




    6

    The Captain's Papers

    WE rode hard all the way till we drew up before Dr. Livesey's door.
  1151. all the time
    without respite
    All the time he lived with us the captain made no change whatever in his
    dress but to buy some stockings from a hawker.
  1152. spar
    stout rounded pole of wood or metal used to support rigging
    The whole schooner had been
    overhauled; six berths had been made astern out of what had been the
    after-part of the main hold; and this set of cabins was only joined to
    the galley and forecastle by a sparred passage on the port side.
  1153. audible
    heard or perceptible by the ear
    And just
    the same whistle that had alarmed my mother and myself over the dead
    captain's money was once more clearly audible through the night,
    but this time twice repeated.
  1154. between
    in the interval
    The voices
    stopped at once, all but Dr. Livesey's; he went on as before speaking
    clear and kind and drawing briskly at his pipe between every word or
    two.
  1155. pity
    a feeling of sympathy and sorrow for misfortunes of others
    My father told him no, very little company, the more was the pity.
  1156. half a dozen
    the cardinal number that is the sum of five and one
    I wished a round score of men--in case of
    natives, buccaneers, or the odious French--and I
    had the worry of the deuce itself to find so much
    as half a dozen, till the most remarkable stroke
    of fortune brought me the very man that I
    required.
  1157. laid
    set down according to a plan
    Between us, with much trouble, we managed to hoist him upstairs, and
    laid him on his bed, where his head fell back on the pillow as if he
    were almost fainting.
  1158. follow
    travel behind, go after, or come after
    I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the
    inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow--a
    tall, strong, heavy, nut-brown man, his tarry pigtail falling over the
    shoulder of his soiled blue coat, his hands ragged and scarred, with
    black, broken nails, and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid
    white.
  1159. changing
    marked by continuous modification or effective action
    Sitting by the fire in the housekeeper's room, I
    approached that island in my fancy from every possible direction; I
    explored every acre of its surface; I climbed a thousand times to that
    tall hill they call the Spy-glass, and from the top enjoyed the most
    wonderful and changing prospects.
  1160. in a way
    from some points of view
    For me, at least, there was no secret about the matter, for
    I was, in a way, a sharer in his alarms.
  1161. rusty
    covered with or consisting of an oxide coating
    "Ben Gunn," he answered, and his voice sounded hoarse and awkward,
    like a rusty lock.
  1162. add to
    have an increased effect
    Add to that the powder, pork, and bread-bags.
  1163. threshold
    the starting point for a new state or experience
    Oh, I
    see what you're at--there"; and he threw down three or four gold pieces
    on the threshold.
  1164. bearing
    characteristic way of holding one's body
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  1165. least
    the superlative of `little' that can be used with mass nouns and is usually preceded by `the'; a quantifier meaning smallest in amount or extent or degree
    For me, at least, there was no secret about the matter, for
    I was, in a way, a sharer in his alarms.
  1166. stop
    have an end, in a temporal, spatial, or quantitative sense
    The voices
    stopped at once, all but Dr. Livesey's; he went on as before speaking
    clear and kind and drawing briskly at his pipe between every word or
    two.
  1167. cut across
    cut using a diagonal line
    I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the
    inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow--a
    tall, strong, heavy, nut-brown man, his tarry pigtail falling over the
    shoulder of his soiled blue coat, his hands ragged and scarred, with
    black, broken nails, and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid
    white.
  1168. perk
    an incidental benefit awarded for certain types of employment (especially if it is regarded as a right)
    But at my last words he perked up into a kind of startled
    slyness.
  1169. incline
    lower or bend, as in a nod or bow
    Some of the man's money--if
    he had any--was certainly due to us, but it was not likely that our
    captain's shipmates, above all the two specimens seen by me, Black
    Dog and the blind beggar, would be inclined to give up their booty in
    payment of the dead man's debts.
  1170. seal
    fastener consisting of a resin that is plastic when warm
    It
    contained two things--a book and a sealed paper.
  1171. shouted
    in a vehement outcry
    "In, in, in!" he shouted, and cursed them for their delay.
  1172. peak
    a V shape
    Away to the
    south-west of us we saw two low hills, about a couple of miles apart,
    and rising behind one of them a third and higher hill, whose peak was
    still buried in the fog.
  1173. stays
    a woman's close-fitting foundation garment
    "Come, my fine fellow," continued the captain; "don't hang so long in
    stays.
  1174. get to
    arrive at the point of
    We must none
    of us go alone till we get to sea.
  1175. sinewy
    consisting of tendons or resembling a tendon
    When I got back with the basin, the doctor had already ripped up the
    captain's sleeve and exposed his great sinewy arm.
  1176. full
    containing as much or as many as is possible or normal
    And again, "If it
    comes to swinging, swing all, say I."

    Then all of a sudden there was a tremendous explosion of oaths and
    other noises--the chair and table went over in a lump, a clash of steel
    followed, and then a cry of pain, and the next instant I saw Black
    Dog in full flight, and the captain hotly pursuing, both with drawn
    cutlasses, and the former streaming blood from the left shoulder.
  1177. override
    travel on the back of (a horse) too hard
    For in these fits he was the most
    overriding companion ever known; he would slap his hand on the table for
    silence all round; he would fly up in a passion of anger at a question,
    or sometimes because none was put, and so he judged the company was not
    following his story.
  1178. talon
    a sharp hooked claw especially on a bird of prey
    Ah, Bill, Bill, we have seen a sight of times, us two, since
    I lost them two talons," holding up his mutilated hand.
  1179. uncovered
    not covered with clothing
    The ebb has made a good while; our
    stores should be uncovered.
  1180. small-arm
    a portable gun
    The cannon-shot was followed after a considerable interval by a volley
    of small arms.
  1181. shortness
    the property of being truncated or short
    "It's the name of a buccaneer of my
    acquaintance; and I call you by it for the sake of shortness, and what I
    have to say to you is this; one glass of rum won't kill you, but if
    you take one you'll take another and another, and I stake my wig if you
    don't break off short, you'll die--do you understand that?--die, and go
    to your own place, like the man in the Bible.
  1182. pie
    dish baked in pastry-lined pan often with a pastry top
    "Squire," said he, "when Dance has had his ale he must, of course, be
    off on his Majesty's service; but I mean to keep Jim Hawkins here to
    sleep at my house, and with your permission, I propose we should have up
    the cold pie and let him sup."
  1183. step
    the act of changing location by raising the foot and setting it down
    Well, mother was upstairs with father and I was laying the
    breakfast-table against the captain's return when the parlour door
    opened and a man stepped in on whom I had never set my eyes before.
  1184. keyhole
    the hole where a key is inserted
    "None of your keyholes for
    me, sonny," he said; and I left them together and retired into the bar.
  1185. agitate
    move or cause to move back and forth
    I found them all three seated round the table, a bottle of Spanish wine
    and some raisins before them, and the doctor smoking away, with his wig
    on his lap, and that, I knew, was a sign that he was agitated.
  1186. roof
    a protective covering that covers or forms the top of a building
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old seaman wi...
  1187. fly
    travel through the air; be airborne
    For in these fits he was the most
    overriding companion ever known; he would slap his hand on the table for
    silence all round; he would fly up in a passion of anger at a question,
    or sometimes because none was put, and so he judged the company was not
    following his story.
  1188. taken up
    having or showing excessive or compulsive concern with something
    On the night before the funeral
    he was as drunk as ever; and it was shocking, in that house of mourning,
    to hear him singing away at his ugly old sea-song; but weak as he was,
    we were all in the fear of death for him, and the doctor was suddenly
    taken up with a case many miles away and was never near the house after
    my father's death.
  1189. isolate
    place or set apart
    I was pretty
    far down on the low, sandy spit that encloses the anchorage to the east,
    and is joined at half-water to Skeleton Island; and now, as I rose to my
    feet, I saw, some distance further down the spit and rising from among
    low bushes, an isolated rock, pretty high, and peculiarly white in
    colour.
  1190. walk
    use one's feet to advance; advance by steps
    Dreadful stories
    they were--about hanging, and walking the plank, and storms at sea, and
    the Dry Tortugas, and wild deeds and places on the Spanish Main.
  1191. legged
    having legs of a specified kind or number
    At first I had supposed "the dead man's chest" to be that identical big
    box of his upstairs in the front room, and the thought had been mingled
    in my nightmares with that of the one- legged seafaring man.
  1192. tired
    depleted of strength or energy
    We never had
    a night at the Admiral Benbow when I had half the work; and I was
    dog- tired when, a little before dawn, the boatswain sounded his pipe
    and the crew began to man the capstan-bars.
  1193. inkling
    a slight suggestion or vague understanding
    As for me, I began to have an inkling.
  1194. hold out
    wait uncompromisingly for something desirable
    I held out my hand, and the horrible, soft-spoken, eyeless creature
    gripped it in a moment like a vise.
  1195. floor
    the inside lower horizontal surface
    Rum! Rum!"

    I ran to fetch it, but I was quite unsteadied by all that had fallen
    out, and I broke one glass and fouled the tap, and while I was still
    getting in my own way, I heard a loud fall in the parlour, and running
    in, beheld the captain lying full length upon the floor.
  1196. set about
    begin to deal with
    Crawling on all fours, I made steadily but slowly towards them, till at
    last, raising my head to an aperture among the leaves, I could see clear
    down into a little green dell beside the marsh, and closely set about
    with trees, where Long John Silver and another of the crew stood face to
    face in conversation.
  1197. grudgingly
    in a reluctant manner
    The slightest order was received with a black look and
    grudgingly and carelessly obeyed.
  1198. peal
    a deep prolonged sound (as of thunder or large bells)
    I could not help joining, and we laughed together, peal after peal,
    until the tavern rang again.
  1199. Abraham
    the first of the Old Testament patriarchs and the father of Isaac; according to Genesis, God promised to give Abraham's family (the Hebrews) the land of Canaan (the Promised Land); God tested Abraham by asking him to sacrifice his son
    "It's to you, Abraham Gray--it's to you I am speaking."
  1200. mercilessly
    without pity
    Everything else was unchanged, the sun still shining mercilessly on the
    steaming marsh and the tall pinnacle of the mountain, and I could scarce
    persuade myself that murder had been actually done and a human life
    cruelly cut short a moment since before my eyes.
  1201. upper hand
    position of advantage and control
    Squalling was the word for it; Pew's anger rose so high at these
    objections till at last, his passion completely taking the upper hand,
    he struck at them right and left in his blindness and his stick sounded
    heavily on more than one.
  1202. miscellany
    a collection containing a variety of sorts of things
    Under
    that, the miscellany began--a quadrant, a tin canikin, several sticks of
    tobacco, two brace of very handsome pistols, a piece of bar silver, an
    old Spanish watch and some other trinkets of little value and mostly of
    foreign make, a pair of compasses mounted with brass, and five or six
    curious West Indian shells.
  1203. both
    (used with count nouns) two considered together; the two
    So saying, the stranger backed along with me into the parlour and put me
    behind him in the corner so that we were both hidden by the open door.
  1204. footfall
    the sound of a step of someone walking
    Soon we could hear their footfalls as they ran and the
    cracking of the branches as they breasted across a bit of thicket.
  1205. hoar
    ice crystals forming a white deposit
    It was one January morning, very early--a pinching, frosty morning--the
    cove all grey with hoar-frost, the ripple lapping softly on the stones,
    the sun still low and only touching the hilltops and shining far to
    seaward.
  1206. quite a
    of an unusually noticeable or exceptional or remarkable kind
    As soon as I
    was back again he returned to his former manner, half fawning, half
    sneering, patted me on the shoulder, told me I was a good boy and he had
    taken quite a fancy to me.
  1207. roll
    move by turning over or rotating
    I'm to be a
    poor, crawling beggar, sponging for rum, when I might be rolling in a
    coach!
  1208. stake
    a strong wooden or metal post driven into the ground
    "It's the name of a buccaneer of my
    acquaintance; and I call you by it for the sake of shortness, and what I
    have to say to you is this; one glass of rum won't kill you, but if
    you take one you'll take another and another, and I stake my wig if you
    don't break off short, you'll die--do you understand that?--die, and go
    to your own place, like the man in the Bible.
  1209. sooner
    comparatives of `soon' or `early'
    No sooner said than done.
  1210. West Indian
    a native or inhabitant of the West Indies
    Under
    that, the miscellany began--a quadrant, a tin canikin, several sticks of
    tobacco, two brace of very handsome pistols, a piece of bar silver, an
    old Spanish watch and some other trinkets of little value and mostly of
    foreign make, a pair of compasses mounted with brass, and five or six
    curious West Indian shells.
  1211. patchwork
    sewing consisting of pieces of different materials sewn together in a pattern
    He was clothed with tatters
    of old ship's canvas and old sea-cloth, and this extraordinary patchwork
    was all held together by a system of the most various and incongruous
    fastenings, brass buttons, bits of stick, and loops of tarry gaskin.
  1212. curtained
    furnished or concealed with curtains or draperies
    When a seaman did put up at the Admiral Benbow
    (as now and then some did, making by the coast road for Bristol) he
    would look in at him through the curtained door before he entered the
    parlour; and he was always sure to be as silent as a mouse when any such
    was present.
  1213. narrative
    an account that tells the particulars of an act or event
    PART FOUR--The Stockade




    16

    Narrative Continued by the Doctor: How the Ship Was Abandoned

    IT was about half past one--three bells in the sea phrase--that the two
    boats went ashore from the HISPANIOLA.
  1214. touch
    make physical contact with, come in contact with
    It was one January morning, very early--a pinching, frosty morning--the
    cove all grey with hoar-frost, the ripple lapping softly on the stones,
    the sun still low and only touching the hilltops and shining far to
    seaward.
  1215. disappear
    become invisible or unnoticeable
    Soon after, Dr. Livesey's horse came to the door and he rode away, but
    the captain held his peace that evening, and for many evenings to come.




    2

    Black Dog Appears and Disappears


    IT was not very long after this that there occurred the first of the
    mysterious events that rid us at last of the captain, though not, as you
    will see, of his affairs.
  1216. hornet
    large stinging paper wasp
    "Mother," said I, "take the whole and let's be going," for I was sure
    the bolted door must have seemed suspicious and would bring the whole
    hornet's nest about our ears, though how thankful I was that I had
    bolted it, none could tell who had never met that terrible blind man.
  1217. join
    cause to become joined or linked
    Often I have heard the house
    shaking with "Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum," all the neighbours joining
    in for dear life, with the fear of death upon them, and each singing
    louder than the other to avoid remark.
  1218. key
    metal device that allows a lock's mechanism to be rotated
    And now," said she when I had done so, "we have to get
    the key off THAT; and who's to touch it, I should like to know!" and she
    gave a kind of sob as she said the words.
  1219. instantly
    without delay or hesitation; with no time intervening
    We both obeyed him to the letter, and I saw him pass something from the
    hollow of the hand that held his stick into the palm of the captain's,
    which closed upon it instantly.
  1220. on it
    on that
    They must be close by; they can't be far;
    you have your hands on it.
  1221. ringlet
    a round shape formed by a series of concentric circles
    I saw, besides, many old sailors, with rings in their ears, and
    whiskers curled in ringlets, and tarry pigtails, and their swaggering,
    clumsy sea-walk; and if I had seen as many kings or archbishops I could
    not have been more delighted.
  1222. lose sight of
    be no longer able to see
    There was a slight bend in the coast, and I steered so as to put it
    between us; even before we landed we had thus lost sight of the gigs.
  1223. tar
    any of various dark heavy viscid substances obtained as a residue
    A strong smell of tobacco and tar rose from the interior, but nothing
    was to be seen on the top except a suit of very good clothes, carefully
    brushed and folded.
  1224. horrible
    provoking horror
    Once I stepped out myself into
    the road, but he immediately called me back, and as I did not obey quick
    enough for his fancy, a most horrible change came over his tallowy face,
    and he ordered me in with an oath that made me jump.
  1225. wasted
    serving no useful purpose; having no excuse for being
    I never wasted good money of mine, nor lost it
    neither; and I'll trick 'em again.
  1226. tinder
    material that burns easily and is used for starting a fire
    A few small coins, a thimble,
    and some thread and big needles, a piece of pigtail tobacco bitten away
    at the end, his gully with the crooked handle, a pocket compass, and a
    tinder box were all that they contained, and I began to despair.
  1227. afire
    lighted up by or as by fire or flame
    His voice sounded louder and higher, as
    if he were afire with eagerness and rage.
  1228. breasted
    having a breast or breasts
    Soon we could hear their footfalls as they ran and the
    cracking of the branches as they breasted across a bit of thicket.
  1229. front
    the side that is forward or prominent
    At first I had supposed "the dead man's chest" to be that identical big
    box of his upstairs in the front room, and the thought had been mingled
    in my nightmares with that of the one-legged seafaring man.
  1230. beat out
    come out better in a competition, race, or conflict
    I was scarcely in position ere my enemies began to arrive, seven
    or eight of them, running hard, their feet beating out of time along
    the road and the man with the lantern some paces in front.
  1231. outlandish
    conspicuously or grossly unconventional or unusual
    I had crossed a marshy tract full of willows, bulrushes, and odd,
    outlandish, swampy trees; and I had now come out upon the skirts of an
    open piece of undulating, sandy country, about a mile long, dotted with
    a few pines and a great number of contorted trees, not unlike the oak
    in growth, but pale in the foliage, like willows.
  1232. kick up
    cause to rise by kicking
    Ball after ball flew
    over or fell short or kicked up the sand in the enclosure, but they had
    to fire so high that the shot fell dead and buried itself in the soft
    sand.
  1233. coolness
    the property of being moderately cold
    I was surprised at the coolness with which John avowed his knowledge
    of the island, and I own I was half-frightened when I saw him drawing
    nearer to myself.
  1234. look at
    look at carefully; study mentally
    "And now, Master Billy Bones, if that be your name, we'll have a look at
    the colour of your blood.
  1235. sign
    a visible clue that something has happened or is present
    And that was
    plainly the last signal of danger, for the buccaneers turned at once
    and ran, separating in every direction, one seaward along the cove, one
    slant across the hill, and so on, so that in half a minute not a sign of
    them remained but Pew. Him they had deserted, whether in sheer panic
    or out of revenge for his ill words and blows I know not; but there he
    remained behind, tapping up and down the road in a frenzy, and groping
    and calling for his comrades.
  1236. whitened
    (of hair) having lost its color
    Underneath there
    was an old boat-cloak, whitened with sea-salt on many a harbour-bar.
  1237. fir
    any of various evergreen trees of the genus Abies
    He had found a longish fir-tree
    lying felled and trimmed in the enclosure, and with the help of Hunter
    he had set it up at the corner of the log-house where the trunks crossed
    and made an angle.
  1238. the Hill
    a hill in Washington, D.C., where the Capitol Building sits and Congress meets
    Once out upon the road, Black
    Dog, in spite of his wound, showed a wonderful clean pair of heels and
    disappeared over the edge of the hill in half a minute.
  1239. the likes of
    a similar kind
    Split my sides, I've a sick heart
    to sail with the likes of you!"
  1240. jerking
    an abrupt spasmodic movement
    All the time he was jerking out these phrases he was stumping up and
    down the tavern on his crutch, slapping tables with his hand, and giving
    such a show of excitement as would have convinced an Old Bailey judge
    or a Bow Street runner.
  1241. wedged
    wedged or packed in together
    I was
    wedged in between Redruth and a stout old gentleman, and in spite of the
    swift motion and the cold night air, I must have dozed a great deal from
    the very first, and then slept like a log up hill and down dale through
    stage after stage, for when I was awakened at last it was by a punch
    in the ribs, and I opened my eyes to find that we were standing still
    before a large building in a city street and that the day had already
    broken a long time.
  1242. swampy
    (of soil) soft and watery
    I had crossed a marshy tract full of willows, bulrushes, and odd,
    outlandish, swampy trees; and I had now come out upon the skirts of an
    open piece of undulating, sandy country, about a mile long, dotted with
    a few pines and a great number of contorted trees, not unlike the oak
    in growth, but pale in the foliage, like willows.
  1243. of course
    as might be expected
    It was the second death I had known, and
    the sorrow of the first was still fresh in my heart.




    4

    The Sea-chest

    I LOST no time, of course, in telling my mother all that I knew, and
    perhaps should have told her long before, and we saw ourselves at once
    in a difficult and dangerous position.
  1244. go down on
    provide sexual gratification through oral stimulation
    I went down on my knees at once.
  1245. trust
    belief in the honesty and reliability of others
    And the
    coxswain, Israel Hands, was a careful, wily, old, experienced seaman who
    could be trusted at a pinch with almost anything.
  1246. rheumatic
    of or pertaining to arthritis
    But by this
    time we had all long ceased to pay any particular notice to the song; it
    was new, that night, to nobody but Dr. Livesey, and on him I observed it
    did not produce an agreeable effect, for he looked up for a moment quite
    angrily before he went on with his talk to old Taylor, the gardener, on
    a new cure for the rheumatics.
  1247. good-bye
    a farewell remark
    I said good-bye to Mother and the
    cove where I had lived since I was born, and the dear old Admiral
    Benbow--since he was repainted, no longer quite so dear.
  1248. muck
    any thick, viscous matter
    "There," John would
    add, "you can't touch pitch and not be mucked, lad.
  1249. names
    verbal abuse; a crude substitute for argument
    People were frightened at the time, but on looking
    back they rather liked it; it was a fine excitement in a quiet country
    life, and there was even a party of the younger men who pretended to
    admire him, calling him a "true sea-dog" and a "real old salt" and
    such like names, and saying there was the sort of man that made England
    terrible at sea.
  1250. tried
    tested and proved to be reliable
    "Bill," said the stranger in a voice that I thought he had tried to make
    bold and big.
  1251. porch
    a structure attached to the exterior of a building often forming a covered entrance
    There was a porch at the door, and under this porch
    the little spring welled up into an artificial basin of a rather odd
    kind--no other than a great ship's kettle of iron, with the bottom
    knocked out, and sunk "to her bearings," as the captain said, among the
    sand.
  1252. so long
    a farewell remark
    At this triumph we were filled with
    hope and hurried upstairs without delay to the little room where he had
    slept so long and where his box had stood since the day of his arrival.
  1253. thinking
    endowed with the capacity to reason
    The expression of his face as he said these words was not at all
    pleasant, and I had my own reasons for thinking that the stranger was
    mistaken, even supposing he meant what he said.
  1254. cruelly
    with cruelty
    Everything else was unchanged, the sun still shining mercilessly on the
    steaming marsh and the tall pinnacle of the mountain, and I could scarce
    persuade myself that murder had been actually done and a human life
    cruelly cut short a moment since before my eyes.
  1255. silence
    the state of being quiet (as when no one is speaking)
    For in these fits he was the most
    overriding companion ever known; he would slap his hand on the table for
    silence all round; he would fly up in a passion of anger at a question,
    or sometimes because none was put, and so he judged the company was not
    following his story.
  1256. handy
    skillful with the hands
    "This is a handy cove," says he at length; "and a pleasant sittyated
    grog-shop.
  1257. sort of
    to some (great or small) extent
    People were frightened at the time, but on looking
    back they rather liked it; it was a fine excitement in a quiet country
    life, and there was even a party of the younger men who pretended to
    admire him, calling him a "true sea-dog" and a "real old salt" and
    such like names, and saying there was the sort of man that made England
    terrible at sea.
  1258. come forth
    come out of
    A full moon was beginning to rise and peered
    redly through the upper edges of the fog, and this increased our haste,
    for it was plain, before we came forth again, that all would be as
    bright as day, and our departure exposed to the eyes of any watchers.
  1259. bouncing
    rebounding from an impact (or series of impacts)
    As soon as I was mounted, holding on to Dogger's belt, the supervisor
    gave the word, and the party struck out at a bouncing trot on the road
    to Dr. Livesey's house.




    6

    The Captain's Papers

    WE rode hard all the way till we drew up before Dr. Livesey's door.
  1260. thick
    not thin
    These fellows who attacked the
    inn tonight--bold, desperate blades, for sure--and the rest who stayed
    aboard that lugger, and more, I dare say, not far off, are, one and all,
    through thick and thin, bound that they'll get that money.
  1261. soaking
    the act of making something completely wet
    Several times we shipped a little water, and my breeches
    and the tails of my coat were all soaking wet before we had gone a
    hundred yards.
  1262. slam
    close violently
    At last in strode the captain, slammed the door behind him, without
    looking to the right or left, and marched straight across the room to
    where his breakfast awaited him.
  1263. clustering
    a grouping of a number of similar things
    We were
    now close in; thirty or forty strokes and we should beach her, for the
    ebb had already disclosed a narrow belt of sand below the clustering
    trees.
  1264. engage
    consume all of one's attention or time
    I was monstrously touched--so would you have
    been--and, out of pure pity, I engaged him on the
    spot to be ship's cook.
  1265. out in
    enter a harbor
    I remember him looking round the cover and whistling to himself
    as he did so, and then breaking out in that old sea-song that he sang so
    often afterwards:

    "Fifteen men on the dead man's chest--
    Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!"

    in the high, old tottering voice that seemed to have been tuned and
    broken at the capstan bars.
  1266. lowering
    the act of causing something to move to a lower level
    And, Jim"--looking all round him and
    lowering his voice to a whisper--"I'm rich."
  1267. England
    a division of the United Kingdom
    People were frightened at the time, but on looking
    back they rather liked it; it was a fine excitement in a quiet country
    life, and there was even a party of the younger men who pretended to
    admire him, calling him a "true sea-dog" and a "real old salt" and
    such like names, and saying there was the sort of man that made England
    terrible at sea.
  1268. fire
    the process of combustion of inflammable materials
    All day he hung round the cove or
    upon the cliffs with a brass telescope; all evening he sat in a corner
    of the parlour next the fire and drank rum and water very strong.
  1269. heart
    the hollow muscular organ located behind the sternum
    In one way, indeed, he bade fair to ruin us, for he kept on staying week
    after week, and at last month after month, so that all the money had
    been long exhausted, and still my father never plucked up the heart to
    insist on having more.
  1270. deal
    be in charge of, act on, or dispose of
    There were nights when he took a deal more rum and water
    than his head would carry; and then he would sometimes sit and sing his
    wicked, old, wild sea-songs, minding nobody; but sometimes he would call
    for glasses round and force all the trembling company to listen to his
    stories or bear a chorus to his singing.
  1271. mark
    a distinguishing symbol
    One was the
    same as the tattoo mark, "Billy Bones his fancy"; then there was "Mr. W.
    Bones, mate," "No more rum," "Off Palm Key he got itt," and some other
    snatches, mostly single words and unintelligible.
  1272. bloodthirsty
    marked by eagerness to resort to violence
    He was the
    bloodthirstiest buccaneer that sailed.
  1273. displease
    give displeasure to
    The cap'n was displeased at that, but my messmates were all of a
    mind and landed.
  1274. viceroy
    governor who rules as the representative of a sovereign
    She was at the boarding of the viceroy of the Indies out of
    Goa, she was; and to look at her you would think she was a babby.
  1275. up and down
    moving backward and forward along a given course
    He clambered up
    and down
    stairs, and went from the parlour to the bar and back again,
    and sometimes put his nose out of doors to smell the sea, holding on to
    the walls as he went for support and breathing hard and fast like a man
    on a steep mountain.
  1276. twice
    two times
    Now, if you had sailed
    along of Bill, you wouldn't have stood there to be spoke to twice--not
    you.
  1277. rather
    more readily or willingly
    People were frightened at the time, but on looking
    back they rather liked it; it was a fine excitement in a quiet country
    life, and there was even a party of the younger men who pretended to
    admire him, calling him a "true sea-dog" and a "real old salt" and
    such like names, and saying there was the sort of man that made England
    terrible at sea.
  1278. hedge
    a fence formed by a row of closely planted shrubs or bushes
    To see him leap and run and pursue me over hedge and
    ditch was the worst of nightmares.
  1279. budge
    move very slightly
    We'll have to budge, mates."
  1280. open door
    freedom of access
    So saying, the stranger backed along with me into the parlour and put me
    behind him in the corner so that we were both hidden by the open door.
  1281. neat
    clean or organized
    I
    followed him in, and I remember observing the contrast the neat, bright
    doctor, with his powder as white as snow and his bright, black eyes and
    pleasant manners, made with the coltish country folk, and above all,
    with that filthy, heavy, bleared scarecrow of a pirate of ours, sitting,
    far gone in rum, with his arms on the table.
  1282. observing
    quick to notice; showing quick and keen perception
    I
    followed him in, and I remember observing the contrast the neat, bright
    doctor, with his powder as white as snow and his bright, black eyes and
    pleasant manners, made with the coltish country folk, and above all,
    with that filthy, heavy, bleared scarecrow of a pirate of ours, sitting,
    far gone in rum, with his arms on the table.
  1283. inquire
    conduct an investigation of
    The man who came
    with the barrow told us the mail had set him down the morning before at
    the Royal George, that he had inquired what inns there were along the
    coast, and hearing ours well spoken of, I suppose, and described as
    lonely, had chosen it from the others for his place of residence.
  1284. main
    most important element
    Dreadful stories
    they were--about hanging, and walking the plank, and storms at sea, and
    the Dry Tortugas, and wild deeds and places on the Spanish Main.
  1285. fairly
    without favoring one party, in a fair evenhanded manner
    When they heard how my mother went back to the inn, Dr.
    Livesey fairly slapped his thigh, and the squire cried "Bravo!" and
    broke his long pipe against the grate.
  1286. cleanly
    in a manner that minimizes dirt and pollution
    The sign was
    newly painted; the windows had neat red curtains; the floor was cleanly
    sanded.
  1287. cache
    a hidden storage space
    The bar silver is in the north cache; you can find
    it by the trend of the east hummock, ten fathoms
    south of the black crag with the face on it.
  1288. deny
    declare untrue; contradict
    None of them
    dare, however, to deny the merits of the ship.
  1289. double
    consisting of or involving two parts or components usually in pairs
    Soon after, the lugger doubled the point and disappeared.
  1290. big
    above average in size or number or quantity
    At first I had supposed "the dead man's chest" to be that identical big
    box of his upstairs in the front room, and the thought had been mingled
    in my nightmares with that of the one-legged seafaring man.
  1291. keeping
    the act of retaining something
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  1292. yard
    enclosed land around a house or other building
    The hamlet lay not many hundred yards away, though out of view, on the
    other side of the next cove; and what greatly encouraged me, it was
    in an opposite direction from that whence the blind man had made his
    appearance and whither he had presumably returned.
  1293. ready
    completely prepared or in condition for immediate action or use or progress
    The neighbourhood, to our ears, seemed haunted by
    approaching footsteps; and what between the dead body of the captain
    on the parlour floor and the thought of that detestable blind beggar
    hovering near at hand and ready to return, there were moments when, as
    the saying goes, I jumped in my skin for terror.
  1294. work through
    apply thoroughly; think through
    "You can tell me when I've worked through that," says
    he, looking as fierce as a commander.
  1295. wanted
    desired or wished for or sought
    He wandered a little longer, his voice growing weaker; but soon after I
    had given him his medicine, which he took like a child, with the remark,
    "If ever a seaman wanted drugs, it's me," he fell at last into a heavy,
    swoon-like sleep, in which I left him.
  1296. spoken
    uttered through the medium of speech or characterized by speech; sometimes used in combination
    The man who came
    with the barrow told us the mail had set him down the morning before at
    the Royal George, that he had inquired what inns there were along the
    coast, and hearing ours well spoken of, I suppose, and described as
    lonely, had chosen it from the others for his place of residence.
  1297. computation
    the procedure of calculating
    It was about the last day of our
    outward voyage by the largest computation; some time that night, or at
    latest before noon of the morrow, we should sight the Treasure Island.
  1298. monkey
    any of various long-tailed primates
    The cook came up the side like a monkey for cleverness, and as soon as
    he saw what was doing, "So ho, mates!" says he.
  1299. spurned
    rebuffed (by a lover) without warning
    Down went Pew with a cry that
    rang high into the night; and the four hoofs trampled and spurned him
    and passed by.
  1300. curled
    of hair having curls
    I saw, besides, many old sailors, with rings in their ears, and
    whiskers curled in ringlets, and tarry pigtails, and their swaggering,
    clumsy sea-walk; and if I had seen as many kings or archbishops I could
    not have been more delighted.
  1301. warped
    used especially of timbers or boards
    We had a dreary morning's work before us, for there was no sign of any
    wind, and the boats had to be got out and manned, and the ship warped
    three or four miles round the corner of the island and up the narrow
    passage to the haven behind Skeleton Island.
  1302. jacket
    a short coat
    All this time he had been feeling the stuff of my jacket, smoothing
    my hands, looking at my boots, and generally, in the intervals of
    his speech, showing a childish pleasure in the presence of a fellow
    creature.
  1303. Goa
    a state of southwestern India; a former Portuguese colony
    She was at the boarding of the viceroy of the Indies out of
    Goa, she was; and to look at her you would think she was a babby.
  1304. try on
    put on a garment in order to see whether it fits and looks nice
    It's
    trying on a man, I know.
  1305. block
    obstruct
    "I have a son of my own," said he, "as like
    you as two blocks, and he's all the pride of my 'art.
  1306. address
    the place where a person or organization can be found
    "Were you addressing me, sir?" says the doctor; and when the ruffian had
    told him, with another oath, that this was so, "I have only one thing to
    say to you, sir," replies the doctor, "that if you keep on drinking rum,
    the world will soon be quit of a very dirty scoundrel!"
  1307. murderer
    a criminal who commits homicide
    Just before him Tom
    lay motionless upon the sward; but the murderer minded him not a whit,
    cleansing his blood-stained knife the while upon a wisp of grass.
  1308. duplicity
    acting in bad faith
    He did not know, to be sure, that I had overheard his
    council from the apple barrel, and yet I had by this time taken such a
    horror of his cruelty, duplicity, and power that I could scarce conceal
    a shudder when he laid his hand upon my arm.
  1309. instant
    a very short time
    He spoke to him as before, over his
    shoulder and in the same tone of voice, rather high, so that all the
    room might hear, but perfectly calm and steady: "If you do not put that
    knife this instant in your pocket, I promise, upon my honour, you shall
    hang at the next assizes."
  1310. port
    where people and merchandise can enter or leave a country
    I've seen his top-sails with
    these eyes, off Trinidad, and the cowardly son of a rum-puncheon that I
    sailed with put back--put back, sir, into Port of Spain."
  1311. villainous
    extremely wicked
    The captain glared at him for a while, flapped his hand again,
    glared still harder, and at last broke out with a villainous, low oath,
    "Silence, there, between decks!"
  1312. evening
    the latter part of the day
    All day he hung round the cove or
    upon the cliffs with a brass telescope; all evening he sat in a corner
    of the parlour next the fire and drank rum and water very strong.
  1313. drinking
    the act of consuming liquids
    "Were you addressing me, sir?" says the doctor; and when the ruffian had
    told him, with another oath, that this was so, "I have only one thing to
    say to you, sir," replies the doctor, "that if you keep on drinking rum,
    the world will soon be quit of a very dirty scoundrel!"
  1314. observed
    discovered or determined by scientific observation
    But by this
    time we had all long ceased to pay any particular notice to the song; it
    was new, that night, to nobody but Dr. Livesey, and on him I observed it
    did not produce an agreeable effect, for he looked up for a moment quite
    angrily before he went on with his talk to old Taylor, the gardener, on
    a new cure for the rheumatics.
  1315. sward
    surface layer of ground containing a mat of grass and grass roots
    Just before him Tom
    lay motionless upon the sward; but the murderer minded him not a whit,
    cleansing his blood-stained knife the while upon a wisp of grass.
  1316. navigate
    direct carefully and safely
    If I was sure of you all, sons of double
    Dutchmen, I'd have Cap'n Smollett navigate us half-way back again before
    I struck."
  1317. first and last
    taking everything together
    That's what all you gentlemen split on,
    first and last.
  1318. scream
    utter a sudden loud cry
    At this Pew saw his error, turned with a scream, and ran straight for
    the ditch, into which he rolled.
  1319. each
    (used of count nouns) every one considered individually
    Often I have heard the house
    shaking with "Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum," all the neighbours joining
    in for dear life, with the fear of death upon them, and each singing
    louder than the other to avoid remark.
  1320. slip on
    put on with ease or speed
    When a mate brings a slip on his cable--one as knows me, I
    mean--it won't be in the same world with old John.
  1321. arms
    weapons considered collectively
    I
    followed him in, and I remember observing the contrast the neat, bright
    doctor, with his powder as white as snow and his bright, black eyes and
    pleasant manners, made with the coltish country folk, and above all,
    with that filthy, heavy, bleared scarecrow of a pirate of ours, sitting,
    far gone in rum, with his arms on the table.
  1322. latitude
    an imaginary line around the Earth parallel to the equator
    In a few cases, to be sure, the name of a place would be added,
    as "Offe Caraccas," or a mere entry of latitude and longitude, as "62o
    17' 20", 19o 2' 40"."
  1323. disaffected
    discontented as toward authority
    Or rather, I suppose the
    truth was this, that all hands were disaffected by the example of the
    ringleaders--only some more, some less; and a few, being good fellows in
    the main, could neither be led nor driven any further.
  1324. sodden
    wet through and through; thoroughly wet
    A peculiar stagnant smell hung over the anchorage--a smell of
    sodden leaves and rotting tree trunks.
  1325. roar
    make a loud noise, as of an animal
    On
    stormy nights, when the wind shook the four corners of the house and
    the surf roared along the cove and up the cliffs, I would see him in a
    thousand forms, and with a thousand diabolical expressions.
  1326. condescending
    characteristic of those who treat others with arrogance
    "Come in, Mr. Dance," says he, very stately and condescending.
  1327. comrade
    a friend who is frequently in the company of another
    For that matter, anyone who was a
    comrade of the captain's was enough to frighten them to death.
  1328. bow
    something curved in shape
    All the time he was jerking out these phrases he was stumping up and
    down the tavern on his crutch, slapping tables with his hand, and giving
    such a show of excitement as would have convinced an Old Bailey judge
    or a Bow Street runner.
  1329. cheer
    a cry or shout of approval
    It was already candle-light when we reached the hamlet, and I shall
    never forget how much I was cheered to see the yellow shine in doors and
    windows; but that, as it proved, was the best of the help we were likely
    to get in that quarter.
  1330. white
    being of the achromatic color of maximum lightness
    I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the
    inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow--a
    tall, strong, heavy, nut-brown man, his tarry pigtail falling over the
    shoulder of his soiled blue coat, his hands ragged and scarred, with
    black, broken nails, and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid
    white.
  1331. cargo
    goods carried by a large vehicle
    On our little walk along the quays, he made himself the most interesting
    companion, telling me about the different ships that we passed by,
    their rig, tonnage, and nationality, explaining the work that was going
    forward--how one was discharging, another taking in cargo, and a third
    making ready for sea--and every now and then telling me some little
    anecdote of ships or seamen or repeating a nautical phrase till I had
    learned it perfectly.
  1332. pass
    go across or through
    Then he
    passed his hand over his eyes several times and at last turned back into
    the house.
  1333. ambiguity
    unclearness by virtue of having more than one meaning
    The sums are the scoundrel's
    share, and where he feared an ambiguity, you see he added something
    clearer.
  1334. bookcase
    a piece of furniture with shelves for storing books
    The servant led us down a matted passage and showed us at the end into a
    great library, all lined with bookcases and busts upon the top of them,
    where the squire and Dr. Livesey sat, pipe in hand, on either side of a
    bright fire.
  1335. Providence
    the capital and largest city of Rhode Island
    She's been at Madagascar, and at
    Malabar, and Surinam, and Providence, and Portobello.
  1336. explore
    travel to or penetrate into
    Sitting by the fire in the housekeeper's room, I
    approached that island in my fancy from every possible direction; I
    explored every acre of its surface; I climbed a thousand times to that
    tall hill they call the Spy-glass, and from the top enjoyed the most
    wonderful and changing prospects.
  1337. disaffect
    arouse hostility or indifference in where there had formerly been love, affection, or friendliness
    Or rather, I suppose the
    truth was this, that all hands were disaffected by the example of the
    ringleaders--only some more, some less; and a few, being good fellows in
    the main, could neither be led nor driven any further.
  1338. topping
    a flavorful addition on top of a dish
    This even tint
    was indeed broken up by streaks of yellow sand-break in the lower lands,
    and by many tall trees of the pine family, out- topping the others--some
    singly, some in clumps; but the general colouring was uniform and sad.
  1339. coat
    an outer garment that covers the body from shoulder down
    I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the
    inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow--a
    tall, strong, heavy, nut-brown man, his tarry pigtail falling over the
    shoulder of his soiled blue coat, his hands ragged and scarred, with
    black, broken nails, and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid
    white.
  1340. nettle
    plant having stinging hairs that cause skin irritation
    He had been
    growing nettled before, but now he pulled himself together.
  1341. dozen
    the cardinal number that is the sum of eleven and one
    I wished a round score of men--in case of
    natives, buccaneers, or the odious French--and I
    had the worry of the deuce itself to find so much
    as half a dozen, till the most remarkable stroke
    of fortune brought me the very man that I
    required.
  1342. live on
    continue to live through hardship or adversity
    I been in places hot as pitch, and mates
    dropping round with Yellow Jack, and the blessed land a-heaving like the
    sea with earthquakes--what to the doctor know of lands like that?--and I
    lived on rum, I tell you.
  1343. divide
    a serious disagreement between two groups of people
    With all this in our minds, we waded ashore as fast as we could, leaving
    behind us the poor jolly-boat and a good half of all our powder and
    provisions.




    18

    Narrative Continued by the Doctor: End of the First Day's Fighting

    WE made our best speed across the strip of wood that now divided us from
    the stockade, and at every step we took the voices of the buccaneers
    rang nearer.
  1344. health
    the general condition of body and mind
    I found
    he was an old sailor, kept a public-house, knew
    all the seafaring men in Bristol, had lost his
    health ashore, and wanted a good berth as cook to
    get to sea again.
  1345. alarming
    frightening because of an awareness of danger
    He had an alarming way now when he was drunk of drawing his
    cutlass and laying it bare before him on the table.
  1346. burnished
    made smooth and bright by or as if by rubbing
    To me he was
    unweariedly kind, and always glad to see me in the galley, which he kept
    as clean as a new pin, the dishes hanging up burnished and his parrot in
    a cage in one corner.
  1347. explanatory
    serving or intended to make clear
    There was a date at one end of the line and at the other a
    sum of money, as in common account-books, but instead of explanatory
    writing, only a varying number of crosses between the two.
  1348. irresolute
    uncertain how to act or proceed
    This appeal seemed to produce some effect, for two of the fellows began
    to look here and there among the lumber, but half-heartedly, I thought,
    and with half an eye to their own danger all the time, while the rest
    stood irresolute on the road.
  1349. clumsy
    lacking grace in movement or posture
    I had thought up to that moment of the adventures before me,
    not at all of the home that I was leaving; and now, at sight of this
    clumsy stranger, who was to stay here in my place beside my mother, I
    had my first attack of tears.
  1350. entirely
    to a complete degree or to the full or entire extent
    So there we had to stay--my mother almost entirely exposed and both of
    us within earshot of the inn.




    5

    The Last of the Blind Man

    MY curiosity, in a sense, was stronger than my fear, for I could not
    remain where I was, but crept back to the bank again, whence, sheltering
    my head behind a bush of broom, I might command the road before our
    door.
  1351. blade
    the flat part of a tool or weapon that has a cutting edge
    He
    cleared the hilt of his cutlass and loosened the blade in the sheath;
    and all the time we were waiting there he kept swallowing as if he felt
    what we used to call a lump in the throat.
  1352. and so
    subsequently or soon afterward
    For in these fits he was the most
    overriding companion ever known; he would slap his hand on the table for
    silence all round; he would fly up in a passion of anger at a question,
    or sometimes because none was put, and so he judged the company was not
    following his story.
  1353. banging
    a continuing very loud noise
    The booms
    were tearing at the blocks, the rudder was banging to and fro, and the
    whole ship creaking, groaning, and jumping like a manufactory.
  1354. starved
    suffering from lack of food
    He begged, and he stole, and he cut throats, and
    starved at that, by the powers!"
  1355. tire
    lose interest or become bored with something or somebody
    We never had
    a night at the Admiral Benbow when I had half the work; and I was
    dog- tired when, a little before dawn, the boatswain sounded his pipe
    and the crew began to man the capstan-bars.
  1356. occur
    come to pass
    Soon after, Dr. Livesey's horse came to the door and he rode away, but
    the captain held his peace that evening, and for many evenings to come.




    2

    Black Dog Appears and Disappears


    IT was not very long after this that there occurred the first of the
    mysterious events that rid us at last of the captain, though not, as you
    will see, of his affairs.
  1357. postscript
    a note appended to a letter after the signature
    John Trelawney

    Postscript--I did not tell you that Blandly,
    who, by the way, is to send a consort after us if
    we don't turn up by the end of August, had found
    an admirable fellow for sailing master--a stiff
    man, which I regret, but in all other respects a
    treasure.
  1358. swish
    move with or cause to move with a whistling or hissing sound
    The man at
    the helm was watching the luff of the sail and whistling away gently
    to himself, and that was the only sound excepting the swish of the sea
    against the bows and around the sides of the ship.
  1359. save
    bring into safety
    For my part, I must do my best to save this fellow's trebly
    worthless life; Jim, you get me a basin."
  1360. imagine
    expect, believe, or suppose
    I went back with him to the Admiral Benbow, and you cannot imagine a
    house in such a state of smash; the very clock had been thrown down
    by these fellows in their furious hunt after my mother and myself;
    and though nothing had actually been taken away except the captain's
    money-bag and a little silver from the till, I could see at once that we
    were ruined.
  1361. eat
    take in solid food
    He got downstairs next morning, to be sure, and had his meals as usual,
    though he ate little and had more, I am afraid, than his usual supply of
    rum, for he helped himself out of the bar, scowling and blowing through
    his nose, and no one dared to cross him.
  1362. length
    the linear extent in space from one end to the other
    "This is a handy cove," says he at length; "and a pleasant sittyated
    grog-shop.
  1363. qualm
    uneasiness about the fitness of an action
    I had
    to cling tight to the backstay, and the world turned giddily before my
    eyes, for though I was a good enough sailor when there was way on, this
    standing still and being rolled about like a bottle was a thing I never
    learned to stand without a qualm or so, above all in the morning, on an
    empty stomach.
  1364. assize
    the regulation of weights and measures of articles offered for sale
    He spoke to him as before, over his
    shoulder and in the same tone of voice, rather high, so that all the
    room might hear, but perfectly calm and steady: "If you do not put that
    knife this instant in your pocket, I promise, upon my honour, you shall
    hang at the next assizes."
  1365. toasted
    browned over by exposure to heat
    No? Well,
    many's the long night I've dreamed of cheese-- toasted, mostly--and woke
    up again, and here I were."
  1366. reappear
    appear again
    Instantly the figure reappeared, and making a wide circuit, began to
    head me off.
  1367. be after
    have the will and intention to carry out some action
    "And so, Jim," said the doctor, "you have the thing that they were
    after
    , have you?"
  1368. try
    make an effort or attempt
    "Bill," said the stranger in a voice that I thought he had tried to make
    bold and big.
  1369. sulk
    be in a huff and display one's displeasure
    I believe the silly fellows must have thought they would break their
    shins over treasure as soon as they were landed, for they all came out
    of their sulks in a moment and gave a cheer that started the echo in a
    faraway hill and sent the birds once more flying and squalling round the
    anchorage.
  1370. flit
    move along rapidly and lightly; skim or dart
    But soon the anchor was short up; soon it was hanging
    dripping at the bows; soon the sails began to draw, and the land and
    shipping to flit by on either side; and before I could lie down to
    snatch an hour of slumber the HISPANIOLA had begun her voyage to the
    Isle of Treasure.
  1371. ticking
    a metallic tapping sound
    Indeed, it seemed
    impossible for either of us to remain much longer in the house; the fall
    of coals in the kitchen grate, the very ticking of the clock, filled
    us with alarms.
  1372. matted
    tangled in a dense mass
    The servant led us down a matted passage and showed us at the end into a
    great library, all lined with bookcases and busts upon the top of them,
    where the squire and Dr. Livesey sat, pipe in hand, on either side of a
    bright fire.
  1373. growl
    to utter or emit low dull rumbling sounds
    "Well, who's a better right?" growled the gamekeeper.
  1374. apologetically
    in an apologetic manner
    "It's the custom, sir," he added apologetically.
  1375. retrace
    to go back over again
    Silver himself appeared
    less terrible in contrast with this creature of the woods, and I turned
    on my heel, and looking sharply behind me over my shoulder, began to
    retrace my steps in the direction of the boats.
  1376. high ground
    a position of superiority over opponents or competitors
    The fog was rapidly
    dispersing; already the moon shone quite clear on the high ground on
    either side; and it was only in the exact bottom of the dell and round
    the tavern door that a thin veil still hung unbroken to conceal the
    first steps of our escape.
  1377. paling
    a fence made of upright pickets
    All round this they had cleared a wide
    space, and then the thing was completed by a paling six feet high,
    without door or opening, too strong to pull down without time and labour
    and too open to shelter the besiegers.
  1378. brightness
    the quality of being luminous; emitting or reflecting light
    Just then a sort of brightness fell upon me in the barrel, and looking
    up, I found the moon had risen and was silvering the mizzen-top and
    shining white on the luff of the fore-sail; and almost at the same time
    the voice of the lookout shouted, "Land ho!"




    12

    Council of War

    THERE was a great rush of feet across the deck.
  1379. temper
    a characteristic state of feeling
    He never particularly addressed me, and it is my
    belief he had as good as forgotten his confidences; but his temper was
    more flighty, and allowing for his bodily weakness, more violent than
    ever.
  1380. hoarse
    deep and harsh sounding as if from shouting or illness
    "Silver," said the other man--and I observed he was not only red in the
    face, but spoke as hoarse as a crow, and his voice shook too, like a
    taut rope--"Silver," says he, "you're old, and you're honest, or has the
    name for it; and you've money too, which lots of poor sailors hasn't;
    and you're brave, or I'm mistook.
  1381. go for
    intend with some possibility of fulfilment
    He clambered up
    and down stairs, and went from the parlour to the bar and back again,
    and sometimes put his nose out of doors to smell the sea, holding on to
    the walls as he went for support and breathing hard and fast like a man
    on a steep mountain.
  1382. heavy
    of comparatively great physical weight or density
    I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the
    inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow--a
    tall, strong, heavy, nut-brown man, his tarry pigtail falling over the
    shoulder of his soiled blue coat, his hands ragged and scarred, with
    black, broken nails, and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid
    white.
  1383. sighted
    able to see
    This
    land that we have sighted is the place we have been sailing for.
  1384. up to
    busy or occupied with
    Once, for instance, to our extreme wonder, he piped up to a
    different air, a king of country love-song that he must have learned in
    his youth before he had begun to follow the sea.
  1385. show
    make visible or noticeable
    Once out upon the road, Black
    Dog, in spite of his wound, showed a wonderful clean pair of heels and
    disappeared over the edge of the hill in half a minute.
  1386. Madagascar
    a republic on the island of Madagascar
    She's been at Madagascar, and at
    Malabar, and Surinam, and Providence, and Portobello.
  1387. several
    of an indefinite number more than 2 or 3 but not many
    Then he
    passed his hand over his eyes several times and at last turned back into
    the house.
  1388. devil
    an evil supernatural being
    Drink and the devil had done for the rest--
    Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!"
  1389. leaving
    the act of departing
    Next moment we were both groping downstairs, leaving the candle by
    the empty chest; and the next we had opened the door and were in full
    retreat.
  1390. trim
    cut down on; make a reduction in
    The captain made us trim the boat, and we got her to lie a little more
    evenly.
  1391. turned on
    feeling great sexual desire
    And with that he turned on his heel and rejoined the other two.
  1392. fine
    free from impurities
    People were frightened at the time, but on looking
    back they rather liked it; it was a fine excitement in a quiet country
    life, and there was even a party of the younger men who pretended to
    admire him, calling him a "true sea-dog" and a "real old salt" and
    such like names, and saying there was the sort of man that made England
    terrible at sea.
  1393. too much
    more than necessary
    The captain has said too much or he has said too
    little, and I'm bound to say that I require an explanation of his words.
  1394. heave
    lift or elevate
    I been in places hot as pitch, and mates
    dropping round with Yellow Jack, and the blessed land a- heaving like the
    sea with earthquakes--what to the doctor know of lands like that?--and I
    lived on rum, I tell you.
  1395. besieger
    an enemy who lays siege to your position
    All round this they had cleared a wide
    space, and then the thing was completed by a paling six feet high,
    without door or opening, too strong to pull down without time and labour
    and too open to shelter the besiegers.
  1396. country people
    people living in the same country; compatriots
    By his
    own account he must have lived his life among some of the wickedest men
    that God ever allowed upon the sea, and the language in which he told
    these stories shocked our plain country people almost as much as the
    crimes that he described.
  1397. stand firm
    stand up or offer resistance to somebody or something
    To add to our concern, we heard voices already drawing near us in the
    woods along shore, and we had not only the danger of being cut off from
    the stockade in our half-crippled state but the fear before us whether,
    if Hunter and Joyce were attacked by half a dozen, they would have the
    sense and conduct to stand firm.
  1398. plodding
    (of movement) slow and laborious
    I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the
    inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow--a
    tall, strong, heavy, nut-brown man, his tarry pigtail falling over the
    shoulder of his soiled blue coat, his hands ragged and scarred, with
    black, broken nails, and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid
    white.
  1399. think of
    devise or invent
    Our natural distress, the visits of the neighbours, the
    arranging of the funeral, and all the work of the inn to be carried on
    in the meanwhile kept me so busy that I had scarcely time to think of
    the captain, far less to be afraid of him.
  1400. admirable
    inspiring approval
    The admirable fellow literally slaved in
    my interest, and so, I may say, did everyone in
    Bristol, as soon as they got wind of the port we
    sailed for--treasure, I mean.
  1401. conceal
    prevent from being seen or discovered
    The fog was rapidly
    dispersing; already the moon shone quite clear on the high ground on
    either side; and it was only in the exact bottom of the dell and round
    the tavern door that a thin veil still hung unbroken to conceal the
    first steps of our escape.
  1402. plump
    sufficiently fat so as to have a pleasing fullness of figure
    I could hear as well as see that brandy-faced rascal Israel Hands
    plumping down a round-shot on the deck.
  1403. stench
    a distinctive odor that is offensively unpleasant
    The pitch was
    bubbling in the seams; the nasty stench of the place turned me sick;
    if ever a man smelt fever and dysentery, it was in that abominable
    anchorage.
  1404. fresh
    recently made, produced, or harvested
    It was the second death I had known, and
    the sorrow of the first was still fresh in my heart.




    4

    The Sea-chest

    I LOST no time, of course, in telling my mother all that I knew, and
    perhaps should have told her long before, and we saw ourselves at once
    in a difficult and dangerous position.
  1405. at the same time
    at the same instant
    Almost at the same time a
    pistol-shot, flash and report, came from the hedge side.
  1406. ten
    the cardinal number that is the sum of nine and one
    " Ten o'clock!" he cried.
  1407. morass
    a soft wet area of low-lying land that sinks underfoot
    But where Silver stood with his lieutenant, all was still in
    shadow, and they waded knee-deep in a low white vapour that had crawled
    during the night out of the morass.
  1408. things
    any movable possession (especially articles of clothing)
    But as things fell out, my poor
    father died quite suddenly that evening, which put all other matters
    on one side.
  1409. best
    having the most positive qualities
    For a long time, though I certainly did my best to listen, I could hear
    nothing but a low gattling; but at last the voices began to grow higher,
    and I could pick up a word or two, mostly oaths, from the captain.
  1410. wickedness
    the quality of being wicked
    "Now, that bird," he would say, "is, maybe, two hundred years
    old, Hawkins--they live forever mostly; and if anybody's seen more
    wickedness, it must be the devil himself.
  1411. detour
    a roundabout road
    But towards the end of the bombardment, though still I durst
    not venture in the direction of the stockade, where the balls fell
    oftenest, I had begun, in a manner, to pluck up my heart again, and
    after a long detour to the east, crept down among the shore-side trees.
  1412. outstrip
    go far ahead of
    He
    fairly outstripped himself in willingness and civility; he was all
    smiles to everyone.
  1413. saving
    recovery or preservation from loss or danger
    But I'm a saving soul.
  1414. manufactory
    a plant consisting of one or more buildings with facilities for manufacturing
    The booms
    were tearing at the blocks, the rudder was banging to and fro, and the
    whole ship creaking, groaning, and jumping like a manufactory.
  1415. marshy
    (of soil) soft and watery
    I had crossed a marshy tract full of willows, bulrushes, and odd,
    outlandish, swampy trees; and I had now come out upon the skirts of an
    open piece of undulating, sandy country, about a mile long, dotted with
    a few pines and a great number of contorted trees, not unlike the oak
    in growth, but pale in the foliage, like willows.
  1416. cock
    adult male chicken
    One of the cocks of his
    hat having fallen down, he let it hang from that day forth, though it
    was a great annoyance when it blew.
  1417. rebuff
    a deliberate discourteous act
    I have seen him wringing his hands after such a
    rebuff, and I am sure the annoyance and the terror he lived in must have
    greatly hastened his early and unhappy death.
  1418. rate
    a quantity considered as a proportion of another quantity
    They were pulling up, at any
    rate, horrified at the accident; and I soon saw what they were.
  1419. moonlit
    lighted by moonlight
    This time, as the distance was short, I did not mount, but ran with
    Dogger's stirrup-leather to the lodge gates and up the long, leafless,
    moonlit avenue to where the white line of the hall buildings looked on
    either hand on great old gardens.
  1420. brisk
    quick and energetic
    He owned, when driven into a corner, that he seemed to have
    been wrong about the crew, that some of them were as brisk as he wanted
    to see and all had behaved fairly well.
  1421. account
    a record or narrative description of past events
    By his
    own account he must have lived his life among some of the wickedest men
    that God ever allowed upon the sea, and the language in which he told
    these stories shocked our plain country people almost as much as the
    crimes that he described.
  1422. come off
    come to be detached
    We were all hard at work, changing the powder and the berths, when
    the last man or two, and Long John along with them, came off in a
    shore-boat.
  1423. sudden death
    (sports) overtime in which play is stopped as soon as one contestant scores; e.g. football and golf
    It was
    battle, murder, and sudden death, leastways--him against six.
  1424. nightmare
    a terrifying or deeply upsetting dream
    To see him leap and run and pursue me over hedge and
    ditch was the worst of nightmares.
  1425. fast
    acting or moving or capable of acting or moving quickly
    He clambered up
    and down stairs, and went from the parlour to the bar and back again,
    and sometimes put his nose out of doors to smell the sea, holding on to
    the walls as he went for support and breathing hard and fast like a man
    on a steep mountain.
  1426. rolled
    rolled up and secured
    At this Pew saw his error, turned with a scream, and ran straight for
    the ditch, into which he rolled.
  1427. at bottom
    in reality
    I know you are a good man at
    bottom
    , and I dare say not one of the lot of you's as bad as he makes
    out.
  1428. wading
    walking with your feet in shallow water
    For
    four or five of them were busy carrying off our stores and wading out
    with them to one of the gigs that lay close by, pulling an oar or so to
    hold her steady against the current.
  1429. rotting
    the process of decay caused by bacterial or fungal action
    A peculiar stagnant smell hung over the anchorage--a smell of
    sodden leaves and rotting tree trunks.
  1430. isle
    a small island
    Sometimes the isle was thick with
    savages, with whom we fought, sometimes full of dangerous animals that
    hunted us, but in all my fancies nothing occurred to me so strange and
    tragic as our actual adventures.
  1431. all told
    with everything included or counted
    You're a good boy, or I'm mistook;
    but you're on'y a boy, all told.
  1432. send
    cause to go somewhere
    My father was always saying the inn would be
    ruined, for people would soon cease coming there to be tyrannized over
    and put down, and sent shivering to their beds; but I really believe his
    presence did us good.
  1433. forearm
    the part of the superior limb between the elbow and the wrist
    "Here's luck," "A fair wind," and "Billy Bones his
    fancy," were very neatly and clearly executed on the forearm; and up
    near the shoulder there was a sketch of a gallows and a man hanging from
    it--done, as I thought, with great spirit.
  1434. not bad
    very good
    His
    eyebrows were very black, and moved readily, and this gave him a look of
    some temper, not bad, you would say, but quick and high.
  1435. scowling
    sullen or unfriendly in appearance
    He got downstairs next morning, to be sure, and had his meals as usual,
    though he ate little and had more, I am afraid, than his usual supply of
    rum, for he helped himself out of the bar, scowling and blowing through
    his nose, and no one dared to cross him.
  1436. cleave
    separate or cut with a tool, such as a sharp instrument
    "You're a good lad, Jim," he said; "and you're all in a clove hitch,
    ain't you?
  1437. get away
    run away from confinement
    "I must get away from here.
  1438. recover
    regain or make up for
    So much I saw, almost in a dream, for I had not yet recovered from my
    horrid fear of a minute or two before.
  1439. uninhabited
    not having inhabitants; not lived in
    The isle was
    uninhabited; my shipmates I had left behind, and nothing lived in front
    of me but dumb brutes and fowls.
  1440. broken
    physically and forcibly separated into pieces or cracked or split
    I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the
    inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow--a
    tall, strong, heavy, nut-brown man, his tarry pigtail falling over the
    shoulder of his soiled blue coat, his hands ragged and scarred, with
    black, broken nails, and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid
    white.
  1441. overboard
    to extremes
    " Overboard!" said the captain.
  1442. prove
    establish the validity of something
    It was already candle-light when we reached the hamlet, and I shall
    never forget how much I was cheered to see the yellow shine in doors and
    windows; but that, as it proved, was the best of the help we were likely
    to get in that quarter.
  1443. greedily
    in a greedy manner
    When I brought it to him, he seized it greedily and drank it out.
  1444. decide
    reach, make, or come to a conclusion about something
    It was so decided; loaded pistols were served out to all the sure men;
    Hunter, Joyce, and Redruth were taken into our confidence and received
    the news with less surprise and a better spirit than we had looked for,
    and then the captain went on deck and addressed the crew.
  1445. in full
    referring to a quantity
    And again, "If it
    comes to swinging, swing all, say I."

    Then all of a sudden there was a tremendous explosion of oaths and
    other noises--the chair and table went over in a lump, a clash of steel
    followed, and then a cry of pain, and the next instant I saw Black
    Dog in full flight, and the captain hotly pursuing, both with drawn
    cutlasses, and the former streaming blood from the left shoulder.
  1446. foggy
    filled or abounding with fog or mist
    So things passed until, the day after the funeral, and about three
    o'clock of a bitter, foggy, frosty afternoon, I was standing at the door
    for a moment, full of sad thoughts about my father, when I saw someone
    drawing slowly near along the road.
  1447. noonday
    the middle of the day
    "The thing is as clear as noonday," cried the squire.
  1448. tone of voice
    the quality of a person's voice
    He spoke to him as before, over his
    shoulder and in the same tone of voice, rather high, so that all the
    room might hear, but perfectly calm and steady: "If you do not put that
    knife this instant in your pocket, I promise, upon my honour, you shall
    hang at the next assizes."
  1449. admiringly
    with admiration
    "There's the man for me!" cried the cook admiringly.
  1450. blue
    of the color intermediate between green and violet
    I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the
    inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow--a
    tall, strong, heavy, nut-brown man, his tarry pigtail falling over the
    shoulder of his soiled blue coat, his hands ragged and scarred, with
    black, broken nails, and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid
    white.
  1451. weakness
    a flaw
    His words, spirited as they
    were in meaning, contrasted sadly with the weakness of the voice in
    which they were uttered.
  1452. jaw
    the part of the skull of a vertebrate that frames the mouth
    I got the rum, to be sure, and tried to put it down his
    throat, but his teeth were tightly shut and his jaws as strong as iron.
  1453. come in
    to come or go into
    It was a happy relief for us when the door opened and Doctor Livesey
    came in, on his visit to my father.
  1454. leap out
    jump out from a hiding place and surprise (someone)
    I should have leaped out and run for
    it if I had found the strength, but my limbs and heart alike misgave me.
  1455. the like
    a similar kind
    "If you had been mixed up with the like of that, you would
    never have put another foot in my house, you may lay to that.
  1456. proved
    established beyond doubt
    It was already candle-light when we reached the hamlet, and I shall
    never forget how much I was cheered to see the yellow shine in doors and
    windows; but that, as it proved, was the best of the help we were likely
    to get in that quarter.
  1457. chorus
    actors who comment on the action in a classical Greek play
    There were nights when he took a deal more rum and water
    than his head would carry; and then he would sometimes sit and sing his
    wicked, old, wild sea-songs, minding nobody; but sometimes he would call
    for glasses round and force all the trembling company to listen to his
    stories or bear a chorus to his singing.
  1458. porridge
    soft food made by boiling meal or legumes in water or milk
    There was sand in our eyes, sand in our teeth, sand in our
    suppers, sand dancing in the spring at the bottom of the kettle, for all
    the world like porridge beginning to boil.
  1459. spirits
    an alcoholic beverage that is distilled rather than fermented
    I am in the most magnificent health and
    spirits, eating like a bull, sleeping like a tree,
    yet I shall not enjoy a moment till I hear my old
    tarpaulins tramping round the capstan.
  1460. get back
    recover something or somebody that appeared to be lost
    When I got back with the basin, the doctor had already ripped up the
    captain's sleeve and exposed his great sinewy arm.
  1461. fall in
    break down, literally or metaphorically
    Rum! Rum!"

    I ran to fetch it, but I was quite unsteadied by all that had fallen
    out, and I broke one glass and fouled the tap, and while I was still
    getting in my own way, I heard a loud fall in the parlour, and running
    in, beheld the captain lying full length upon the floor.
  1462. the devil
    something difficult or awkward to do or deal with
    Drink and the devil had done for the rest--
    Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!"
  1463. handsome
    pleasing in appearance
    Under
    that, the miscellany began--a quadrant, a tin canikin, several sticks of
    tobacco, two brace of very handsome pistols, a piece of bar silver, an
    old Spanish watch and some other trinkets of little value and mostly of
    foreign make, a pair of compasses mounted with brass, and five or six
    curious West Indian shells.
  1464. dark
    devoid of or deficient in light or brightness
    I slipped the bolt at once, and we stood and panted for a moment in the
    dark, alone in the house with the dead captain's body.
  1465. close in
    advance or converge on
    In the meantime the
    supervisor rode on, as fast as he could, to Kitt's Hole; but his men
    had to dismount and grope down the dingle, leading, and sometimes
    supporting, their horses, and in continual fear of ambushes; so it was
    no great matter for surprise that when they got down to the Hole the
    lugger was already under way, though still close in.
  1466. gunwale
    plank or ridge at the top of the side of boat
    The gunwale was
    lipping astern.
  1467. placidly
    in a quiet and tranquil manner
    And at that, up I jumped, and rubbing my eyes, ran to a loophole in the
    wall.




    20

    Silver's Embassy

    SURE enough, there were two men just outside the stockade, one of them
    waving a white cloth, the other, no less a person than Silver himself,
    standing placidly by.
  1468. lock
    a fastener fitted to a door or drawer to keep it firmly closed
    "Give me the key," said my mother; and though the lock was very stiff,
    she had turned it and thrown back the lid in a twinkling.
  1469. headway
    forward movement
    In the meanwhile we had been making headway at a good pace for a boat so
    overloaded, and we had shipped but little water in the process.
  1470. snatch
    to grasp hastily or eagerly
    One was the
    same as the tattoo mark, "Billy Bones his fancy"; then there was "Mr. W.
    Bones, mate," "No more rum," "Off Palm Key he got itt," and some other
    snatches, mostly single words and unintelligible.
  1471. tearing
    marked by extreme intensity of emotions or convictions
    The booms
    were tearing at the blocks, the rudder was banging to and fro, and the
    whole ship creaking, groaning, and jumping like a manufactory.
  1472. subside
    wear off or die down
    "One more cheer for Cap'n Smollett," cried Long John when the first had
    subsided.
  1473. sneering
    expressive of contempt
    As soon as I
    was back again he returned to his former manner, half fawning, half
    sneering, patted me on the shoulder, told me I was a good boy and he had
    taken quite a fancy to me.
  1474. shove
    come into rough contact with while moving
    In a jiffy I had slipped over the side and curled up in the
    fore-sheets of the nearest boat, and almost at the same moment she
    shoved off.
  1475. moon
    the natural satellite of the Earth
    A full moon was beginning to rise and peered
    redly through the upper edges of the fog, and this increased our haste,
    for it was plain, before we came forth again, that all would be as
    bright as day, and our departure exposed to the eyes of any watchers.
  1476. terms
    status with respect to the relations between people or groups
    These, in their turn, cursed back at the blind miscreant, threatened him
    in horrid terms, and tried in vain to catch the stick and wrest it from
    his grasp.
  1477. warn
    notify of danger, potential harm, or risk
    "No more wounded than
    you or I. The man has had a stroke, as I warned him.
  1478. agile
    moving quickly and lightly
    Silver, agile as a monkey even without
    leg or crutch, was on the top of him next moment and had twice buried
    his knife up to the hilt in that defenceless body.
  1479. athwart
    across the course, direction, or center line of a ship
    "But," asked Dick, "when we do lay 'em athwart, what are we to do with
    'em, anyhow?"
  1480. surf
    waves breaking on the shore
    On
    stormy nights, when the wind shook the four corners of the house and
    the surf roared along the cove and up the cliffs, I would see him in a
    thousand forms, and with a thousand diabolical expressions.
  1481. less
    a quantifier meaning not as great in amount or degree
    But though I was so terrified by the idea of the seafaring man with one
    leg, I was far less afraid of the captain himself than anybody else who
    knew him.
  1482. prop
    a support placed beneath or against something to keep it from shaking or falling
    I plucked up courage at once, crossed the threshold, and walked right up
    to the man where he stood, propped on his crutch, talking to a customer.
  1483. first of all
    before anything else
    " First of all we'll try the book," observed the doctor.
  1484. confidential
    given in secret
    Get back to your place for a lubber, Tom."

    And then, as Morgan rolled back to his seat, Silver added to me in a
    confidential whisper that was very flattering, as I thought, "He's
    quite an honest man, Tom Morgan, on'y stupid.
  1485. Down
    English physician who first described Down's syndrome
    " Down with the door!" he cried.
  1486. cleanse
    clean one's body or parts thereof, as by washing
    Just before him Tom
    lay motionless upon the sward; but the murderer minded him not a whit,
    cleansing his blood-stained knife the while upon a wisp of grass.
  1487. room
    an area within a building enclosed by walls and floor and ceiling
    If ever he mentioned it, the captain blew through
    his nose so loudly that you might say he roared, and stared my poor
    father out of the room.
  1488. bush
    a woody perennial plant usually having several major stems
    So there we had to stay--my mother almost entirely exposed and both of
    us within earshot of the inn.




    5

    The Last of the Blind Man

    MY curiosity, in a sense, was stronger than my fear, for I could not
    remain where I was, but crept back to the bank again, whence, sheltering
    my head behind a bush of broom, I might command the road before our
    door.
  1489. life
    the organic phenomenon that distinguishes living organisms
    Often I have heard the house
    shaking with "Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum," all the neighbours joining
    in for dear life, with the fear of death upon them, and each singing
    louder than the other to avoid remark.
  1490. boom
    a deep prolonged loud noise
    The booms
    were tearing at the blocks, the rudder was banging to and fro, and the
    whole ship creaking, groaning, and jumping like a manufactory.
  1491. bounce
    spring back; spring away from an impact
    As soon as I was mounted, holding on to Dogger's belt, the supervisor
    gave the word, and the party struck out at a bouncing trot on the road
    to Dr. Livesey's house.




    6

    The Captain's Papers

    WE rode hard all the way till we drew up before Dr. Livesey's door.
  1492. Trinidad
    an island in West Indies just off the northeastern coast of Venezuela
    I've seen his top-sails with
    these eyes, off Trinidad, and the cowardly son of a rum-puncheon that I
    sailed with put back--put back, sir, into Port of Spain."
  1493. dismount
    alight from (a horse)
    In the meantime the
    supervisor rode on, as fast as he could, to Kitt's Hole; but his men
    had to dismount and grope down the dingle, leading, and sometimes
    supporting, their horses, and in continual fear of ambushes; so it was
    no great matter for surprise that when they got down to the Hole the
    lugger was already under way, though still close in.
  1494. nineteen
    the cardinal number that is the sum of eighteen and one
    In the meantime, talk as we pleased, there
    were only seven out of the twenty-six on whom we knew we could rely; and
    out of these seven one was a boy, so that the grown men on our side were
    six to their nineteen.
  1495. grandly
    in a grand manner
    It is for you to speak," says Mr. Trelawney
    grandly.
  1496. cool
    neither warm nor very cold; giving relief from heat
    "I have
    drawn blood enough to keep him quiet awhile; he should lie for a week
    where he is--that is the best thing for him and you; but another stroke
    would settle him."




    3

    The Black Spot

    ABOUT noon I stopped at the captain's door with some cooling drinks
    and medicines.
  1497. at least
    not less than
    For me, at least, there was no secret about the matter, for
    I was, in a way, a sharer in his alarms.
  1498. at work
    on the job
    The doctor had to go
    to London for a physician to take charge of his practice; the squire was
    hard at work at Bristol; and I lived on at the hall under the charge of
    old Redruth, the gamekeeper, almost a prisoner, but full of sea-dreams
    and the most charming anticipations of strange islands and adventures.
  1499. extricate
    release from entanglement of difficulty
    Instantly I began to extricate myself and crawl back again, with what
    speed and silence I could manage, to the more open portion of the
    wood.
  1500. outside
    the region that is outside of something
    "Draw down the blind, Jim," whispered my mother; "they might come and
    watch outside.
  1501. complete
    having all necessary qualities
    The ship's company complete!"
  1502. begging
    a solicitation for money or food
    Now, treasure is ticklish work; I don't
    like treasure voyages on any account, and I don't like them, above all,
    when they are secret and when ( begging your pardon, Mr. Trelawney) the
    secret has been told to the parrot."
  1503. get on with
    have smooth relations
    It was something to see him wedge the
    foot of the crutch against a bulkhead, and propped against it, yielding
    to every movement of the ship, get on with his cooking like someone safe
    ashore.
  1504. belief
    any cognitive content held as true
    He never particularly addressed me, and it is my
    belief he had as good as forgotten his confidences; but his temper was
    more flighty, and allowing for his bodily weakness, more violent than
    ever.
  1505. flap
    move in a wavy pattern or with a rising and falling motion
    In the meantime, the captain gradually
    brightened up at his own music, and at last flapped his hand upon
    the table before him in a way we all knew to mean silence.
  1506. full moon
    the time when the Moon is fully illuminated
    A full moon was beginning to rise and peered
    redly through the upper edges of the fog, and this increased our haste,
    for it was plain, before we came forth again, that all would be as
    bright as day, and our departure exposed to the eyes of any watchers.
  1507. slip in
    insert casually
    I could hear people
    tumbling up from the cabin and the forecastle, and slipping in an
    instant outside my barrel, I dived behind the fore-sail, made a double
    towards the stern, and came out upon the open deck in time to join
    Hunter and Dr. Livesey in the rush for the weather bow.
  1508. at hand
    close in space; within reach
    The neighbourhood, to our ears, seemed haunted by
    approaching footsteps; and what between the dead body of the captain
    on the parlour floor and the thought of that detestable blind beggar
    hovering near at hand and ready to return, there were moments when, as
    the saying goes, I jumped in my skin for terror.
  1509. overjoyed
    extremely joyful
    I
    set off, overjoyed at this opportunity to see some more of the ships and
    seamen, and picked my way among a great crowd of people and carts and
    bales, for the dock was now at its busiest, until I found the tavern in
    question.
  1510. pound
    16 ounces avoirdupois
    Then there followed a great to-do through all our old inn, heavy feet
    pounding to and fro, furniture thrown over, doors kicked in, until the
    very rocks re-echoed and the men came out again, one after another, on
    the road and declared that we were nowhere to be found.
  1511. reduce
    make smaller
    There was little else in the volume but a few bearings of places noted
    in the blank leaves towards the end and a table for reducing French,
    English, and Spanish moneys to a common value.
  1512. across
    to the opposite side
    I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the
    inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow--a
    tall, strong, heavy, nut-brown man, his tarry pigtail falling over the
    shoulder of his soiled blue coat, his hands ragged and scarred, with
    black, broken nails, and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid
    white.
  1513. creep
    move slowly
    So there we had to stay--my mother almost entirely exposed and both of
    us within earshot of the inn.




    5

    The Last of the Blind Man

    MY curiosity, in a sense, was stronger than my fear, for I could not
    remain where I was, but crept back to the bank again, whence, sheltering
    my head behind a bush of broom, I might command the road before our
    door.
  1514. rapidity
    a rate that is rapid
    And the parrot would say, with great rapidity, "Pieces of eight!
  1515. yet
    up to the present time
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  1516. knocked out
    knocked unconscious by a heavy blow
    There was a porch at the door, and under this porch
    the little spring welled up into an artificial basin of a rather odd
    kind--no other than a great ship's kettle of iron, with the bottom
    knocked out, and sunk "to her bearings," as the captain said, among the
    sand.
  1517. breakfast
    the first meal of the day (usually in the morning)
    Well, mother was upstairs with father and I was laying the
    breakfast-table against the captain's return when the parlour door
    opened and a man stepped in on whom I had never set my eyes before.
  1518. amphitheatre
    an oval large stadium with tiers of seats
    The place was entirely land-locked, buried in woods, the trees coming
    right down to high-water mark, the shores mostly flat, and the hilltops
    standing round at a distance in a sort of amphitheatre, one here, one
    there.
  1519. grey
    of an achromatic color intermediate between white and black
    It was one January morning, very early--a pinching, frosty morning--the
    cove all grey with hoar-frost, the ripple lapping softly on the stones,
    the sun still low and only touching the hilltops and shining far to
    seaward.
  1520. clue
    evidence that helps to solve a problem
    What I want to know is this: Supposing that I have here in my pocket
    some clue to where Flint buried his treasure, will that treasure amount
    to much?"
  1521. to the letter
    in every detail
    We both obeyed him to the letter, and I saw him pass something from the
    hollow of the hand that held his stick into the palm of the captain's,
    which closed upon it instantly.
  1522. unearth
    recover through digging
    Long John Silver unearthed a very
    competent man for a mate, a man named Arrow.
  1523. rout
    an overwhelming defeat
    I'm not a doctor only; I'm a magistrate; and if I catch a breath
    of complaint against you, if it's only for a piece of incivility like
    tonight's, I'll take effectual means to have you hunted down and routed
    out of this.
  1524. cloud
    a visible mass of water or ice particles suspended at a considerable altitude
    There was a street on each side and an open door on both, which
    made the large, low room pretty clear to see in, in spite of clouds of
    tobacco smoke.
  1525. thumping
    a heavy dull sound (as made by impact of heavy objects)
    And here a fresh alarm brought me to a standstill with a thumping heart.




    15

    The Man of the Island

    FROM the side of the hill, which was here steep and stony, a spout of
    gravel was dislodged and fell rattling and bounding through the trees.
  1526. gloomy
    depressingly dark
    Of all the gloomy features of that gloomy afternoon, this obvious
    anxiety on the part of Long John appeared the worst.
  1527. thank you
    a conversational expression of gratitude
    And I'll thank you for that bag, Mrs. Crossley,
    to bring back our lawful money in."
  1528. will
    the capability of conscious choice and decision
    "Were you addressing me, sir?" says the doctor; and when the ruffian had
    told him, with another oath, that this was so, "I have only one thing to
    say to you, sir," replies the doctor, "that if you keep on drinking rum,
    the world will soon be quit of a very dirty scoundrel!"
  1529. for instance
    as an example
    Once, for instance, to our extreme wonder, he piped up to a
    different air, a king of country love-song that he must have learned in
    his youth before he had begun to follow the sea.
  1530. duck
    small wild or domesticated web-footed broad-billed swimming bird usually having a depressed body and short legs
    We'll have favourable
    winds, a quick passage, and not the least difficulty in finding the
    spot, and money to eat, to roll in, to play duck and drake with ever
    after."
  1531. taut
    pulled or drawn tight
    "Silver," said the other man--and I observed he was not only red in the
    face, but spoke as hoarse as a crow, and his voice shook too, like a
    taut rope--"Silver," says he, "you're old, and you're honest, or has the
    name for it; and you've money too, which lots of poor sailors hasn't;
    and you're brave, or I'm mistook.
  1532. tonnage
    a tax imposed on ships that enter the US
    On our little walk along the quays, he made himself the most interesting
    companion, telling me about the different ships that we passed by,
    their rig, tonnage, and nationality, explaining the work that was going
    forward--how one was discharging, another taking in cargo, and a third
    making ready for sea--and every now and then telling me some little
    anecdote of ships or seamen or repeating a nautical phrase till I had
    learned it perfectly.
  1533. flash
    emit a brief burst of light
    Almost at the same time a
    pistol-shot, flash and report, came from the hedge side.
  1534. bye
    a farewell remark
    I said good- bye to Mother and the
    cove where I had lived since I was born, and the dear old Admiral
    Benbow--since he was repainted, no longer quite so dear.
  1535. in vain
    to no avail
    But haste was all in vain.
  1536. look to
    turn one's interests or expectations towards
    At last in strode the captain, slammed the door behind him, without
    looking to the right or left, and marched straight across the room to
    where his breakfast awaited him.
  1537. head up
    be the first or leading member of (a group) and excel
    "I'm a plain man; rum
    and bacon and eggs is what I want, and that head up there for to watch
    ships off.
  1538. underneath
    on the lower or downward side; on the underside of
    Underneath there
    was an old boat-cloak, whitened with sea-salt on many a harbour-bar.
  1539. conical
    relating to or resembling a cone
    All three seemed sharp and conical in figure.
  1540. busy
    actively or fully engaged or occupied
    He sank daily, and my mother
    and I had all the inn upon our hands, and were kept busy enough without
    paying much regard to our unpleasant guest.
  1541. cling
    hold on tightly or tenaciously
    The blind man clung close to me, holding me in one iron fist
    and leaning almost more of his weight on me than I could carry.
  1542. on the spot
    at the place in question; there
    I was monstrously touched--so would you have
    been--and, out of pure pity, I engaged him on the
    spot
    to be ship's cook.
  1543. seat
    any support where you can sit
    Then followed a battle of looks between them, but the captain soon
    knuckled under, put up his weapon, and resumed his seat, grumbling like
    a beaten dog.
  1544. Jack
    a man who serves as a sailor
    I been in places hot as pitch, and mates
    dropping round with Yellow Jack, and the blessed land a-heaving like the
    sea with earthquakes--what to the doctor know of lands like that?--and I
    lived on rum, I tell you.
  1545. south
    the direction corresponding to the southward cardinal compass point
    The bar silver is in the north cache; you can find
    it by the trend of the east hummock, ten fathoms
    south of the black crag with the face on it.
  1546. count
    determine the number or amount of
    "And now, sir," continued the doctor, "since I now know there's such a
    fellow in my district, you may count I'll have an eye upon you day and
    night.
  1547. fit
    meeting adequate standards for a purpose
    For in these fits he was the most
    overriding companion ever known; he would slap his hand on the table for
    silence all round; he would fly up in a passion of anger at a question,
    or sometimes because none was put, and so he judged the company was not
    following his story.
  1548. chill
    coldness due to a cold environment
    The sun had just set, the sea breeze was rustling and tumbling in the
    woods and ruffling the grey surface of the anchorage; the tide, too, was
    far out, and great tracts of sand lay uncovered; the air, after the heat
    of the day, chilled me through my jacket.
  1549. curl up
    shape one's body into a curl
    In a jiffy I had slipped over the side and curled up in the
    fore-sheets of the nearest boat, and almost at the same moment she
    shoved off.
  1550. burnish
    polish and make shiny
    To me he was
    unweariedly kind, and always glad to see me in the galley, which he kept
    as clean as a new pin, the dishes hanging up burnished and his parrot in
    a cage in one corner.
  1551. aim
    point or cause to go towards
    Just
    at the door the captain aimed at the fugitive one last tremendous
    cut, which would certainly have split him to the chine had it not been
    intercepted by our big signboard of Admiral Benbow.
  1552. cloudless
    free from clouds
    The sky was bright
    and cloudless overhead, and the tops of the trees shone rosily in
    the sun.
  1553. skirt
    a garment hanging from the waist
    The captain had risen earlier than usual and set out down the
    beach, his cutlass swinging under the broad skirts of the old blue coat,
    his brass telescope under his arm, his hat tilted back upon his head.
  1554. cable
    a very strong thick rope made of twisted hemp or steel wire
    "Take your hat, Hawkins, and we'll see
    the ship."




    9

    Powder and Arms

    THE HISPANIOLA lay some way out, and we went under the figureheads and
    round the sterns of many other ships, and their cables sometimes grated
    underneath our keel, and sometimes swung above us.
  1555. breaking
    the act of breaking something
    I remember him looking round the cover and whistling to himself
    as he did so, and then breaking out in that old sea-song that he sang so
    often afterwards:

    "Fifteen men on the dead man's chest--
    Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!"

    in the high, old tottering voice that seemed to have been tuned and
    broken at the capstan bars.
  1556. ration
    a fixed portion that is allotted
    But the rations
    are short, very short--so short, Dr. Livesey, that we're perhaps as well
    without that extra mouth."
  1557. sink
    fall or descend to a lower place or level
    He sank daily, and my mother
    and I had all the inn upon our hands, and were kept busy enough without
    paying much regard to our unpleasant guest.
  1558. pair
    a set of two similar things considered as a unit
    Once out upon the road, Black
    Dog, in spite of his wound, showed a wonderful clean pair of heels and
    disappeared over the edge of the hill in half a minute.
  1559. distant
    separated in space or coming from far away
    In the meantime, the squire and Captain Smollett were still on pretty
    distant terms with one another.
  1560. tallow
    a hard substance used for making soap and candles
    It was the tallow-faced man, wanting two fingers, who had come
    first to the Admiral Benbow.
  1561. wounded
    suffering from physical injury especially that suffered in battle
    Where is he wounded?"
  1562. risen
    (of e.g. celestial bodies) above the horizon
    The captain had risen earlier than usual and set out down the
    beach, his cutlass swinging under the broad skirts of the old blue coat,
    his brass telescope under his arm, his hat tilted back upon his head.
  1563. grapple
    come to terms with
    I seen him grapple
    four and knock their heads together--him unarmed."
  1564. beginning
    the act of starting something
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  1565. mile
    a unit of length equal to 1,760 yards or 5,280 feet
    On the night before the funeral
    he was as drunk as ever; and it was shocking, in that house of mourning,
    to hear him singing away at his ugly old sea-song; but weak as he was,
    we were all in the fear of death for him, and the doctor was suddenly
    taken up with a case many miles away and was never near the house after
    my father's death.
  1566. scarecrow
    an effigy in the shape of a man to frighten birds away from seeds
    I
    followed him in, and I remember observing the contrast the neat, bright
    doctor, with his powder as white as snow and his bright, black eyes and
    pleasant manners, made with the coltish country folk, and above all,
    with that filthy, heavy, bleared scarecrow of a pirate of ours, sitting,
    far gone in rum, with his arms on the table.
  1567. frenzy
    state of violent mental agitation
    And that was
    plainly the last signal of danger, for the buccaneers turned at once
    and ran, separating in every direction, one seaward along the cove, one
    slant across the hill, and so on, so that in half a minute not a sign of
    them remained but Pew. Him they had deserted, whether in sheer panic
    or out of revenge for his ill words and blows I know not; but there he
    remained behind, tapping up and down the road in a frenzy, and groping
    and calling for his comrades.
  1568. tailed
    having a tail of a specified kind; often used in combination
    And I was going to sea myself, to sea in a schooner, with a piping
    boatswain and pig- tailed singing seamen, to sea, bound for an unknown
    island, and to seek for buried treasure!
  1569. laying
    the production of eggs (especially in birds)
    Well, mother was upstairs with father and I was laying the
    breakfast-table against the captain's return when the parlour door
    opened and a man stepped in on whom I had never set my eyes before.
  1570. thrown
    caused to fall to the ground
    "Give me the key," said my mother; and though the lock was very stiff,
    she had turned it and thrown back the lid in a twinkling.
  1571. gasp
    a short labored intake of breath with the mouth open
    The captain made a sort of gasp.
  1572. ruffle
    stir up (water) so as to form ripples
    The sun had just set, the sea breeze was rustling and tumbling in the
    woods and ruffling the grey surface of the anchorage; the tide, too, was
    far out, and great tracts of sand lay uncovered; the air, after the heat
    of the day, chilled me through my jacket.
  1573. forth
    forward in time, order, or degree
    One of the cocks of his
    hat having fallen down, he let it hang from that day forth, though it
    was a great annoyance when it blew.
  1574. clean out
    deprive completely of money or goods
    "Gray told me nothing, and I asked
    him nothing; and what's more, I would see you and him and this whole
    island blown clean out of the water into blazes first.
  1575. wanting
    inadequate in amount or degree
    He
    was a pale, tallowy creature, wanting two fingers of the left hand, and
    though he wore a cutlass, he did not look much like a fighter.
  1576. matter
    that which has mass and occupies space
    For me, at least, there was no secret about the matter, for
    I was, in a way, a sharer in his alarms.
  1577. spirit
    the vital principle or animating force within living things
    "Here's luck," "A fair wind," and "Billy Bones his
    fancy," were very neatly and clearly executed on the forearm; and up
    near the shoulder there was a sketch of a gallows and a man hanging from
    it--done, as I thought, with great spirit.
  1578. get off
    leave a vehicle, aircraft, etc.
    They've got off clean, and there's
    an end.
  1579. clash
    crash together with violent impact
    And again, "If it
    comes to swinging, swing all, say I."

    Then all of a sudden there was a tremendous explosion of oaths and
    other noises--the chair and table went over in a lump, a clash of steel
    followed, and then a cry of pain, and the next instant I saw Black
    Dog in full flight, and the captain hotly pursuing, both with drawn
    cutlasses, and the former streaming blood from the left shoulder.
  1580. red
    the chromatic color resembling the hue of blood
    There were several additions of a
    later date, but above all, three crosses of red ink--two on the north
    part of the island, one in the southwest--and beside this last, in
    the same red ink, and in a small, neat hand, very different from the
    captain's tottery characters, these words: "Bulk of treasure here."
  1581. wound
    an injury to living tissue
    Once out upon the road, Black
    Dog, in spite of his wound, showed a wonderful clean pair of heels and
    disappeared over the edge of the hill in half a minute.
  1582. brave
    possessing or displaying courage
    "He had good
    schooling in his young days and can speak like a book when so minded;
    and brave--a lion's nothing alongside of Long John!
  1583. longer
    for more time
    He wandered a little longer, his voice growing weaker; but soon after I
    had given him his medicine, which he took like a child, with the remark,
    "If ever a seaman wanted drugs, it's me," he fell at last into a heavy,
    swoon-like sleep, in which I left him.
  1584. snipe
    Old or New World straight-billed game bird of the sandpiper family; of marshy areas; similar to the woodcocks
    Would not the first of them who saw me wring
    my neck like a snipe's?
  1585. coming
    of the relatively near future
    My father was always saying the inn would be
    ruined, for people would soon cease coming there to be tyrannized over
    and put down, and sent shivering to their beds; but I really believe his
    presence did us good.
  1586. week
    any period of seven consecutive days
    Often enough when the first
    of the month came round and I applied to him for my wage, he would only
    blow through his nose at me and stare me down, but before the week was
    out he was sure to think better of it, bring me my four-penny piece, and
    repeat his orders to look out for "the seafaring man with one leg."
  1587. fool
    a person who lacks good judgment
    That doctor's a fool, I tell you.
  1588. good enough
    adequately good for the circumstances
    I had
    to cling tight to the backstay, and the world turned giddily before my
    eyes, for though I was a good enough sailor when there was way on, this
    standing still and being rolled about like a bottle was a thing I never
    learned to stand without a qualm or so, above all in the morning, on an
    empty stomach.
  1589. liking
    a feeling of pleasure and enjoyment
    I'll have a glass of rum from this dear child here, as I've took
    such a liking to; and we'll sit down, if you please, and talk square,
    like old shipmates."
  1590. wash away
    remove by the application of water or other liquid and soap or some other cleaning agent
    Most of the soil had
    been washed away or buried in drift after the removal of the trees; only
    where the streamlet ran down from the kettle a thick bed of moss and
    some ferns and little creeping bushes were still green among the sand.
  1591. cleansing
    the act of making something clean
    Just before him Tom
    lay motionless upon the sward; but the murderer minded him not a whit,
    cleansing his blood-stained knife the while upon a wisp of grass.
  1592. in earnest
    in a serious manner
    I'm fifty, mark you; once back from this cruise, I set up
    gentleman in earnest.
  1593. turned out
    dressed well or smartly
    Mr. Arrow, first of all, turned out even worse than the captain had
    feared.
  1594. willow
    any of numerous deciduous trees and shrubs of the genus Salix
    I had crossed a marshy tract full of willows, bulrushes, and odd,
    outlandish, swampy trees; and I had now come out upon the skirts of an
    open piece of undulating, sandy country, about a mile long, dotted with
    a few pines and a great number of contorted trees, not unlike the oak
    in growth, but pale in the foliage, like willows.
  1595. noiseless
    making no sound
    We slipped along the hedges, noiseless and swift, nor did we see or hear
    anything to increase our terrors, till, to our relief, the door of the
    Admiral Benbow had closed behind us.
  1596. amount
    how much there is of something that you can quantify
    And
    she began to count over the amount of the captain's score from the
    sailor's bag into the one that I was holding.
  1597. rascal
    one who is playfully mischievous
    For what
    would they risk their rascal carcasses but money?"
  1598. party
    occasion on which people can assemble for social interaction
    People were frightened at the time, but on looking
    back they rather liked it; it was a fine excitement in a quiet country
    life, and there was even a party of the younger men who pretended to
    admire him, calling him a "true sea-dog" and a "real old salt" and
    such like names, and saying there was the sort of man that made England
    terrible at sea.
  1599. tread on
    place or press the foot on
    Only," he added, "I'm glad I trod on Master Pew's corns," for by
    this time he had heard my story.
  1600. put up
    place so as to be noticed
    When a seaman did put up at the Admiral Benbow
    (as now and then some did, making by the coast road for Bristol) he
    would look in at him through the curtained door before he entered the
    parlour; and he was always sure to be as silent as a mouse when any such
    was present.
  1601. languor
    inactivity; showing an unusual lack of energy
    The rocks of the Spy-glass re-echoed it a
    score of times; the whole troop of marsh-birds rose again, darkening
    heaven, with a simultaneous whirr; and long after that death yell was
    still ringing in my brain, silence had re-established its empire, and
    only the rustle of the redescending birds and the boom of the distant
    surges disturbed the languor of the afternoon.
  1602. smoking
    the act of smoking tobacco or other substances
    I found them all three seated round the table, a bottle of Spanish wine
    and some raisins before them, and the doctor smoking away, with his wig
    on his lap, and that, I knew, was a sign that he was agitated.
  1603. throat
    the passage to the stomach and lungs
    He
    cleared the hilt of his cutlass and loosened the blade in the sheath;
    and all the time we were waiting there he kept swallowing as if he felt
    what we used to call a lump in the throat.
  1604. coast
    the shore of a sea or ocean
    The man who came
    with the barrow told us the mail had set him down the morning before at
    the Royal George, that he had inquired what inns there were along the
    coast, and hearing ours well spoken of, I suppose, and described as
    lonely, had chosen it from the others for his place of residence.
  1605. blood
    the fluid that is pumped through the body by the heart
    And again, "If it
    comes to swinging, swing all, say I."

    Then all of a sudden there was a tremendous explosion of oaths and
    other noises--the chair and table went over in a lump, a clash of steel
    followed, and then a cry of pain, and the next instant I saw Black
    Dog in full flight, and the captain hotly pursuing, both with drawn
    cutlasses, and the former streaming blood from the left shoulder.
  1606. button
    a round fastener sewn to shirts and coats
    But dash my
    buttons!
  1607. sick
    affected by impairment of normal physical or mental function
    The captain spun round on his heel and fronted us; all the brown had
    gone out of his face, and even his nose was blue; he had the look of a
    man who sees a ghost, or the evil one, or something worse, if anything
    can be; and upon my word, I felt sorry to see him all in a moment turn
    so old and sick.
  1608. fable
    a short moral story
    "Captain Smollett," began the doctor with a smile, "did ever you hear
    the fable of the mountain and the mouse?
  1609. soak
    submerge in a liquid
    The thicket stretched down from the top of
    one of the sandy knolls, spreading and growing taller as it went, until
    it reached the margin of the broad, reedy fen, through which the nearest
    of the little rivers soaked its way into the anchorage.
  1610. back out
    move out of a space backwards
    But
    he was too deep, and too ready, and too clever for me, and by the time
    the two men had come back out of breath and confessed that they had lost
    the track in a crowd, and been scolded like thieves, I would have gone
    bail for the innocence of Long John Silver.
  1611. enclosing
    the act of enclosing something inside something else
    Well, on the knoll, and enclosing the spring, they had clapped a
    stout loghouse fit to hold two score of people on a pinch and loopholed
    for musketry on either side.
  1612. absurdly
    in an absurd manner or to an absurd degree
    They go
    the length of declaring that this honest creature
    would do anything for money, that the HISPANIOLA
    belonged to him, and that he sold it me absurdly
    high--the most transparent calumnies.
  1613. do up
    wrap for decorative purposes
    One fine day up went the signal,
    and here come Flint by himself in a little boat, and his head done up in
    a blue scarf.
  1614. unprotected
    lacking protection or defense
    The captain's order to mount at
    once and ride for Doctor Livesey would have left my mother alone
    and unprotected, which was not to be thought of.
  1615. service
    an act of help or assistance
    I asked him what was for his service, and he said he would take rum; but
    as I was going out of the room to fetch it, he sat down upon a table
    and motioned me to draw near.
  1616. incongruous
    lacking in harmony or compatibility or appropriateness
    He was clothed with tatters
    of old ship's canvas and old sea-cloth, and this extraordinary patchwork
    was all held together by a system of the most various and incongruous
    fastenings, brass buttons, bits of stick, and loops of tarry gaskin.
  1617. coughing
    a sudden noisy expulsion of air from the lungs that clears the air passages; a common symptom of upper respiratory infection or bronchitis or pneumonia or tuberculosis
    Our chimney was a square hole
    in the roof; it was but a little part of the smoke that found its way
    out, and the rest eddied about the house and kept us coughing and piping
    the eye.
  1618. beat up
    give a beating to
    'Ah,' says he, 'you can go ashore, if you like,
    and stay,' he says; 'but as for the ship, she'll beat up for more, by
    thunder!'
  1619. wonder
    the feeling aroused by something strange and surprising
    Once, for instance, to our extreme wonder, he piped up to a
    different air, a king of country love-song that he must have learned in
    his youth before he had begun to follow the sea.
  1620. standstill
    a situation in which no progress can be made
    And here a fresh alarm brought me to a standstill with a thumping heart.




    15

    The Man of the Island

    FROM the side of the hill, which was here steep and stony, a spout of
    gravel was dislodged and fell rattling and bounding through the trees.
  1621. funeral
    a ceremony at which a dead person is buried or cremated
    Our natural distress, the visits of the neighbours, the
    arranging of the funeral, and all the work of the inn to be carried on
    in the meanwhile kept me so busy that I had scarcely time to think of
    the captain, far less to be afraid of him.
  1622. dainty
    something considered choice to eat
    Ah, but I've lived easy
    in the meantime, never denied myself o' nothing heart desires, and slep'
    soft and ate dainty all my days but when at sea.
  1623. go under
    go under, "The raft sank and its occupants drowned"
    "Take your hat, Hawkins, and we'll see
    the ship."




    9

    Powder and Arms

    THE HISPANIOLA lay some way out, and we went under the figureheads and
    round the sterns of many other ships, and their cables sometimes grated
    underneath our keel, and sometimes swung above us.
  1624. have the best
    overcome, usually through no fault or weakness of the person that is overcome
    In three weeks' time--three
    weeks!--two weeks--ten days--we'll have the best ship, sir, and the
    choicest crew in England.
  1625. runner
    someone who travels on foot by running
    Ben's a good runner; few
    seamen run better than Ben. He should run him down, hand over hand, by
    the powers!
  1626. shrewdness
    intelligence manifested by being astute
    "AND a passage home?" he added with a look of great shrewdness.
  1627. way out
    an opening that permits escape or release
    "Take your hat, Hawkins, and we'll see
    the ship."




    9

    Powder and Arms

    THE HISPANIOLA lay some way out, and we went under the figureheads and
    round the sterns of many other ships, and their cables sometimes grated
    underneath our keel, and sometimes swung above us.
  1628. shirk
    avoid one's assigned duties
    "Search him, some of you shirking lubbers, and the rest of you aloft and
    get the chest," he cried.
  1629. brandy
    distilled from wine or fermented fruit juice
    I could hear as well as see that brandy-faced rascal Israel Hands
    plumping down a round-shot on the deck.
  1630. waiting
    the act of waiting
    The
    stranger kept hanging about just inside the inn door, peering round the
    corner like a cat waiting for a mouse.
  1631. hole
    an opening into or through something
    Some of the men who
    had been to field-work on the far side of the Admiral Benbow remembered,
    besides, to have seen several strangers on the road, and taking them to
    be smugglers, to have bolted away; and one at least had seen a little
    lugger in what we called Kitt's Hole.
  1632. wild
    in a natural state; not tamed or domesticated or cultivated
    There were nights when he took a deal more rum and water
    than his head would carry; and then he would sometimes sit and sing his
    wicked, old, wild sea-songs, minding nobody; but sometimes he would call
    for glasses round and force all the trembling company to listen to his
    stories or bear a chorus to his singing.
  1633. relieved
    made easier to bear
    First he recognized the doctor with
    an unmistakable frown; then his glance fell upon me, and he looked
    relieved.
  1634. nail
    a thin pointed piece of metal that is hammered into materials as a fastener
    I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the
    inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow--a
    tall, strong, heavy, nut-brown man, his tarry pigtail falling over the
    shoulder of his soiled blue coat, his hands ragged and scarred, with
    black, broken nails, and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid
    white.
  1635. thrifty
    mindful of the future in spending money
    " Thrifty man!" cried the doctor.
  1636. startled
    excited by sudden surprise or alarm and making a quick involuntary movement
    I was so much startled that I
    struggled to withdraw, but the blind man pulled me close up to him with
    a single action of his arm.
  1637. indeed
    in truth (often tends to intensify)
    And indeed bad as his clothes were and coarsely as he spoke, he had none
    of the appearance of a man who sailed before the mast, but seemed like
    a mate or skipper accustomed to be obeyed or to strike.
  1638. continual
    occurring without interruption
    In the meantime the
    supervisor rode on, as fast as he could, to Kitt's Hole; but his men
    had to dismount and grope down the dingle, leading, and sometimes
    supporting, their horses, and in continual fear of ambushes; so it was
    no great matter for surprise that when they got down to the Hole the
    lugger was already under way, though still close in.
  1639. fill
    make full, also in a metaphorical sense
    Indeed, it seemed
    impossible for either of us to remain much longer in the house; the fall
    of coals in the kitchen grate, the very ticking of the clock, filled
    us with alarms.
  1640. leer
    look suggestively or obliquely
    "Is this here table for my mate Bill?" he asked with a kind of leer.
  1641. unsteady
    not firmly or solidly positioned
    Rum! Rum!"

    I ran to fetch it, but I was quite unsteadied by all that had fallen
    out, and I broke one glass and fouled the tap, and while I was still
    getting in my own way, I heard a loud fall in the parlour, and running
    in, beheld the captain lying full length upon the floor.
  1642. people
    any group of human beings collectively
    Mostly
    he would not speak when spoken to, only look up sudden and fierce and
    blow through his nose like a fog-horn; and we and the people who came
    about our house soon learned to let him be.
  1643. cleared
    rid of objects or obstructions such as e.g. trees and brush
    He
    cleared the hilt of his cutlass and loosened the blade in the sheath;
    and all the time we were waiting there he kept swallowing as if he felt
    what we used to call a lump in the throat.
  1644. stagnant
    not growing or changing; without force or vitality
    A peculiar stagnant smell hung over the anchorage--a smell of
    sodden leaves and rotting tree trunks.
  1645. tail
    the posterior part of the body of a vertebrate especially when elongated and extending beyond the trunk or main part of the body
    One,
    tailing out behind the rest, was a lad that had gone from the hamlet to
    Dr. Livesey's; the rest were revenue officers, whom he had met by the
    way, and with whom he had had the intelligence to return at once.
  1646. jump on
    get up on the back of
    And so now I made
    up my mind instantly, and with no time lost returned to the shore and
    jumped on board the jolly-boat.
  1647. trample
    tread or stomp heavily or roughly
    Down went Pew with a cry that
    rang high into the night; and the four hoofs trampled and spurned him
    and passed by.
  1648. good fortune
    an auspicious state resulting from favorable outcomes
    We were
    just at the little bridge, by good fortune; and I helped her, tottering
    as she was, to the edge of the bank, where, sure enough, she gave a sigh
    and fell on my shoulder.
  1649. hoist
    raise or haul up with or as if with mechanical help
    Between us, with much trouble, we managed to hoist him upstairs, and
    laid him on his bed, where his head fell back on the pillow as if he
    were almost fainting.
  1650. half-dozen
    denoting a quantity consisting of six items or units
    Not one of the men ashore had a musket, and before
    they could get within range for pistol shooting, we flattered ourselves
    we should be able to give a good account of a half-dozen at least.
  1651. throw
    propel through the air
    Oh, I
    see what you're at--there"; and he threw down three or four gold pieces
    on the threshold.
  1652. repugnance
    intense aversion
    Overcoming a strong repugnance, I tore open his shirt at the neck, and
    there, sure enough, hanging to a bit of tarry string, which I cut with
    his own gully, we found the key.
  1653. cropped
    (of land or soil) used for growing crops
    Long before it was done, Mr.
    Trelawney (that, you will remember, was the squire's name) had got up
    from his seat and was striding about the room, and the doctor, as if to
    hear the better, had taken off his powdered wig and sat there looking
    very strange indeed with his own close- cropped black poll.
  1654. seven
    the cardinal number that is the sum of six and one
    It was not yet seven, she said, by a long way; she
    knew her rights and she would have them; and she was still arguing with
    me when a little low whistle sounded a good way off upon the hill.
  1655. wheeling
    propelling something on wheels
    The plunge of our anchor sent up
    clouds of birds wheeling and crying over the woods, but in less than a
    minute they were down again and all was once more silent.
  1656. company
    an institution created to conduct business
    Much company, mate?"
  1657. finger
    any of the terminal members of the hand
    He
    was a pale, tallowy creature, wanting two fingers of the left hand, and
    though he wore a cutlass, he did not look much like a fighter.
  1658. well up
    come up
    There was a porch at the door, and under this porch
    the little spring welled up into an artificial basin of a rather odd
    kind--no other than a great ship's kettle of iron, with the bottom
    knocked out, and sunk "to her bearings," as the captain said, among the
    sand.
  1659. edge
    a line determining the limits of an area
    Once out upon the road, Black
    Dog, in spite of his wound, showed a wonderful clean pair of heels and
    disappeared over the edge of the hill in half a minute.
  1660. get out
    move out of or depart from
    The bundle was sewn together, and the doctor had to get out his
    instrument case and cut the stitches with his medical scissors.
  1661. touching
    arousing affect
    It was one January morning, very early--a pinching, frosty morning--the
    cove all grey with hoar-frost, the ripple lapping softly on the stones,
    the sun still low and only touching the hilltops and shining far to
    seaward.
  1662. sleep
    a natural and periodic state of rest
    He wandered a little longer, his voice growing weaker; but soon after I
    had given him his medicine, which he took like a child, with the remark,
    "If ever a seaman wanted drugs, it's me," he fell at last into a heavy,
    swoon-like sleep, in which I left him.
  1663. come on
    move towards
    "And now," added the doctor, "Jim may come on board with us, may he
    not?"
  1664. Old
    of a very early stage in development
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  1665. lump
    a compact mass
    He
    cleared the hilt of his cutlass and loosened the blade in the sheath;
    and all the time we were waiting there he kept swallowing as if he felt
    what we used to call a lump in the throat.
  1666. surface
    the outer boundary of an artifact or a material layer
    Sitting by the fire in the housekeeper's room, I
    approached that island in my fancy from every possible direction; I
    explored every acre of its surface; I climbed a thousand times to that
    tall hill they call the Spy-glass, and from the top enjoyed the most
    wonderful and changing prospects.
  1667. magistrate
    a lay judge or civil authority who administers the law
    I'm not a doctor only; I'm a magistrate; and if I catch a breath
    of complaint against you, if it's only for a piece of incivility like
    tonight's, I'll take effectual means to have you hunted down and routed
    out of this.
  1668. shaking
    the act of causing something to move up and down (or back and forth) with quick movements
    Often I have heard the house
    shaking with "Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum," all the neighbours joining
    in for dear life, with the fear of death upon them, and each singing
    louder than the other to avoid remark.
  1669. nautical
    relating to ships or navigation
    On our little walk along the quays, he made himself the most interesting
    companion, telling me about the different ships that we passed by,
    their rig, tonnage, and nationality, explaining the work that was going
    forward--how one was discharging, another taking in cargo, and a third
    making ready for sea--and every now and then telling me some little
    anecdote of ships or seamen or repeating a nautical phrase till I had
    learned it perfectly.
  1670. in that
    (formal) in or into that thing or place
    I remember him looking round the cover and whistling to himself
    as he did so, and then breaking out in that old sea-song that he sang so
    often afterwards:

    "Fifteen men on the dead man's chest--
    Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!"

    in the high, old tottering voice that seemed to have been tuned and
    broken at the capstan bars.
  1671. wonderful
    extraordinarily good or great
    Once out upon the road, Black
    Dog, in spite of his wound, showed a wonderful clean pair of heels and
    disappeared over the edge of the hill in half a minute.
  1672. manner
    how something is done or how it happens
    I
    followed him in, and I remember observing the contrast the neat, bright
    doctor, with his powder as white as snow and his bright, black eyes and
    pleasant manners, made with the coltish country folk, and above all,
    with that filthy, heavy, bleared scarecrow of a pirate of ours, sitting,
    far gone in rum, with his arms on the table.
  1673. hunt
    pursue for food or sport (as of wild animals)
    I'm not a doctor only; I'm a magistrate; and if I catch a breath
    of complaint against you, if it's only for a piece of incivility like
    tonight's, I'll take effectual means to have you hunted down and routed
    out of this.
  1674. reddened
    (especially of the face) reddened or suffused with or as if with blood from emotion or exertion
    He was a tall man, over six
    feet high, and broad in proportion, and he had a bluff, rough-and-ready
    face, all roughened and reddened and lined in his long travels.
  1675. talker
    someone who expresses in language; someone who talks
    Neither did I, to be sure, he was so loose a talker; yet
    in this case I believe he was really right and that nobody had told the
    situation of the island.
  1676. Benjamin
    (Old Testament) the youngest and best-loved son of Jacob and Rachel and one of the twelve forebears of the tribes of Israel
    'As
    for you, Benjamin Gunn,' says they, 'here's a musket,' they says, 'and
    a spade, and pick-axe.
  1677. being
    the state or fact of existing
    Then it struck sharp on the inn door, and then we could hear the handle
    being turned and the bolt rattling as the wretched being tried to enter;
    and then there was a long time of silence both within and without.
  1678. treachery
    an act of deliberate betrayal
    But good did come of the apple barrel, as you shall hear, for if it had
    not been for that, we should have had no note of warning and might all
    have perished by the hand of treachery.
  1679. wisp
    a small tuft or lock
    Just before him Tom
    lay motionless upon the sward; but the murderer minded him not a whit,
    cleansing his blood-stained knife the while upon a wisp of grass.
  1680. excuse
    a defense of some offensive behavior
    He leaves his wife to manage the inn;
    and as she is a woman of colour, a pair of old
    bachelors like you and I may be excused for
    guessing that it is the wife, quite as much as the
    health, that sends him back to roving.
  1681. do it
    have sexual intercourse with
    I do not know how I found the strength to do it
    at all, and I am afraid it was roughly done, but I managed to drag her
    down the bank and a little way under the arch.
  1682. last word
    an authoritative statement
    But at my last words he perked up into a kind of startled
    slyness.
  1683. seated
    (of persons) having the torso erect and legs bent with the body supported on the buttocks
    When I returned with the rum, they were already seated on either side
    of the captain's breakfast-table--Black Dog next to the door and
    sitting sideways so as to have one eye on his old shipmate and one, as I
    thought, on his retreat.
  1684. quiet
    characterized by an absence of agitation or activity
    People were frightened at the time, but on looking
    back they rather liked it; it was a fine excitement in a quiet country
    life, and there was even a party of the younger men who pretended to
    admire him, calling him a "true sea-dog" and a "real old salt" and
    such like names, and saying there was the sort of man that made England
    terrible at sea.
  1685. patched
    mended usually clumsily by covering a hole with a patch
    I remember the appearance of his
    coat, which he patched himself upstairs in his room, and which, before
    the end, was nothing but patches.
  1686. append
    fix to; attach
    The record lasted over nearly twenty years, the amount of the separate
    entries growing larger as time went on, and at the end a grand total
    had been made out after five or six wrong additions, and these words
    appended, "Bones, his pile."
  1687. pin
    a small slender (often pointed) piece of wood or metal used to support or fasten or attach things
    He sprang to his feet, drew and opened
    a sailor's clasp-knife, and balancing it open on the palm of his hand,
    threatened to pin the doctor to the wall.
  1688. shelter
    covering that provides protection from the weather
    The more we told of our troubles, the more--man, woman,
    and child--they clung to the shelter of their houses.
  1689. pop
    make a sharp explosive noise
    But when they saw Redruth waiting for them in the sparred
    galley, they went about ship at once, and a head popped out again on
    deck.
  1690. fetch
    go or come after and bring or take back
    I asked him what was for his service, and he said he would take rum; but
    as I was going out of the room to fetch it, he sat down upon a table
    and motioned me to draw near.
  1691. bid
    propose a payment
    In one way, indeed, he bade fair to ruin us, for he kept on staying week
    after week, and at last month after month, so that all the money had
    been long exhausted, and still my father never plucked up the heart to
    insist on having more.
  1692. rippling
    a small wave on the surface of a liquid
    In the second place, the ebb was now making--a strong rippling current
    running westward through the basin, and then south'ard and seaward down
    the straits by which we had entered in the morning.
  1693. in case
    if there happens to be need
    All they would do was to give me a loaded pistol lest we were
    attacked, and to promise to have horses ready saddled in case we were
    pursued on our return, while one lad was to ride forward to the doctor's
    in search of armed assistance.
  1694. darkening
    changing to a darker color
    The rocks of the Spy-glass re-echoed it a
    score of times; the whole troop of marsh-birds rose again, darkening
    heaven, with a simultaneous whirr; and long after that death yell was
    still ringing in my brain, silence had re-established its empire, and
    only the rustle of the redescending birds and the boom of the distant
    surges disturbed the languor of the afternoon.
  1695. rider
    a traveler who actively sits and travels on an animal
    Finally he took a wrong turn and ran a few
    steps past me, towards the hamlet, crying, "Johnny, Black Dog, Dirk,"
    and other names, "you won't leave old Pew, mates--not old Pew!"

    Just then the noise of horses topped the rise, and four or five riders
    came in sight in the moonlight and swept at full gallop down the slope.
  1696. have a look
    look at with attention
    "And now, Master Billy Bones, if that be your name, we'll have a look at
    the colour of your blood.
  1697. spoonful
    as much as a spoon will hold
    If I had my way, I'd have Cap'n Smollett work us back
    into the trades at least; then we'd have no blessed miscalculations and
    a spoonful of water a day.
  1698. musketry
    the technique of using small arms (especially in battle)
    Well, on the knoll, and enclosing the spring, they had clapped a
    stout loghouse fit to hold two score of people on a pinch and loopholed
    for musketry on either side.
  1699. faithful
    loyal and reliable
    Hence there were still faithful men on
    board.
  1700. in the air
    on everybody's mind
    "Aye, aye, mates," said Long John, who was standing by, with his crutch
    under his arm, and at once broke out in the air and words I knew so
    well:

    "Fifteen men on the dead man's chest--"

    And then the whole crew bore chorus:--

    "Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!"
  1701. bear
    be pregnant with
    There were nights when he took a deal more rum and water
    than his head would carry; and then he would sometimes sit and sing his
    wicked, old, wild sea-songs, minding nobody; but sometimes he would call
    for glasses round and force all the trembling company to listen to his
    stories or bear a chorus to his singing.
  1702. doggedly
    with obstinate determination
    He had lain like
    a Trojan behind his mattress in the gallery; he had followed every order
    silently, doggedly, and well; he was the oldest of our party by a score
    of years; and now, sullen, old, serviceable servant, it was he that was
    to die.
  1703. deformed
    so badly formed or out of shape as to be ugly
    He was plainly blind, for he tapped
    before him with a stick and wore a great green shade over his eyes and
    nose; and he was hunched, as if with age or weakness, and wore a huge
    old tattered sea-cloak with a hood that made him appear positively
    deformed.
  1704. wink
    a reflex that closes and opens the eyes rapidly
    Tom had leaped at the sound, like a horse at the spur, but Silver had
    not winked an eye.
  1705. horror
    intense and profound fear
    If I don't have a drain o' rum, Jim, I'll have the horrors; I seen some
    on 'em already.
  1706. sweet
    having or denoting the characteristic taste of sugar
    That's short and sweet."
  1707. bed
    a piece of furniture that provides a place to sleep
    Nor would he allow anyone to leave the inn till he
    had drunk himself sleepy and reeled off to bed.
  1708. deserted
    forsaken by owner or inhabitants
    And now you see, mate, I'm pretty low,
    and deserted by all; and Jim, you'll bring me one noggin of rum, now,
    won't you, matey?"
  1709. sharp
    having a point or thin edge suitable for cutting or piercing
    Then it struck sharp on the inn door, and then we could hear the handle
    being turned and the bolt rattling as the wretched being tried to enter;
    and then there was a long time of silence both within and without.
  1710. appear
    come into sight or view
    Then he rapped on the door with a bit of
    stick like a handspike that he carried, and when my father appeared,
    called roughly for a glass of rum.
  1711. steep
    having a sharp inclination
    He clambered up
    and down stairs, and went from the parlour to the bar and back again,
    and sometimes put his nose out of doors to smell the sea, holding on to
    the walls as he went for support and breathing hard and fast like a man
    on a steep mountain.
  1712. stone
    a lump or mass of hard consolidated mineral matter
    It was one January morning, very early--a pinching, frosty morning--the
    cove all grey with hoar-frost, the ripple lapping softly on the stones,
    the sun still low and only touching the hilltops and shining far to
    seaward.
  1713. aloud
    using the voice; not silently
    And now," he ran on again,
    aloud, "let's see--Black Dog? No, I don't know the name, not I. Yet I
    kind of think I've--yes, I've seen the swab.
  1714. neck
    the part of an organism (human or animal) that connects the head to the rest of the body
    "Perhaps it's round his neck," suggested my mother.
  1715. Cain
    (Old Testament) Cain and Abel were the first children of Adam and Eve born after the Fall of Man; Cain killed Abel out of jealousy and was exiled by God
    I seen old Flint in the corner there, behind you; as
    plain as print, I seen him; and if I get the horrors, I'm a man that
    has lived rough, and I'll raise Cain.
  1716. rid
    relieve from
    Soon after, Dr. Livesey's horse came to the door and he rode away, but
    the captain held his peace that evening, and for many evenings to come.




    2

    Black Dog Appears and Disappears


    IT was not very long after this that there occurred the first of the
    mysterious events that rid us at last of the captain, though not, as you
    will see, of his affairs.
  1717. regret
    feel sorry for; be contrite about
    Master Pew's
    dead, when all's done; not that I regret it, but he's dead, you see, and
    people will make it out against an officer of his Majesty's revenue,
    if make it out they can.
  1718. to leeward
    the side sheltered from the wind
    You see, sir," he went on,
    "if once we dropped to leeward of the landing-place, it's hard to say
    where we should get ashore, besides the chance of being boarded by the
    gigs; whereas, the way we go the current must slacken, and then we can
    dodge back along the shore."
  1719. growling
    a gruff or angry utterance
    They lay about the deck growling
    together in talk.
  1720. held
    occupied or in the control of; often used in combination
    Soon after, Dr. Livesey's horse came to the door and he rode away, but
    the captain held his peace that evening, and for many evenings to come.




    2

    Black Dog Appears and Disappears


    IT was not very long after this that there occurred the first of the
    mysterious events that rid us at last of the captain, though not, as you
    will see, of his affairs.
  1721. rolling
    propelling something on wheels
    I'm to be a
    poor, crawling beggar, sponging for rum, when I might be rolling in a
    coach!
  1722. hot
    having a high or higher than desirable temperature
    I been in places hot as pitch, and mates
    dropping round with Yellow Jack, and the blessed land a-heaving like the
    sea with earthquakes--what to the doctor know of lands like that?--and I
    lived on rum, I tell you.
  1723. behaviour
    the way a person behaves toward other people
    Is that seamanly behaviour, now, I want to know?
  1724. filled
    generously supplied with
    Indeed, it seemed
    impossible for either of us to remain much longer in the house; the fall
    of coals in the kitchen grate, the very ticking of the clock, filled
    us with alarms.
  1725. diabolical
    showing cunning or ingenuity or wickedness
    On
    stormy nights, when the wind shook the four corners of the house and
    the surf roared along the cove and up the cliffs, I would see him in a
    thousand forms, and with a thousand diabolical expressions.
  1726. fifteen
    the cardinal number that is the sum of fourteen and one
    I remember him looking round the cover and whistling to himself
    as he did so, and then breaking out in that old sea-song that he sang so
    often afterwards:

    " Fifteen men on the dead man's chest--
    Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!"

    in the high, old tottering voice that seemed to have been tuned and
    broken at the capstan bars.
  1727. deplore
    express strong disapproval of
    As for my mother, when we had carried her up
    to the hamlet, a little cold water and salts and that soon brought her
    back again, and she was none the worse for her terror, though she still
    continued to deplore the balance of the money.
  1728. repeat
    say or state again
    Often enough when the first
    of the month came round and I applied to him for my wage, he would only
    blow through his nose at me and stare me down, but before the week was
    out he was sure to think better of it, bring me my four-penny piece, and
    repeat his orders to look out for "the seafaring man with one leg."
  1729. break off
    interrupt before its natural or planned end
    "It's the name of a buccaneer of my
    acquaintance; and I call you by it for the sake of shortness, and what I
    have to say to you is this; one glass of rum won't kill you, but if
    you take one you'll take another and another, and I stake my wig if you
    don't break off short, you'll die--do you understand that?--die, and go
    to your own place, like the man in the Bible.
  1730. terrible
    exceptionally bad or displeasing
    People were frightened at the time, but on looking
    back they rather liked it; it was a fine excitement in a quiet country
    life, and there was even a party of the younger men who pretended to
    admire him, calling him a "true sea-dog" and a "real old salt" and
    such like names, and saying there was the sort of man that made England
    terrible at sea.
  1731. hunch
    an impression that something might be the case
    He was plainly blind, for he tapped
    before him with a stick and wore a great green shade over his eyes and
    nose; and he was hunched, as if with age or weakness, and wore a huge
    old tattered sea-cloak with a hood that made him appear positively
    deformed.
  1732. body
    an individual 3-dimensional object that has mass
    Now the leg
    would be cut off at the knee, now at the hip; now he was a monstrous
    kind of a creature who had never had but the one leg, and that in the
    middle of his body.
  1733. strange
    unusual or out of the ordinary
    The name of
    Captain Flint, though it was strange to me, was well enough known to
    some there and carried a great weight of terror.
  1734. catechism
    an elementary book summarizing the principles of a religion
    And I was a civil,
    pious boy, and could rattle off my catechism that fast, as you couldn't
    tell one word from another.
  1735. bramble
    any of various rough thorny shrubs or vines
    Then I came to a long thicket of these oaklike trees--live, or
    evergreen, oaks, I heard afterwards they should be called--which grew
    low along the sand like brambles, the boughs curiously twisted, the
    foliage compact, like thatch.
  1736. clock
    a timepiece that shows the time of day
    Indeed, it seemed
    impossible for either of us to remain much longer in the house; the fall
    of coals in the kitchen grate, the very ticking of the clock, filled
    us with alarms.
  1737. discipline
    a system of rules of conduct or method of practice
    But the great
    thing for boys is discipline, sonny--discipline.
  1738. raised
    located or moved above the surround or above the normal position
    Between us we raised his head.
  1739. axe
    an edge tool with a heavy bladed head mounted across a handle
    'As
    for you, Benjamin Gunn,' says they, 'here's a musket,' they says, 'and
    a spade, and pick- axe.
  1740. particular
    unique or specific to a person or thing or category
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  1741. joining
    the act of bringing two things into contact
    Often I have heard the house
    shaking with "Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum," all the neighbours joining
    in for dear life, with the fear of death upon them, and each singing
    louder than the other to avoid remark.
  1742. hullo
    an expression of greeting
    Hullo, Hunter, is that you?" came the cries.
  1743. go to
    be present at (meetings, church services, university), etc.
    "It's the name of a buccaneer of my
    acquaintance; and I call you by it for the sake of shortness, and what I
    have to say to you is this; one glass of rum won't kill you, but if
    you take one you'll take another and another, and I stake my wig if you
    don't break off short, you'll die--do you understand that?--die, and go
    to
    your own place, like the man in the Bible.
  1744. humbug
    something intended to deceive
    "Silver, if you like," cried the squire; "but as for that intolerable
    humbug, I declare I think his conduct unmanly, unsailorly, and downright
    un-English."
  1745. bewildered
    perplexed by many conflicting situations or statements
    The captain, for
    his part, stood staring at the signboard like a bewildered man.
  1746. prettily
    in a pretty manner
    "Yes, sir," said he, "this is the spot, to be sure, and very prettily
    drawed out.
  1747. barring
    the act of excluding someone by a negative vote or veto
    Barring rum, his match were
    never seen.
  1748. piracy
    the act of plagiarizing
    The HISPANIOLA still lay where she had anchored; but, sure enough, there
    was the Jolly Roger--the black flag of piracy--flying from her peak.
  1749. to windward
    the side toward the wind
    If you would on'y lay your course, and a
    p'int to windward, you would ride in carriages, you would.
  1750. infectious
    relating to the invasion of germs that cause disease
    They say cowardice is infectious; but then argument is, on the other
    hand, a great emboldener; and so when each had said his say, my mother
    made them a speech.
  1751. square
    a polygon with four equal sides and four right angles
    I'll have a glass of rum from this dear child here, as I've took
    such a liking to; and we'll sit down, if you please, and talk square,
    like old shipmates."
  1752. calf
    young of domestic cattle
    "Why, what a precious old sea- calf I am!" he said at last, wiping his
    cheeks.
  1753. whiten
    turn white
    Underneath there
    was an old boat-cloak, whitened with sea-salt on many a harbour-bar.
  1754. rose
    any of many shrubs of the genus Rosa that bear roses
    A strong smell of tobacco and tar rose from the interior, but nothing
    was to be seen on the top except a suit of very good clothes, carefully
    brushed and folded.
  1755. hip
    either side of the body below the waist and above the thigh
    Now the leg
    would be cut off at the knee, now at the hip; now he was a monstrous
    kind of a creature who had never had but the one leg, and that in the
    middle of his body.
  1756. summoning
    calling up supposed supernatural forces by spells and incantations
    I had thought it to be the blind man's
    trumpet, so to speak, summoning his crew to the assault, but I now found
    that it was a signal from the hillside towards the hamlet, and from its
    effect upon the buccaneers, a signal to warn them of approaching danger.
  1757. cannibal
    a person who eats human flesh
    I began to recall what I had heard of cannibals.
  1758. here and there
    in or to various places; first this place and then that
    This appeal seemed to produce some effect, for two of the fellows began
    to look here and there among the lumber, but half-heartedly, I thought,
    and with half an eye to their own danger all the time, while the rest
    stood irresolute on the road.
  1759. creep up
    advance stealthily or unnoticed
    I will confess that I was far too much taken up with what was going on
    to be of the slightest use as sentry; indeed, I had already deserted
    my eastern loophole and crept up behind the captain, who had now seated
    himself on the threshold, with his elbows on his knees, his head in his
    hands, and his eyes fixed on the water as it bubbled out of the old iron
    kettle in the sand.
  1760. mine
    excavation from which ores and minerals are extracted
    But it was no affair of
    mine, I thought; and besides, it was difficult to know what to do.
  1761. mend
    restore by putting together what is torn or broken
    Even the honest hands must have caught
    the infection, for there was not one man aboard to mend another.
  1762. supper
    a light evening meal
    So a big pigeon pie was brought in and put on a sidetable, and I made
    a hearty supper, for I was as hungry as a hawk, while Mr. Dance was
    further complimented and at last dismissed.
  1763. shin
    the front part of the human leg between the knee and the ankle
    I believe the silly fellows must have thought they would break their
    shins over treasure as soon as they were landed, for they all came out
    of their sulks in a moment and gave a cheer that started the echo in a
    faraway hill and sent the birds once more flying and squalling round the
    anchorage.
  1764. growing
    relating to or suitable for growth
    I'll give you a golden guinea for a noggin, Jim."

    He was growing more and more excited, and this alarmed me for my father,
    who was very low that day and needed quiet; besides, I was reassured by
    the doctor's words, now quoted to me, and rather offended by the offer
    of a bribe.
  1765. enjoy
    derive or receive pleasure from
    The squire and I were both peering over his shoulder as he opened
    it, for Dr. Livesey had kindly motioned me to come round from the
    side-table, where I had been eating, to enjoy the sport of the search.
  1766. step in
    act as a substitute
    Well, mother was upstairs with father and I was laying the
    breakfast-table against the captain's return when the parlour door
    opened and a man stepped in on whom I had never set my eyes before.
  1767. fling
    throw with force or recklessness
    Now, the most goes for rum and a good fling, and to
    sea again in their shirts.
  1768. unhealthy
    not in or exhibiting good health in body or mind
    It was plainly a damp,
    feverish, unhealthy spot.
  1769. permission
    approval to do something
    "Squire," said he, "when Dance has had his ale he must, of course, be
    off on his Majesty's service; but I mean to keep Jim Hawkins here to
    sleep at my house, and with your permission, I propose we should have up
    the cold pie and let him sup."
  1770. and so on
    continuing in the same way
    And that was
    plainly the last signal of danger, for the buccaneers turned at once
    and ran, separating in every direction, one seaward along the cove, one
    slant across the hill, and so on, so that in half a minute not a sign of
    them remained but Pew. Him they had deserted, whether in sheer panic
    or out of revenge for his ill words and blows I know not; but there he
    remained behind, tapping up and down the road in a frenzy, and groping
    and calling for his comrades.
  1771. squint
    partly close one's eyes, as when hit by direct light
    At last, however,
    we got alongside, and were met and saluted as we stepped aboard by the
    mate, Mr. Arrow, a brown old sailor with earrings in his ears and a
    squint.
  1772. unlike
    marked by dissimilarity
    I had crossed a marshy tract full of willows, bulrushes, and odd,
    outlandish, swampy trees; and I had now come out upon the skirts of an
    open piece of undulating, sandy country, about a mile long, dotted with
    a few pines and a great number of contorted trees, not unlike the oak
    in growth, but pale in the foliage, like willows.
  1773. stretch out
    extend or stretch out to a greater or the full length
    He lay as we had left him, on his back, with his eyes
    open and one arm stretched out.
  1774. look for
    try to locate or discover, or try to establish the existence of
    Scatter and look for them, dogs!
  1775. bring in
    earn on some commercial or business transaction
    So a big pigeon pie was brought in and put on a sidetable, and I made
    a hearty supper, for I was as hungry as a hawk, while Mr. Dance was
    further complimented and at last dismissed.
  1776. wherever
    where in the world
    His skin, wherever it was exposed, was
    burnt by the sun; even his lips were black, and his fair eyes looked
    quite startling in so dark a face.
  1777. crossed
    placed crosswise
    He was only once crossed, and that was towards the end, when my poor
    father was far gone in a decline that took him off.
  1778. chink
    a narrow opening as e.g. between planks in a wall
    The cold evening breeze, of which I have spoken, whistled through every
    chink of the rude building and sprinkled the floor with a continual rain
    of fine sand.
  1779. customer
    someone who pays for goods or services
    The customers were mostly seafaring men, and they talked so loudly that
    I hung at the door, almost afraid to enter.
  1780. at any rate
    if nothing else
    They were pulling up, at any
    rate
    , horrified at the accident; and I soon saw what they were.
  1781. scarred
    blemished by injury or rough wear
    I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the
    inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow--a
    tall, strong, heavy, nut-brown man, his tarry pigtail falling over the
    shoulder of his soiled blue coat, his hands ragged and scarred, with
    black, broken nails, and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid
    white.
  1782. quack
    the harsh sound of a duck
    All at once there began to go a sort of bustle among the bulrushes;
    a wild duck flew up with a quack, another followed, and soon over the
    whole surface of the marsh a great cloud of birds hung screaming and
    circling in the air.
  1783. notice
    the act of paying attention
    But by this
    time we had all long ceased to pay any particular notice to the song; it
    was new, that night, to nobody but Dr. Livesey, and on him I observed it
    did not produce an agreeable effect, for he looked up for a moment quite
    angrily before he went on with his talk to old Taylor, the gardener, on
    a new cure for the rheumatics.
  1784. livid
    furiously angry
    I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the
    inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow--a
    tall, strong, heavy, nut-brown man, his tarry pigtail falling over the
    shoulder of his soiled blue coat, his hands ragged and scarred, with
    black, broken nails, and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid
    white.
  1785. quite an
    of an unusually noticeable or exceptional or remarkable kind
    Get back to your place for a lubber, Tom."

    And then, as Morgan rolled back to his seat, Silver added to me in a
    confidential whisper that was very flattering, as I thought, "He's
    quite an honest man, Tom Morgan, on'y stupid.
  1786. hither and thither
    from one place or situation to another
    I turned hither and thither among the
    trees.
  1787. sounding
    appearing to be as specified
    The doctor opened the seals with great care, and there fell out
    the map of an island, with latitude and longitude, soundings, names of
    hills and bays and inlets, and every particular that would be needed
    to bring a ship to a safe anchorage upon its shores.
  1788. appearance
    outward or visible aspect of a person or thing
    And indeed bad as his clothes were and coarsely as he spoke, he had none
    of the appearance of a man who sailed before the mast, but seemed like
    a mate or skipper accustomed to be obeyed or to strike.
  1789. afoot
    on foot; walking
    The night passed, and the next day, after dinner, Redruth and I were
    afoot again and on the road.
  1790. schooling
    the act of teaching at school
    "He had good
    schooling in his young days and can speak like a book when so minded;
    and brave--a lion's nothing alongside of Long John!
  1791. steadily
    at a continuous rate or pace
    The HISPANIOLA rolled steadily, dipping her bowsprit now and then with
    a whiff of spray.
  1792. climbing
    an event that involves rising to a higher point
    Then, climbing on the roof, he had with his own hand
    bent and run up the colours.
  1793. toast
    slices of bread that have been toasted
    When we got to the inn, the squire and Dr. Livesey were seated together,
    finishing a quart of ale with a toast in it, before they should go
    aboard the schooner on a visit of inspection.
  1794. indie
    not affiliated with a major recording company
    She was at the boarding of the viceroy of the Indies out of
    Goa, she was; and to look at her you would think she was a babby.
  1795. connoisseur
    an expert able to appreciate a field
    This, when it was brought to him,
    he drank slowly, like a connoisseur, lingering on the taste and still
    looking about him at the cliffs and up at our signboard.
  1796. creaking
    a squeaking sound
    The booms
    were tearing at the blocks, the rudder was banging to and fro, and the
    whole ship creaking, groaning, and jumping like a manufactory.
  1797. slight
    small in quantity or degree
    "My friend should, perhaps,
    have taken you along with him; but the slight, if there be one, was
    unintentional.
  1798. contribute
    provide
    Then it was that there came into my head the first of the mad notions
    that contributed so much to save our lives.
  1799. on the side
    without official authorization
    This quarrel was the saving of us, for while it was still raging,
    another sound came from the top of the hill on the side of the
    hamlet--the tramp of horses galloping.
  1800. protestation
    a strong declaration of protest
    And I could
    see that neither he nor the captain paid much regard to Mr. Trelawney's
    protestations.
  1801. counting
    the act of counting; reciting numbers in ascending order
    "Three," reckoned the captain; "ourselves make seven, counting Hawkins
    here.
  1802. sucking
    the act of sucking
    Don't you get sucking of
    that bilge, John.
  1803. now and then
    now and then or here and there
    When a seaman did put up at the Admiral Benbow
    (as now and then some did, making by the coast road for Bristol) he
    would look in at him through the curtained door before he entered the
    parlour; and he was always sure to be as silent as a mouse when any such
    was present.
  1804. toss
    throw with a light motion
    Nor was this all, for the sound of several footsteps running
    came already to our ears, and as we looked back in their direction, a
    light tossing to and fro and still rapidly advancing showed that one of
    the newcomers carried a lantern.
  1805. haunted
    inhabited by or as if by apparitions
    How that personage haunted my dreams, I need scarcely tell you.
  1806. sent
    caused or enabled to go or be conveyed or transmitted
    My father was always saying the inn would be
    ruined, for people would soon cease coming there to be tyrannized over
    and put down, and sent shivering to their beds; but I really believe his
    presence did us good.
  1807. tilted
    departing or being caused to depart from the true vertical or horizontal
    The captain had risen earlier than usual and set out down the
    beach, his cutlass swinging under the broad skirts of the old blue coat,
    his brass telescope under his arm, his hat tilted back upon his head.
  1808. hazy
    filled or abounding with fog or mist
    But that was by no means the worst of it, for after a
    day or two at sea he began to appear on deck with hazy eye, red cheeks,
    stuttering tongue, and other marks of drunkenness.
  1809. peer
    look searchingly
    The
    stranger kept hanging about just inside the inn door, peering round the
    corner like a cat waiting for a mouse.
  1810. useless
    having no beneficial utility
    He was not only useless as an officer and a bad influence amongst
    the men, but it was plain that at this rate he must soon kill himself
    outright, so nobody was much surprised, nor very sorry, when one dark
    night, with a head sea, he disappeared entirely and was seen no more.
  1811. prejudiced
    showing bias or bigotry or influenced by preconceived ideas
    There is a class of men in Bristol
    monstrously prejudiced against Blandly.
  1812. trembling
    vibrating slightly and irregularly
    There were nights when he took a deal more rum and water
    than his head would carry; and then he would sometimes sit and sing his
    wicked, old, wild sea-songs, minding nobody; but sometimes he would call
    for glasses round and force all the trembling company to listen to his
    stories or bear a chorus to his singing.
  1813. third
    one of three equal parts of a divisible whole
    On our little walk along the quays, he made himself the most interesting
    companion, telling me about the different ships that we passed by,
    their rig, tonnage, and nationality, explaining the work that was going
    forward--how one was discharging, another taking in cargo, and a third
    making ready for sea--and every now and then telling me some little
    anecdote of ships or seamen or repeating a nautical phrase till I had
    learned it perfectly.
  1814. sneer
    a facial expression of contempt or scorn
    As soon as I
    was back again he returned to his former manner, half fawning, half
    sneering, patted me on the shoulder, told me I was a good boy and he had
    taken quite a fancy to me.
  1815. cliff
    a steep high face of rock
    This, when it was brought to him,
    he drank slowly, like a connoisseur, lingering on the taste and still
    looking about him at the cliffs and up at our signboard.
  1816. ditch
    a long narrow excavation in the earth
    To see him leap and run and pursue me over hedge and
    ditch was the worst of nightmares.
  1817. recognize
    perceive to be the same
    First he recognized the doctor with
    an unmistakable frown; then his glance fell upon me, and he looked
    relieved.
  1818. a few
    more than one but indefinitely small in number
    And when I had pointed out the rock and told him how the captain was
    likely to return, and how soon, and answered a few other questions,
    "Ah," said he, "this'll be as good as drink to my mate Bill."
  1819. fathom
    a linear unit of measurement for water depth
    The bar silver is in the north cache; you can find
    it by the trend of the east hummock, ten fathoms
    south of the black crag with the face on it.
  1820. craft
    the skilled practice of a practical occupation
    "She seems a clever craft; more I can't say."
  1821. soft
    yielding readily to pressure or weight
    I held out my hand, and the horrible, soft-spoken, eyeless creature
    gripped it in a moment like a vise.
  1822. eight
    the cardinal number that is the sum of seven and one
    It was a long, difficult business, for the coins were of all countries
    and sizes--doubloons, and louis d'ors, and guineas, and pieces of eight,
    and I know not what besides, all shaken together at random.
  1823. deform
    assume a different shape or form
    He was plainly blind, for he tapped
    before him with a stick and wore a great green shade over his eyes and
    nose; and he was hunched, as if with age or weakness, and wore a huge
    old tattered sea-cloak with a hood that made him appear positively
    deformed.
  1824. indomitable
    impossible to subdue
    Between
    Silver and myself we got together in a few days a
    company of the toughest old salts imaginable--not
    pretty to look at, but fellows, by their faces, of
    the most indomitable spirit.
  1825. sharply
    very suddenly and to a great degree
    It was some time before either I or the captain seemed to gather our
    senses, but at length, and about at the same moment, I released his
    wrist, which I was still holding, and he drew in his hand and looked
    sharply into the palm.
  1826. cage
    an enclosure in which animals can be kept
    To me he was
    unweariedly kind, and always glad to see me in the galley, which he kept
    as clean as a new pin, the dishes hanging up burnished and his parrot in
    a cage in one corner.
  1827. disperse
    move away from each other
    The fog was rapidly
    dispersing; already the moon shone quite clear on the high ground on
    either side; and it was only in the exact bottom of the dell and round
    the tavern door that a thin veil still hung unbroken to conceal the
    first steps of our escape.
  1828. croak
    a harsh hoarse utterance (as of a frog)
    But there was no unusual sound--nothing but the low
    wash of the ripple and the croaking of the inmates of the wood.
  1829. drawn
    showing the wearing effects of overwork or care or suffering
    And again, "If it
    comes to swinging, swing all, say I."

    Then all of a sudden there was a tremendous explosion of oaths and
    other noises--the chair and table went over in a lump, a clash of steel
    followed, and then a cry of pain, and the next instant I saw Black
    Dog in full flight, and the captain hotly pursuing, both with drawn
    cutlasses, and the former streaming blood from the left shoulder.
  1830. walking
    the act of traveling by foot
    Dreadful stories
    they were--about hanging, and walking the plank, and storms at sea, and
    the Dry Tortugas, and wild deeds and places on the Spanish Main.
  1831. confidant
    someone to whom private matters are told
    He was a great confidant of Long John Silver, and so the mention of
    his name leads me on to speak of our ship's cook, Barbecue, as the men
    called him.
  1832. lamb
    young sheep
    Well now, I tell you, I'm not a boasting man, and you
    seen yourself how easy I keep company, but when I was quartermaster,
    LAMBS wasn't the word for Flint's old buccaneers.
  1833. itch
    an irritating cutaneous sensation that produces a desire to scratch
    The doctor looked it all over, as if his fingers were itching to open
    it; but instead of doing that, he put it quietly in the pocket of his
    coat.
  1834. reverently
    with reverence; in a reverent manner
    But he had an
    eye on Tom's passage for all that, and as soon as all was over, came
    forward with another flag and reverently spread it on the body.
  1835. uncouth
    lacking refinement or cultivation or taste
    With a cry John seized the branch of a tree, whipped the crutch out of
    his armpit, and sent that uncouth missile hurtling through the air.
  1836. at random
    in a random manner
    It was a long, difficult business, for the coins were of all countries
    and sizes--doubloons, and louis d'ors, and guineas, and pieces of eight,
    and I know not what besides, all shaken together at random.
  1837. detestable
    offensive to the mind
    The neighbourhood, to our ears, seemed haunted by
    approaching footsteps; and what between the dead body of the captain
    on the parlour floor and the thought of that detestable blind beggar
    hovering near at hand and ready to return, there were moments when, as
    the saying goes, I jumped in my skin for terror.
  1838. fit out
    provide with (something) usually for a specific purpose
    "It will amount to this: If we have the
    clue you talk about, I fit out a ship in Bristol dock, and take you and
    Hawkins here along, and I'll have that treasure if I search a year."
  1839. singly
    apart from others
    This even tint
    was indeed broken up by streaks of yellow sand-break in the lower lands,
    and by many tall trees of the pine family, out-topping the others--some
    singly, some in clumps; but the general colouring was uniform and sad.
  1840. fall short
    fail to meet (expectations or standards)
    Ball after ball flew
    over or fell short or kicked up the sand in the enclosure, but they had
    to fire so high that the shot fell dead and buried itself in the soft
    sand.
  1841. simultaneous
    occurring or operating at the same time
    The rocks of the Spy-glass re-echoed it a
    score of times; the whole troop of marsh-birds rose again, darkening
    heaven, with a simultaneous whirr; and long after that death yell was
    still ringing in my brain, silence had re-established its empire, and
    only the rustle of the redescending birds and the boom of the distant
    surges disturbed the languor of the afternoon.
  1842. talking to
    a lengthy rebuke
    I plucked up courage at once, crossed the threshold, and walked right up
    to the man where he stood, propped on his crutch, talking to a customer.
  1843. rip
    tear or be torn violently
    When I got back with the basin, the doctor had already ripped up the
    captain's sleeve and exposed his great sinewy arm.
  1844. predicament
    an unpleasant or difficult situation
    I had made my mind up in a moment, and by way of answer told him
    the whole story of our voyage and the predicament in which we found
    ourselves.
  1845. add
    join or combine or unite with others
    "There," John would
    add, "you can't touch pitch and not be mucked, lad.
  1846. changed
    made or become different in nature or form
    But suddenly his colour changed, and he tried to raise
    himself, crying, "Where's Black Dog?"

    "There is no Black Dog here," said the doctor, "except what you have
    on your own back.
  1847. on guard
    vigilant
    "Somebody hailing us," said Hunter, who was on guard.
  1848. business
    the principal activity in one's life to earn money
    Business is business.
  1849. few
    a small but indefinite number
    And when I had pointed out the rock and told him how the captain was
    likely to return, and how soon, and answered a few other questions,
    "Ah," said he, "this'll be as good as drink to my mate Bill."
  1850. obstinately
    in a stubborn unregenerate manner
    But my mother, frightened as she was, would not consent to take a
    fraction more than was due to her and was obstinately unwilling to be
    content with less.
  1851. swear
    to declare or affirm solemnly and formally as true
    But the blind man swore at them again for their delay.
  1852. candle
    stick of wax with a wick in the middle
    It was already candle-light when we reached the hamlet, and I shall
    never forget how much I was cheered to see the yellow shine in doors and
    windows; but that, as it proved, was the best of the help we were likely
    to get in that quarter.
  1853. beat
    hit repeatedly
    Then followed a battle of looks between them, but the captain soon
    knuckled under, put up his weapon, and resumed his seat, grumbling like
    a beaten dog.
  1854. servant
    a person working in the service of another
    The servant led us down a matted passage and showed us at the end into a
    great library, all lined with bookcases and busts upon the top of them,
    where the squire and Dr. Livesey sat, pipe in hand, on either side of a
    bright fire.
  1855. trot
    ride at a gait faster than a walk
    As soon as I was mounted, holding on to Dogger's belt, the supervisor
    gave the word, and the party struck out at a bouncing trot on the road
    to Dr. Livesey's house.




    6

    The Captain's Papers

    WE rode hard all the way till we drew up before Dr. Livesey's door.
  1856. landing
    the act of coming to land after a voyage
    Even the ripples
    were a danger to our overloaded craft, but the worst of it was that we
    were swept out of our true course and away from our proper landing-place
    behind the point.
  1857. scrap
    a small fragment of something broken off from the whole
    On the first page there were only some scraps of writing, such as a man
    with a pen in his hand might make for idleness or practice.
  1858. bell
    a hollow metal device that makes a ringing sound when struck
    Hawkins, will you ring that bell?
  1859. clear out
    empty completely
    We were clear out of the ship, but not yet ashore in our stockade.




    17

    Narrative Continued by the Doctor: The Jolly-boat's Last Trip

    THIS fifth trip was quite different from any of the others.
  1860. goodwill
    a disposition to kindness and compassion
    And the Spy-glass is sold, lease and goodwill
    and rigging; and the old girl's off to meet me.
  1861. more than
    (comparative of `much' used with mass nouns) a quantifier meaning greater in size or amount or extent or degree
    It cowed me more than the pain,
    and I began to obey him at once, walking straight in at the door and
    towards the parlour, where our sick old buccaneer was sitting, dazed
    with rum.
  1862. islet
    a small island
    "The anchorage is on the south, behind an islet, I fancy?" asked the
    captain.
  1863. scissors
    an edge tool having two crossed pivoting blades
    The bundle was sewn together, and the doctor had to get out his
    instrument case and cut the stitches with his medical scissors.
  1864. frost
    ice crystals forming a white deposit
    It was a bitter cold winter, with long, hard
    frosts and heavy gales; and it was plain from the first that my poor
    father was little likely to see the spring.
  1865. tattered
    worn to shreds; or wearing torn or ragged clothing
    He was plainly blind, for he tapped
    before him with a stick and wore a great green shade over his eyes and
    nose; and he was hunched, as if with age or weakness, and wore a huge
    old tattered sea-cloak with a hood that made him appear positively
    deformed.
  1866. hesitate
    pause or hold back in uncertainty or unwillingness
    He knew the passage like the palm of his hand, and though the man in the
    chains got everywhere more water than was down in the chart, John never
    hesitated once.
  1867. mutilated
    having a part of the body crippled or disabled
    Ah, Bill, Bill, we have seen a sight of times, us two, since
    I lost them two talons," holding up his mutilated hand.
  1868. ride away
    ride away on a horse, for example
    Soon after, Dr. Livesey's horse came to the door and he rode away, but
    the captain held his peace that evening, and for many evenings to come.




    2

    Black Dog Appears and Disappears


    IT was not very long after this that there occurred the first of the
    mysterious events that rid us at last of the captain, though not, as you
    will see, of his affairs.
  1869. turn on
    cause to operate by flipping a switch
    And with that he turned on his heel and rejoined the other two.
  1870. explode
    burst and release energy as through a violent reaction
    "A trifle more of that man," he would say, "and I shall explode."
  1871. friend
    a person you know well and regard with affection and trust
    He stopped a little from the inn, and raising his voice in an odd
    sing-song, addressed the air in front of him, "Will any kind friend
    inform a poor blind man, who has lost the precious sight of his eyes in
    the gracious defence of his native country, England--and God bless King
    George!--where or in what part of this country he may now be?"
  1872. ass
    an animal that has longer ears and is smaller than a horse
    I own
    myself an ass, and I await your orders."
  1873. lose it
    lose control of one's emotions
    I never wasted good money of mine, nor lost it
    neither; and I'll trick 'em again.
  1874. saddled
    having a saddle on or being mounted on a saddled animal
    All they would do was to give me a loaded pistol lest we were
    attacked, and to promise to have horses ready saddled in case we were
    pursued on our return, while one lad was to ride forward to the doctor's
    in search of armed assistance.
  1875. gallery
    a porch along the outside of a building
    We put old Redruth in the gallery between the cabin and the forecastle,
    with three or four loaded muskets and a mattress for protection.
  1876. helplessness
    the state of needing help from something
    But the wind was wanting; and
    to complete our helplessness, down came Hunter with the news that Jim
    Hawkins had slipped into a boat and was gone ashore with the rest.
  1877. calling
    the particular occupation for which you are trained
    People were frightened at the time, but on looking
    back they rather liked it; it was a fine excitement in a quiet country
    life, and there was even a party of the younger men who pretended to
    admire him, calling him a "true sea-dog" and a "real old salt" and
    such like names, and saying there was the sort of man that made England
    terrible at sea.
  1878. out of sight
    not accessible to view
    Next moment we had turned the corner and my home was out of sight.
  1879. wicked
    having committed unrighteous acts
    There were nights when he took a deal more rum and water
    than his head would carry; and then he would sometimes sit and sing his
    wicked, old, wild sea-songs, minding nobody; but sometimes he would call
    for glasses round and force all the trembling company to listen to his
    stories or bear a chorus to his singing.
  1880. bring up
    raise from a lower to a higher position
    Here you, matey," he
    cried to the man who trundled the barrow; " bring up alongside and help
    up my chest.
  1881. understand
    know and comprehend the nature or meaning of
    "It's the name of a buccaneer of my
    acquaintance; and I call you by it for the sake of shortness, and what I
    have to say to you is this; one glass of rum won't kill you, but if
    you take one you'll take another and another, and I stake my wig if you
    don't break off short, you'll die--do you understand that?--die, and go
    to your own place, like the man in the Bible.
  1882. climb
    go up or advance
    Sitting by the fire in the housekeeper's room, I
    approached that island in my fancy from every possible direction; I
    explored every acre of its surface; I climbed a thousand times to that
    tall hill they call the Spy-glass, and from the top enjoyed the most
    wonderful and changing prospects.
  1883. knock out
    eliminate
    There was a porch at the door, and under this porch
    the little spring welled up into an artificial basin of a rather odd
    kind--no other than a great ship's kettle of iron, with the bottom
    knocked out, and sunk "to her bearings," as the captain said, among the
    sand.
  1884. owner
    a person who owns something
    "All's
    well with him; no fear for a hand that's been shot down in his duty to
    captain and owner.
  1885. evenly
    in a level and regular way
    The captain made us trim the boat, and we got her to lie a little more
    evenly.
  1886. getting
    the act of acquiring something
    "And who else?" returned the other, getting more at his ease.
  1887. taking
    the act of someone who picks up or takes something
    And with that he went off to see my father, taking me with him by the
    arm.
  1888. laced
    closed with a lace
    He was tricked out in his best;
    an immense blue coat, thick with brass buttons, hung as low as to his
    knees, and a fine laced hat was set on the back of his head.
  1889. roving
    migratory
    He leaves his wife to manage the inn;
    and as she is a woman of colour, a pair of old
    bachelors like you and I may be excused for
    guessing that it is the wife, quite as much as the
    health, that sends him back to roving.
  1890. sprinkle
    scatter with liquid; wet lightly
    The cold evening breeze, of which I have spoken, whistled through every
    chink of the rude building and sprinkled the floor with a continual rain
    of fine sand.
  1891. bad luck
    an unfortunate state resulting from unfavorable outcomes
    "It's not Flint's ship, and Flint is dead; but I'll tell you true, as
    you ask me--there are some of Flint's hands aboard; worse luck for the
    rest of us."
  1892. cut short
    make shorter as if by cutting off
    Everything else was unchanged, the sun still shining mercilessly on the
    steaming marsh and the tall pinnacle of the mountain, and I could scarce
    persuade myself that murder had been actually done and a human life
    cruelly cut short a moment since before my eyes.
  1893. jump out
    be highly noticeable
    I jumped out and came as near running as I durst, with a big silk
    handkerchief under my hat for coolness' sake and a brace of pistols
    ready primed for safety.
  1894. sheath
    a protective covering, as for a knife or sword
    He
    cleared the hilt of his cutlass and loosened the blade in the sheath;
    and all the time we were waiting there he kept swallowing as if he felt
    what we used to call a lump in the throat.
  1895. eddy
    a miniature whirlpool or whirlwind
    Our chimney was a square hole
    in the roof; it was but a little part of the smoke that found its way
    out, and the rest eddied about the house and kept us coughing and piping
    the eye.
  1896. spat
    a quarrel about petty points
    And he turned his quid and spat.
  1897. acquiescence
    agreement with a statement or proposal to do something
    Poor old fellow, he had not uttered one word of surprise, complaint,
    fear, or even acquiescence from the very beginning of our troubles till
    now, when we had laid him down in the log-house to die.
  1898. settle
    become resolved, fixed, established, or quiet
    "I have
    drawn blood enough to keep him quiet awhile; he should lie for a week
    where he is--that is the best thing for him and you; but another stroke
    would settle him."




    3

    The Black Spot

    ABOUT noon I stopped at the captain's door with some cooling drinks
    and medicines.
  1899. move
    change location
    The doctor never so much as moved.
  1900. raising
    the event of something being raised upward
    He stopped a little from the inn, and raising his voice in an odd
    sing-song, addressed the air in front of him, "Will any kind friend
    inform a poor blind man, who has lost the precious sight of his eyes in
    the gracious defence of his native country, England--and God bless King
    George!--where or in what part of this country he may now be?"
  1901. fiercely
    in a physically fierce manner
    The heat was sweltering,
    and the men grumbled fiercely over their work.
  1902. turn back
    go back to a previous state
    Then he
    passed his hand over his eyes several times and at last turned back into
    the house.
  1903. mortal
    subject to death
    Probably I should have told the whole story to
    the doctor, for I was in mortal fear lest the captain should repent of
    his confessions and make an end of me.
  1904. great care
    more attention and consideration than is normally bestowed by prudent persons
    The doctor opened the seals with great care, and there fell out
    the map of an island, with latitude and longitude, soundings, names of
    hills and bays and inlets, and every particular that would be needed
    to bring a ship to a safe anchorage upon its shores.
  1905. uppermost
    at or nearest to the top
    As for the captain, he had carried his over his
    shoulder by a bandoleer, and like a wise man, lock uppermost.
  1906. dig out
    create by digging
    "There's a strong scour with the ebb," he said, "and this here passage
    has been dug out, in a manner of speaking, with a spade."
  1907. whit
    a tiny or scarcely detectable amount
    Just before him Tom
    lay motionless upon the sward; but the murderer minded him not a whit,
    cleansing his blood-stained knife the while upon a wisp of grass.
  1908. watching
    the act of observing; taking a patient look
    The man at
    the helm was watching the luff of the sail and whistling away gently
    to himself, and that was the only sound excepting the swish of the sea
    against the bows and around the sides of the ship.
  1909. thank
    express gratitude or show appreciation to
    Back we will go, the way we came, and small
    thanks to you big, hulking, chicken-hearted men.
  1910. knuckle
    a joint of a finger when the fist is closed
    Then followed a battle of looks between them, but the captain soon
    knuckled under, put up his weapon, and resumed his seat, grumbling like
    a beaten dog.
  1911. dear
    a beloved person
    And altogether I paid pretty dear for
    my monthly fourpenny piece, in the shape of these abominable fancies.
  1912. balance
    harmonious arrangement or relation of parts within a whole
    He sprang to his feet, drew and opened
    a sailor's clasp-knife, and balancing it open on the palm of his hand,
    threatened to pin the doctor to the wall.
  1913. balancing
    getting two things to correspond
    He sprang to his feet, drew and opened
    a sailor's clasp-knife, and balancing it open on the palm of his hand,
    threatened to pin the doctor to the wall.
  1914. landed
    owning or consisting of land or real estate
    I believe the silly fellows must have thought they would break their
    shins over treasure as soon as they were landed, for they all came out
    of their sulks in a moment and gave a cheer that started the echo in a
    faraway hill and sent the birds once more flying and squalling round the
    anchorage.
  1915. wily
    marked by skill in deception
    And the
    coxswain, Israel Hands, was a careful, wily, old, experienced seaman who
    could be trusted at a pinch with almost anything.
  1916. evergreen
    a plant having foliage that persists and remains green throughout the year
    Then I came to a long thicket of these oaklike trees--live, or
    evergreen, oaks, I heard afterwards they should be called--which grew
    low along the sand like brambles, the boughs curiously twisted, the
    foliage compact, like thatch.
  1917. all the way
    completely
    As soon as I was mounted, holding on to Dogger's belt, the supervisor
    gave the word, and the party struck out at a bouncing trot on the road
    to Dr. Livesey's house.




    6

    The Captain's Papers

    WE rode hard all the way till we drew up before Dr. Livesey's door.
  1918. favourable
    encouraging or approving or pleasing
    We'll have favourable
    winds, a quick passage, and not the least difficulty in finding the
    spot, and money to eat, to roll in, to play duck and drake with ever
    after."
  1919. sen
    a fractional monetary unit of Japan and Indonesia and Cambodia; equal to one hundredth of a yen or rupiah or riel
    We'll
    divide stores with you, man for man; and I'll give my affy-davy, as
    before to speak the first ship I sight, and sen
  1920. head off
    prevent the occurrence of; prevent from happening
    I'll wring his calf's head off his body with
    these hands, Dick!" he added, breaking off.
  1921. make for
    cause to happen or to occur as a consequence
    On the first page there were only some scraps of writing, such as a man
    with a pen in his hand might make for idleness or practice.
  1922. master
    a person who has authority over others
    "And now, Master Billy Bones, if that be your name, we'll have a look at
    the colour of your blood.
  1923. set off
    direct attention to, as if by means of contrast
    I
    set off, overjoyed at this opportunity to see some more of the ships and
    seamen, and picked my way among a great crowd of people and carts and
    bales, for the dock was now at its busiest, until I found the tavern in
    question.
  1924. stumble
    miss a step and fall or nearly fall
    We began to rejoice over our good success when just at that moment a
    pistol cracked in the bush, a ball whistled close past my ear, and poor
    Tom Redruth stumbled and fell his length on the ground.
  1925. scissor
    cut with or as if with scissors
    The bundle was sewn together, and the doctor had to get out his
    instrument case and cut the stitches with his medical scissors.
  1926. leeward
    on the side away from the wind
    You see, sir," he went on,
    "if once we dropped to leeward of the landing-place, it's hard to say
    where we should get ashore, besides the chance of being boarded by the
    gigs; whereas, the way we go the current must slacken, and then we can
    dodge back along the shore."
  1927. telling
    disclosing unintentionally
    It was the second death I had known, and
    the sorrow of the first was still fresh in my heart.




    4

    The Sea-chest

    I LOST no time, of course, in telling my mother all that I knew, and
    perhaps should have told her long before, and we saw ourselves at once
    in a difficult and dangerous position.
  1928. search
    look or seek
    All they would do was to give me a loaded pistol lest we were
    attacked, and to promise to have horses ready saddled in case we were
    pursued on our return, while one lad was to ride forward to the doctor's
    in search of armed assistance.
  1929. hoarsely
    in a hoarse or husky voice
    "Israel was Flint's gunner," said Gray hoarsely.
  1930. noon
    the middle of the day
    "I have
    drawn blood enough to keep him quiet awhile; he should lie for a week
    where he is--that is the best thing for him and you; but another stroke
    would settle him."




    3

    The Black Spot

    ABOUT noon I stopped at the captain's door with some cooling drinks
    and medicines.
  1931. aperture
    a natural opening in something
    Crawling on all fours, I made steadily but slowly towards them, till at
    last, raising my head to an aperture among the leaves, I could see clear
    down into a little green dell beside the marsh, and closely set about
    with trees, where Long John Silver and another of the crew stood face to
    face in conversation.
  1932. hand in hand
    clasping each other's hands
    Three men ran
    together, hand in hand; and I made out, even through the mist, that the
    middle man of this trio was the blind beggar.
  1933. new
    not of long duration
    But by this
    time we had all long ceased to pay any particular notice to the song; it
    was new, that night, to nobody but Dr. Livesey, and on him I observed it
    did not produce an agreeable effect, for he looked up for a moment quite
    angrily before he went on with his talk to old Taylor, the gardener, on
    a new cure for the rheumatics.
  1934. arrange
    put into a proper or systematic order
    Our natural distress, the visits of the neighbours, the
    arranging of the funeral, and all the work of the inn to be carried on
    in the meanwhile kept me so busy that I had scarcely time to think of
    the captain, far less to be afraid of him.
  1935. atrocious
    shockingly brutal or cruel
    And as for
    riding down that black, atrocious miscreant, I regard it as an act of
    virtue, sir, like stamping on a cockroach.
  1936. many
    amounting to a large but indefinite number
    Soon after, Dr. Livesey's horse came to the door and he rode away, but
    the captain held his peace that evening, and for many evenings to come.




    2

    Black Dog Appears and Disappears


    IT was not very long after this that there occurred the first of the
    mysterious events that rid us at last of the captain, though not, as you
    will see, of his affairs.
  1937. mere
    being nothing more than specified
    In a few cases, to be sure, the name of a place would be added,
    as "Offe Caraccas," or a mere entry of latitude and longitude, as "62o
    17' 20", 19o 2' 40"."
  1938. always
    at all times; all the time and on every occasion
    When a seaman did put up at the Admiral Benbow
    (as now and then some did, making by the coast road for Bristol) he
    would look in at him through the curtained door before he entered the
    parlour; and he was always sure to be as silent as a mouse when any such
    was present.
  1939. dot
    a very small circular shape
    I had crossed a marshy tract full of willows, bulrushes, and odd,
    outlandish, swampy trees; and I had now come out upon the skirts of an
    open piece of undulating, sandy country, about a mile long, dotted with
    a few pines and a great number of contorted trees, not unlike the oak
    in growth, but pale in the foliage, like willows.
  1940. rigged
    fitted or equipped with necessary rigging
    He had a line or two rigged up to help him across the
    widest spaces--Long John's earrings, they were called; and he would hand
    himself from one place to another, now using the crutch, now trailing it
    alongside by the lanyard, as quickly as another man could walk.
  1941. fall back
    fall backwards and down
    Between us, with much trouble, we managed to hoist him upstairs, and
    laid him on his bed, where his head fell back on the pillow as if he
    were almost fainting.
  1942. case
    an occurrence of something
    On the night before the funeral
    he was as drunk as ever; and it was shocking, in that house of mourning,
    to hear him singing away at his ugly old sea-song; but weak as he was,
    we were all in the fear of death for him, and the doctor was suddenly
    taken up with a case many miles away and was never near the house after
    my father's death.
  1943. scratching
    a harsh noise made by scraping
    "Why, yes," returned the captain, scratching his head; "and making a
    large allowance, sir, for all the gifts of Providence, I should say we
    were pretty close hauled."
  1944. guessing
    an estimate based on little or no information
    He leaves his wife to manage the inn;
    and as she is a woman of colour, a pair of old
    bachelors like you and I may be excused for
    guessing that it is the wife, quite as much as the
    health, that sends him back to roving.
  1945. bowls
    a bowling game played on a level lawn with biased wooden balls that are rolled at a jack
    Carpet bowls!
  1946. supplication
    the act of communicating with a deity
    Then he hesitated,
    drew back, came forward again, and at last, to my wonder and
    confusion, threw himself on his knees and held out his clasped hands in
    supplication.
  1947. due
    that which is deserved or owed
    Some of the man's money--if
    he had any--was certainly due to us, but it was not likely that our
    captain's shipmates, above all the two specimens seen by me, Black
    Dog and the blind beggar, would be inclined to give up their booty in
    payment of the dead man's debts.
  1948. spurn
    reject with contempt
    Down went Pew with a cry that
    rang high into the night; and the four hoofs trampled and spurned him
    and passed by.
  1949. brush
    an implement that has hairs or bristles set into a handle
    A strong smell of tobacco and tar rose from the interior, but nothing
    was to be seen on the top except a suit of very good clothes, carefully
    brushed and folded.
  1950. such
    of so extreme a degree or extent
    When a seaman did put up at the Admiral Benbow
    (as now and then some did, making by the coast road for Bristol) he
    would look in at him through the curtained door before he entered the
    parlour; and he was always sure to be as silent as a mouse when any such
    was present.
  1951. compass
    navigational instrument for finding directions
    A few small coins, a thimble,
    and some thread and big needles, a piece of pigtail tobacco bitten away
    at the end, his gully with the crooked handle, a pocket compass, and a
    tinder box were all that they contained, and I began to despair.
  1952. hurt
    be the source of pain
    "Are you hurt?" cried I.

    "Rum," he repeated.
  1953. mouthful
    the quantity that can be held in the mouth
    You'll have your mouthful of rum tomorrow, and go hang."
  1954. at length
    in a lengthy or prolix manner
    "This is a handy cove," says he at length; "and a pleasant sittyated
    grog-shop.
  1955. shaken
    disturbed psychologically as if by a physical jolt or shock
    It was a long, difficult business, for the coins were of all countries
    and sizes--doubloons, and louis d'ors, and guineas, and pieces of eight,
    and I know not what besides, all shaken together at random.
  1956. Spanish
    of or relating to or characteristic of Spain or the people of Spain
    Dreadful stories
    they were--about hanging, and walking the plank, and storms at sea, and
    the Dry Tortugas, and wild deeds and places on the Spanish Main.
  1957. forgotten
    not noticed inadvertently
    He never particularly addressed me, and it is my
    belief he had as good as forgotten his confidences; but his temper was
    more flighty, and allowing for his bodily weakness, more violent than
    ever.
  1958. bustling
    full of energetic and noisy activity
    I might have been twice
    as weary, yet I would not have left the deck, all was so new and
    interesting to me--the brief commands, the shrill note of the whistle,
    the men bustling to their places in the glimmer of the ship's lanterns.
  1959. five
    the cardinal number that is the sum of four and one
    Under
    that, the miscellany began--a quadrant, a tin canikin, several sticks of
    tobacco, two brace of very handsome pistols, a piece of bar silver, an
    old Spanish watch and some other trinkets of little value and mostly of
    foreign make, a pair of compasses mounted with brass, and five or six
    curious West Indian shells.
  1960. pinnacle
    a slender upright spire at the top of a buttress of tower
    Everything else was unchanged, the sun still shining mercilessly on the
    steaming marsh and the tall pinnacle of the mountain, and I could scarce
    persuade myself that murder had been actually done and a human life
    cruelly cut short a moment since before my eyes.
  1961. Garrison
    United States abolitionist who published an anti-slavery journal (1805-1879)
    And I ran to the door in time to see Jim Hawkins, safe and sound, come
    climbing over the stockade.




    19

    Narrative Resumed by Jim Hawkins: The Garrison in the Stockade

    AS soon as Ben Gunn saw the colours he came to a halt, stopped me by the
    arm, and sat down.
  1962. soiled
    soiled or likely to soil with dirt or grime
    I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the
    inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow--a
    tall, strong, heavy, nut-brown man, his tarry pigtail falling over the
    shoulder of his soiled blue coat, his hands ragged and scarred, with
    black, broken nails, and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid
    white.
  1963. motionless
    completely still
    "And now that's done," said the blind man; and at the words he suddenly
    left hold of me, and with incredible accuracy and nimbleness,
    skipped out of the parlour and into the road, where, as I still stood
    motionless, I could hear his stick go tap-tap-tapping into the distance.
  1964. whip
    an instrument with a handle and a flexible lash
    He whipped out of sight
    in a moment, leaving Silver to arrange the party, and I fancy it was as
    well he did so.
  1965. fastening
    the act of fastening things together
    He was clothed with tatters
    of old ship's canvas and old sea-cloth, and this extraordinary patchwork
    was all held together by a system of the most various and incongruous
    fastenings, brass buttons, bits of stick, and loops of tarry gaskin.
  1966. dry
    free from liquid or moisture
    Dreadful stories
    they were--about hanging, and walking the plank, and storms at sea, and
    the Dry Tortugas, and wild deeds and places on the Spanish Main.
  1967. kill
    cause to die
    "It's the name of a buccaneer of my
    acquaintance; and I call you by it for the sake of shortness, and what I
    have to say to you is this; one glass of rum won't kill you, but if
    you take one you'll take another and another, and I stake my wig if you
    don't break off short, you'll die--do you understand that?--die, and go
    to your own place, like the man in the Bible.
  1968. stunning
    causing bewilderment or shock or insensibility
    It struck poor Tom, point foremost, and with stunning violence, right
    between the shoulders in the middle of his back.
  1969. clapping
    a demonstration of approval by clapping the hands together
    And clapping me in the friendliest way upon the shoulder, he hobbled off
    forward and went below.
  1970. vain
    characteristic of false pride
    But haste was all in vain.
  1971. fight
    be engaged in a contest or struggle
    At the same
    instant my mother, alarmed by the cries and fighting, came running
    downstairs to help me.
  1972. boasting
    speaking of yourself in superlatives
    Well now, I tell you, I'm not a boasting man, and you
    seen yourself how easy I keep company, but when I was quartermaster,
    LAMBS wasn't the word for Flint's old buccaneers.
  1973. feel
    be conscious of a physical, mental, or emotional state
    He
    cleared the hilt of his cutlass and loosened the blade in the sheath;
    and all the time we were waiting there he kept swallowing as if he felt
    what we used to call a lump in the throat.
  1974. swagger
    walk with a lofty proud gait
    I saw, besides, many old sailors, with rings in their ears, and
    whiskers curled in ringlets, and tarry pigtails, and their swaggering,
    clumsy sea-walk; and if I had seen as many kings or archbishops I could
    not have been more delighted.
  1975. go back
    return in thought or speech to something
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The Old Sea-dog at the Admiral Benbow


    SQUIRE TRELAWNEY, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having
    asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from
    the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the
    island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
    take up my pen in the year of grace 17__ and go back to the time when
    my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old se...
  1976. hearty
    showing warm and sincere friendliness
    So a big pigeon pie was brought in and put on a sidetable, and I made
    a hearty supper, for I was as hungry as a hawk, while Mr. Dance was
    further complimented and at last dismissed.
  1977. indoors
    within a building
    "Keep indoors, men," said the captain.
  1978. break away
    break off (a piece from a whole)
    Add to this that Gray, the new man, had his face tied up in a bandage
    for a cut he had got in breaking away from the mutineers and that poor
    old Tom Redruth, still unburied, lay along the wall, stiff and stark,
    under the Union Jack.
  1979. no longer
    not now
    I said good-bye to Mother and the
    cove where I had lived since I was born, and the dear old Admiral
    Benbow--since he was repainted, no longer quite so dear.
  1980. tract
    an extended area of land
    I had crossed a marshy tract full of willows, bulrushes, and odd,
    outlandish, swampy trees; and I had now come out upon the skirts of an
    open piece of undulating, sandy country, about a mile long, dotted with
    a few pines and a great number of contorted trees, not unlike the oak
    in growth, but pale in the foliage, like willows.
  1981. paper
    a material made of cellulose pulp derived mainly from wood or rags or certain grasses
    On the floor close to his hand there
    was a little round of paper, blackened on the one side.
  1982. pickle
    vegetables preserved in brine or vinegar
    I want their pickles and wines, and
    that."
  1983. smash
    hit violently
    It was like any other seaman's chest on the outside, the initial "B"
    burned on the top of it with a hot iron, and the corners somewhat
    smashed and broken as by long, rough usage.
  1984. keep on
    allow to remain in a place or position or maintain a property or feature
    In one way, indeed, he bade fair to ruin us, for he kept on staying week
    after week, and at last month after month, so that all the money had
    been long exhausted, and still my father never plucked up the heart to
    insist on having more.
  1985. genteel
    marked by refinement in taste and manners
    He were afraid of none, not he; on'y Silver--Silver was that
    genteel."
  1986. drop down
    fall or descend to a lower place or level
    The squire dropped down beside him on his knees and kissed his hand,
    crying like a child.
  1987. mahogany
    wood of any of various mahogany trees
    The man whom he called Morgan--an old, grey-haired, mahogany-faced
    sailor--came forward pretty sheepishly, rolling his quid.
  1988. pass on
    place into the hands or custody of
    "Not much instruction there," said Dr. Livesey as he passed on.
  1989. sideways
    toward one side
    When I returned with the rum, they were already seated on either side
    of the captain's breakfast-table--Black Dog next to the door and
    sitting sideways so as to have one eye on his old shipmate and one, as I
    thought, on his retreat.
  1990. westward
    the cardinal compass point that is a 270 degrees
    In the second place, the ebb was now making--a strong rippling current
    running westward through the basin, and then south'ard and seaward down
    the straits by which we had entered in the morning.
  1991. box
    a (usually rectangular) container; may have a lid
    At first I had supposed "the dead man's chest" to be that identical big
    box of his upstairs in the front room, and the thought had been mingled
    in my nightmares with that of the one-legged seafaring man.
  1992. home
    where you live at a particular time
    No, she said, he had come home in the afternoon but had gone up to the
    hall to dine and pass the evening with the squire.
  1993. to the south
    in a southern direction
    Away to the
    south
    -west of us we saw two low hills, about a couple of miles apart,
    and rising behind one of them a third and higher hill, whose peak was
    still buried in the fog.
  1994. ace
    a playing card in a deck having a single pip on its face
    I was within an ace of
    calling for help.
  1995. roughly
    with rough motion as over a rough surface
    Then he rapped on the door with a bit of
    stick like a handspike that he carried, and when my father appeared,
    called roughly for a glass of rum.
  1996. stroll
    a leisurely walk, usually in some public place
    Every day when he came back
    from his stroll he would ask if any seafaring men had gone by along the
    road.
  1997. get it
    understand, usually after some initial difficulty
    "No, sir; not money, I think," replied I. "In fact, sir, I believe I
    have the thing in my breast pocket; and to tell you the truth, I should
    like to get it put in safety."
  1998. nigh
    near in time or place or relationship
    They was ashore nigh on a week, and us
    standing off and on in the old WALRUS.
  1999. swoon
    pass out from weakness or physical or emotional distress
    He wandered a little longer, his voice growing weaker; but soon after I
    had given him his medicine, which he took like a child, with the remark,
    "If ever a seaman wanted drugs, it's me," he fell at last into a heavy,
    swoon-like sleep, in which I left him.
  2000. utterly
    completely and without qualification
    Between this and that, I
    was so utterly terrified of the blind beggar that I forgot my terror of
    the captain, and as I opened the parlour door, cried out the words he
    had ordered in a trembling voice.
  2001. drenched
    abundantly covered or supplied with
    The other three took complete headers, and came up again drenched and
    bubbling.
  2002. regain
    get or find back; recover the use of
    I have said the captain was weak, and indeed he
    seemed rather to grow weaker than regain his strength.
  2003. twenty-six
    the cardinal number that is the sum of twenty-five and one
    In the meantime, talk as we pleased, there
    were only seven out of the twenty-six on whom we knew we could rely; and
    out of these seven one was a boy, so that the grown men on our side were
    six to their nineteen.
  2004. lined
    having a lining or a liner; often used in combination
    The servant led us down a matted passage and showed us at the end into a
    great library, all lined with bookcases and busts upon the top of them,
    where the squire and Dr. Livesey sat, pipe in hand, on either side of a
    bright fire.
  2005. foaming
    emitting or filled with bubbles as from carbonation or fermentation
    Perhaps it was this--perhaps it was the look of the island, with its
    grey, melancholy woods, and wild stone spires, and the surf that we
    could both see and hear foaming and thundering on the steep beach--at
    least, although the sun shone bright and hot, and the shore birds were
    fishing and crying all around us, and you would have thought anyone
    would have been glad to get to land after being so long at sea, my heart
    sank, as the saying is, into my boots; and from the first look onward,...
  2006. terrifying
    causing extreme terror
    I moved from hiding-place to
    hiding-place, always pursued, or so it seemed to me, by these terrifying
    missiles.
  2007. napkin
    a small piece of table linen that is used to wipe the mouth and to cover the lap in order to protect clothing
    I paused where I was, with my napkin in my
    hand.
  2008. north side
    the side that is on the north
    Dr. Livesey take the north side,
    if you please; Jim, the east; Gray, west.
  2009. work at
    to exert effort in order to do, make, or perform something
    The doctor had to go
    to London for a physician to take charge of his practice; the squire was
    hard at work at Bristol; and I lived on at the hall under the charge of
    old Redruth, the gamekeeper, almost a prisoner, but full of sea-dreams
    and the most charming anticipations of strange islands and adventures.
  2010. windward
    the direction from which the wind is coming
    If you would on'y lay your course, and a
    p'int to windward, you would ride in carriages, you would.
  2011. Bible
    the sacred writings of the Christian religions
    "It's the name of a buccaneer of my
    acquaintance; and I call you by it for the sake of shortness, and what I
    have to say to you is this; one glass of rum won't kill you, but if
    you take one you'll take another and another, and I stake my wig if you
    don't break off short, you'll die--do you understand that?--die, and go
    to your own place, like the man in the Bible.
  2012. get rid of
    dispose of
    Long John even got rid of two out of the six
    or seven I had already engaged.
  2013. pedestal
    an architectural support or base
    All were strangely shaped, and the Spy-glass, which was by three or four
    hundred feet the tallest on the island, was likewise the strangest in
    configuration, running up sheer from almost every side and then suddenly
    cut off at the top like a pedestal to put a statue on.
  2014. unintelligible
    not clearly understood or expressed
    One was the
    same as the tattoo mark, "Billy Bones his fancy"; then there was "Mr. W.
    Bones, mate," "No more rum," "Off Palm Key he got itt," and some other
    snatches, mostly single words and unintelligible.
  2015. crack
    a narrow opening
    Soon we could hear their footfalls as they ran and the
    cracking of the branches as they breasted across a bit of thicket.
  2016. stare
    look at with fixed eyes
    Often enough when the first
    of the month came round and I applied to him for my wage, he would only
    blow through his nose at me and stare me down, but before the week was
    out he was sure to think better of it, bring me my four-penny piece, and
    repeat his orders to look out for "the seafaring man with one leg."
  2017. serviceable
    ready to function or provide assistance
    He had lain like
    a Trojan behind his mattress in the gallery; he had followed every order
    silently, doggedly, and well; he was the oldest of our party by a score
    of years; and now, sullen, old, serviceable servant, it was he that was
    to die.
  2018. calumny
    a false accusation of an offense
    They go
    the length of declaring that this honest creature
    would do anything for money, that the HISPANIOLA
    belonged to him, and that he sold it me absurdly
    high--the most transparent calumnies.
  2019. destroy
    do away with; cause the ruin or undoing of
    Terrified as I was, I could not help thinking to myself that this must
    have been how Mr. Arrow got the strong waters that destroyed him.
  2020. right angle
    the 90 degree angle between two perpendicular lines
    I tried and found by experiment that the tide kept sweeping us westward
    until I had laid her head due east, or just about right angles to the
    way we ought to go.
  2021. forefinger
    the finger next to the thumb
    And at this there came suddenly a lowering shadow over his face, and he
    tightened his grasp upon my hand and raised a forefinger threateningly
    before my eyes.
  2022. imaginable
    capable of being conceived of
    Between
    Silver and myself we got together in a few days a
    company of the toughest old salts imaginable--not
    pretty to look at, but fellows, by their faces, of
    the most indomitable spirit.
  2023. plod
    walk heavily and firmly, as when weary, or through mud
    I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the
    inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow--a
    tall, strong, heavy, nut-brown man, his tarry pigtail falling over the
    shoulder of his soiled blue coat, his hands ragged and scarred, with
    black, broken nails, and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid
    white.
  2024. certainly
    definitely or positively
    I
    was very uneasy and alarmed, as you may fancy, and it rather added to my
    fears to observe that the stranger was certainly frightened himself.
  2025. pass by
    move past
    Down went Pew with a cry that
    rang high into the night; and the four hoofs trampled and spurned him
    and passed by.
  2026. dexterity
    adroitness in using the hands
    His left leg was cut off close by the hip,
    and under the left shoulder he carried a crutch, which he managed with
    wonderful dexterity, hopping about upon it like a bird.
  2027. bundle
    a collection of things wrapped or boxed together
    My
    mother pulled it up with impatience, and there lay before us, the last
    things in the chest, a bundle tied up in oilcloth, and looking like
    papers, and a canvas bag that gave forth, at a touch, the jingle of
    gold.
  2028. marrow
    network of connective tissue filling the cavities of bones
    It was still quite early, and the coldest morning that I think I ever
    was abroad in--a chill that pierced into the marrow.
  2029. chance
    an unknown and unpredictable phenomenon
    And I'm to lose my chance for you!
  2030. medicine
    the profession devoted to alleviating diseases and injuries
    "I have
    drawn blood enough to keep him quiet awhile; he should lie for a week
    where he is--that is the best thing for him and you; but another stroke
    would settle him."




    3

    The Black Spot

    ABOUT noon I stopped at the captain's door with some cooling drinks
    and medicines.
  2031. repeated
    recurring again and again
    "Are you hurt?" cried I.

    "Rum," he repeated.
  2032. dropping
    coming down freely under the influence of gravity
    I been in places hot as pitch, and mates
    dropping round with Yellow Jack, and the blessed land a-heaving like the
    sea with earthquakes--what to the doctor know of lands like that?--and I
    lived on rum, I tell you.
  2033. large
    above average in size or number or quantity or magnitude
    I was
    wedged in between Redruth and a stout old gentleman, and in spite of the
    swift motion and the cold night air, I must have dozed a great deal from
    the very first, and then slept like a log up hill and down dale through
    stage after stage, for when I was awakened at last it was by a punch
    in the ribs, and I opened my eyes to find that we were standing still
    before a large building in a city street and that the day had already
    broken a long time.
  2034. tramp
    travel on foot, especially on a walking expedition
    This quarrel was the saving of us, for while it was still raging,
    another sound came from the top of the hill on the side of the
    hamlet--the tramp of horses galloping.
  2035. close at hand
    close in space; within reach
    I had half a
    mind to change my plan and destroy their boats, but I feared that Silver
    and the others might be close at hand, and all might very well be lost
    by trying for too much.
  2036. trick
    a cunning or deceitful action or device
    I never wasted good money of mine, nor lost it
    neither; and I'll trick 'em again.
  2037. to-do
    a disorderly outburst or tumult
    Then there followed a great to-do through all our old inn, heavy feet
    pounding to and fro, furniture thrown over, doors kicked in, until the
    very rocks re-echoed and the men came out again, one after another, on
    the road and declared that we were nowhere to be found.
  2038. footstep
    the sound of a step of someone walking
    The neighbourhood, to our ears, seemed haunted by
    approaching footsteps; and what between the dead body of the captain
    on the parlour floor and the thought of that detestable blind beggar
    hovering near at hand and ready to return, there were moments when, as
    the saying goes, I jumped in my skin for terror.
  2039. report
    to give an account or representation of in words
    Almost at the same time a
    pistol-shot, flash and report, came from the hedge side.
  2040. inside
    relating to or being on the side closer to the center or within a defined space
    The
    stranger kept hanging about just inside the inn door, peering round the
    corner like a cat waiting for a mouse.
  2041. trouble
    a source of difficulty
    Between us, with much trouble, we managed to hoist him upstairs, and
    laid him on his bed, where his head fell back on the pillow as if he
    were almost fainting.
  2042. call for
    express the need or desire for; ask for
    There were nights when he took a deal more rum and water
    than his head would carry; and then he would sometimes sit and sing his
    wicked, old, wild sea-songs, minding nobody; but sometimes he would call
    for
    glasses round and force all the trembling company to listen to his
    stories or bear a chorus to his singing.
  2043. harm
    any physical damage to the body caused by violence or accident or fracture etc.
    The squire was sitting down, as
    white as a sheet, thinking of the harm he had led us to, the good soul!
  2044. sheer
    so thin as to transmit light
    And that was
    plainly the last signal of danger, for the buccaneers turned at once
    and ran, separating in every direction, one seaward along the cove, one
    slant across the hill, and so on, so that in half a minute not a sign of
    them remained but Pew. Him they had deserted, whether in sheer panic
    or out of revenge for his ill words and blows I know not; but there he
    remained behind, tapping up and down the road in a frenzy, and groping
    and calling for his comrades.
  2045. armchair
    chair with a support on each side for arms
    The squire had had everything repaired, and the
    public rooms and the sign repainted, and had added some furniture--above
    all a beautiful armchair for mother in the bar.
  2046. pay
    give money, usually in exchange for goods or services
    And altogether I paid pretty dear for
    my monthly fourpenny piece, in the shape of these abominable fancies.
  2047. term
    a limited period of time during which something lasts
    These, in their turn, cursed back at the blind miscreant, threatened him
    in horrid terms, and tried in vain to catch the stick and wrest it from
    his grasp.
  2048. lying
    the deliberate act of deviating from the truth
    Rum! Rum!"

    I ran to fetch it, but I was quite unsteadied by all that had fallen
    out, and I broke one glass and fouled the tap, and while I was still
    getting in my own way, I heard a loud fall in the parlour, and running
    in, beheld the captain lying full length upon the floor.
  2049. lie about
    hang around idly
    They lay about the deck growling
    together in talk.
  2050. cloth
    artifact made by weaving or felting or knitting or crocheting natural or synthetic fibers
    While I was still in this delightful dream, we came suddenly in front
    of a large inn and met Squire Trelawney, all dressed out like a
    sea-officer, in stout blue cloth, coming out of the door with a smile on
    his face and a capital imitation of a sailor's walk.
  2051. reparation
    something done or paid in expiation of a wrong
    The ebb-tide, which had so cruelly delayed
    us, was now making reparation and delaying our assailants.
  2052. pulling
    the act of pulling
    They were pulling up, at any
    rate, horrified at the accident; and I soon saw what they were.
  2053. foremost
    ranking above all others
    Even as he did so, he reeled, put his hand to his throat, stood swaying
    for a moment, and then, with a peculiar sound, fell from his whole
    height face foremost to the floor.
  2054. young
    any immature animal
    "You are at the Admiral Benbow, Black Hill Cove, my good man," said I.

    "I hear a voice," said he, "a young voice.
  2055. contrast
    the opposition or dissimilarity of things that are compared
    I
    followed him in, and I remember observing the contrast the neat, bright
    doctor, with his powder as white as snow and his bright, black eyes and
    pleasant manners, made with the coltish country folk, and above all,
    with that filthy, heavy, bleared scarecrow of a pirate of ours, sitting,
    far gone in rum, with his arms on the table.
  2056. for that matter
    as far as that is concerned
    For that matter, anyone who was a
    comrade of the captain's was enough to frighten them to death.
  2057. carcass
    the dead body of an animal
    For what
    would they risk their rascal carcasses but money?"
  2058. south side
    the side that is on the south
    We struck the enclosure about the middle of the south
    side
    , and almost at the same time, seven mutineers--Job Anderson, the
    boatswain, at their head--appeared in full cry at the southwestern
    corner.
  2059. twinkle
    gleam or glow intermittently
    "Give me the key," said my mother; and though the lock was very stiff,
    she had turned it and thrown back the lid in a twinkling.
  2060. allow for
    make a possibility or provide opportunity for
    He never particularly addressed me, and it is my
    belief he had as good as forgotten his confidences; but his temper was
    more flighty, and allowing for his bodily weakness, more violent than
    ever.
  2061. paid
    marked by the reception of pay
    And altogether I paid pretty dear for
    my monthly fourpenny piece, in the shape of these abominable fancies.
  2062. drunkenness
    a temporary state resulting from excessive consumption of alcohol
    But that was by no means the worst of it, for after a
    day or two at sea he began to appear on deck with hazy eye, red cheeks,
    stuttering tongue, and other marks of drunkenness.
  2063. colouring
    a visual attribute of things that results from the light they emit or transmit or reflect
    This even tint
    was indeed broken up by streaks of yellow sand-break in the lower lands,
    and by many tall trees of the pine family, out-topping the others--some
    singly, some in clumps; but the general colouring was uniform and sad.
  2064. pretended
    adopted in order to deceive
    People were frightened at the time, but on looking
    back they rather liked it; it was a fine excitement in a quiet country
    life, and there was even a party of the younger men who pretended to
    admire him, calling him a "true sea-dog" and a "real old salt" and
    such like names, and saying there was the sort of man that made England
    terrible at sea.
  2065. learned
    having or showing profound knowledge
    Mostly
    he would not speak when spoken to, only look up sudden and fierce and
    blow through his nose like a fog-horn; and we and the people who came
    about our house soon learned to let him be.
  2066. clothes
    apparel in general
    And indeed bad as his clothes were and coarsely as he spoke, he had none
    of the appearance of a man who sailed before the mast, but seemed like
    a mate or skipper accustomed to be obeyed or to strike.
  2067. gently
    in a gentle manner
    He fell on his side, then gently collapsed upon his face
    and moved no more.
  2068. headed
    having a head of a specified kind or anything that serves as a head; often used in combination
    Bare- headed as we were, we ran out at once in the gathering evening and
    the frosty fog.
  2069. pale
    a wooden strip forming part of a fence
    He
    was a pale, tallowy creature, wanting two fingers of the left hand, and
    though he wore a cutlass, he did not look much like a fighter.
  2070. pounding
    an instance of rapid strong pulsation (of the heart)
    Then there followed a great to-do through all our old inn, heavy feet
    pounding to and fro, furniture thrown over, doors kicked in, until the
    very rocks re-echoed and the men came out again, one after another, on
    the road and declared that we were nowhere to be found.
  2071. bound
    confined by bonds
    These fellows who attacked the
    inn tonight--bold, desperate blades, for sure--and the rest who stayed
    aboard that lugger, and more, I dare say, not far off, are, one and all,
    through thick and thin, bound that they'll get that money.
  2072. glad
    showing or causing joy and pleasure; especially made happy
    Only," he added, "I'm glad I trod on Master Pew's corns," for by
    this time he had heard my story.
  2073. breathe
    draw air into, and expel out of, the lungs
    Jim and I shall stick together in the
    meanwhile; you'll take Joyce and Hunter when you ride to Bristol, and
    from first to last, not one of us must breathe a word of what we've
    found."
  2074. landlord
    a property owner who leases property or housing to others
    I had seen
    the captain, and Black Dog, and the blind man, Pew, and I thought I knew
    what a buccaneer was like--a very different creature, according to me,
    from this clean and pleasant-tempered landlord.
  2075. stand for
    express indirectly by an image, form, or model; be a symbol
    These crosses stand for the names of
    ships or towns that they sank or plundered.
  2076. fancied
    formed or conceived by the imagination
    Of all the beggar-men that I had seen
    or fancied, he was the chief for raggedness.
  2077. buckle
    fastener that fastens together two ends of a belt or strap
    About his waist he wore an old brass- buckled leather belt, which was the
    one thing solid in his whole accoutrement.
  2078. tear
    separate or cause to separate abruptly
    It is a curious
    thing to understand, for I had certainly never liked the man, though of
    late I had begun to pity him, but as soon as I saw that he was dead, I
    burst into a flood of tears.
  2079. stole
    a wide scarf worn about their shoulders by women
    He begged, and he stole, and he cut throats, and
    starved at that, by the powers!"
  2080. fist
    a hand with the fingers clenched in the palm
    The blind man clung close to me, holding me in one iron fist
    and leaning almost more of his weight on me than I could carry.
  2081. plundered
    wrongfully emptied or stripped of anything of value
    These crosses stand for the names of
    ships or towns that they sank or plundered.
  2082. all day long
    during the entire day
    Sometimes he fell and cut himself;
    sometimes he lay all day long in his little bunk at one side of the
    companion; sometimes for a day or two he would be almost sober and
    attend to his work at least passably.
  2083. advance
    move forward
    Then my mother
    got a candle in the bar, and holding each other's hands, we advanced
    into the parlour.
  2084. Dutchman
    a native or inhabitant of Holland
    Here I have this confounded son of a Dutchman sitting in my own house
    drinking of my own rum!
  2085. awake
    not in a state of sleep; completely conscious
    I could not tell, of course, the meaning of the signal, but
    it instantly awoke my fears.
  2086. make it
    succeed in a big way; get to the top
    Master Pew's
    dead, when all's done; not that I regret it, but he's dead, you see, and
    people will make it out against an officer of his Majesty's revenue,
    if make it out they can.
  2087. phrase
    an expression consisting of one or more words
    All the time he was jerking out these phrases he was stumping up and
    down the tavern on his crutch, slapping tables with his hand, and giving
    such a show of excitement as would have convinced an Old Bailey judge
    or a Bow Street runner.
  2088. freshly
    very recently
    The air too smelt more freshly than down
    beside the marsh.
  2089. soul
    the immaterial part of a person
    But I'm a saving soul.
  2090. write down
    put down in writing; of texts, musical compositions, etc.
    PART ONE--The Old Buccaneer




    1

    The