sew

Sew describes stitching something together. If you sew up the holes in your socks, you use thread and a needle to close them.

The word sew comes from the Old English word siwian, to stitch. You can sew a patch on a pair of jeans, sew a dress, or sew up a hole in your grandmother's old quilt. A figurative meaning of sew, as in the phrase to sew something up, is to secure something or bring it to a happy conclusion, like sewing up the plot in the last chapter of a book. Don't confuse sew with sow, to plant or set in motion.

Definitions of sew
1

v create (clothes) with cloth

“Can the seamstress sew me a suit by next week?”
Synonyms:
tailor, tailor-make
Types:
run up
make by sewing together quickly
quilt
create by stitching together
Type of:
fashion, forge
make out of components (often in an improvising manner)

v fasten by sewing; do needlework

Synonyms:
run up, sew together, stitch
Types:
show 14 types...
hide 14 types...
hem
fold over and sew together to provide with a hem
resew
sew again
overcast
sew with an overcast stitch from one section to the next
overcast
sew over the edge of with long slanting wide stitches
backstitch
do backstitches
gather, pucker, tuck
draw together into folds or puckers
finedraw
sew together very finely
fell
sew a seam by folding the edges
baste, tack
sew together loosely, with large stitches
hemstitch
sew with hemstitches
retick, tick
sew
cast on
make the first row of stitches when knitting
cast off
make the last row of stitches when knitting
oversew
sew (two edges) with close stitches that pass over them both
Type of:
fasten, fix, secure
cause to be firmly attached

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