To Kill a Mockingbird All Words 2500 words

  1. Atticus
    atlas moth
    We were far too old to settle an argument with a fist-fight, so we consulted
    Atticus.
  2. dill
    aromatic Old World herb having aromatic threadlike foliage and seeds used as seasoning
    He said it began the summer Dill came to us, when Dill first gave us the idea
    of making Boo Radley come out.
  3. Gilmer
    United States journalist who wrote a syndicated column of advice to the lovelorn (1870-1951)
    The solicitor, a Mr. Gilmer, was not well known to us.
  4. finch
    any of numerous small songbirds with short stout bills adapted for crushing seeds
    If General Jackson hadn’t run the Creeks up the creek, Simon Finch
    would never have paddled up the Alabama, and where would we be if he hadn’t?
  5. Tate
    United States poet and critic (1899-1979)
    Atticus and Mr. Heck Tate got out.
  6. Scout
    a Boy Scout or Girl Scout
    Scout yonder’s
    been readin‘ ever since she was born, and she ain’t even started to school yet.
  7. nut grass
    a widely distributed perennial sedge having small edible nutlike tubers
    If she found a blade of nut grass in her yard it was like the Second
    Battle of the Marne: she swooped down upon it with a tin tub and subjected it to
    blasts from beneath with a poisonous substance she said was so powerful it’d kill
    us all if we didn’t stand out of the way.
  8. entailment
    something that is inferred (deduced or entailed or implied)
    After a
    dreary conversation in our livingroom one night about his entailment, before Mr.
    Cunningham left he said, “Mr. Finch, I don’t know when I’ll ever be able to pay
    you.”
  9. sunhat
    a hat with a broad brim that protects the face from direct exposure to the sun
    Miss Maudie’s old sunhat glistened with snow crystals.
  10. boo
    show displeasure, as after a performance or speech
    He said it began the summer Dill came to us, when Dill first gave us the idea
    of making Boo Radley come out.
  11. aunty
    the sister of your father or mother; the wife of your uncle
    Long
    ago, in a burst of friendliness, Aunty and Uncle Jimmy produced a son named
    Henry, who left home as soon as was humanly possible, married, and produced
    Francis.
  12. chinaberry tree
    tree of northern India and China having purple blossoms and small inedible yellow fruits; naturalized in the southern United States as a shade tree
    Routine
    contentment was: improving our treehouse that rested between giant twin
    chinaberry trees in the back yard, fussing, running through our list of dramas
    based on the works of Oliver Optic, Victor Appleton, and Edgar Rice Burroughs.
  13. chinaberry
    evergreen of tropical America having pulpy fruit containing saponin which was used as soap by Native Americans
    Routine
    contentment was: improving our treehouse that rested between giant twin
    chinaberry trees in the back yard, fussing, running through our list of dramas
    based on the works of Oliver Optic, Victor Appleton, and Edgar Rice Burroughs.
  14. lumber jacket
    a short warm outer jacket
    He was long-nosed, wore boots with shiny metal eye-holes, boot pants
    and a lumber jacket.
  15. snow-on-the-mountain
    annual spurge of western United States having showy white-bracted flower clusters and very poisonous milk
    “Thought you could kill my Snow-on-the-Mountain, did you?
  16. redbug
    larval mite that sucks the blood of vertebrates including human beings causing intense irritation
    In his lawyer’s voice, without a shade of
    inflection, he said: “Your aunt has asked me to try and impress upon you and Jean
    Louise that you are not from run-of-the-mill people, that you are the product of
    several generations’ gentle breeding—” Atticus paused, watching me locate an
    elusive redbug on my leg.
  17. schoolyard
    the yard associated with a school
    The Maycomb school
    grounds adjoined the back of the Radley lot; from the Radley chickenyard tall
    pecan trees shook their fruit into the schoolyard, but the nuts lay untouched by the
    children: Radley pecans would kill you.
  18. scuppernong
    amber-green muscadine grape of southeastern United States
    Plucking an occasional camellia,
    getting a squirt of hot milk from Miss Maudie Atkinson’s cow on a summer day,
    helping ourselves to someone’s scuppernongs was part of our ethical culture, but
    money was different.
  19. bridgework
    a denture anchored to teeth on either side of missing teeth
    With a click of her tongue she thrust out her bridgework, a
    gesture of cordiality that cemented our friendship.
  20. said
    being the one previously mentioned or spoken of
    I maintain that the Ewells
    started it all, but Jem, who was four years my senior, said it started long before
    that.
  21. Miss
    a form of address for an unmarried woman
    Early one morning as we were beginning our day’s play in the back yard, Jem and
    I heard something next door in Miss Rachel Haverford’s collard patch.
  22. say
    utter aloud
    I maintain that the Ewells
    started it all, but Jem, who was four years my senior, said it started long before
    that.
  23. strip poker
    poker in which a player's losses are paid by removing an article of clothing
    “We were playin‘ strip poker up yonder by the fishpool,” he said.
  24. front yard
    the yard in front of a house; between the house and the street
    The remains
    of a picket drunkenly guarded the front yard— a “swept” yard that was never
    swept— where johnson grass and rabbit-tobacco grew in abundance.
  25. Taylor
    12th President of the United States; died in office (1784-1850)
    John Taylor was kind enough to give us a postponement…”
    “If you shouldn’t be defendin‘ him, then why are you doin’ it?”
  26. snowman
    a figure of a person made of packed snow
    When Atticus finally called us to order and bade us look at our plates instead of
    out the windows, Jem asked, “How do you make a snowman?”
  27. protective garment
    clothing that is intended to protect the wearer from injury
    She was not fat, but solid, and she chose
    protective garments that drew up her bosom to giddy heights, pinched in her
    waist, flared out her rear, and managed to suggest that Aunt Alexandra’s was once
    an hour-glass figure.
  28. porch
    a structure attached to the exterior of a building often forming a covered entrance
    Walking south, one
    faced its porch; the sidewalk turned and ran beside the lot.
  29. Reverend
    a title of respect for a clergyman
    Don’t pay no ‘tention to
    Lula, she’s contentious because Reverend Sykes threatened to church her.
  30. Cunningham
    United States dancer and choreographer (born in 1922)
    She
    stopped at Walter Cunningham’s desk.
  31. butterbean
    small flat green bean similar to lima beans
    Don’t you like butterbeans?
  32. courthouse
    a building that houses judicial courts
    Atticus’s office in the courthouse contained little more
    than a hat rack, a spittoon, a checkerboard and an unsullied Code of Alabama.
  33. Robinson
    United States baseball player; first Black to play in the major leagues (1919-1972)
    “I’m simply defending a Negro—his name’s Tom Robinson.
  34. collards
    kale that has smooth leaves
    Sitting down, he
    wasn’t much higher than the collards.
  35. Caroline
    of or relating to the life and times of kings Charles I or Charles II of England
    Before the first morning was over, Miss Caroline Fisher, our
    teacher, hauled me up to the front of the room and patted the palm of my hand
    with a ruler, then made me stand in the corner until noon.
  36. Meridian
    a town in eastern Mississippi
    Dill was from Meridian, Mississippi, was spending the summer with his aunt,
    Miss Rachel, and would be spending every summer in Maycomb from now on.
  37. front porch
    a porch for the front door
    The house was low,
    was once white with a deep front porch and green shutters, but had long ago
    darkened to the color of the slate-gray yard around it.
  38. folks
    people in general (often used in the plural)
    Folks call me Dill,” said Dill, struggling under the fence.
  39. okay
    being satisfactory or in satisfactory condition
    “That’s okay, ma’am, you’ll get to know all the county folks after a while.
  40. snipe hunt
    an elaborate practical joke in which the unsuspecting victim hunts a snipe and is typically left in the dark holding a bag and waiting for the snipe to run into it
    “Called ‘em off on a snipe hunt,” was the succinct answer.
  41. sidewalk
    walk consisting of a paved area for pedestrians; usually beside a street or roadway
    In
    rainy weather the streets turned to red slop; grass grew on the sidewalks, the
    courthouse sagged in the square.
  42. witness stand
    a box enclosure for a witness when testifying
    The witness stand was to the right of Judge Taylor, and when we got to our seats
    Mr. Heck Tate was already on it.
  43. underwood
    the brush (small trees and bushes and ferns etc.) growing beneath taller trees in a wood or forest
    Even Mr. Underwood was there.
  44. air rifle
    a gun that propels a projectile by compressed air
    He declined to let
    us take our air rifles to the Landing (I had already begun to think of shooting
    Francis) and said if we made one false move he’d take them away from us for
    good.
  45. aunt
    the sister of your father or mother; the wife of your uncle
    Aunt Rachel says your name’s Jeremy Atticus Finch.”
  46. jitney
    a vehicle carrying many passengers; used for public transport
    “Come on,” whispered Jem. We streaked across the square, across the street, until
    we were in the shelter of the Jitney Jungle door.
  47. jury
    a body of citizens sworn to give a true verdict according to the evidence presented in a court of law
    The jury
    couldn’t possibly be expected to take Tom Robinson’s word against the Ewells’—
    are you acquainted with the Ewells?”
  48. nigger
    (ethnic slur) extremely offensive name for a Black person
    Says if
    anybody sees a white nigger around, that’s the one.
  49. milk glass
    a milky white translucent or opaque glass
    He would probably have poured it into his milk glass had I not
    asked what the sam hill he was doing.
  50. wax crayon
    writing implement consisting of a colored stick of composition wax used for writing and drawing
    Indeed,
    they were an endless Project that slowly evolved into a Unit, in which miles of
    construction paper and wax crayon were expended by the State of Alabama in its
    well-meaning but fruitless efforts to teach me Group Dynamics.
  51. courtroom
    a room in which a lawcourt sits
    It took Atticus’s courtroom voice to drag us away from the tree.
  52. Crawford
    United States neoclassical sculptor (1814-1857)
    So Jem received most of his information from Miss Stephanie Crawford, a
    neighborhood scold, who said she knew the whole thing.
  53. screen door
    a door that consists of a frame holding metallic or plastic netting; used to allow ventilation and to keep insects from entering a building through the open door
    The Radley house had no screen doors.
  54. cootie
    a parasitic louse that infests the body of human beings
    “There ain’t no need to fear a cootie, ma’am.
  55. turn around
    turn abruptly and face the other way, either physically or metaphorically
    I turned around and saw most of the town people and the entire bus delegation
    looking at me.
  56. Rachel
    (Old Testament) the second wife of Jacob and mother of Joseph and Benjamin
    Early one morning as we were beginning our day’s play in the back yard, Jem and
    I heard something next door in Miss Rachel Haverford’s collard patch.
  57. double first
    a first-class honours degree in two subjects
    Double first cousin.”
  58. collard
    variety of kale having smooth leaves
    Early one morning as we were beginning our day’s play in the back yard, Jem and
    I heard something next door in Miss Rachel Haverford’s collard patch.
  59. druthers
    the right or chance to choose
    “If I had my ‘druthers I’d take a shotgun.”
  60. spelling contest
    a contest in which you are eliminated if you fail to spell a word correctly
    Jem showed it to
    Atticus, who said it was a spelling medal, that before we were born the Maycomb
    County schools had spelling contests and awarded medals to the winners.
  61. snot-nosed
    (used colloquially) overly conceited or arrogant
    Ain’t
    no snot-nosed slut of a schoolteacher ever born c’n make me do nothin‘!
  62. get
    come into the possession of something concrete or abstract
    Charles Lamb
    PART ONE
    Contents - Prev / Next
    Chapter 1
    When he was nearly thirteen, my brother Jem got his arm badly broken at the
    elbow.
  63. folk
    people in general (often used in the plural)
    Folks call me Dill,” said Dill, struggling under the fence.
  64. chicken wire
    a galvanized wire network with a hexagonal mesh; used to build fences
    Mrs. Crenshaw took some
    chicken wire and bent it into the shape of a cured ham.
  65. mockingbird
    long-tailed grey-and-white songbird of the southern United States able to mimic songs of other birds
    1960
    TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD
    by Harper Lee
    Copyright (C) 1960 by Harper Lee
    Copyright (C) renewed 1988 by Harper Lee
    Published by arrangement with McIntosh and Otis, Inc.
    CONTENTS
    l DEDICATION
    l PART ONE
    m Chapter 1
    m Chapter 2
    m Chapter 3
    m Chapter 4
    m Chapter 5
    m Chapter 6
    m Chapter 7
    m Chapter 8
    m Chapter 9
    m Chapter 10
    m Chapter 11
    l PART TWO
    m Chapter 12
    m Chapter 13
    m Chapter 14
    m Chapter 15
    m Chapter 16
    m Chapter 17
    m Chapter 18
    m Chapter 19
    m Chapter 20
    m Chapter 21
    m Chapter 22...
  66. around
    in the area or vicinity
    The place was self-sufficient:
    modest in comparison with the empires around it, the Landing nevertheless
    produced everything required to sustain life except ice, wheat flour, and articles
    of clothing, supplied by river-boats from Mobile.
  67. Tom
    (ethnic slur) offensive and derogatory name for a Black man who is abjectly servile and deferential to Whites
    He played the character parts formerly
    thrust upon me— the ape in Tarzan, Mr. Crabtree in The Rover Boys, Mr. Damon
    in Tom Swift.
  68. fire truck
    any of various large trucks that carry firemen and equipment to the site of a fire
    The old fire truck, killed by the cold, was being pushed from town
    by a crowd of men.
  69. judge
    a public official authorized to decide questions brought before a court of justice
    The town decided something had to
    be done; Mr. Conner said he knew who each and every one of them was, and he
    was bound and determined they wouldn’t get away with it, so the boys came
    before the probate judge on charges of disorderly conduct, disturbing the peace,
    assault and battery, and using abusive and profane language in the presence and
    hearing of a female.
  70. snot
    nasal mucus
    Ain’t
    no snot-nosed slut of a schoolteacher ever born c’n make me do nothin‘!
  71. scared
    made afraid
    I suppose he loved honor more than his head,
    for Dill wore him down easily: “You’re scared,” Dill said, the first day.
  72. streetlight
    a lamp supported on a lamppost; for illuminating a street
    In the glare from the streetlight, I could see Dill hatching one: his eyes widened,
    his fat cherub face grew rounder.
  73. front
    the side that is forward or prominent
    The house was low,
    was once white with a deep front porch and green shutters, but had long ago
    darkened to the color of the slate-gray yard around it.
  74. alarm clock
    a clock that wakes a sleeper at some preset time
    There was a marble-topped washstand by her bed; on it were a glass with a
    teaspoon in it, a red ear syringe, a box of absorbent cotton, and a steel alarm clock
    standing on three tiny legs.
  75. floorboard
    a board in the floor
    It was necessary to turn on the lights in the daytime; there was always a film of
    dust on the rough floorboards.
  76. extension cord
    an electric cord used to extend the length of a power cord
    We parted at suppertime, and after our meal Jem and I were settling down to a
    routine evening, when Atticus did something that interested us: he came into the
    livingroom carrying a long electrical extension cord.
  77. construction paper
    paper suitable for drawing and making cutouts
    Indeed,
    they were an endless Project that slowly evolved into a Unit, in which miles of
    construction paper and wax crayon were expended by the State of Alabama in its
    well-meaning but fruitless efforts to teach me Group Dynamics.
  78. stink up
    cause to smell bad; fill with a bad smell
    Don’t light that thing, Dill, you’ll stink up this whole end of
    town.”
  79. picknicker
    a person who is picnicking
    With one phrase he had turned happy picknickers
    into a sulky, tense, murmuring crowd, being slowly hypnotized by gavel taps
    lessening in intensity until the only sound in the courtroom was a dim pink-pinkpink:
    the judge might have been rapping the bench with a pencil.
  80. bust up
    smash or break forcefully
    “I said come here, nigger, and bust up this chiffarobe for me, I gotta nickel for
    you.
  81. county
    (United States) the largest administrative district within a state
    Maycomb, some twenty miles east of Finch’s Landing, was the county
    seat of Maycomb County.
  82. yeah
    not only so, but
    Yeah, that’s all,” said Dill.
  83. summertime
    the warmest season of the year; in the northern hemisphere it extends from the summer solstice to the autumnal equinox
    When I was almost six and Jem was nearly ten, our summertime boundaries
    (within calling distance of Calpurnia) were Mrs. Henry Lafayette Dubose’s house
    two doors to the north of us, and the Radley Place three doors to the south.
  84. ask
    make a request or demand for something to somebody
    She
    was always ordering me out of the kitchen, asking me why I couldn’t behave as
    well as Jem when she knew he was older, and calling me home when I wasn’t
    ready to come.
  85. decimal system
    a positional system of numeration that uses decimal digits and a base of ten
    It’s the Dewey Decimal System.”
  86. Bullfinch
    United States architect who designed the Capitol Building in Washington which served as a model for state capitols throughout the United States (1763-1844)
    He read in a book where I was a Bullfinch instead of a Finch.
  87. look
    perceive with attention; direct one's gaze towards
    When enough years had gone by to enable us to look back on them, we
    sometimes discussed the events leading to his accident.
  88. yard
    the enclosed land around a house or other building
    Early one morning as we were beginning our day’s play in the back yard, Jem and
    I heard something next door in Miss Rachel Haverford’s collard patch.
  89. oral contract
    an agreement that is not in writing and is not signed by the parties but is a real existing contract that lacks only the formal requirement of a memorandum to render it enforceable in litigation
    I thought she was going to spit in it, which was the only reason anybody in
    Maycomb held out his hand: it was a time-honored method of sealing oral
    contracts
    .
  90. guestroom
    a bedroom that is kept for the use of guests
    Simple enough; but
    the daughters’ rooms could be reached only by one staircase, Welcome’s room
    and the guestroom only by another.
  91. bulb-shaped
    shaped like a bulb
    The more affluent chased
    their food with drugstore Coca-Cola in bulb-shaped soda glasses.
  92. scare
    cause fear in
    I suppose he loved honor more than his head,
    for Dill wore him down easily: “You’re scared,” Dill said, the first day.
  93. pants
    underpants worn by women
    As Mr.
    Radley passed by, Boo drove the scissors into his parent’s leg, pulled them out,
    wiped them on his pants, and resumed his activities.
  94. Walter
    German conductor (1876-1962)
    She
    stopped at Walter Cunningham’s desk.
  95. but
    and nothing more
    I maintain that the Ewells
    started it all, but Jem, who was four years my senior, said it started long before
    that.
  96. rat terrier
    any of several breeds of terrier developed to catch rats
    We went
    to the wire fence to see if there was a puppy— Miss Rachel’s rat terrier was
    expecting— instead we found someone sitting looking at us.
  97. camellia
    any of several shrubs or small evergreen trees having solitary white or pink or reddish flowers
    Plucking an occasional camellia,
    getting a squirt of hot milk from Miss Maudie Atkinson’s cow on a summer day,
    helping ourselves to someone’s scuppernongs was part of our ethical culture, but
    money was different.
  98. bass drum
    a large drum with two heads; makes a sound of indefinite but very low pitch
    Then the
    bass drum sounded.
  99. just
    and nothing more
    “I just thought you’d like to know I can read.
  100. jury box
    an enclosure within a courtroom for the jury
    We were surprised to find that we had been
    gone nearly an hour, and were equally surprised to find the courtroom exactly as
    we had left it, with minor changes: the jury box was empty, the defendant was
    gone; Judge Taylor had been gone, but he reappeared as we were seating
    ourselves.
  101. angel food cake
    a light sponge cake made without egg yolks
    All the ladies in Maycomb includin‘ my wife’d be knocking on his
    door bringing angel food cakes.
  102. unrouged
    not wearing rouge
    The ladies were cool in fragile pastel prints: most of them were heavily powdered
    but unrouged; the only lipstick in the room was Tangee Natural.
  103. switchblade knife
    a pocketknife with a blade that springs open at the press of a button
    Mr. Tate reached in his side pocket and withdrew a long switchblade knife.
  104. tell
    narrate or give a detailed account of
    But it was a time of vague optimism for some of the people:
    Maycomb County had recently been told that it had nothing to fear but fear itself.
  105. like
    having the same or similar characteristics
    He liked
    Maycomb, he was Maycomb County born and bred; he knew his people, they
    knew him, and because of Simon Finch’s industry, Atticus was related by blood
    or marriage to nearly every family in the town.
  106. Rosetta Stone
    a part of an inscribed granite stela that was originally about six feet tall and was set up in 196 BC; the inscriptions in hieroglyphics and Demotic and Greek gave the first clues to the decipherment of Egyptian hieroglyphics
    Mr. Avery said it was written on the Rosetta Stone that when
    children disobeyed their parents, smoked cigarettes and made war on each other,
    the seasons would change: Jem and I were burdened with the guilt of contributing
    to the aberrations of nature, thereby causing unhappiness to our neighbors and
    discomfort to ourselves.
  107. Nome
    a town in western Alaska on the southern coast of the Seward Peninsula; an important center of an Alaskan gold rush at the beginning of the 20th century
    Nome thank you ma’am,” he drawled softly.
  108. know
    be cognizant or aware of a fact or a specific piece of information; possess knowledge or information about
    Mindful of John Wesley’s strictures on the use of many words
    in buying and selling, Simon made a pile practicing medicine, but in this pursuit
    he was unhappy lest he be tempted into doing what he knew was not for the glory
    of God, as the putting on of gold and costly apparel.
  109. Reynolds
    English portrait painter and first president of the Royal Academy (1723-1792)
    Dr. Reynolds parked his car in front of our house and walked to the
    Radley’s every time he called.
  110. catwalk
    narrow pathway high in the air (as above a stage or between parts of a building or along a bridge)
    There was a kitchen separate from the rest of the house, tacked onto it by a
    wooden catwalk; in the back yard was a rusty bell on a pole, used to summon
    field hands or as a distress signal; a widow’s walk was on the roof, but no widows
    walked there—from it, Simon oversaw his overseer, watched the river-boats, and
    gazed into the lives of surrounding landholders.
  111. reckon
    make a mathematical calculation or computation
    Jem said he reckoned he wasn’t, he’d passed
    the Radley Place every school day of his life.
  112. grubbiness
    the state of being grimy
    Because its primary reason for existence was government, Maycomb was spared
    the grubbiness that distinguished most Alabama towns its size.
  113. down
    spatially or metaphorically from a higher to a lower level or position
    Sitting down, he
    wasn’t much higher than the collards.
  114. think
    judge or regard; look upon; judge
    I did not miss her, but I think Jem did.
  115. back
    the posterior part of a human (or animal) body from the neck to the end of the spine
    His left arm was
    somewhat shorter than his right; when he stood or walked, the back of his hand
    was at right angles to his body, his thumb parallel to his thigh.
  116. linin
    an obsolete term for the network of viscous material in the cell nucleus on which the chromatin granules were thought to be suspended
    Linin‘?” she asked.
  117. Jacobs
    United States writer and critic of urban planning (born in 1916)
    Cecil Jacobs, who lived at the far end of our street next door to the post office,
    walked a total of one mile per school day to avoid the Radley Place and old Mrs.
    Henry Lafayette Dubose.
  118. jean
    (usually plural) close-fitting trousers of heavy denim for manual work or casual wear
    Jem says my name’s really Jean Louise Bullfinch, that I got swapped when I was
    born and I’m really a-”
    Miss Caroline apparently thought I was lying.
  119. fingernail
    the nail at the end of a finger
    She had bright auburn hair, pink
    cheeks, and wore crimson fingernail polish.
  120. slop jar
    a large pail used to receive waste water from a washbasin or chamber pot
    Against the fence, in a
    line, were six chipped-enamel slop jars holding brilliant red geraniums, cared for
    as tenderly as if they belonged to Miss Maudie Atkinson, had Miss Maudie
    deigned to permit a geranium on her premises.
  121. out
    moving or appearing to move away from a place, especially one that is enclosed or hidden
    He said it began the summer Dill came to us, when Dill first gave us the idea
    of making Boo Radley come out.
  122. chewing gum
    a preparation (usually made of sweetened chicle) for chewing
    I stood on tiptoe, hastily looked around once more, reached
    into the hole, and withdrew two pieces of chewing gum minus their outer
    wrappers.
  123. see
    perceive by sight or have the power to perceive by sight
    There was no hurry, for there was nowhere to go,
    nothing to buy and no money to buy it with, nothing to see outside the boundaries
    of Maycomb County.
  124. teacake
    flat semisweet cookie or biscuit usually served with tea
    Ladies bathed before noon, after their three-o’clock naps,
    and by nightfall were like soft teacakes with frostings of sweat and sweet talcum.
  125. back porch
    a porch for the back door
    The back porch was bathed in moonlight, and the shadow, crisp as toast,
    moved across the porch toward Jem.
    Dill saw it next.
  126. all right
    being satisfactory or in satisfactory condition
    It was all right to shut him up, Mr.
    Radley conceded, but insisted that Boo not be charged with anything: he was not
    a criminal.
  127. yonder
    distant but within sight (`yon' is dialectal)
    “Scout yonder’s
    been readin‘ ever since she was born, and she ain’t even started to school yet.
  128. hear
    perceive (sound) via the auditory sense
    Early one morning as we were beginning our day’s play in the back yard, Jem and
    I heard something next door in Miss Rachel Haverford’s collard patch.
  129. holler
    utter a sudden loud cry
    Jem hollered.
  130. comfortableness
    a feeling of being at ease in a relationship
    Atticus’s voice had lost its comfortableness; he was
    speaking in his arid, detached professional voice.
  131. pot liquor
    the liquid in which vegetables or meat have be cooked
    “You know,” he said, “I’ve seen Atticus pat his foot when there’s fiddlin‘ on the
    radio, and he loves pot liquor better’n any man I ever saw—”
    “Then that makes us like the Cunninghams,” I said.
  132. tonight
    during the night of the present day
    Besides, they’d put me in jail
    if I kept you at home—dose of magnesia for you tonight and school tomorrow.”
  133. right
    free from error; especially conforming to fact or truth
    His left arm was
    somewhat shorter than his right; when he stood or walked, the back of his hand
    was at right angles to his body, his thumb parallel to his thigh.
  134. why
    the cause or intention underlying an action or situation, especially in the phrase `the whys and wherefores'
    She
    was always ordering me out of the kitchen, asking me why I couldn’t behave as
    well as Jem when she knew he was older, and calling me home when I wasn’t
    ready to come.
  135. yelled
    in a vehement outcry
    Jem yelled.
  136. come
    move toward, travel toward something or somebody or approach something or somebody
    He said it began the summer Dill came to us, when Dill first gave us the idea
    of making Boo Radley come out.
  137. work shoe
    a thick and heavy shoe
    He shifted his feet, clad in heavy work shoes.
  138. lavation
    the work of cleansing (usually with soap and water)
    In Maycomb County, it was easy to tell when someone bathed regularly, as
    opposed to yearly lavations: Mr. Ewell had a scalded look; as if an overnight
    soaking had deprived him of protective layers of dirt, his skin appeared to be
    sensitive to the elements.
  139. misguide
    lead someone in the wrong direction or give someone wrong directions
    “Gertrude,” she
    said, “I tell you there are some good but misguided people in this town.
  140. Halloween
    the evening before All Saints' Day; often devoted to pranks played by young people
    Until then, Halloween in Maycomb was a completely unorganized
    affair.
  141. Mister
    a form of address for a man
    Dear Mister…”
    “How do you know it’s a man?
  142. walk
    use one's feet to advance; advance by steps
    His left arm was
    somewhat shorter than his right; when he stood or walked, the back of his hand
    was at right angles to his body, his thumb parallel to his thigh.
  143. witness
    someone who sees an event and reports what happened
    The
    Haverfords had dispatched Maycomb’s leading blacksmith in a misunderstanding
    arising from the alleged wrongful detention of a mare, were imprudent enough to
    do it in the presence of three witnesses, and insisted that the-son-of-a-bitch-had-itcoming-
    to-him was a good enough defense for anybody.
  144. liver spot
    a type of skin disease that causes brown spots on the skin
    Old-age liver spots dotted her cheeks, and her pale eyes had
    black pinpoint pupils.
  145. live oak
    any of several American evergreen oaks
    Somehow, it was hotter then: a black dog
    suffered on a summer’s day; bony mules hitched to Hoover carts flicked flies in
    the sweltering shade of the live oaks on the square.
  146. run
    move fast by using one's feet, with one foot off the ground at any given time
    If General Jackson hadn’t run the Creeks up the creek, Simon Finch
    would never have paddled up the Alabama, and where would we be if he hadn’t?
  147. door
    a swinging or sliding barrier that will close the entrance to a room or building or vehicle
    When I was almost six and Jem was nearly ten, our summertime boundaries
    (within calling distance of Calpurnia) were Mrs. Henry Lafayette Dubose’s house
    two doors to the north of us, and the Radley Place three doors to the south.
  148. azalea
    any of numerous ornamental shrubs grown for their showy flowers of various colors
    When people’s azaleas froze in a cold snap, it was
    because he had breathed on them.
  149. one
    the smallest whole number or a numeral representing this number
    1960
    TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD
    by Harper Lee
    Copyright (C) 1960 by Harper Lee
    Copyright (C) renewed 1988 by Harper Lee
    Published by arrangement with McIntosh and Otis, Inc.
    CONTENTS
    l DEDICATION
    l PART ONE
    m Chapter 1
    m Chapter 2
    m Chapter 3
    m Chapter 4
    m Chapter 5
    m Chapter 6
    m Chapter 7
    m Chapter 8
    m Chapter 9
    m Chapter 10
    m Chapter 11
    l PART TWO
    m Chapter 12
    m Chapter 13
    m Chapter 14
    m Chapter 15
    m Chapter 16
    m Chapter 17
    m Chapter 18
    m Chapter 19
    m Chapter 20
    m Chapter 21
    m Chapter 22...
  150. sit
    take a seat
    We went
    to the wire fence to see if there was a puppy— Miss Rachel’s rat terrier was
    expecting— instead we found someone sitting looking at us.
  151. there
    in or at that place
    They persisted in
    pleading Not Guilty to first-degree murder, so there was nothing much Atticus
    could do for his clients except be present at their departure, an occasion that was
    probably the beginning of my father’s profound distaste for the practice of
    criminal law.
  152. antagonize
    provoke the hostility of
    Of course Jem antagonized me
    sometimes until I could kill him, but when it came down to it he was all I had.
  153. all
    to a complete degree or to the full or entire extent (`whole' is often used informally for `wholly')
    I maintain that the Ewells
    started it all, but Jem, who was four years my senior, said it started long before
    that.
  154. contents
    a list of divisions (chapters or articles) and the pages on which they start
    1960
    TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD
    by Harper Lee
    Copyright (C) 1960 by Harper Lee
    Copyright (C) renewed 1988 by Harper Lee
    Published by arrangement with McIntosh and Otis, Inc.
    CONTENTS
    l DEDICATION
    l PART ONE
    m Chapter 1
    m Chapter 2
    m Chapter 3
    m Chapter 4
    m Chapter 5
    m Chapter 6
    m Chapter 7
    m Chapter 8
    m Chapter 9
    m Chapter 10
    m Chapter 11
    l PART TWO
    m Chapter 12
    m Chapter 13
    m Chapter 14
    m Chapter 15
    m Chapter 16
    m Chapter 17
    m Chapter 18
    m Chapter 19
    m Chapter 20
    m Chapter 21
    m Chapter 22...
  155. garbage truck
    a truck for collecting domestic refuse
    We sat
    waiting for Zeebo to arrive in the garbage truck.
  156. fishing pole
    a rod of wood or steel or fiberglass that is used in fishing to extend the fishing line
    Jem was merely going to put the note on the end of a fishing pole and stick it
    through the shutters.
  157. somebody
    a human being
    Somebody did.
  158. Alabama
    a state in the southeastern United States on the Gulf of Mexico; one of the Confederate states during the American Civil War
    If General Jackson hadn’t run the Creeks up the creek, Simon Finch
    would never have paddled up the Alabama, and where would we be if he hadn’t?
  159. Jack
    a man who serves as a sailor
    John Hale Finch was ten years younger than my father, and chose to
    study medicine at a time when cotton was not worth growing; but after getting
    Uncle Jack started, Atticus derived a reasonable income from the law.
  160. look around
    look about oneself
    Now that I was compelled to think about
    it, reading was something that just came to me, as learning to fasten the seat of
    my union suit without looking around, or achieving two bows from a snarl of
    shoelaces.
  161. prison farm
    a camp for trustworthy prisoners employed in government projects
    He was at Enfield Prison Farm, seventy miles away
    in Chester County.
  162. field pea
    variety of pea plant native to the Mediterranean region and North Africa and widely grown especially for forage
    Refreshed by food, Dill recited this narrative: having been
    bound in chains and left to die in the basement (there were basements in
    Meridian) by his new father, who disliked him, and secretly kept alive on raw
    field peas by a passing farmer who heard his cries for help (the good man poked a
    bushel pod by pod through the ventilator), Dill worked himself free by pulling the
    chains from the wall.
  163. headshaking
    the act of turning your head left and right to signify denial or disbelief or bemusement
    Through all the headshaking,
    quelling of nausea and Jem-yelling, I had heard another sound, so low I
    could not have heard it from the sidewalk.
  164. never
    not ever; at no time in the past or future
    When it healed, and Jem’s fears of never being able to play football were
    assuaged, he was seldom self-conscious about his injury.
  165. wheel around
    change directions as if revolving on a pivot
    “Not being wheeled around
    yet, am I? Neither’s your father.
  166. way
    how something is done or how it happens
    In England, Simon was irritated by the
    persecution of those who called themselves Methodists at the hands of their more
    liberal brethren, and as Simon called himself a Methodist, he worked his way
    across the Atlantic to Philadelphia, thence to Jamaica, thence to Mobile, and up
    the Saint Stephens.
  167. head
    the upper part of the human body or the front part of the body in animals; contains the face and brains
    He wore blue linen shorts that buttoned to his shirt, his hair
    was snow white and stuck to his head like duckfluff; he was a year my senior but
    I towered over him.
  168. Mrs
    a form of address for a married woman
    When I was almost six and Jem was nearly ten, our summertime boundaries
    (within calling distance of Calpurnia) were Mrs. Henry Lafayette Dubose’s house
    two doors to the north of us, and the Radley Place three doors to the south.
  169. mandrake root
    the root of the mandrake plant; used medicinally or as a narcotic
    I so often wondered how she could be
    Atticus’s and Uncle Jack’s sister that I revived half-remembered tales of
    changelings and mandrake roots that Jem had spun long ago.
  170. uncle
    the brother of your father or mother; the husband of your aunt
    John Hale Finch was ten years younger than my father, and chose to
    study medicine at a time when cotton was not worth growing; but after getting
    Uncle Jack started, Atticus derived a reasonable income from the law.
  171. dewberry
    any of several trailing blackberry brambles especially of North America
    The gentle hum of ladies’ voices grew louder as she opened the door: “Why,
    Alexandra, I never saw such charlotte… just lovely… I never can get my crust
    like this, never can… who’d‘ve thought of little dewberry tarts… Calpurnia?…
    who’da thought it… anybody tell you that the preacher’s wife’s… nooo, well she
    is, and that other one not walkin’ yet…”
    They became quiet, and I knew they had all been served.
  172. stay
    continue in a place, position, or situation
    “If I didn’t have to stay I’d leave.
  173. stop
    have an end, in a temporal, spatial, or quantitative sense; either spatial or metaphorical
    This was enough to make Jem march to the corner, where he stopped and leaned
    against the light-pole, watching the gate hanging crazily on its homemade hinge.
  174. disorderly conduct
    any act of molesting, interrupting, hindering, agitating, or arousing from a state of repose or otherwise depriving inhabitants of the peace and quiet to which they are entitled
    The town decided something had to
    be done; Mr. Conner said he knew who each and every one of them was, and he
    was bound and determined they wouldn’t get away with it, so the boys came
    before the probate judge on charges of disorderly conduct, disturbing the peace,
    assault and battery, and using abusive and profane language in the presence and
    hearing of a female.
  175. corrugate
    fold into ridges
    The cabin’s plank walls were supplemented with sheets of
    corrugated iron, its roof shingled with tin cans hammered flat, so only its general
    shape suggested its original design: square, with four tiny rooms opening onto a
    shotgun hall, the cabin rested uneasily upon four irregular lumps of limestone.
  176. in their right minds
    behaving responsibly
    “People in their right minds never take pride in their talents,” said Miss Maudie.
  177. garbage collector
    someone employed to collect and dispose of refuse
    It was Zeebo, the garbage collector.
  178. sinking spell
    a temporary decline in health or value
    Despite our compromise,
    my campaign to avoid school had continued in one form or another since my first
    day’s dose of it: the beginning of last September had brought on sinking spells,
    dizziness, and mild gastric complaints.
  179. bed
    a piece of furniture that provides a place to sleep
    She was all angles and bones; she was
    nearsighted; she squinted; her hand was wide as a bed slat and twice as hard.
  180. about
    (of quantities) imprecise but fairly close to correct
    When it healed, and Jem’s fears of never being able to play football were
    assuaged, he was seldom self-conscious about his injury.
  181. Gates
    United States computer entrepreneur whose software company made him the youngest multi-billionaire in the history of the United States (born in 1955)
    Aunt Alexandra got up from the table and swiftly passed more refreshments,
    neatly engaging Mrs. Merriweather and Mrs. Gates in brisk conversation.
  182. go to
    be present at (meetings, church services, university), etc.
    Simon would have regarded with impotent fury the disturbance between the North
    and the South, as it left his descendants stripped of everything but their land, yet
    the tradition of living on the land remained unbroken until well into the twentieth
    century, when my father, Atticus Finch, went to Montgomery to read law, and his
    younger brother went to Boston to study medicine.
  183. home
    where you live at a particular time
    She
    was always ordering me out of the kitchen, asking me why I couldn’t behave as
    well as Jem when she knew he was older, and calling me home when I wasn’t
    ready to come.
  184. thought
    the content of cognition; the main thing you are thinking about
    “I just thought you’d like to know I can read.
  185. not
    negation of a word or group of words
    Mindful of John Wesley’s strictures on the use of many words
    in buying and selling, Simon made a pile practicing medicine, but in this pursuit
    he was unhappy lest he be tempted into doing what he knew was not for the glory
    of God, as the putting on of gold and costly apparel.
  186. thing
    a separate and self-contained entity
    I said if he wanted to take a broad view of the thing, it really began with Andrew
    Jackson.
  187. twelve noon
    the middle of the day
    The sun said twelve noon.
  188. group dynamics
    the branch of social psychology that studies the psychodynamics of interaction in social groups
    Indeed,
    they were an endless Project that slowly evolved into a Unit, in which miles of
    construction paper and wax crayon were expended by the State of Alabama in its
    well-meaning but fruitless efforts to teach me Group Dynamics.
  189. picture show
    a form of entertainment that enacts a story by sound and a sequence of images giving the illusion of continuous movement
    She gave the money to Dill, who went to the picture show
    twenty times on it.
  190. try
    make an effort or attempt
    “Let’s try to make him come out,” said Dill.
  191. slicked
    (of hair) made smooth by applying a sticky or glossy substance
    See how they’ve been slicked up?
  192. drugstore
    a retail shop where medicine and other articles are sold
    By the time Mrs. Cat called the drugstore for
    an order of chocolate malted mice the class was wriggling like a bucketful of
    catawba worms.
  193. for a while
    for a short time
    I licked it and waited
    for a while.
  194. dime
    a United States coin worth one tenth of a dollar
    As
    Maycomb County was farm country, nickels and dimes were hard to come by for
    doctors and dentists and lawyers.
  195. look at
    look at carefully; study mentally
    We went
    to the wire fence to see if there was a puppy— Miss Rachel’s rat terrier was
    expecting— instead we found someone sitting looking at us.
  196. heard
    detected or perceived by the sense of hearing
    Early one morning as we were beginning our day’s play in the back yard, Jem and
    I heard something next door in Miss Rachel Haverford’s collard patch.
  197. chair
    a seat for one person, with a support for the back
    As I was the last to leave, I saw her sink
    down into her chair and bury her head in her arms.
  198. go home
    return home
    “Everybody who goes home to lunch hold up your hands,” said Miss Caroline,
    breaking into my new grudge against Calpurnia.
  199. short pants
    trousers that end at or above the knee
    He had
    discarded the abominable blue shorts that were buttoned to his shirts and wore
    real short pants with a belt; he was somewhat heavier, no taller, and said he had
    seen his father.
  200. hush
    become quiet or still; fall silent
    Dill blushed and Jem told me to hush, a sure sign that Dill had been studied and
    found acceptable.
  201. granddaddy
    the father of your father or mother
    You can teach me like Granddaddy taught
    you ‘n’ Uncle Jack.”
  202. kitchen
    a room equipped for preparing meals
    She
    was always ordering me out of the kitchen, asking me why I couldn’t behave as
    well as Jem when she knew he was older, and calling me home when I wasn’t
    ready to come.
  203. sir
    term of address for a man
    When he passed we would look at the ground and say,
    “Good morning, sir,” and he would cough in reply.
  204. slick up
    make neat, smart, or trim
    See how they’ve been slicked up?
  205. house
    a dwelling that serves as living quarters for one or more families
    He remembered her clearly, and
    sometimes in the middle of a game he would sigh at length, then go off and play
    by himself behind the car-house.
  206. rape
    the crime of forcing a woman to submit to sexual intercourse against her will
    “Well, if everybody in Maycomb knows what kind of folks the Ewells are they’d
    be glad to hire Helen… what’s rape, Cal?”
    “It’s somethin‘ you’ll have to ask Mr. Finch about,” she said.
  207. go around
    turn on or around an axis or a center
    “Tell you what,” said Jem. “We’ll keep ‘em till school starts, then go around and
    ask everybody if they’re theirs.
  208. want
    the state of needing something that is absent or unavailable
    I said if he wanted to take a broad view of the thing, it really began with Andrew
    Jackson.
  209. step
    the act of changing location by raising the foot and setting it down
    But to climb the Radley front steps
    and call, “He-y,” of a Sunday afternoon was something their neighbors never did.
  210. cold sober
    totally sober
    When Miss Caroline threatened it with a similar fate the first grade exploded
    again, becoming cold sober only when the shadow of Miss Blount fell over them.
  211. grin
    to draw back the lips and reveal the teeth, in a smile, grimace, or snarl
    Jem suddenly grinned at him.
  212. gavel
    a small mallet used by a presiding officer or a judge
    So serene was Judge Taylor’s court, that he had few occasions to use his gavel,
    but he hammered fully five minutes.
  213. child
    a human offspring (son or daughter) of any age
    1960
    TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD
    by Harper Lee
    Copyright (C) 1960 by Harper Lee
    Copyright (C) renewed 1988 by Harper Lee
    Published by arrangement with McIntosh and Otis, Inc.
    CONTENTS
    l DEDICATION
    l PART ONE
    m Chapter 1
    m Chapter 2
    m Chapter 3
    m Chapter 4
    m Chapter 5
    m Chapter 6
    m Chapter 7
    m Chapter 8
    m Chapter 9
    m Chapter 10
    m Chapter 11
    l PART TWO
    m Chapter 12
    m Chapter 13
    m Chapter 14
    m Chapter 15
    m Chapter 16
    m Chapter 17
    m Chapter 18
    m Chapter 19
    m Chapter 20
    m Chapter 21
    m Chapter 22
    m Chap...
  214. steps
    the course along which a person has walked or is walking in
    But to climb the Radley front steps
    and call, “He-y,” of a Sunday afternoon was something their neighbors never did.
  215. capital offense
    a crime so serious that capital punishment is considered appropriate
    “You know rape’s a capital offense in Alabama,” said Atticus.
  216. corner
    the point where three areas or surfaces meet or intersect
    In spite of our warnings and explanations it
    drew him as the moon draws water, but drew him no nearer than the light-pole on
    the corner, a safe distance from the Radley gate.
  217. Braxton Bragg
    Confederate general during the American Civil War who was defeated by Grant in the battle of Chattanooga (1817-1876)
    Local opinion held Mr. Underwood to be an intense, profane little man, whose
    father in a fey fit of humor christened Braxton Bragg, a name Mr. Underwood had
    done his best to live down.
  218. unlatched
    not firmly fastened or secured
    I unlatched the back door and held it while he crept down the steps.
  219. school
    an educational institution
    “Scout yonder’s
    been readin‘ ever since she was born, and she ain’t even started to school yet.
  220. stopped
    (of a nose) blocked
    This was enough to make Jem march to the corner, where he stopped and leaned
    against the light-pole, watching the gate hanging crazily on its homemade hinge.
  221. swivel chair
    a chair that swivels on its base
    Atticus would flee to his office directly after dinner, where
    if we sometimes looked in on him, we would find him sitting back in his swivel
    chair
    reading.
  222. switchblade
    a pocketknife with a blade that springs open at the press of a button
    Mr. Tate reached in his side pocket and withdrew a long switchblade knife.
  223. thick-bodied
    having a thick body
    As she raised her hand and swore that
    the evidence she gave would be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the
    truth so help her God, she seemed somehow fragile-looking, but when she sat
    facing us in the witness chair she became what she was, a thick-bodied girl
    accustomed to strenuous labor.
  224. squeeze for
    squeeze someone for money, information, etc.
    I followed, and held up
    the wire for Jem. It was a tight squeeze for him.
  225. front door
    exterior door (at the entrance) at the front of a building
    My memory came alive to see Mrs. Radley occasionally open the front door, walk
    to the edge of the porch, and pour water on her cannas.
  226. time
    the continuum of experience in which events pass from the future through the present to the past
    Their sister Alexandra was the
    Finch who remained at the Landing: she married a taciturn man who spent most
    of his time lying in a hammock by the river wondering if his trot-lines were full.
  227. proofed
    treated so as to become resistant
    Contents - Prev
    Scan & Proof Notes
    [scanned & proofed anonymously to version 1.5]
    [30 March, 2005, html proofed and formatted to version 2.0], rb version created
    from this versin as well.
  228. stand
    be standing; be upright
    His left arm was
    somewhat shorter than his right; when he stood or walked, the back of his hand
    was at right angles to his body, his thumb parallel to his thigh.
  229. pecan tree
    tree of southern United States and Mexico cultivated for its nuts
    The Maycomb school
    grounds adjoined the back of the Radley lot; from the Radley chickenyard tall
    pecan trees shook their fruit into the schoolyard, but the nuts lay untouched by the
    children: Radley pecans would kill you.
  230. pant
    breathe noisily, as when one is exhausted
    As Mr.
    Radley passed by, Boo drove the scissors into his parent’s leg, pulled them out,
    wiped them on his pants, and resumed his activities.
  231. in front
    at or in the front
    Dr. Reynolds parked his car in front of our house and walked to the
    Radley’s every time he called.
  232. tinfoil
    foil made of tin or an alloy of tin and lead
    Some tinfoil was sticking in a knot-hole just above my eye level, winking at me in
    the afternoon sun.
  233. nickel
    a hard malleable ductile silvery metallic element that is resistant to corrosion; used in alloys; occurs in pentlandite and smaltite and garnierite and millerite
    As
    Maycomb County was farm country, nickels and dimes were hard to come by for
    doctors and dentists and lawyers.
  234. fence
    a barrier that serves to enclose an area
    We went
    to the wire fence to see if there was a puppy— Miss Rachel’s rat terrier was
    expecting— instead we found someone sitting looking at us.
  235. the Street
    used to allude to the securities industry of the United States
    They did not go to church, Maycomb’s principal
    recreation, but worshiped at home; Mrs. Radley seldom if ever crossed the street
    for a mid-morning coffee break with her neighbors, and certainly never joined a
    missionary circle.
  236. corroborating evidence
    additional evidence or evidence of different kind that supports a proof already offered in a proceeding
    All the spectators were as relaxed as Judge Taylor, except Jem. His mouth was
    twisted into a purposeful half-grin, and his eyes happy about, and he said
    something about corroborating evidence, which made me sure he was showing off.
  237. liver-colored
    having a reddish-brown color
    Tim was a liver-colored bird dog, the pet
    of Maycomb.
  238. nauseate
    upset and make nauseated
    Dizzy and nauseated, I lay on the cement
    and shook my head still, pounded my ears to silence, and heard Jem’s voice:
    “Scout, get away from there, come on!”
  239. inside
    relating to or being on the side closer to the center or within a defined space
    Inside the house lived a malevolent phantom.
  240. grime
    the state of being covered with unclean things
    “Living in that jungle with nobody but J. Grimes
    Everett,” she said.
  241. hookworm
    parasitic bloodsucking roundworms having hooked mouth parts to fasten to the intestinal wall of human and other hosts
    Walter Cunningham’s face told everybody in the first grade he had hookworms.
  242. make
    perform or carry out
    He said it began the summer Dill came to us, when Dill first gave us the idea
    of making Boo Radley come out.
  243. sheriff
    the principal law-enforcement officer in a county
    Mrs. Radley ran screaming into the street that Arthur was killing them all, but
    when the sheriff arrived he found Boo still sitting in the livingroom, cutting up the
    Tribune.
  244. moistly
    in a damp manner
    There was no color in his face except at
    the tip of his nose, which was moistly pink.
  245. neighborhood
    an area within a city or town that has some distinctive features (especially one forming a community)
    Mr. Radley walked to town at eleven-thirty every morning and
    came back promptly at twelve, sometimes carrying a brown paper bag that the
    neighborhood assumed contained the family groceries.
  246. yes
    an affirmative
    I once asked Atticus if it ever had any;
    Atticus said yes, but before I was born.
  247. hand
    the (prehensile) extremity of the superior limb
    His left arm was
    somewhat shorter than his right; when he stood or walked, the back of his hand
    was at right angles to his body, his thumb parallel to his thigh.
  248. off
    from a particular thing or place or position (`forth' is obsolete)
    He remembered her clearly, and
    sometimes in the middle of a game he would sigh at length, then go off and play
    by himself behind the car-house.
  249. look like
    bear a physical resemblance to
    Looks like he’d just stick
    his head out the door.”
  250. then
    at that time
    Somehow, it was hotter then: a black dog
    suffered on a summer’s day; bony mules hitched to Hoover carts flicked flies in
    the sweltering shade of the live oaks on the square.
  251. face
    the front of the human head from the forehead to the chin and ear to ear
    Walking south, one
    faced its porch; the sidewalk turned and ran beside the lot.
  252. auditorium
    the area of a theater or concert hall where the audience sits
    The high-school
    auditorium would be open, there would be a pageant for the grown-ups; applebobbing,
    taffy-pulling, pinning the tail on the donkey for the children.
  253. car tire
    a tire consisting of a rubber ring around the rim of an automobile wheel
    I ran to the back yard and pulled an old car tire from under the house.
  254. decimal
    a number in the decimal system
    It’s the Dewey Decimal System.”
  255. riverbank
    the bank of a river
    Smoke was rolling off our house and Miss Rachel’s house like fog off a
    riverbank, and men were pulling hoses toward them.
  256. remember
    recall knowledge from memory; have a recollection
    She had been with us ever since Jem
    was born, and I had felt her tyrannical presence as long as I could remember.
  257. town
    an urban area with a fixed boundary that is smaller than a city
    He liked
    Maycomb, he was Maycomb County born and bred; he knew his people, they
    knew him, and because of Simon Finch’s industry, Atticus was related by blood
    or marriage to nearly every family in the town.
  258. cow barn
    a barn for cows
    Why, I hated that old cow barn.
  259. play hooky
    play truant from work or school
    Playing hooky, I
    suppose.
  260. wintertime
    the coldest season of the year; in the northern hemisphere it extends from the winter solstice to the vernal equinox
    Hours of wintertime had found me in the treehouse, looking over at the
    schoolyard, spying on multitudes of children through a two-power telescope Jem
    had given me, learning their games, following Jem’s red jacket through wriggling
    circles of blind man’s buff, secretly sharing their misfortunes and minor victories.
  261. turnip greens
    tender leaves of young white turnips
    That spring when we found a crokersack full of turnip
    greens
    , Atticus said Mr. Cunningham had more than paid him.
  262. glasses
    optical instrument consisting of a frame that holds a pair of lenses for correcting defective vision
    Calpurnia set a pitcher and three glasses on the porch, then
    went about her business.
  263. grade
    a position on a scale of intensity or amount or quality
    I was to stick with the first grade and he would stick with the
    fifth.
  264. father
    a male parent (also used as a term of address to your father)
    Our father said we were both right.
  265. yank
    pull, or move with a sudden movement
    I
    interrupted to make Uncle Jack let me know when he would pull it out, but he
    held up a bloody splinter in a pair of tweezers and said he yanked it while I was
    laughing, that was what was known as relativity.
  266. yell
    a loud utterance; often in protest or opposition
    Jem yelled.
  267. someone
    a human being
    We went
    to the wire fence to see if there was a puppy— Miss Rachel’s rat terrier was
    expecting— instead we found someone sitting looking at us.
  268. read
    look at, interpret, and say out loud something that is written or printed
    Simon would have regarded with impotent fury the disturbance between the North
    and the South, as it left his descendants stripped of everything but their land, yet
    the tradition of living on the land remained unbroken until well into the twentieth
    century, when my father, Atticus Finch, went to Montgomery to read law, and his
    younger brother went to Boston to study medicine.
  269. maybe
    by chance
    They’re some bus child’s, maybe—he was too
    taken up with gettin’ outa school today an‘ forgot ’em.
  270. street
    a thoroughfare (usually including sidewalks) that is lined with buildings
    In
    rainy weather the streets turned to red slop; grass grew on the sidewalks, the
    courthouse sagged in the square.
  271. colored
    having color or a certain color; sometimes used in combination
    Atticus
    said Calpurnia had more education than most colored folks.
  272. farrow
    the production of a litter of pigs
    Mrs. Merriweather faced Mrs. Farrow: “Gertrude, I tell you there’s nothing more
    distracting than a sulky darky.
  273. anyway
    in any way whatsoever
    “She
    likes Jem better’n she likes me, anyway,” I concluded, and suggested that Atticus
    lose no time in packing her off.
  274. untalented
    devoid of talent; not gifted
    Jem said Mr. Avery misfigured, Dill said he must drink a
    gallon a day, and the ensuing contest to determine relative distances and
    respective prowess only made me feel left out again, as I was untalented in this
    area.
  275. run-of-the-mill
    not special in any way
    In his lawyer’s voice, without a shade of
    inflection, he said: “Your aunt has asked me to try and impress upon you and Jean
    Louise that you are not from run-of-the-mill people, that you are the product of
    several generations’ gentle breeding—” Atticus paused, watching me locate an
    elusive redbug on my leg.
  276. window
    a framework of wood or metal that contains a glass windowpane and is built into a wall or roof to admit light or air
    People said he went out at night when the moon was down,
    and peeped in windows.
  277. bedtime
    the time you go to bed
    We decorated the tree until bedtime, and that night I dreamed of the two long
    packages for Jem and me.
  278. saw
    hand tool having a toothed blade for cutting
    Mr. Radley’s elder son lived
    in Pensacola; he came home at Christmas, and he was one of the few persons we
    ever saw enter or leave the place.
  279. wisteria
    any flowering vine of the genus Wisteria
    When he completed his
    examination of the wisteria vine he strolled back to me.
  280. daddy
    an informal term for a father; probably derived from baby talk
    “Your daddy Mr. Walter Cunningham from Old
    Sarum?” he asked, and Walter nodded.
  281. lemon drop
    a hard candy with lemon flavor and a yellow color and (usually) the shape of a lemon
    It had been
    a placid week: I had minded Aunty; Jem had outgrown the treehouse, but helped
    Dill and me construct a new rope ladder for it; Dill had hit upon a foolproof plan
    to make Boo Radley come out at no cost to ourselves (place a trail of lemon drops
    from the back door to the front yard and he’d follow it, like an ant).
  282. can
    airtight sealed metal container for food or drink or paint etc.
    “I can read.”
  283. jail
    a correctional institution used to detain persons who are in the lawful custody of the government (either accused persons awaiting trial or convicted persons serving a sentence)
    His
    first two clients were the last two persons hanged in the Maycomb County jail.
  284. turned
    moved around an axis or center
    In
    rainy weather the streets turned to red slop; grass grew on the sidewalks, the
    courthouse sagged in the square.
  285. put
    cause to be in a certain state; cause to be in a certain relation
    Mindful of John Wesley’s strictures on the use of many words
    in buying and selling, Simon made a pile practicing medicine, but in this pursuit
    he was unhappy lest he be tempted into doing what he knew was not for the glory
    of God, as the putting on of gold and costly apparel.
  286. defendant
    a person or institution against whom an action is brought in a court of law; the person being sued or accused
    “Maybe he doesn’t have anywhere to run off to…”
    Contents - Prev / Next
    Chapter 15
    After many telephone calls, much pleading on behalf of the defendant, and a long
    forgiving letter from his mother, it was decided that Dill could stay.
  287. please
    give pleasure to or be pleasing to
    In Calpurnia’s teaching, there was no sentimentality: I
    seldom pleased her and she seldom rewarded me.
  288. dirt
    the part of the earth's surface consisting of humus and disintegrated rock
    Contents - Prev / Next
    Chapter 3
    Catching Walter Cunningham in the schoolyard gave me some pleasure, but when
    I was rubbing his nose in the dirt Jem came by and told me to stop.
  289. enough
    sufficient for the purpose
    When enough years had gone by to enable us to look back on them, we
    sometimes discussed the events leading to his accident.
  290. chew
    chew (food); to bite and grind with the teeth
    I stood on tiptoe, hastily looked around once more, reached
    into the hole, and withdrew two pieces of chewing gum minus their outer
    wrappers.
  291. trash
    worthless material that is to be disposed of
    “Your father’s no better than the niggers and trash he
    works for!”
  292. jump on
    get up on the back of
    “He’ll probably come out after you when he sees you
    in the yard, then Scout’n‘ me’ll jump on him and hold him down till we can tell
    him we ain’t gonna hurt him.”
  293. tooth and nail
    with force and ferocity
    I
    would fight anyone from a third cousin upwards tooth and nail.
  294. pecan
    tree of southern United States and Mexico cultivated for its nuts
    The Maycomb school
    grounds adjoined the back of the Radley lot; from the Radley chickenyard tall
    pecan trees shook their fruit into the schoolyard, but the nuts lay untouched by the
    children: Radley pecans would kill you.
  295. dump
    a piece of land where waste materials are dumped
    He
    lives in that little settlement beyond the town dump.
  296. shook
    a disassembled barrel; the parts packed for storage or shipment
    The Maycomb school
    grounds adjoined the back of the Radley lot; from the Radley chickenyard tall
    pecan trees shook their fruit into the schoolyard, but the nuts lay untouched by the
    children: Radley pecans would kill you.
  297. worry
    a strong feeling of anxiety
    Jem, that damn lady says Atticus’s been
    teaching me to read and for him to stop it-”
    “Don’t worry, Scout,” Jem comforted me.
  298. well
    (often used as a combining form) in a good or proper or satisfactory manner or to a high standard (`good' is a nonstandard dialectal variant for `well')
    Simon would have regarded with impotent fury the disturbance between the North
    and the South, as it left his descendants stripped of everything but their land, yet
    the tradition of living on the land remained unbroken until well into the twentieth
    century, when my father, Atticus Finch, went to Montgomery to read law, and his
    younger brother went to Boston to study medicine.
  299. Mobile
    a port in southwestern Alabama on Mobile Bay
    In England, Simon was irritated by the
    persecution of those who called themselves Methodists at the hands of their more
    liberal brethren, and as Simon called himself a Methodist, he worked his way
    across the Atlantic to Philadelphia, thence to Jamaica, thence to Mobile, and up
    the Saint Stephens.
  300. tomorrow
    the day after today
    You can pay me back tomorrow.”
  301. watch
    look attentively
    At last
    the sawhorses were taken away, and we stood watching from the front porch
    when Mr. Radley made his final journey past our house.
  302. spat
    a quarrel about petty points
    “There goes the meanest man ever God blew breath into,” murmured Calpurnia,
    and she spat meditatively into the yard.
  303. rocking chair
    a chair mounted on rockers
    I saw Atticus carrying Miss
    Maudie’s heavy oak rocking chair, and thought it sensible of him to save what she
    valued most.
  304. lady
    a polite name for any woman
    Ladies bathed before noon, after their three-o’clock naps,
    and by nightfall were like soft teacakes with frostings of sweat and sweet talcum.
  305. shuffle
    walk by dragging one's feet
    They ambled across the square, shuffled in and out of
    the stores around it, took their time about everything.
  306. turn
    move around an axis or a center
    In
    rainy weather the streets turned to red slop; grass grew on the sidewalks, the
    courthouse sagged in the square.
  307. post office
    a local branch where postal services are available"
    It was our habit to run meet Atticus the moment
    we saw him round the post office corner in the distance.
  308. whittle away
    cut away in small pieces
    Boo bit it off one night when he couldn’t find
    any cats and squirrels to eat.); she sat in the livingroom and cried most of the
    time, while Boo slowly whittled away all the furniture in the house.
  309. unclipped
    not clipped
    He drew out an envelope,
    then reached into his vest pocket and unclipped his fountain pen.
  310. hymnbook
    a songbook containing a collection of hymns
    “How’re we gonna sing it if there ain’t any hymnbooks?”
  311. religious holiday
    a day specified for religious observance
    The fact that Aunty
    was a good cook was some compensation for being forced to spend a religious
    holiday
    with Francis Hancock.
  312. leave
    go away from a place
    His left arm was
    somewhat shorter than his right; when he stood or walked, the back of his hand
    was at right angles to his body, his thumb parallel to his thigh.
  313. chapter
    a subdivision of a written work; usually numbered and titled
    1960
    TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD
    by Harper Lee
    Copyright (C) 1960 by Harper Lee
    Copyright (C) renewed 1988 by Harper Lee
    Published by arrangement with McIntosh and Otis, Inc.
    CONTENTS
    l DEDICATION
    l PART ONE
    m Chapter 1
    m Chapter 2
    m Chapter 3
    m Chapter 4
    m Chapter 5
    m Chapter 6
    m Chapter 7
    m Chapter 8
    m Chapter 9
    m Chapter 10
    m Chapter 11
    l PART TWO
    m Chapter 12
    m Chapter 13
    m Chapter 14
    m Chapter 15
    m Chapter 16
    m Chapter 17
    m Chapter 18
    m Chapter 19
    m Chapter 20
    m Chapter 21
    m Chapter 22...
  314. link
    connect, fasten, or put together two or more pieces
    On the way home I nearly hit Mr. Link Deas, who said, “Look
    out now, Scout!” when I missed a toss, and when we approached Mrs. Dubose’s
    house my baton was grimy from having picked it up out of the dirt so many times.
  315. spit
    the act of spitting (forcefully expelling saliva)
    “There goes the meanest man ever God blew breath into,” murmured Calpurnia,
    and she spat meditatively into the yard.
  316. take
    get into one's hands, take physically
    I said if he wanted to take a broad view of the thing, it really began with Andrew
    Jackson.
  317. barefooted
    without shoes
    People caught hookworms going
    barefooted in barnyards and hog wallows.
  318. behind
    in or to or toward the rear
    He remembered her clearly, and
    sometimes in the middle of a game he would sigh at length, then go off and play
    by himself behind the car-house.
  319. man
    an adult person who is male (as opposed to a woman)
    It was customary for the men in the family to remain on Simon’s homestead,
    Finch’s Landing, and make their living from cotton.
  320. flash card
    a card with words or numbers or pictures that is flashed to a class by the teacher
    The second grade was as bad as the first, only worse—they still
    flashed cards at you and wouldn’t let you read or write.
  321. Alabama River
    a river in Alabama formed by the confluence of the Coosa and Tallapoosa Rivers near Montgomery; flows southwestward to become a tributary of the Mobile River
    So Simon, having forgotten
    his teacher’s dictum on the possession of human chattels, bought three slaves and
    with their aid established a homestead on the banks of the Alabama River some
    forty miles above Saint Stephens.
  322. pair of tweezers
    a hand tool for holding consisting of a compound lever for grasping
    I
    interrupted to make Uncle Jack let me know when he would pull it out, but he
    held up a bloody splinter in a pair of tweezers and said he yanked it while I was
    laughing, that was what was known as relativity.
  323. talcum
    a fine grained mineral having a soft soapy feel and consisting of hydrated magnesium silicate; used in a variety of products including talcum powder
    Ladies bathed before noon, after their three-o’clock naps,
    and by nightfall were like soft teacakes with frostings of sweat and sweet talcum.
  324. bang up
    damage or destroy as if by violence
    She was mighty
    banged up.
  325. unawareness
    unconsciousness resulting from lack of knowledge or attention
    High above us in the darkness a solitary mocker poured out his repertoire in
    blissful unawareness of whose tree he sat in, plunging from the shrill kee, kee of
    the sunflower bird to the irascible qua-ack of a bluejay, to the sad lament of Poor
    Will, Poor Will, Poor Will.
  326. tried
    tested and proved to be reliable
    I tried again: “Walter’s one of the Cunninghams, Miss Caroline.”
  327. scratch
    cut the surface of; wear away the surface of
    I’ve seen his tracks in our back yard many a mornin’, and one night I heard
    him scratching on the back screen, but he was gone time Atticus got there.”
  328. afternoon
    the part of the day between noon and evening
    Of all days Sunday was the day for formal afternoon visiting: ladies wore
    corsets, men wore coats, children wore shoes.
  329. backstage
    a stage area out of sight of the audience
    I went with Cecil down
    to the front of the auditorium, through a door on one side, and backstage.
  330. baton
    a hollow metal rod that is wielded or twirled by a drum major or drum majorette
    Jem thought he had enough to buy a
    miniature steam engine for himself and a twirling baton for me.
  331. wait
    stay in one place and anticipate or expect something
    Jem threw open the gate and sped to the side of the house, slapped it with his
    palm and ran back past us, not waiting to see if his foray was successful.
  332. Cola
    large genus of African trees bearing kola nuts
    A few graves in the cemetery were marked with crumbling
    tombstones; newer ones were outlined with brightly colored glass and broken
    Coca-Cola bottles.
  333. one time
    on one occasion
    Miss Stephanie Crawford
    said she woke up in the middle of the night one time and saw him looking straight
    through the window at her… said his head was like a skull lookin‘ at her.
  334. ever
    at all times; all the time and on every occasion
    She had been with us ever since Jem
    was born, and I had felt her tyrannical presence as long as I could remember.
  335. shut
    move so that an opening or passage is obstructed; make shut
    It was all right to shut him up, Mr.
    Radley conceded, but insisted that Boo not be charged with anything: he was not
    a criminal.
  336. shotgun
    firearm that is a double-barreled smoothbore shoulder weapon for firing shot at short ranges
    Halfway through the collards I tripped; as I tripped the roar of a shotgun shattered
    the neighborhood.
  337. unclip
    remove the clip from
    He drew out an envelope,
    then reached into his vest pocket and unclipped his fountain pen.
  338. chicken leg
    the lower joint of the leg of a chicken
    “I’da got her told,” growled Dill, gnawing a chicken leg, “but she didn’t look
    much like tellin‘ this morning.
  339. checkerboard
    a board having 64 squares of two alternating colors
    Atticus’s office in the courthouse contained little more
    than a hat rack, a spittoon, a checkerboard and an unsullied Code of Alabama.
  340. hallway
    an interior passage or corridor onto which rooms open
    The following Monday afternoon Jem and I climbed the steep front steps to Mrs.
    Dubose’s house and padded down the open hallway.
  341. cotton gin
    a machine that separates the seeds from raw cotton fibers
    Reverend Sykes leaned across me and whispered to Jem. “He got it caught in a
    cotton gin, caught it in Mr. Dolphus Raymond’s cotton gin when he was a boy…
    like to bled to death… tore all the muscles loose from his bones—”
    Atticus said, “Is this the man who raped you?”
  342. balcony
    a platform projecting from the wall of a building and surrounded by a balustrade or railing or parapet
    Do you all reckon it’ll be all right if you all came to the
    balcony with me?”
  343. night
    the time after sunset and before sunrise while it is dark outside
    People said he went out at night when the moon was down,
    and peeped in windows.
  344. again
    anew
    Calpurnia was something else again.
  345. raveling
    a bit of fiber that has become separated from woven fabric
    “Gracious child, I was raveling a thread, wasn’t even thinking about your father,
    but now that I am I’ll say this: Atticus Finch is the same in his house as he is on
    the public streets.
  346. congenital defect
    a defect that is present at birth
    No truant officers
    could keep their numerous offspring in school; no public health officer could free
    them from congenital defects, various worms, and the diseases indigenous to
    filthy surroundings.
  347. next
    immediately following in time or order
    1960
    TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD
    by Harper Lee
    Copyright (C) 1960 by Harper Lee
    Copyright (C) renewed 1988 by Harper Lee
    Published by arrangement with McIntosh and Otis, Inc.
    CONTENTS
    l DEDICATION
    l PART ONE
    m Chapter 1
    m Chapter 2
    m Chapter 3
    m Chapter 4
    m Chapter 5
    m Chapter 6
    m Chapter 7
    m Chapter 8
    m Chapter 9
    m Chapter 10
    m Chapter 11
    l PART TWO
    m Chapter 12
    m Chapter 13
    m Chapter 14
    m Chapter 15
    m Chapter 16
    m Chapter 17
    m Chapter 18
    m Chapter 19
    m Chapter 20
    m Chapter 21
    m Chapter 22
    m Chap...
  348. day
    time for Earth to make a complete rotation on its axis
    Somehow, it was hotter then: a black dog
    suffered on a summer’s day; bony mules hitched to Hoover carts flicked flies in
    the sweltering shade of the live oaks on the square.
  349. costume
    the attire characteristic of a country or a time or a social class
    There
    would also be a prize of twenty-five cents for the best Halloween costume,
    created by the wearer.
  350. come out
    appear or become visible; make a showing
    He said it began the summer Dill came to us, when Dill first gave us the idea
    of making Boo Radley come out.
  351. bank building
    a building in which the business of banking transacted
    Atticus’s office was in the courthouse when he began his law practice, but after
    several years of it he moved to quieter quarters in the Maycomb Bank building.
  352. body English
    a motion of the body by a player as if to make an object already propelled go in the desired direction
    I was beginning to learn his body English.
  353. content
    satisfied or showing satisfaction with things as they are
    1960
    TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD
    by Harper Lee
    Copyright (C) 1960 by Harper Lee
    Copyright (C) renewed 1988 by Harper Lee
    Published by arrangement with McIntosh and Otis, Inc.
    CONTENTS
    l DEDICATION
    l PART ONE
    m Chapter 1
    m Chapter 2
    m Chapter 3
    m Chapter 4
    m Chapter 5
    m Chapter 6
    m Chapter 7
    m Chapter 8
    m Chapter 9
    m Chapter 10
    m Chapter 11
    l PART TWO
    m Chapter 12
    m Chapter 13
    m Chapter 14
    m Chapter 15
    m Chapter 16
    m Chapter 17
    m Chapter 18
    m Chapter 19
    m Chapter 20
    m Chapter 21
    m Chapter 22...
  354. grab
    take or grasp suddenly
    Miss Caroline stood stock still, then grabbed me by the collar and hauled me back
    to her desk.
  355. bob
    move up and down repeatedly
    Another thing, Mr. Bob Ewell, Burris’s father, was
    permitted to hunt and trap out of season.
  356. nobody
    a person of no influence
    Nobody in Maycomb had nerve enough to tell Mr. Radley that his boy
    was in with the wrong crowd.
  357. permanent wave
    a series of waves in the hair made by applying heat and chemicals
    She
    had a fresh permanent wave, and her hair was a mass of tight gray ringlets.
  358. punk
    a teenager or young adult who is a performer (or enthusiast) of punk rock and a member of the punk youth subculture
    Punk, punk, punk, her needle
    broke the taut circle.
  359. wrapping paper
    a tough paper used for wrapping
    Jem, there’s some wrapping paper in the
    pantry, I think.
  360. scream
    utter a sudden loud cry
    Mrs. Radley ran screaming into the street that Arthur was killing them all, but
    when the sheriff arrived he found Boo still sitting in the livingroom, cutting up the
    Tribune.
  361. pull
    apply force so as to cause motion towards the source of the motion
    As he told us the old tale his blue eyes would lighten and
    darken; his laugh was sudden and happy; he habitually pulled at a cowlick in the
    center of his forehead.
  362. chain-smoke
    smoke one cigarette after another; light one cigarette from the preceding one
    Bert, the
    court reporter, was chain-smoking: he sat back with his feet on the table.
  363. slate-gray
    of the color of slate or granite
    The house was low,
    was once white with a deep front porch and green shutters, but had long ago
    darkened to the color of the slate-gray yard around it.
  364. window screen
    screen to keep insects from entering a building through the open window
    Jem turned out the livingroom lights and pressed his nose to a window screen.
  365. think about
    have on one's mind, think about actively
    Jem thought about it for three days.
  366. probate
    the act of proving that an instrument purporting to be a will was signed and executed in accord with legal requirements
    The town decided something had to
    be done; Mr. Conner said he knew who each and every one of them was, and he
    was bound and determined they wouldn’t get away with it, so the boys came
    before the probate judge on charges of disorderly conduct, disturbing the peace,
    assault and battery, and using abusive and profane language in the presence and
    hearing of a female.
  367. get it
    understand, usually after some initial difficulty
    “I hope you’ve got it through your head that he’ll kill us each and every one, Dill
    Harris,” said Jem, when we joined him.
  368. sass
    an impudent or insolent rejoinder
    I don’t mean to sass you, I’m just tryin‘
    to tell you.”
  369. schoolhouse
    a building where young people receive education
    Often as not, Miss Maudie and I
    would sit silently on her porch, watching the sky go from yellow to pink as the
    sun went down, watching flights of martins sweep low over the neighborhood and
    disappear behind the schoolhouse rooftops.
  370. luncher
    someone who is eating lunch
    Hey, look—”
    Some invisible signal had made the lunchers on the square rise and scatter bits of
    newspaper, cellophane, and wrapping paper.
  371. things
    any movable possession (especially articles of clothing)
    “If you are, then-”
    “Dill, you have to think about these things,” Jem said.
  372. bleakly
    without hope
    “Atticus—” said Jem bleakly.
  373. summer
    the warmest season of the year; in the northern hemisphere it extends from the summer solstice to the autumnal equinox
    He said it began the summer Dill came to us, when Dill first gave us the idea
    of making Boo Radley come out.
  374. blind spot
    the point where the optic nerve enters the retina; not sensitive to light
    “Mr.
    Cunningham’s basically a good man,” he said, “he just has his blind spots along
    with the rest of us.”
  375. tax assessor
    an official who evaluates property for the purpose of taxing it
    To reach the courtroom, on the second floor, one passed sundry sunless county
    cubbyholes: the tax assessor, the tax collector, the county clerk, the county
    solicitor, the circuit clerk, the judge of probate lived in cool dim hutches that
    smelled of decaying record books mingled with old damp cement and stale urine.
  376. slicked up
    having been made especially tidy
    See how they’ve been slicked up?
  377. coffee cup
    a cup from which coffee is drunk
    Her voice soared over the clink of coffee cups
    and the soft bovine sounds of the ladies munching their dainties.
  378. hat
    headdress that protects the head from bad weather; has shaped crown and usually a brim
    Atticus’s office in the courthouse contained little more
    than a hat rack, a spittoon, a checkerboard and an unsullied Code of Alabama.
  379. voice
    the sound made by the vibration of vocal folds modified by the resonance of the vocal tract
    Impatience crept into Miss Caroline’s voice: “Here Walter, come get it.”
  380. decide
    reach, make, or come to a decision about something
    The town decided something had to
    be done; Mr. Conner said he knew who each and every one of them was, and he
    was bound and determined they wouldn’t get away with it, so the boys came
    before the probate judge on charges of disorderly conduct, disturbing the peace,
    assault and battery, and using abusive and profane language in the presence and
    hearing of a female.
  381. Negro
    a person with dark skin who comes from Africa (or whose ancestors came from Africa)
    A Negro would not pass the Radley Place at night, he would cut
    across to the sidewalk opposite and whistle as he walked.
  382. raise
    move upwards
    Walter looked as if he had been raised on fish food: his eyes, as blue as Dill
    Harris’s, were red-rimmed and watery.
  383. county courthouse
    the town or city that is the seat of government for a county
    “Naw, we better wait till they get in, Atticus might not like it if he sees us,” said
    Jem.
    The Maycomb County courthouse was faintly reminiscent of Arlington in one
    respect: the concrete pillars supporting its south roof were too heavy for their light
    burden.
  384. Helen
    (Greek mythology) the beautiful daughter of Zeus and Leda who was abducted by Paris; the Greek army sailed to Troy to get her back which resulted in the Trojan War
    The
    collection taken up today and for the next three Sundays will go to Helen—his
    wife, to help her out at home.”
  385. wanted
    desired or wished for or sought
    I said if he wanted to take a broad view of the thing, it really began with Andrew
    Jackson.
  386. seem
    give a certain impression or have a certain outward aspect
    A day was twenty-four
    hours long but seemed longer.
  387. eyetooth
    one of the four pointed conical teeth (two in each jaw) located between the incisors and the premolars
    She called us by all our
    names, and when she grinned she revealed two minute gold prongs clipped to her
    eyeteeth.
  388. happen
    come to pass
    But there came a day, barely within Jem’s memory, when Boo Radley was heard
    from and was seen by several people, but not by Jem. He said Atticus never talked
    much about the Radleys: when Jem would question him Atticus’s only answer
    was for him to mind his own business and let the Radleys mind theirs, they had a
    right to; but when it happened Jem said Atticus shook his head and said, “Mm,
    mm, mm.”
  389. twenty-first
    coming next after the twentieth in position
    Mr. Tate said, “It was the night of November twenty-first.
  390. old
    (used especially of persons) having lived for a relatively long time or attained a specific age
    We were far too old to settle an argument with a fist-fight, so we consulted
    Atticus.
  391. baptistry
    bowl for baptismal water
    “But we can’t have communion with you all-”
    Apparently deciding that it was easier to define primitive baptistry than closed
    communion, Miss Maudie said: “Foot-washers believe anything that’s pleasure is
    a sin.
  392. grow
    increase in size by natural process
    John Hale Finch was ten years younger than my father, and chose to
    study medicine at a time when cotton was not worth growing; but after getting
    Uncle Jack started, Atticus derived a reasonable income from the law.
  393. minute
    a unit of time equal to 60 seconds or 1/60th of an hour
    “Lemme think a minute
    it’s sort of like making a turtle come out…”
    “How’s that?” asked Dill.
  394. mean
    denote or connote
    The shutters and doors of the Radley house were closed on Sundays, another
    thing alien to Maycomb’s ways: closed doors meant illness and cold weather
    only.
  395. across
    to the opposite side
    In England, Simon was irritated by the
    persecution of those who called themselves Methodists at the hands of their more
    liberal brethren, and as Simon called himself a Methodist, he worked his way
    across the Atlantic to Philadelphia, thence to Jamaica, thence to Mobile, and up
    the Saint Stephens.
  396. shake
    move or cause to move back and forth
    The Maycomb school
    grounds adjoined the back of the Radley lot; from the Radley chickenyard tall
    pecan trees shook their fruit into the schoolyard, but the nuts lay untouched by the
    children: Radley pecans would kill you.
  397. catch
    take hold of so as to seize or restrain or stop the motion of
    Jem gave a reasonable description of Boo: Boo was about six-and-a-half feet tall,
    judging from his tracks; he dined on raw squirrels and any cats he could catch,
    that’s why his hands were bloodstained—if you ate an animal raw, you could
    never wash the blood off.
  398. chop up
    cut into pieces
    Mollified, Mayella gave Atticus a final terrified glance and said to Mr. Gilmer,
    “Well sir, I was on the porch and—and he came along and, you see, there was this
    old chiffarobe in the yard Papa’d brought in to chop up for kindlin‘—Papa told
    me to do it while he was off in the woods but I wadn’t feelin’ strong enough then,
    so he came by-”
    “Who is ‘he’?”
  399. sitting
    the act of assuming or maintaining a seated position
    We went
    to the wire fence to see if there was a puppy— Miss Rachel’s rat terrier was
    expecting— instead we found someone sitting looking at us.
  400. dirty-faced
    having a dirty face
    Some people said
    six, others said nine; there were always several dirty-faced ones at the windows
    when anyone passed by.
  401. driveway
    a road leading up to a private house
    We leaped over the low wall that separated Miss Rachel’s yard from our
    driveway.
  402. do it
    have sexual intercourse with
    The
    Haverfords had dispatched Maycomb’s leading blacksmith in a misunderstanding
    arising from the alleged wrongful detention of a mare, were imprudent enough to
    do it in the presence of three witnesses, and insisted that the-son-of-a-bitch-had-itcoming-
    to-him was a good enough defense for anybody.
  403. sometimes
    on certain occasions or in certain cases but not always
    When enough years had gone by to enable us to look back on them, we
    sometimes discussed the events leading to his accident.
  404. left
    being or located on or directed toward the side of the body to the west when facing north
    His left arm was
    somewhat shorter than his right; when he stood or walked, the back of his hand
    was at right angles to his body, his thumb parallel to his thigh.
  405. answer
    a statement (either spoken or written) that is made to reply to a question or request or criticism or accusation
    But there came a day, barely within Jem’s memory, when Boo Radley was heard
    from and was seen by several people, but not by Jem. He said Atticus never talked
    much about the Radleys: when Jem would question him Atticus’s only answer
    was for him to mind his own business and let the Radleys mind theirs, they had a
    right to; but when it happened Jem said Atticus shook his head and said, “Mm,
    mm, mm.”
  406. play
    engage in recreational activities rather than work; occupy oneself in a diversion
    When it healed, and Jem’s fears of never being able to play football were
    assuaged, he was seldom self-conscious about his injury.
  407. go by
    pass by
    When enough years had gone by to enable us to look back on them, we
    sometimes discussed the events leading to his accident.
  408. Arthur
    a legendary king of the Britons (possibly based on a historical figure in the 6th century but the story has been retold too many times to be sure); said to have led the Knights of the Round Table at Camelot
    If the judge released Arthur, Mr. Radley would see to it that Arthur gave no
    further trouble.
  409. workbasket
    container for holding implements and materials for work (especially for sewing)
    She sat in her chair with her workbasket beside it, her rug spread across her lap.
  410. union suit
    an undergarment with shirt and drawers in one piece
    Now that I was compelled to think about
    it, reading was something that just came to me, as learning to fasten the seat of
    my union suit without looking around, or achieving two bows from a snarl of
    shoelaces.
  411. burlap bag
    a bag made of burlap
    She was bending over
    some small bushes, wrapping them in burlap bags.
  412. mouth
    the opening through which food is taken in and vocalizations emerge
    His cheekbones were sharp
    and his mouth was wide, with a thin upper lip and a full lower lip.
  413. nearsighted
    unable to see distant objects clearly
    She was all angles and bones; she was
    nearsighted; she squinted; her hand was wide as a bed slat and twice as hard.
  414. sawhorse
    a framework for holding wood that is being sawed
    Wooden sawhorses blocked the road at each end of the
    Radley lot, straw was put down on the sidewalk, traffic was diverted to the back
    street.
  415. tree
    a tall perennial woody plant having a main trunk and branches forming a distinct elevated crown; includes both gymnosperms and angiosperms
    Routine
    contentment was: improving our treehouse that rested between giant twin
    chinaberry trees in the back yard, fussing, running through our list of dramas
    based on the works of Oliver Optic, Victor Appleton, and Edgar Rice Burroughs.
  416. left-handed
    using or intended for the left hand
    “You’re left-handed, Mr. Ewell,” said Judge Taylor.
  417. gate
    a movable barrier in a fence or wall
    In spite of our warnings and explanations it
    drew him as the moon draws water, but drew him no nearer than the light-pole on
    the corner, a safe distance from the Radley gate.
  418. people
    (plural) any group of human beings (men or women or children) collectively
    He liked
    Maycomb, he was Maycomb County born and bred; he knew his people, they
    knew him, and because of Simon Finch’s industry, Atticus was related by blood
    or marriage to nearly every family in the town.
  419. chewing
    biting and grinding food in your mouth so it becomes soft enough to swallow
    I stood on tiptoe, hastily looked around once more, reached
    into the hole, and withdrew two pieces of chewing gum minus their outer
    wrappers.
  420. every
    (used of count nouns) each and all of the members of a group considered singly and without exception
    He liked
    Maycomb, he was Maycomb County born and bred; he knew his people, they
    knew him, and because of Simon Finch’s industry, Atticus was related by blood
    or marriage to nearly every family in the town.
  421. now
    at the present moment
    Dill was from Meridian, Mississippi, was spending the summer with his aunt,
    Miss Rachel, and would be spending every summer in Maycomb from now on.
  422. swing
    change direction with a swinging motion; turn
    Calpurnia sent me through the swinging door to the diningroom with a stinging
    smack.
  423. Hitler
    German Nazi dictator during World War II (1889-1945)
    When his turn came, he went to the
    front of the room and began, “Old Hitler—”
    “Adolf Hitler, Cecil,” said Miss Gates.
  424. tormenter
    someone who torments
    I’ve heard that lawyers’ children, on seeing their parents
    in court in the heat of argument, get the wrong idea: they think opposing counsel
    to be the personal enemies of their parents, they suffer agonies, and are surprised
    to see them often go out arm-in-arm with their tormenters during the first recess.
  425. shiny
    reflecting light
    I see it-”
    Jem looked around, reached up, and gingerly pocketed a tiny shiny package.
  426. pajama
    (usually plural) loose-fitting nightclothes worn for sleeping or lounging; have a jacket top and trousers
    “It’s not like he’d never speak to you again or somethin‘… I’m gonna wake him
    up, Jem, I swear I am—”
    Jem grabbed my pajama collar and wrenched it tight.
  427. white gold
    a pale alloy of gold usually with platinum or nickel or palladium
    “You reckon it’s white gold, Jem?”
    “Don’t know.
  428. corncrib
    a crib for storing and drying ears of corn
    They don’t eat up people’s gardens, don’t nest in corncribs, they
    don’t do one thing but sing their hearts out for us.
  429. out of
    motivated by
    They ambled across the square, shuffled in and out of
    the stores around it, took their time about everything.
  430. long
    primarily spatial sense; of relatively great or greater than average spatial extension or extension as specified
    He couldn’t have
    cared less, so long as he could pass and punt.
  431. nod
    lower and raise the head, as to indicate assent or agreement or confirmation
    Dill nodded.
  432. pageant
    an elaborate representation of scenes from history etc; usually involves a parade with rich costumes
    The high-school
    auditorium would be open, there would be a pageant for the grown-ups; applebobbing,
    taffy-pulling, pinning the tail on the donkey for the children.
  433. knock on
    (rugby) knocking the ball forward while trying to catch it (a foul)
    Jem said if Dill wanted to get himself killed, all he had to do was go up and knock
    on
    the front door.
  434. boy
    a youthful male person
    He played the character parts formerly
    thrust upon me— the ape in Tarzan, Mr. Crabtree in The Rover Boys, Mr. Damon
    in Tom Swift.
  435. crawler
    a person who crawls or creeps along the ground
    The night-crawlers had retired, but ripe chinaberries drummed on
    the roof when the wind stirred, and the darkness was desolate with the barking of
    distant dogs.
  436. reach into
    run into or up to
    I stood on tiptoe, hastily looked around once more, reached
    into
    the hole, and withdrew two pieces of chewing gum minus their outer
    wrappers.
  437. keep
    continue a certain state, condition, or activity
    Rain-rotted shingles
    drooped over the eaves of the veranda; oak trees kept the sun away.
  438. live
    have life, be alive
    Simon lived to
    an impressive age and died rich.
  439. whispered
    spoken in soft hushed tones without vibrations of the vocal cords
    When Walter shook his head a third time someone whispered, “Go on and tell
    her, Scout.”
  440. room
    an area within a building enclosed by walls and floor and ceiling
    His father entered the room.
  441. whiskey
    a liquor made from fermented mash of grain
    They did little, but
    enough to be discussed by the town and publicly warned from three pulpits: they
    hung around the barbershop; they rode the bus to Abbottsville on Sundays and
    went to the picture show; they attended dances at the county’s riverside gambling
    hell, the Dew-Drop Inn & Fishing Camp; they experimented with stumphole
    whiskey.
  442. with-it
    having the shrewd resourcefulness needed to survive in an urban environment
    They buy me everything I want, but it’s now—you’ve-got-it-go-play-with-it.
  443. cowlick
    a tuft of hair that grows in a different direction from the rest of the hair and usually will not lie flat
    As he told us the old tale his blue eyes would lighten and
    darken; his laugh was sudden and happy; he habitually pulled at a cowlick in the
    center of his forehead.
  444. pocket watch
    a watch that is carried in a small watch pocket
    It was a pocket watch that wouldn’t
    run, on a chain with an aluminum knife.
  445. figure out
    find the solution to (a problem or question) or understand the meaning of
    But I never figured out how Atticus knew I was listening, and it was
    not until many years later that I realized he wanted me to hear every word he said.
  446. disorderly
    completely unordered and unpredictable and confusing
    The town decided something had to
    be done; Mr. Conner said he knew who each and every one of them was, and he
    was bound and determined they wouldn’t get away with it, so the boys came
    before the probate judge on charges of disorderly conduct, disturbing the peace,
    assault and battery, and using abusive and profane language in the presence and
    hearing of a female.
  447. streak
    a narrow marking of a different color or texture from the background
    Aunt Alexandra, in underlining the moral of young Sam Merriweather’s suicide,
    said it was caused by a morbid streak in the family.
  448. lightning bug
    nocturnal beetle common in warm regions having luminescent abdominal organs
    Lightning bugs were still about,
    the night crawlers and flying insects that beat against the screen the summer long
    had not gone wherever they go when autumn comes.
  449. grandma
    the mother of your father or mother
    Grandma’s a wonderful cook,” said Francis.
  450. wonder
    the feeling aroused by something strange and surprising
    Their sister Alexandra was the
    Finch who remained at the Landing: she married a taciturn man who spent most
    of his time lying in a hammock by the river wondering if his trot-lines were full.
  451. Edgar Rice Burroughs
    United States novelist and author of the Tarzan stories (1875-1950)
    Routine
    contentment was: improving our treehouse that rested between giant twin
    chinaberry trees in the back yard, fussing, running through our list of dramas
    based on the works of Oliver Optic, Victor Appleton, and Edgar Rice Burroughs.
  452. court
    an assembly (including one or more judges) to conduct judicial business
    He was in court one time and they asked him his
    name.
  453. Montgomery
    the state capital of Alabama on the Mobile River
    Simon would have regarded with impotent fury the disturbance between the North
    and the South, as it left his descendants stripped of everything but their land, yet
    the tradition of living on the land remained unbroken until well into the twentieth
    century, when my father, Atticus Finch, went to Montgomery to read law, and his
    younger brother went to Boston to study medicine.
  454. made
    produced by a manufacturing process
    Mindful of John Wesley’s strictures on the use of many words
    in buying and selling, Simon made a pile practicing medicine, but in this pursuit
    he was unhappy lest he be tempted into doing what he knew was not for the glory
    of God, as the putting on of gold and costly apparel.
  455. burgle
    commit a burglary; enter and rob a dwelling
    “But why should he try to burgle John Taylor’s house?
  456. clean-living
    morally pure
    She says they’re clean-living
    folks.
  457. denim
    a coarse durable twill-weave cotton fabric
    Miss Caroline seemed unaware that the ragged, denim-shirted
    and floursack-skirted first grade, most of whom had chopped cotton and fed hogs
    from the time they were able to walk, were immune to imaginative literature.
  458. switch on
    cause to operate by flipping a switch
    Atticus switched on the ceiling light in the livingroom and found us there, frozen
    still.
  459. chuckle
    a soft partly suppressed laugh
    When we left her, she was still chuckling.
  460. be quiet
    refuse to talk or stop talking; fall silent
    Uncle Jack said if I talked like that he’d lick me again, so I was quiet.
  461. hickory nut
    small hard-shelled nut of North American hickory trees especially the shagbark hickories
    Later, a sack of hickory nuts appeared on the back steps.
  462. call
    utter a sudden loud cry
    In England, Simon was irritated by the
    persecution of those who called themselves Methodists at the hands of their more
    liberal brethren, and as Simon called himself a Methodist, he worked his way
    across the Atlantic to Philadelphia, thence to Jamaica, thence to Mobile, and up
    the Saint Stephens.
  463. push
    move with force, "He pushed the table into a corner"
    “You c’n push.”
  464. smilax
    fragile twining plant of South Africa with bright green flattened stems and glossy foliage popular as a floral decoration
    With Christmas came a
    crate of smilax and holly.
  465. first
    preceding all others in time or space or degree
    He said it began the summer Dill came to us, when Dill first gave us the idea
    of making Boo Radley come out.
  466. hell
    any place of pain and turmoil
    The Radley Place was inhabited by an
    unknown entity the mere description of whom was enough to make us behave for
    days on end; Mrs. Dubose was plain hell.
  467. concentrate on
    center upon
    Miss Caroline, the
    sixth grade cannot concentrate on the pyramids for all this racket!”
  468. sniff
    perceive by inhaling through the nose
    I sniffed it and it smelled all right.
  469. river boat
    a boat used on rivers or to ply a river
    The place was self-sufficient:
    modest in comparison with the empires around it, the Landing nevertheless
    produced everything required to sustain life except ice, wheat flour, and articles
    of clothing, supplied by river-boats from Mobile.
  470. mealtime
    the hour at which a meal is habitually or customarily eaten
    These were abstract speculations for the first month of her stay, as she had little to
    say to Jem or me, and we saw her only at mealtimes and at night before we went
    to bed.
  471. Coca
    United States comedienne who starred in early television shows with Sid Caesar (1908-2001)
    A few graves in the cemetery were marked with crumbling
    tombstones; newer ones were outlined with brightly colored glass and broken
    Coca-Cola bottles.
  472. swinging door
    a door that swings on a double hinge; opens in either direction
    Calpurnia sent me through the swinging door to the diningroom with a stinging
    smack.
  473. cot
    a small bed that folds up for storage or transport
    Summer was our
    best season: it was sleeping on the back screened porch in cots, or trying to sleep
    in the treehouse; summer was everything good to eat; it was a thousand colors in a
    parched landscape; but most of all, summer was Dill.
  474. furnace room
    a room (usually in the basement of a building) that contains a furnace for heating the building
    Left to its own devices, the class tied Eunice Ann Simpson to a
    chair and placed her in the furnace room.
  475. kudzu
    fast-growing vine from eastern Asia having tuberous starchy roots and hairy trifoliate leaves and racemes of purple flowers followed by long hairy pods containing many seeds; grown for fodder and forage and root starch; widespread in the southern United States
    At first we saw nothing but a kudzu-covered front porch,
    but a closer inspection revealed an arc of water descending from the leaves and
    splashing in the yellow circle of the street light, some ten feet from source to
    earth, it seemed to us.
  476. over
    beyond the top or upper surface or edge; forward from an upright position
    “Why don’t you come over,
    Charles Baker Harris?” he said.
  477. big toe
    the first largest innermost toe
    The next day Dill said, “You’re too scared even
    to put your big toe in the front yard.”
  478. persecute
    cause to suffer
    “Old Adolf Hitler has been prosecutin‘ the—”
    Persecuting Cecil…”
    “Nome, Miss Gates, it says here—well anyway, old Adolf Hitler has been after
    the Jews and he’s puttin‘ ’em in prisons and he’s taking away all their property
    and he won’t let any of ‘em out of the country and he’s washin’ all the feebleminded
    and—”
    “Washing the feeble-minded?”
  479. talk
    use language
    But there came a day, barely within Jem’s memory, when Boo Radley was heard
    from and was seen by several people, but not by Jem. He said Atticus never talked
    much about the Radleys: when Jem would question him Atticus’s only answer
    was for him to mind his own business and let the Radleys mind theirs, they had a
    right to; but when it happened Jem said Atticus shook his head and said, “Mm,
    mm, mm.”
  480. eye
    the organ of sight
    Dill had seen Dracula, a revelation that moved Jem to eye him with the beginning
    of respect.
  481. light
    (physics) electromagnetic radiation that can produce a visual sensation
    In spite of our warnings and explanations it
    drew him as the moon draws water, but drew him no nearer than the light-pole on
    the corner, a safe distance from the Radley gate.
  482. let go
    release, as from one's grip
    Let’s go in the front yard.”
  483. shutter
    a hinged blind for a window
    The house was low,
    was once white with a deep front porch and green shutters, but had long ago
    darkened to the color of the slate-gray yard around it.
  484. good
    having desirable or positive qualities especially those suitable for a thing specified
    The
    Haverfords had dispatched Maycomb’s leading blacksmith in a misunderstanding
    arising from the alleged wrongful detention of a mare, were imprudent enough to
    do it in the presence of three witnesses, and insisted that the-son-of-a-bitch-had-itcoming-
    to-him was a good enough defense for anybody.
  485. bong
    a dull resonant sound as of a bell
    The old courthouse clock suffered its preliminary strain and struck the hour, eight
    deafening bongs that shook our bones.
  486. chicken
    a domestic fowl bred for flesh or eggs; believed to have been developed from the red jungle fowl
    Once the town was terrorized by a series of morbid
    nocturnal events: people’s chickens and household pets were found mutilated;
    although the culprit was Crazy Addie, who eventually drowned himself in
    Barker’s Eddy, people still looked at the Radley Place, unwilling to discard their
    initial suspicions.
  487. foot
    the pedal extremity of vertebrates other than human beings
    Bet it’s a foot longer.”
  488. any
    one or some or every or all without specification
    “Lord, what a name.”
    “‘s not any funnier’n yours.
  489. sense of direction
    an awareness of your orientation in space
    He traveled with the show all over Mississippi until his
    infallible sense of direction told him he was in Abbott County, Alabama, just
    across the river from Maycomb.
  490. pass
    go across or through
    He couldn’t have
    cared less, so long as he could pass and punt.
  491. murmur
    a low continuous indistinct sound; often accompanied by movement of the lips without the production of articulate speech
    “There goes the meanest man ever God blew breath into,” murmured Calpurnia,
    and she spat meditatively into the yard.
  492. family
    primary social group; parents and children
    Being Southerners, it was a source of shame to some members of the family that
    we had no recorded ancestors on either side of the Battle of Hastings.
  493. reading
    written material intended to be read
    Miss Caroline began the day by reading us a story about cats.
  494. sit in
    attend as a visitor
    According to Miss
    Stephanie, Boo was sitting in the livingroom cutting some items from The
    Maycomb Tribune to paste in his scrapbook.
  495. shorts
    trousers that end at or above the knee
    He wore blue linen shorts that buttoned to his shirt, his hair
    was snow white and stuck to his head like duckfluff; he was a year my senior but
    I towered over him.
  496. varmint
    any usually predatory wild animal considered undesirable; e.g., coyote
    Its
    windows were merely open spaces in the walls, which in the summertime were
    covered with greasy strips of cheesecloth to keep out the varmints that feasted on
    Maycomb’s refuse.
  497. some
    quantifier; used with either mass nouns or plural count nouns to indicate an unspecified number or quantity
    Being Southerners, it was a source of shame to some members of the family that
    we had no recorded ancestors on either side of the Battle of Hastings.
  498. ring finger
    the third finger (especially of the left hand)
    “You’ll have a very
    unladylike scar on your wedding-ring finger.”
  499. football
    any of various games played with a ball (round or oval) in which two teams try to kick or carry or propel the ball into each other's goal
    When it healed, and Jem’s fears of never being able to play football were
    assuaged, he was seldom self-conscious about his injury.
  500. cotton
    erect bushy mallow plant or small tree bearing bolls containing seeds with many long hairy fibers
    It was customary for the men in the family to remain on Simon’s homestead,
    Finch’s Landing, and make their living from cotton.
  501. negro
    relating to or characteristic of or being a member of the traditional racial division of mankind having brown to black pigmentation and tightly curled hair
    The sheriff hadn’t the heart to put him in jail alongside Negroes, so
    Boo was locked in the courthouse basement.
  502. trying
    hard to endure
    “I’m just trying to tell you the new way they’re teachin‘ the first grade, stubborn.
  503. sunnily
    in a cheerful manner
    If I said as sunnily as I could, “Hey, Mrs.
    Dubose,” I would receive for an answer, “Don’t you say hey to me, you ugly girl!
  504. color
    a visual attribute of things that results from the light they emit or transmit or reflect
    The house was low,
    was once white with a deep front porch and green shutters, but had long ago
    darkened to the color of the slate-gray yard around it.
  505. colon
    the part of the large intestine between the cecum and the rectum; it extracts moisture from food residues before they are excreted
    A few graves in the cemetery were marked with crumbling
    tombstones; newer ones were outlined with brightly colored glass and broken
    Coca-Cola bottles.
  506. here
    in or at this place; where the speaker or writer is
    “Don’t have any picture shows here, except Jesus ones in the courthouse
    sometimes,” said Jem. “Ever see anything good?”
  507. shinny
    a simple version of hockey played by children on the streets (or on ice or on a field) using a ball or can as the puck
    Miss Maudie Atkinson baked a Lane cake so loaded
    with shinny it made me tight; Miss Stephanie Crawford had long visits with Aunt
    Alexandra, consisting mostly of Miss Stephanie shaking her head and saying,
    “Uh, uh, uh.”
  508. get up
    rise to one's feet
    Well,” she said, getting up from the
    kitchen chair, “it’s enough time to make a pan of cracklin‘ bread, I reckon.
  509. store-bought
    purchased; not homemade
    He placed the young town too far away from the only kind of public
    transportation in those days—river-boat—and it took a man from the north end of
    the county two days to travel to Maycomb for store-bought goods.
  510. suppertime
    the customary or habitual hour for the evening meal
    We parted at suppertime, and after our meal Jem and I were settling down to a
    routine evening, when Atticus did something that interested us: he came into the
    livingroom carrying a long electrical extension cord.
  511. bam
    a sudden very loud noise
    Bam, bam, bam, and the checkerboard was swept clean of my men.
  512. bread line
    a queue of people waiting for free food
    The Governor was eager to scrape a few
    barnacles off the ship of state; there were sit-down strikes in Birmingham; bread
    lines
    in the cities grew longer, people in the country grew poorer.
  513. standing
    social or financial or professional status or reputation
    Walter had picked himself up and was standing quietly listening to Jem and me.
  514. slowly
    without speed (`slow' is sometimes used informally for `slowly')
    People moved slowly then.
  515. settle
    become resolved, fixed, established, or quiet
    We were far too old to settle an argument with a fist-fight, so we consulted
    Atticus.
  516. wear
    put clothing on one's body
    He wore blue linen shorts that buttoned to his shirt, his hair
    was snow white and stuck to his head like duckfluff; he was a year my senior but
    I towered over him.
  517. ask over
    invite someone to one's house
    “Are you all right, darling?” she asked over and over as she
    worked me free.
  518. side yard
    the grounds at either side of a house
    We leaped over the driveway wall, cut through Miss Rachel’s side yard and went
    to Dill’s window.
  519. coffee can
    a can for storing ground coffee
    One by one, the congregation came forward and dropped nickels and dimes into a
    black enameled coffee can.
  520. morning
    the time period between dawn and noon
    Men’s stiff collars wilted by
    nine in the morning.
  521. raped
    having been robbed and destroyed by force and violence
    I was just leaving my
    office to go home when B—Mr. Ewell came in, very excited he was, and said get
    out to his house quick, some nigger’d raped his girl.”
  522. better
    (comparative of `good') superior to another (of the same class or set or kind) in excellence or quality or desirability or suitability; more highly skilled than another
    When he was like that, I knew better than to
    bother him.
  523. feel
    be conscious of a physical, mental, or emotional state
    She had been with us ever since Jem
    was born, and I had felt her tyrannical presence as long as I could remember.
  524. white
    being of the achromatic color of maximum lightness; having little or no hue owing to reflection of almost all incident light
    He wore blue linen shorts that buttoned to his shirt, his hair
    was snow white and stuck to his head like duckfluff; he was a year my senior but
    I towered over him.
  525. pocket
    a small pouch inside a garment for carrying small articles
    Thus we came to know Dill as a pocket Merlin, whose head teemed
    with eccentric plans, strange longings, and quaint fancies.
  526. shoot
    fire a shot
    Shoot no wonder, then,” said Jem, jerking his thumb at me.
  527. camisole
    a short sleeveless undergarment for women
    You should be in a
    dress and camisole, young lady!
  528. bother
    cause annoyance in; disturb, especially by minor irritations
    When he was like that, I knew better than to
    bother him.
  529. whisper
    speaking softly without vibration of the vocal cords
    When Walter shook his head a third time someone whispered, “Go on and tell
    her, Scout.”
  530. lean
    to incline or bend from a vertical position
    This was enough to make Jem march to the corner, where he stopped and leaned
    against the light-pole, watching the gate hanging crazily on its homemade hinge.
  531. parked
    that have been left
    Dr. Reynolds parked his car in front of our house and walked to the
    Radley’s every time he called.
  532. too
    to a degree exceeding normal or proper limits
    We were far too old to settle an argument with a fist-fight, so we consulted
    Atticus.
  533. nothing
    in no respect; to no degree
    They persisted in
    pleading Not Guilty to first-degree murder, so there was nothing much Atticus
    could do for his clients except be present at their departure, an occasion that was
    probably the beginning of my father’s profound distaste for the practice of
    criminal law.
  534. poisonous substance
    any substance that causes injury or illness or death of a living organism
    If she found a blade of nut grass in her yard it was like the Second
    Battle of the Marne: she swooped down upon it with a tin tub and subjected it to
    blasts from beneath with a poisonous substance she said was so powerful it’d kill
    us all if we didn’t stand out of the way.
  535. hit
    deal a blow to, either with the hand or with an instrument
    A baseball hit into the Radley yard was a
    lost ball and no questions asked.
  536. shoes
    a particular situation
    Of all days Sunday was the day for formal afternoon visiting: ladies wore
    corsets, men wore coats, children wore shoes.
  537. tire
    lose interest or become bored with something or somebody
    Maycomb was an old town, but it was a tired old town when I first knew it.
  538. still
    not in physical motion
    Once the town was terrorized by a series of morbid
    nocturnal events: people’s chickens and household pets were found mutilated;
    although the culprit was Crazy Addie, who eventually drowned himself in
    Barker’s Eddy, people still looked at the Radley Place, unwilling to discard their
    initial suspicions.
  539. bitty
    (used informally) very small
    “Fat in the
    middle and little-bitty arms.”
  540. get along
    have smooth relations
    He asked how I was getting along.
  541. get in
    to come or go into
    You all get in
    outa that hot sun ‘fore you fry alive!”
  542. nose
    the organ of smell and entrance to the respiratory tract; the prominent part of the face of man or other mammals
    Jem’s nose wrinkled.
  543. ear trumpet
    a conical acoustic device formerly used to direct sound to the ear of a hearing-impaired person
    Miss Tutti denied it and lived in a world of silence,
    but Miss Frutti, not about to miss anything, employed an ear trumpet so enormous
    that Jem declared it was a loudspeaker from one of those dog Victrolas.
  544. going
    the act of departing
    Miss Stephanie said old Mr. Radley said no Radley was going to any asylum,
    when it was suggested that a season in Tuscaloosa might be helpful to Boo. Boo
    wasn’t crazy, he was high-strung at times.
  545. Dracula
    comprises tropical American species usually placed in genus Masdevallia: diminutive plants having bizarre and often sinister-looking flowers with pendulous scapes and motile lips
    Dill had seen Dracula, a revelation that moved Jem to eye him with the beginning
    of respect.
  546. quieten
    become quiet or quieter
    “Take a good sip,
    it’ll quieten you.”
  547. stick
    a long thin implement resembling a length of wood
    He wore blue linen shorts that buttoned to his shirt, his hair
    was snow white and stuck to his head like duckfluff; he was a year my senior but
    I towered over him.
  548. Christmas
    a Christian holiday celebrating the birth of Christ; a quarter day in England, Wales, and Ireland
    Mr. Radley’s elder son lived
    in Pensacola; he came home at Christmas, and he was one of the few persons we
    ever saw enter or leave the place.
  549. crazy
    affected with madness or insanity
    Once the town was terrorized by a series of morbid
    nocturnal events: people’s chickens and household pets were found mutilated;
    although the culprit was Crazy Addie, who eventually drowned himself in
    Barker’s Eddy, people still looked at the Radley Place, unwilling to discard their
    initial suspicions.
  550. asafoetida
    the brownish gum resin of various plants; has strong taste and odor; formerly used as an antispasmodic
    The warm bittersweet smell of clean Negro welcomed us as we entered the
    churchyard—Hearts of Love hairdressing mingled with asafoetida, snuff, Hoyt’s
    Cologne, Brown’s Mule, peppermint, and lilac talcum.
  551. patiently
    with patience; in a patient manner
    “You’re still scared,” murmured Dill patiently.
  552. hands
    (with `in') guardianship over; in divorce cases it is the right to house and care for and discipline a child
    In England, Simon was irritated by the
    persecution of those who called themselves Methodists at the hands of their more
    liberal brethren, and as Simon called himself a Methodist, he worked his way
    across the Atlantic to Philadelphia, thence to Jamaica, thence to Mobile, and up
    the Saint Stephens.
  553. ham
    meat cut from the thigh of a hog (usually smoked)
    But at supper that evening when I asked him to pass the damn ham, please, Uncle
    Jack pointed at me.
  554. along
    in line with a length or direction (often followed by `by' or `beside')
    When we slowed to a walk at the edge of the schoolyard, Jem was
    careful to explain that during school hours I was not to bother him, I was not to
    approach him with requests to enact a chapter of Tarzan and the Ant Men, to
    embarrass him with references to his private life, or tag along behind him at
    recess and noon.
  555. pick
    look for and gather
    Miss Caroline picked up
    her ruler, gave me half a dozen quick little pats, then told me to stand in the
    corner.
  556. mutter
    talk indistinctly; usually in a low voice
    “Can’t get it off the pole,” he muttered, “or if I got it off I can’t make it stay.
  557. pigpen
    a pen for swine
    There was a smell of stale whiskey and pigpen about, and when I glanced around
    I discovered that these men were strangers.
  558. Barber
    United States composer (1910-1981)
    Misses Tutti and Frutti Barber were maiden ladies, sisters, who lived together in
    the only Maycomb residence boasting a cellar.
  559. crackle
    make a crackling sound
    It was not often that she made crackling bread, she said she never had time, but
    with both of us at school today had been an easy one for her.
  560. place
    a point located with respect to surface features of some region
    The place was self-sufficient:
    modest in comparison with the empires around it, the Landing nevertheless
    produced everything required to sustain life except ice, wheat flour, and articles
    of clothing, supplied by river-boats from Mobile.
  561. touch football
    a version of American football in which the ball carrier is touched rather than tackled
    The Methodists were trying to pay off their church mortgage, and had
    challenged the Baptists to a game of touch football.
  562. spittoon
    a receptacle for spit (usually in a public place)
    Atticus’s office in the courthouse contained little more
    than a hat rack, a spittoon, a checkerboard and an unsullied Code of Alabama.
  563. flashlight
    a small portable battery-powered electric lamp
    “You should have brought the flashlight, Jem.”
    “Didn’t know it was this dark.
  564. shoulder
    a ball-and-socket joint between the head of the humerus and a cavity of the scapula
    Shoulder up, I reeled around to face Boo Radley and his bloody fangs; instead, I
    saw Dill ringing the bell with all his might in Atticus’s face.
  565. scoop up
    take out or up with or as if with a scoop
    Jem scooped up an armful of dirt, patted it into a mound on which he added
    another load, and another until he had constructed a torso.
  566. kitchen stove
    a kitchen appliance used for cooking food
    The cats had long
    conversations with one another, they wore cunning little clothes and lived in a
    warm house beneath a kitchen stove.
  567. nineteen
    the cardinal number that is the sum of eighteen and one
    Nineteen-six and Scout, one of em’s nineteen-hundred.
  568. stage left
    the part of the stage on the actor's left as the actor faces the audience
    Our only duties, as far as I could gather from our two rehearsals, were to enter
    from stage left as Mrs. Merriweather (not only the author, but the narrator)
    identified us.
  569. hip pocket
    a pocket in rear of trousers
    He spat into the shrubbery,
    then thrust his hands into his hip pockets and faced Atticus.
  570. carnal knowledge
    the act of sexual procreation between a man and a woman; the man's penis is inserted into the woman's vagina and excited until orgasm and ejaculation occur
    He sighed, and said rape was carnal knowledge of a female by force and without
    consent.
  571. cement
    a building material that is a powder made of a mixture of calcined limestone and clay; used with water and sand or gravel to make concrete and mortar
    Dizzy and nauseated, I lay on the cement
    and shook my head still, pounded my ears to silence, and heard Jem’s voice:
    “Scout, get away from there, come on!”
  572. looking
    appearing to be as specified; usually used as combining forms
    We went
    to the wire fence to see if there was a puppy— Miss Rachel’s rat terrier was
    expecting— instead we found someone sitting looking at us.
  573. pitch black
    a very dark black
    It was pitch black.
  574. today
    on this day as distinct from yesterday or tomorrow
    “Go and eat downtown today.
  575. oak
    a deciduous tree of the genus Quercus; has acorns and lobed leaves
    Somehow, it was hotter then: a black dog
    suffered on a summer’s day; bony mules hitched to Hoover carts flicked flies in
    the sweltering shade of the live oaks on the square.
  576. toy with
    take into consideration, have in view
    Tom Robinson was toying with them.
    “…absence of any corroborative evidence, this man was indicted on a capital
    charge and is now on trial for his life…”
    I punched Jem. “How long’s he been at it?”
  577. from way back
    since long ago
    She’s a
    troublemaker from way back, got fancy ideas an’ haughty ways—we’re mighty
    glad to have you all.”
  578. travel plan
    a proposed route of travel
    By late afternoon most of my traveling plans were complete; when Jem and I
    raced each other up the sidewalk to meet Atticus coming home from work, I
    didn’t give him much of a race.
  579. feebleminded
    retarded in intellectual development
    “Old Adolf Hitler has been prosecutin‘ the—”
    “Persecuting Cecil…”
    “Nome, Miss Gates, it says here—well anyway, old Adolf Hitler has been after
    the Jews and he’s puttin‘ ’em in prisons and he’s taking away all their property
    and he won’t let any of ‘em out of the country and he’s washin’ all the feebleminded
    and—”
    “Washing the feeble-minded?”
  580. arm
    a human limb; technically the part of the superior limb between the shoulder and the elbow but commonly used to refer to the whole superior limb
    Charles Lamb
    PART ONE
    Contents - Prev / Next
    Chapter 1
    When he was nearly thirteen, my brother Jem got his arm badly broken at the
    elbow.
  581. landing
    the act of coming to land after a voyage
    It was customary for the men in the family to remain on Simon’s homestead,
    Finch’s Landing, and make their living from cotton.
  582. question
    a sentence of inquiry that asks for a reply
    A baseball hit into the Radley yard was a
    lost ball and no questions asked.
  583. yawl
    a ship's small boat (usually rowed by 4 or 6 oars)
    I mean it, now-”
    Yawl hush,” growled Jem, “you act like you believe in Hot Steams.”
  584. smatter
    speak with spotty or superficial knowledge
    I don’t think-”
    “‘Smatter?” said Dill.
  585. dish out
    administer or bestow, as in small portions
    Calpurnia poured milk, dished out potato salad and ham, muttering, “‘shamed of
    yourselves,” in varying degrees of intensity.
  586. chuck
    throw carelessly
    Little Chuck Little, whose patience with all living things
    was phenomenal, said, “Which way did he go, Miss Caroline?
  587. collection plate
    a shallow receptacle for collection in church
    Besides making change in the collection plate every Sunday, Mr. Avery sat on the
    porch every night until nine o’clock and sneezed.
  588. misplace
    place (something) where one cannot find it again
    Andrew Jackson appointed him to a position of authority, and Colonel
    Maycomb’s misplaced self-confidence and slender sense of direction brought
    disaster to all who rode with him in the Creek Indian Wars.
  589. thank you
    a conversational expression of gratitude
    “Nome thank you ma’am,” he drawled softly.
  590. going-over
    a careful and thorough inspection
    He nodded, produced his handkerchief, gave his face a going-over and blew his
    nose violently.
  591. square
    (geometry) a plane rectangle with four equal sides and four right angles; a four-sided regular polygon
    In
    rainy weather the streets turned to red slop; grass grew on the sidewalks, the
    courthouse sagged in the square.
  592. begin
    set in motion, cause to start
    He said it began the summer Dill came to us, when Dill first gave us the idea
    of making Boo Radley come out.
  593. away
    at a distance in space or time
    Rain-rotted shingles
    drooped over the eaves of the veranda; oak trees kept the sun away.
  594. fuss
    an excited state of agitation
    Routine
    contentment was: improving our treehouse that rested between giant twin
    chinaberry trees in the back yard, fussing, running through our list of dramas
    based on the works of Oliver Optic, Victor Appleton, and Edgar Rice Burroughs.
  595. bung
    a plug used to close a hole in a barrel or flask
    I
    remember now, she was bunged up on that side of her face…”
    Mr. Tate blinked again, as if something had suddenly been made plain to him.
  596. neighbor
    a person who lives (or is located) near another
    They did not go to church, Maycomb’s principal
    recreation, but worshiped at home; Mrs. Radley seldom if ever crossed the street
    for a mid-morning coffee break with her neighbors, and certainly never joined a
    missionary circle.
  597. funny
    an account of an amusing incident (usually with a punch line)
    “We better go down there,” said Jem. “They’ll think it’s funny if we don’t show
    up.”
  598. black
    being of the achromatic color of maximum darkness; having little or no hue owing to absorption of almost all incident light
    Somehow, it was hotter then: a black dog
    suffered on a summer’s day; bony mules hitched to Hoover carts flicked flies in
    the sweltering shade of the live oaks on the square.
  599. be on
    appear in a show, on T.V. or radio
    I was on the verge
    of leavin’—I done done my time for this year.”
  600. bout
    a contest or fight (especially between boxers or wrestlers)
    After my bout with Cecil Jacobs
    when I committed myself to a policy of cowardice, word got around that Scout
    Finch wouldn’t fight any more, her daddy wouldn’t let her.
  601. lot
    anything (straws or pebbles etc.) taken or chosen at random
    Walking south, one
    faced its porch; the sidewalk turned and ran beside the lot.
  602. clipper
    scissors for cutting hair or finger nails (often used in the plural)
    Our activities halted when any of the neighbors appeared, and once I
    saw Miss Maudie Atkinson staring across the street at us, her hedge clippers
    poised in midair.
  603. yaws
    an infectious tropical disease resembling syphilis in its early stages; marked by red skin eruptions and ulcerating lesions
    They put the women out in huts when their time came, whatever that was; they
    had no sense of family—I knew that’d distress Aunty—they subjected children to
    terrible ordeals when they were thirteen; they were crawling with yaws and
    earworms, they chewed up and spat out the bark of a tree into a communal pot
    and then got drunk on it.
  604. poke at
    to push against gently
    Dill asked if I’d like to have a poke at
    Boo Radley.
  605. fat hen
    European plant naturalized in North America; often collected from the wild as a potherb
    “Cecil Jacobs is a big fat hen, I think.
  606. drop-kick
    drop and kick (a ball) as it touches the ground, as for a field goal
    It was only three forty-five when we got home, so Jem and I drop-kicked in the
    back yard until it was time to meet Atticus.
  607. Simon
    one of the twelve Apostles (first century)
    If General Jackson hadn’t run the Creeks up the creek, Simon Finch
    would never have paddled up the Alabama, and where would we be if he hadn’t?
  608. motivate
    give an incentive for action
    Tim Johnson was advancing at a snail’s pace, but he was not playing or sniffing at
    foliage: he seemed dedicated to one course and motivated by an invisible force
    that was inching him toward us.
  609. hip
    either side of the body below the waist and above the thigh
    Miss Blount, a native Maycombian as yet uninitiated in the mysteries of the
    Decimal System, appeared at the door hands on hips and announced: “If I hear
    another sound from this room I’ll burn up everybody in it.
  610. get started
    start to be active
    Those
    Bellingraths’ll look plain puny when I get started!”
  611. looking at
    the act of directing the eyes toward something and perceiving it visually
    We went
    to the wire fence to see if there was a puppy— Miss Rachel’s rat terrier was
    expecting— instead we found someone sitting looking at us.
  612. hard rubber
    a hard nonresilient rubber formed by vulcanizing natural rubber
    It was
    not quite like hard rubber, and I had the sensation that it was alive.
  613. county line
    the boundary between two counties
    Lives by himself way
    down near the county line.
  614. unbuttoned
    not buttoned
    He unhitched his
    watch and chain and placed them on the table, saying, “With the court’s
    permission—”
    Judge Taylor nodded, and then Atticus did something I never saw him do before
    or since, in public or in private: he unbuttoned his vest, unbuttoned his collar,
    loosened his tie, and took off his coat.
  615. listen
    hear with intention
    I could not remember when the lines above Atticus’s moving finger
    separated into words, but I had stared at them all the evenings in my memory,
    listening to the news of the day, Bills to Be Enacted into Laws, the diaries of
    Lorenzo Dow—anything Atticus happened to be reading when I crawled into his
    lap every night.
  616. bathrobe
    a loose-fitting robe of towelling; worn after a bath or swim
    Atticus was holding out my bathrobe and coat.
  617. chunk
    a compact mass
    “Ain’t hateful, just persuades him—‘s not like you’d chunk him in the fire,” Jem
    growled.
  618. more
    (comparative of `much' used with mass nouns) a quantifier meaning greater in size or amount or extent or degree
    In England, Simon was irritated by the
    persecution of those who called themselves Methodists at the hands of their more
    liberal brethren, and as Simon called himself a Methodist, he worked his way
    across the Atlantic to Philadelphia, thence to Jamaica, thence to Mobile, and up
    the Saint Stephens.
  619. little
    limited or below average in number or quantity or magnitude or extent
    Atticus’s office in the courthouse contained little more
    than a hat rack, a spittoon, a checkerboard and an unsullied Code of Alabama.
  620. look up
    seek information from
    I looked up to see Miss Caroline standing in the middle of the
    room, sheer horror flooding her face.
  621. pester
    annoy persistently
    “Let’s don’t pester him, he’ll know when it’s time,” said Jem.
    The Abbottsville fire truck began pumping water on our house; a man on the roof
    pointed to places that needed it most.
  622. circumstantial evidence
    evidence providing only a basis for inference about the fact in dispute
    We don’t know, but there is circumstantial evidence to indicate that
    Mayella Ewell was beaten savagely by someone who led almost exclusively with
    his left.
  623. hydrant
    a faucet for drawing water from a pipe or cask
    When the men attached its hose to a hydrant, the hose burst
    and water shot up, tinkling down on the pavement.
  624. forget
    dismiss from the mind; stop remembering
    So Simon, having forgotten
    his teacher’s dictum on the possession of human chattels, bought three slaves and
    with their aid established a homestead on the banks of the Alabama River some
    forty miles above Saint Stephens.
  625. behave
    behave in a certain manner; show a certain behavior; conduct or comport oneself
    She
    was always ordering me out of the kitchen, asking me why I couldn’t behave as
    well as Jem when she knew he was older, and calling me home when I wasn’t
    ready to come.
  626. softly
    with little weight or force
    “Nome thank you ma’am,” he drawled softly.
  627. side
    a place within a region identified relative to a center or reference location
    Being Southerners, it was a source of shame to some members of the family that
    we had no recorded ancestors on either side of the Battle of Hastings.
  628. scratching
    a harsh noise made by scraping
    I’ve seen his tracks in our back yard many a mornin’, and one night I heard
    him scratching on the back screen, but he was gone time Atticus got there.”
  629. two
    the cardinal number that is the sum of one and one or a numeral representing this number
    1960
    TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD
    by Harper Lee
    Copyright (C) 1960 by Harper Lee
    Copyright (C) renewed 1988 by Harper Lee
    Published by arrangement with McIntosh and Otis, Inc.
    CONTENTS
    l DEDICATION
    l PART ONE
    m Chapter 1
    m Chapter 2
    m Chapter 3
    m Chapter 4
    m Chapter 5
    m Chapter 6
    m Chapter 7
    m Chapter 8
    m Chapter 9
    m Chapter 10
    m Chapter 11
    l PART TWO
    m Chapter 12
    m Chapter 13
    m Chapter 14
    m Chapter 15
    m Chapter 16
    m Chapter 17
    m Chapter 18
    m Chapter 19
    m Chapter 20
    m Chapter 21
    m Chapter 22...
  630. vest pocket
    a small pocket in a man's vest
    He drew out an envelope,
    then reached into his vest pocket and unclipped his fountain pen.
  631. maleness
    the properties characteristic of the male sex
    Dill’s maleness was beginning to assert itself.
  632. briefcase
    a case with a handle; for carrying papers or files or books
    Jem seized his briefcase and bag, I jumped into his arms, felt his vague
    dry kiss and said, “‘d you bring me a book? ’d you know Aunty’s here?”
  633. hold
    have or hold in one's hands or grip
    “He’ll probably come out after you when he sees you
    in the yard, then Scout’n‘ me’ll jump on him and hold him down till we can tell
    him we ain’t gonna hurt him.”
  634. shirt
    a garment worn on the upper half of the body
    He wore blue linen shorts that buttoned to his shirt, his hair
    was snow white and stuck to his head like duckfluff; he was a year my senior but
    I towered over him.
  635. fist
    a hand with the fingers clenched in the palm (as for hitting)
    We were far too old to settle an argument with a fist-fight, so we consulted
    Atticus.
  636. grow up
    become an adult
    Nearly the same age, they had grown up together at Finch’s Landing.
  637. scary
    provoking fear terror
    But Dill got him the third day, when he told Jem that folks in Meridian certainly
    weren’t as afraid as the folks in Maycomb, that he’d never seen such scary folks
    as the ones in Maycomb.
  638. lap
    the upper side of the thighs of a seated person
    I could not remember when the lines above Atticus’s moving finger
    separated into words, but I had stared at them all the evenings in my memory,
    listening to the news of the day, Bills to Be Enacted into Laws, the diaries of
    Lorenzo Dow—anything Atticus happened to be reading when I crawled into his
    lap every night.
  639. under
    below some quantity or limit
    “Folks call me Dill,” said Dill, struggling under the fence.
  640. settle down
    become settled or established and stable in one's residence or life style
    Subdued, I fixed
    my attention upon Reverend Sykes, who seemed to be waiting for me to settle
    down
    .
  641. jump
    move forward by leaps and bounds
    Jem had his little sister to think of the
    time I dared him to jump off the top of the house: “If I got killed, what’d become
    of you?” he asked.
  642. pointed
    having a point
    Miss Caroline pointed a shaking finger not at the floor nor at a desk, but to a
    hulking individual unknown to me.
  643. digestive juice
    secretions that aid digestion
    Bit by
    bit the dead cigar would disappear, to reappear some hours later as a flat slick
    mess, its essence extracted and mingling with Judge Taylor’s digestive juices.
  644. give
    transfer possession of something concrete or abstract to somebody
    He said it began the summer Dill came to us, when Dill first gave us the idea
    of making Boo Radley come out.
  645. cough
    a sudden noisy expulsion of air from the lungs that clears the air passages; a common symptom of upper respiratory infection or bronchitis or pneumonia or tuberculosis
    When he passed we would look at the ground and say,
    “Good morning, sir,” and he would cough in reply.
  646. hair
    a covering for the body (or parts of it) consisting of a dense growth of threadlike structures (as on the human head); helps to prevent heat loss
    Jem brushed his hair back to get a better look.
  647. rotogravure
    printing by transferring an image from a photogravure plate to a cylinder in a rotary press
    Behind the
    rough oak pulpit a faded pink silk banner proclaimed God Is Love, the church’s
    only decoration except a rotogravure print of Hunt’s The Light of the World.
  648. unfunny
    not funny; especially failing to achieve the intended humor
    In obedience to my father, there followed what I later realized was a sickeningly
    comic aspect of an unfunny situation: the men talked in near-whispers.
  649. scowl
    frown with displeasure
    Jem scowled.
  650. weekday
    any day except Sunday (and sometimes except Saturday)
    The doors of the Radley house were closed on
    weekdays as well as Sundays, and Mr. Radley’s boy was not seen again for
    fifteen years.
  651. crazily
    in an insane manner
    This was enough to make Jem march to the corner, where he stopped and leaned
    against the light-pole, watching the gate hanging crazily on its homemade hinge.
  652. move
    change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically
    People moved slowly then.
  653. aggravate
    make worse
    It
    aggravates ’em.
  654. start
    take the first step or steps in carrying out an action
    I maintain that the Ewells
    started it all, but Jem, who was four years my senior, said it started long before
    that.
  655. dangle
    hang freely
    As he read along, I noticed that Mrs. Dubose’s corrections grew fewer and farther
    between, that Jem had even left one sentence dangling in mid-air.
  656. jerk
    a sudden abrupt pull
    “Shoot no wonder, then,” said Jem, jerking his thumb at me.
  657. gambling hell
    a public building in which a variety of games of chance can be played (operated as a business)
    They did little, but
    enough to be discussed by the town and publicly warned from three pulpits: they
    hung around the barbershop; they rode the bus to Abbottsville on Sundays and
    went to the picture show; they attended dances at the county’s riverside gambling
    hell
    , the Dew-Drop Inn & Fishing Camp; they experimented with stumphole
    whiskey.
  658. understand
    know and comprehend the nature or meaning of
    Miss Caroline and I had conferred twice already, and they were
    looking at me in the innocent assurance that familiarity breeds understanding.
  659. eyebrow
    the arch of hair above each eye
    I suppose she chose me because she knew my name; as I read the alphabet a faint
    line appeared between her eyebrows, and after making me read most of My First
    Reader and the stock-market quotations from The Mobile Register aloud, she
    discovered that I was literate and looked at me with more than faint distaste.
  660. quelling
    forceful prevention; putting down by power or authority
    Through all the headshaking,
    quelling of nausea and Jem-yelling, I had heard another sound, so low I
    could not have heard it from the sidewalk.
  661. lawyer
    a professional person authorized to practice law; conducts lawsuits or gives legal advice
    1960
    TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD
    by Harper Lee
    Copyright (C) 1960 by Harper Lee
    Copyright (C) renewed 1988 by Harper Lee
    Published by arrangement with McIntosh and Otis, Inc.
    CONTENTS
    l DEDICATION
    l PART ONE
    m Chapter 1
    m Chapter 2
    m Chapter 3
    m Chapter 4
    m Chapter 5
    m Chapter 6
    m Chapter 7
    m Chapter 8
    m Chapter 9
    m Chapter 10
    m Chapter 11
    l PART TWO
    m Chapter 12
    m Chapter 13
    m Chapter 14
    m Chapter 15
    m Chapter 16
    m Chapter 17
    m Chapter 18
    m Chapter 19
    m Chapter 20
    m Chapter 21
    m Chapter 22
    m Chap...
  662. illicitly
    in a manner disapproved or not allowed by custom
    I never
    deliberately learned to read, but somehow I had been wallowing illicitly in the
    daily papers.
  663. banana peel
    the skin of a banana (especially when it is stripped off and discarded)
    There were at least twelve banana
    peels
    on the floor by his bed, surrounding an empty milk bottle.
  664. push up
    push upward
    Atticus pushed up his glasses and rubbed his face.
  665. crawl
    move slowly; in the case of people or animals with the body near the ground
    I could not remember when the lines above Atticus’s moving finger
    separated into words, but I had stared at them all the evenings in my memory,
    listening to the news of the day, Bills to Be Enacted into Laws, the diaries of
    Lorenzo Dow—anything Atticus happened to be reading when I crawled into his
    lap every night.
  666. tenterhook
    one of a series of hooks used to hold cloth on a tenter
    I waited, on tenterhooks, for Uncle Jack to tell Atticus my side of it.
  667. find
    discover or determine the existence, presence, or fact of
    He returned to Saint Stephens only once, to find
    a wife, and with her established a line that ran high to daughters.
  668. mumble
    talk indistinctly; usually in a low voice
    I mumbled that I was sorry and retired meditating upon my crime.
  669. come to
    cause to experience suddenly
    He said it began the summer Dill came to us, when Dill first gave us the idea
    of making Boo Radley come out.
  670. buttoned
    furnished or closed with buttons or something buttonlike
    He wore blue linen shorts that buttoned to his shirt, his hair
    was snow white and stuck to his head like duckfluff; he was a year my senior but
    I towered over him.
  671. shoe
    footwear shaped to fit the foot (below the ankle) with a flexible upper of leather or plastic and a sole and heel of heavier material
    Of all days Sunday was the day for formal afternoon visiting: ladies wore
    corsets, men wore coats, children wore shoes.
  672. upstairs
    on a floor above
    She boarded across the street one door down from us in Miss Maudie Atkinson’s
    upstairs front room, and when Miss Maudie introduced us to her, Jem was in a
    haze for days.
  673. get to
    arrive at the point of
    “That’s okay, ma’am, you’ll get to know all the county folks after a while.
  674. sick
    affected by an impairment of normal physical or mental function
    The old house was the same, droopy and sick, but as we stared down the street we
    thought we saw an inside shutter move.
  675. low-down
    of the most contemptible kind
    I can’t conceive of
    anyone low-down enough to do a thing like this, but I hope you found him.”
  676. leveler
    a radical who advocates the abolition of social distinctions
    Our courts have their faults, as does any human institution, but
    in this country our courts are the great levelers, and in our courts all men are
    created equal.
  677. sneak up
    advance stealthily or unnoticed
    “He sneaked out of the house—turn ‘round—sneaked up,
    an’ went like this!”
  678. sit-down strike
    a strike in which workers refuse to leave the workplace until a settlement is reached
    The Governor was eager to scrape a few
    barnacles off the ship of state; there were sit-down strikes in Birmingham; bread
    lines in the cities grew longer, people in the country grew poorer.
  679. bowlegged
    have legs that curve outward at the knees
    “Dill if you don’t hush I’ll knock you bowlegged.
  680. uncrossed
    not crossed
    Mr. Tate uncrossed his legs and leaned forward.
  681. pass by
    move past
    As Mr.
    Radley passed by, Boo drove the scissors into his parent’s leg, pulled them out,
    wiped them on his pants, and resumed his activities.
  682. wake up
    stop sleeping
    Miss Stephanie Crawford
    said she woke up in the middle of the night one time and saw him looking straight
    through the window at her… said his head was like a skull lookin‘ at her.
  683. garbage dump
    a piece of land where waste materials are dumped
    Maycomb’s Ewells lived behind the town garbage dump in what was once a
    Negro cabin.
  684. saying
    a word or phrase that particular people use in particular situations
    Scout, you’ll get in trouble if you go around saying things
    like that.
  685. take advantage
    draw advantages from
    Burris seemed to be afraid of a child half his height, and Miss Caroline took
    advantage
    of his indecision: “Burris, go home.
  686. only
    without any others being included or involved
    All we had
    was Simon Finch, a fur-trapping apothecary from Cornwall whose piety was
    exceeded only by his stinginess.
  687. bathroom
    a room (as in a residence) containing a bathtub or shower and usually a washbasin and toilet
    Sometimes when we made a
    midnight pilgrimage to the bathroom we would find him reading.
  688. mighty
    having or showing great strength or force or intensity
    Don’t matter who they are, anybody sets foot in this house’s
    yo‘ comp’ny, and don’t you let me catch you remarkin’ on their ways like you
    was so high and mighty!
  689. conversation piece
    something interesting that stimulates conversation
    The jail was
    Maycomb’s only conversation piece: its detractors said it looked like a Victorian
    privy; its supporters said it gave the town a good solid respectable look, and no
    stranger would ever suspect that it was full of niggers.
  690. pork and beans
    dried beans cooked with pork and tomato sauce
    Dill made his way through the leftovers and was reaching for a can of pork and
    beans
    in the pantry when Miss Rachel’s Do-oo Je-sus went off in the hall.
  691. cousin
    the child of your aunt or uncle
    “You sound like Cousin Ike Finch,” I said.
  692. whiskey bottle
    a bottle for holding whiskey
    “You are too young to
    understand it,” she said, “but sometimes the Bible in the hand of one man is worse
    than a whiskey bottle in the hand of—oh, of your father.”
  693. aisle
    a long narrow passage (as in a cave or woods)
    Zeebo rose from his pew and walked down the center aisle, stopping in front of us
    and facing the congregation.
  694. mind
    that which is responsible for one's thoughts and feelings; the seat of the faculty of reason
    But there came a day, barely within Jem’s memory, when Boo Radley was heard
    from and was seen by several people, but not by Jem. He said Atticus never talked
    much about the Radleys: when Jem would question him Atticus’s only answer
    was for him to mind his own business and let the Radleys mind theirs, they had a
    right to; but when it happened Jem said Atticus shook his head and said, “Mm,
    mm, mm.”
  695. gum
    any of various substances (soluble in water) that exude from certain plants; they are gelatinous when moist but harden on drying
    I stood on tiptoe, hastily looked around once more, reached
    into the hole, and withdrew two pieces of chewing gum minus their outer
    wrappers.
  696. glass
    a brittle transparent solid with irregular atomic structure
    He would probably have poured it into his milk glass had I not
    asked what the sam hill he was doing.
  697. deep in thought
    deeply absorbed in thought
    When we passed our tree he
    gave it a meditative pat on its cement, and remained deep in thought.
  698. beat
    hit repeatedly
    I beat him up twice but it did no good, he only grew closer to Jem. They spent
    days together in the treehouse plotting and planning, calling me only when they
    needed a third party.
  699. little sister
    a younger sister
    Besides, Jem had his little sister to think of.
  700. knife
    edge tool used as a cutting instrument; has a pointed blade with a sharp edge and a handle
    It was a pocket watch that wouldn’t
    run, on a chain with an aluminum knife.
  701. teach
    impart skills or knowledge to
    Miss
    Caroline told me to tell my father not to teach me any more, it would interfere
    with my reading.
  702. chin
    the protruding part of the lower jaw
    I crawled into his lap and tucked my head
    under his chin.
  703. nice
    pleasant or pleasing or agreeable in nature or appearance
    Miss Caroline came to the end of the story and said, “Oh, my, wasn’t that nice?”
  704. hung jury
    a jury that is unable to agree on a verdict (the result is a mistrial)
    “If we’d had two of that crowd, we’d’ve had a hung jury.”
  705. tin can
    airtight sealed metal container for food or drink or paint etc.
    Atticus said to Jem one day, “I’d rather you shot at tin cans in the back yard, but I
    know you’ll go after birds.
  706. breathed
    uttered without voice
    When people’s azaleas froze in a cold snap, it was
    because he had breathed on them.
  707. garishly
    in a tastelessly garish manner
    They were white
    hands, sickly white hands that had never seen the sun, so white they stood out
    garishly against the dull cream wall in the dim light of Jem’s room.
  708. ump
    an official at a baseball game
    Just ump—” Dill’s fat
    foot hit the ground.
  709. bloodcurdling
    extremely alarming
    Through the weeks he had cultivated an expression of polite and
    detached interest, which he would present to her in answer to her most bloodcurdling
    inventions.
  710. floor
    the inside lower horizontal surface (as of a room, hallway, tent, or other structure)
    Miss Caroline pointed a shaking finger not at the floor nor at a desk, but to a
    hulking individual unknown to me.
  711. unroll
    unroll, unfold, or spread out or be unrolled, unfolded, or spread out from a furled state
    I thought they must be coldnatured,
    as their sleeves were unrolled and buttoned at the cuffs.
  712. through
    having finished or arrived at completion
    Routine
    contentment was: improving our treehouse that rested between giant twin
    chinaberry trees in the back yard, fussing, running through our list of dramas
    based on the works of Oliver Optic, Victor Appleton, and Edgar Rice Burroughs.
  713. even
    being level or straight or regular and without variation as e.g. in shape or texture; or being in the same plane or at the same height as something else (i.e. even with)
    “Scout yonder’s
    been readin‘ ever since she was born, and she ain’t even started to school yet.
  714. plot of ground
    a small area of ground covered by specific vegetation
    The Levy family met all criteria for being Fine Folks: they did the best they could
    with the sense they had, and they had been living on the same plot of ground in
    Maycomb for five generations.
  715. stoner
    an attacker who pelts the victim with stones (especially with intent to kill)
    “Heard every word you said,” I muttered. “…
    wasn’t sleep at all, ‘s about a ship an’ Three-Fingered Fred ‘n’ Stoner’s Boy…”
    He unhooked my overalls, leaned me against him, and pulled them off.
  716. muffle
    deaden (a sound or noise), especially by wrapping
    Soft taffeta-like sounds and
    muffled scurrying sounds filled me with helpless dread.
  717. coffee break
    a snack taken during a break in the work day
    They did not go to church, Maycomb’s principal
    recreation, but worshiped at home; Mrs. Radley seldom if ever crossed the street
    for a mid-morning coffee break with her neighbors, and certainly never joined a
    missionary circle.
  718. eat
    take in solid food
    Jem gave a reasonable description of Boo: Boo was about six-and-a-half feet tall,
    judging from his tracks; he dined on raw squirrels and any cats he could catch,
    that’s why his hands were bloodstained—if you ate an animal raw, you could
    never wash the blood off.
  719. lectern
    desk or stand with a slanted top used to hold a text at the proper height for a lecturer
    I got rid
    of my ham costume and departed in a hurry, for Mrs. Merriweather was standing
    at a lectern in front of the first row of seats making last-minute, frenzied changes
    in the script.
  720. backboard
    a board used to support the back of someone or something
    He had walked ten or eleven of
    the fourteen miles to Maycomb, off the highway in the scrub bushes lest the
    authorities be seeking him, and had ridden the remainder of the way clinging to
    the backboard of a cotton wagon.
  721. pillowcase
    bed linen consisting of a cover for a pillow
    Her face was the color of a dirty pillowcase, and the corners of
    her mouth glistened with wet, which inched like a glacier down the deep grooves
    enclosing her chin.
  722. squint
    partly close one's eyes, as when hit by direct blinding light
    She was all angles and bones; she was
    nearsighted; she squinted; her hand was wide as a bed slat and twice as hard.
  723. finger
    any of the terminal members of the hand (sometimes excepting the thumb)
    I could not remember when the lines above Atticus’s moving finger
    separated into words, but I had stared at them all the evenings in my memory,
    listening to the news of the day, Bills to Be Enacted into Laws, the diaries of
    Lorenzo Dow—anything Atticus happened to be reading when I crawled into his
    lap every night.
  724. underline
    draw a line or lines underneath to call attention to
    Jem underlined it when he asked Atticus if he was going out for the Methodists
    and Atticus said he’d break his neck if he did, he was just too old for that sort of
    thing.
  725. sure
    having or feeling no doubt or uncertainty; confident and assured
    Dill blushed and Jem told me to hush, a sure sign that Dill had been studied and
    found acceptable.
  726. screen
    partition consisting of a decorative frame or panel that serves to divide a space
    The Radley house had no screen doors.
  727. stand in
    be a substitute
    Now lemme think… reckon we can rock him…”
    Jem stood in thought so long that Dill made a mild concession: “I won’t say you
    ran out on a dare an‘ I’ll swap you The Gray Ghost if you just go up and touch the
    house.”
  728. eyes
    opinion or judgment
    As he told us the old tale his blue eyes would lighten and
    darken; his laugh was sudden and happy; he habitually pulled at a cowlick in the
    center of his forehead.
  729. hairdressing
    care for the hair: the activity of washing or cutting or curling or arranging the hair
    The warm bittersweet smell of clean Negro welcomed us as we entered the
    churchyard—Hearts of Love hairdressing mingled with asafoetida, snuff, Hoyt’s
    Cologne, Brown’s Mule, peppermint, and lilac talcum.
  730. paper cup
    a disposable cup made of paper; for holding drinks
    Little Chuck brought
    water in a paper cup, and she drank it gratefully.
  731. peeve
    an annoyed or irritated mood
    Calpurnia looked peeved, but Atticus
    looked exhausted.
  732. kick
    drive or propel with the foot
    We ran back and found him struggling in the fence, kicking his pants off to get
    loose.
  733. sensed
    detected by instinct or inference rather than by recognized perceptual cues
    Perhaps Calpurnia sensed that my day had been a grim one: she let me watch her
    fix supper.
  734. guess
    expect, believe, or suppose
    It kept me from driving her crazy on rainy days, I
    guess.
  735. missus
    informal term of address for someone's wife
    “What fer, missus?”
  736. wriggle
    to move in a twisting or contorted motion, (especially when struggling)
    Hours of wintertime had found me in the treehouse, looking over at the
    schoolyard, spying on multitudes of children through a two-power telescope Jem
    had given me, learning their games, following Jem’s red jacket through wriggling
    circles of blind man’s buff, secretly sharing their misfortunes and minor victories.
  737. scurry
    to move about or proceed hurriedly
    Soft taffeta-like sounds and
    muffled scurrying sounds filled me with helpless dread.
  738. routine
    an unvarying or habitual method or procedure
    Thereafter the summer passed in routine contentment.
  739. watching
    the act of observing; taking a patient look
    At last
    the sawhorses were taken away, and we stood watching from the front porch
    when Mr. Radley made his final journey past our house.
  740. kill
    cause to die; put to death, usually intentionally or knowingly
    1960
    TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD
    by Harper Lee
    Copyright (C) 1960 by Harper Lee
    Copyright (C) renewed 1988 by Harper Lee
    Published by arrangement with McIntosh and Otis, Inc.
    CONTENTS
    l DEDICATION
    l PART ONE
    m Chapter 1
    m Chapter 2
    m Chapter 3
    m Chapter 4
    m Chapter 5
    m Chapter 6
    m Chapter 7
    m Chapter 8
    m Chapter 9
    m Chapter 10
    m Chapter 11
    l PART TWO
    m Chapter 12
    m Chapter 13
    m Chapter 14
    m Chapter 15
    m Chapter 16
    m Chapter 17
    m Chapter 18
    m Chapter 19
    m Chapter 20
    m Chapter 21
    m Chapter 22...
  741. grown
    (of animals) fully developed
    “Naw, don’t anybody much but us pass by there, unless it’s some grown
    person’s-”
    “Grown folks don’t have hidin‘ places.
  742. baby
    a very young mammal
    He charges some folks a bushel of potatoes for delivery of a baby.
  743. tea set
    a set of china or silverware for serving tea
    Aunt Alexandra’s
    vision of my deportment involved playing with small stoves, tea sets, and wearing
    the Add-A-Pearl necklace she gave me when I was born; furthermore, I should be
    a ray of sunshine in my father’s lonely life.
  744. rub
    move over something with pressure
    Contents - Prev / Next
    Chapter 3
    Catching Walter Cunningham in the schoolyard gave me some pleasure, but when
    I was rubbing his nose in the dirt Jem came by and told me to stop.
  745. go to bed
    prepare for sleep
    “Sir?”
    Go to bed.”
  746. stroll
    a leisurely walk (usually in some public place)
    When he completed his
    examination of the wisteria vine he strolled back to me.
  747. pole
    a long (usually round) rod of wood or metal or plastic
    In spite of our warnings and explanations it
    drew him as the moon draws water, but drew him no nearer than the light-pole on
    the corner, a safe distance from the Radley gate.
  748. found
    food and lodging provided in addition to money
    Jem and I found our father satisfactory: he played with us,
    read to us, and treated us with courteous detachment.
  749. dressed-up
    dressed in fancy or formal clothing
    One or two of the jury looked vaguely like dressed-up
    Cunninghams.
  750. first cousin
    the child of your aunt or uncle
    Double first cousin.”
  751. walking
    the act of traveling by foot
    Walking south, one
    faced its porch; the sidewalk turned and ran beside the lot.
  752. rest
    take a short break from one's activities in order to relax
    Routine
    contentment was: improving our treehouse that rested between giant twin
    chinaberry trees in the back yard, fussing, running through our list of dramas
    based on the works of Oliver Optic, Victor Appleton, and Edgar Rice Burroughs.
  753. Battle of the Marne
    a World War I battle in northwestern France where the Allies defeated the Germans in 1918
    If she found a blade of nut grass in her yard it was like the Second
    Battle of the Marne: she swooped down upon it with a tin tub and subjected it to
    blasts from beneath with a poisonous substance she said was so powerful it’d kill
    us all if we didn’t stand out of the way.
  754. roomer
    a tenant in someone's house
    Why, I’ll build me a little house and take me a couple of
    roomers and—gracious, I’ll have the finest yard in Alabama.
  755. wordlessly
    without speaking
    Wordlessly, he held up his pants.
  756. whittle
    cut small bits or pare shavings from
    Boo bit it off one night when he couldn’t find
    any cats and squirrels to eat.); she sat in the livingroom and cried most of the
    time, while Boo slowly whittled away all the furniture in the house.
  757. field hand
    a hired hand on a farm
    There was a kitchen separate from the rest of the house, tacked onto it by a
    wooden catwalk; in the back yard was a rusty bell on a pole, used to summon
    field hands or as a distress signal; a widow’s walk was on the roof, but no widows
    walked there—from it, Simon oversaw his overseer, watched the river-boats, and
    gazed into the lives of surrounding landholders.
  758. whore
    a woman who engages in sexual intercourse for money
    “Grandma,” he bawled, “she called me a
    whore-lady and jumped on me!”
  759. year
    the period of time that it takes for a planet (as, e.g., Earth or Mars) to make a complete revolution around the sun
    When enough years had gone by to enable us to look back on them, we
    sometimes discussed the events leading to his accident.
  760. men
    the force of workers available
    It was customary for the men in the family to remain on Simon’s homestead,
    Finch’s Landing, and make their living from cotton.
  761. mad
    roused to anger
    Ground, sky and houses melted into a mad palette, my ears throbbed, I was
    suffocating.
  762. Sunday
    first day of the week; observed as a day of rest and worship by most Christians
    Of all days Sunday was the day for formal afternoon visiting: ladies wore
    corsets, men wore coats, children wore shoes.
  763. slosh
    spill or splash copiously or clumsily
    Jem sloshed water over the mud man and added more
    dirt.
  764. county seat
    the town or city that is the seat of government for a county
    Maycomb, some twenty miles east of Finch’s Landing, was the county
    seat
    of Maycomb County.
  765. hurt
    be the source of pain
    “How do you know a match don’t hurt him?”
  766. come along
    come into being or existence, or appear on the scene
    If anyone came along, Dill would ring the bell.
  767. baby-sit
    take watchful responsibility for
    It was customary for field
    Negroes with tiny children to deposit them in whatever shade there was while
    their parents worked—usually the babies sat in the shade between two rows of
    cotton.
  768. high wire
    a tightrope very high above the ground
    We thought it was better to go under
    the high wire fence at the rear of the Radley lot, we stood less chance of being
    seen.
  769. ahead
    at or in the front
    Walter looked straight ahead.
  770. sound
    mechanical vibrations transmitted by an elastic medium
    When Dill reduced Dracula to dust, and Jem said the show sounded better than
    the book, I asked Dill where his father was: “You ain’t said anything about him.”
  771. learn
    gain knowledge or skills
    Hours of wintertime had found me in the treehouse, looking over at the
    schoolyard, spying on multitudes of children through a two-power telescope Jem
    had given me, learning their games, following Jem’s red jacket through wriggling
    circles of blind man’s buff, secretly sharing their misfortunes and minor victories.
  772. swap
    exchange or give (something) in exchange for
    Now lemme think… reckon we can rock him…”
    Jem stood in thought so long that Dill made a mild concession: “I won’t say you
    ran out on a dare an‘ I’ll swap you The Gray Ghost if you just go up and touch the
    house.”
  773. stay away
    stay clear of, avoid
    Lastly, we
    were to stay away from that house until we were invited there, we were not to
    play an asinine game he had seen us playing or make fun of anybody on this street
    or in this town-
    “We weren’t makin‘ fun of him, we weren’t laughin’ at him,” said Jem, “we were
    just-”
    “So that was what you were doing, wasn’t it?”
  774. unbutton
    undo the buttons of
    He unhitched his
    watch and chain and placed them on the table, saying, “With the court’s
    permission—”
    Judge Taylor nodded, and then Atticus did something I never saw him do before
    or since, in public or in private: he unbuttoned his vest, unbuttoned his collar,
    loosened his tie, and took off his coat.
  775. table
    a piece of furniture having a smooth flat top that is usually supported by one or more vertical legs
    “There’s
    some folks who don’t eat like us,” she whispered fiercely, “but you ain’t called on
    to contradict ‘em at the table when they don’t.
  776. begrudge
    be envious of; set one's heart on
    I don’t know of any landowner around here who begrudges
    those children any game their father can hit.”
  777. complicate
    make more complicated
    I returned to the front yard and busied myself
    for two hours erecting a complicated breastworks at the side of the porch,
    consisting of a tire, an orange crate, the laundry hamper, the porch chairs, and a
    small U.S. flag Jem gave me from a popcorn box.
  778. jury system
    a legal system for determining the facts at issue in a law suit
    “I’m no idealist to believe firmly in the integrity of our courts and in the jury
    system
    —that is no ideal to me, it is a living, working reality.
  779. curtness
    an abrupt discourteous manner
    His curtness stung me.
  780. belt buckle
    the buckle used to fasten a belt
    “Jem?”
    My toes touched trousers, a belt buckle, buttons, something I could not identify, a
    collar, and a face.
  781. crease
    an angular or rounded shape made by folding
    He put
    the newspaper down very carefully, adjusting its creases with lingering fingers.
  782. help
    give help or assistance; be of service
    “Reason I can’t pass the first grade, Mr. Finch, is I’ve had to stay out ever‘ spring
    an’ help Papa with the choppin‘, but there’s another’n at the house now that’s
    field size.”
  783. garbage
    food that is discarded (as from a kitchen)
    We sat
    waiting for Zeebo to arrive in the garbage truck.
  784. fret
    be agitated or irritated
    “Now don’t you
    fret, ma’am,” he said.
  785. stomp
    walk heavily
    I stomped
    at him to chase him away, but Jem put out his hand and stopped me.
  786. church
    a place for public (especially Christian) worship
    They did not go to church, Maycomb’s principal
    recreation, but worshiped at home; Mrs. Radley seldom if ever crossed the street
    for a mid-morning coffee break with her neighbors, and certainly never joined a
    missionary circle.
  787. alive
    possessing life
    My memory came alive to see Mrs. Radley occasionally open the front door, walk
    to the edge of the porch, and pour water on her cannas.
  788. once
    on one occasion
    1960
    TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD
    by Harper Lee
    Copyright (C) 1960 by Harper Lee
    Copyright (C) renewed 1988 by Harper Lee
    Published by arrangement with McIntosh and Otis, Inc.
    CONTENTS
    l DEDICATION
    l PART ONE
    m Chapter 1
    m Chapter 2
    m Chapter 3
    m Chapter 4
    m Chapter 5
    m Chapter 6
    m Chapter 7
    m Chapter 8
    m Chapter 9
    m Chapter 10
    m Chapter 11
    l PART TWO
    m Chapter 12
    m Chapter 13
    m Chapter 14
    m Chapter 15
    m Chapter 16
    m Chapter 17
    m Chapter 18
    m Chapter 19
    m Chapter 20
    m Chapter 21
    m Chapter 22
    m Chap...
  789. dig into
    examine physically with or as if with a probe
    I felt Calpurnia’s hand dig into my shoulder.
  790. die
    pass from physical life and lose all bodily attributes and functions necessary to sustain life
    Simon lived to
    an impressive age and died rich.
  791. dead
    no longer having or seeming to have or expecting to have life
    “Is he dead?”
  792. choked
    stopped up; clogged up
    “Then I’m goin‘ with you
    —” I choked.
  793. coming
    of the relatively near future
    The neighborhood thought when Mr. Radley went under Boo would come out,
    but it had another think coming: Boo’s elder brother returned from Pensacola and
    took Mr. Radley’s place.
  794. cubbyhole
    a small compartment
    To reach the courtroom, on the second floor, one passed sundry sunless county
    cubbyholes: the tax assessor, the tax collector, the county clerk, the county
    solicitor, the circuit clerk, the judge of probate lived in cool dim hutches that
    smelled of decaying record books mingled with old damp cement and stale urine.
  795. rearrange
    put into a new order or arrangement
    She just rearranged food on her plate,
    looking at it sadly while Calpurnia served Jem, Dill and me with a vengeance.
  796. gouge
    an impression in a surface (as made by a blow)
    “Don’t blame me when he gouges your
    eyes out.
  797. changeling
    a child secretly exchanged for another in infancy
    Aunt Alexandra was Atticus’s sister, but when Jem told me about changelings and
    siblings, I decided that she had been swapped at birth, that my grandparents had
    perhaps received a Crawford instead of a Finch.
  798. knuckle
    a joint of a finger when the fist is closed
    Francis looked at me carefully, concluded that I had been sufficiently subdued,
    and crooned softly, “Nigger-lover…”
    This time, I split my knuckle to the bone on his front teeth.
  799. sports page
    any page in the sports section of a newspaper
    Every night Atticus would read us the sports pages of the
    newspapers.
  800. breath
    the process of taking in and expelling air during breathing
    “There goes the meanest man ever God blew breath into,” murmured Calpurnia,
    and she spat meditatively into the yard.
  801. sorry
    feeling or expressing regret or sorrow or a sense of loss over something done or undone
    I mumbled that I was sorry and retired meditating upon my crime.
  802. all the time
    without respite
    “Good Lord, Miss Maudie, Jem and me beat him all the time.”
  803. ambidextrous
    equally skillful with each hand
    “About your writing with your left
    hand, are you ambidextrous, Mr. Ewell?”
  804. solicitor
    a British lawyer who gives legal advice and prepares legal documents
    To reach the courtroom, on the second floor, one passed sundry sunless county
    cubbyholes: the tax assessor, the tax collector, the county clerk, the county
    solicitor, the circuit clerk, the judge of probate lived in cool dim hutches that
    smelled of decaying record books mingled with old damp cement and stale urine.
  805. hall
    an interior passage or corridor onto which rooms open
    That cat thing
    was real fine this mornin‘…
    Miss Caroline smiled, blew her nose, said, “Thank you, darlings,” dispersed us,
    opened a book and mystified the first grade with a long narrative about a toadfrog
    that lived in a hall.
  806. opened
    not sealed or having been unsealed
    Miss Caroline went to her desk and opened her purse.
  807. step on
    place or press the foot on
    Don’t step on it!”
  808. startle
    to stimulate to action
    Reverend Sykes startled me by saying sternly, “Carlow Richardson, I haven’t
    seen you up this aisle yet.”
  809. sticking
    extending out above or beyond a surface or boundary
    Some tinfoil was sticking in a knot-hole just above my eye level, winking at me in
    the afternoon sun.
  810. gone
    no longer retained
    When enough years had gone by to enable us to look back on them, we
    sometimes discussed the events leading to his accident.
  811. ex cathedra
    with the full authority of the office
    I remembered something he had
    said about Judge Taylor’s ex cathedra remarks sometimes exceeding his duty, but
    that few lawyers ever did anything about them.
  812. Lafayette
    a university town in west central Indiana on the Wabash River
    When I was almost six and Jem was nearly ten, our summertime boundaries
    (within calling distance of Calpurnia) were Mrs. Henry Lafayette Dubose’s house
    two doors to the north of us, and the Radley Place three doors to the south.
  813. wake
    stop sleeping
    Miss Stephanie Crawford
    said she woke up in the middle of the night one time and saw him looking straight
    through the window at her… said his head was like a skull lookin‘ at her.
  814. spell
    write or name the letters that comprise the conventionally accepted form of (a word or part of a word)
    “I have a Ewell here, but I don’t have a
    first name… would you spell your first name for me?”
  815. front room
    a room in a private house or establishment where people can sit and talk and relax
    She boarded across the street one door down from us in Miss Maudie Atkinson’s
    upstairs front room, and when Miss Maudie introduced us to her, Jem was in a
    haze for days.
  816. voile
    a light semitransparent fabric
    Calpurnia, in her navy voile dress and tub of a hat, walked between Jem and me.
  817. absorbent cotton
    cotton made absorbent by removal of the natural wax
    There was a marble-topped washstand by her bed; on it were a glass with a
    teaspoon in it, a red ear syringe, a box of absorbent cotton, and a steel alarm clock
    standing on three tiny legs.
  818. fascinate
    to render motionless, as with a fixed stare or by arousing terror or awe
    The Radley Place fascinated Dill.
  819. stare
    look at with fixed eyes
    We stared at him until he spoke:
    “Hey.”
    “Hey yourself,” said Jem pleasantly.
  820. turn to
    direct one's interest or attention towards; go into
    In
    rainy weather the streets turned to red slop; grass grew on the sidewalks, the
    courthouse sagged in the square.
  821. cussed
    stubbornly persistent in wrongdoing
    The judge asked Mr. Conner why he included the last charge;
    Mr. Conner said they cussed so loud he was sure every lady in Maycomb heard
    them.
  822. spitball
    a projectile made by chewing a piece of paper and shaping it into a sphere
    “Bet he was hell
    with a spitball,” murmured Dill.
  823. soaking up
    (chemistry) a process in which one substance permeates another; a fluid permeates or is dissolved by a liquid or solid
    Mr. Braxton Underwood, who had been sitting quietly in a chair reserved for the
    Press, soaking up testimony with his sponge of a brain, allowed his bitter eyes to
    rove over the colored balcony, and they met mine.
  824. go off
    run away; usually includes taking something or somebody along
    He remembered her clearly, and
    sometimes in the middle of a game he would sigh at length, then go off and play
    by himself behind the car-house.
  825. straight
    having no deviations
    Miss Stephanie
    Crawford said he was so upright he took the word of God as his only law, and we
    believed her, because Mr. Radley’s posture was ramrod straight.
  826. miss
    fail to perceive or to catch with the senses or the mind
    I did not miss her, but I think Jem did.
  827. come home
    become clear or enter one's consciousness or emotions
    Mr. Radley’s elder son lived
    in Pensacola; he came home at Christmas, and he was one of the few persons we
    ever saw enter or leave the place.
  828. lean against
    rest on for support
    This was enough to make Jem march to the corner, where he stopped and leaned
    against
    the light-pole, watching the gate hanging crazily on its homemade hinge.
  829. go ahead
    proceed (with a plan of action)
    Dill stopped and let Jem go ahead.
  830. washer
    someone who washes things for a living
    “But we can’t have communion with you all-”
    Apparently deciding that it was easier to define primitive baptistry than closed
    communion, Miss Maudie said: “Foot-washers believe anything that’s pleasure is
    a sin.
  831. engineering school
    a technical school offering instruction in many industrial arts and applied sciences
    The other boys attended the industrial school and received the best secondary
    education to be had in the state; one of them eventually worked his way through
    engineering school at Auburn.
  832. stamping ground
    a frequently visited place
    Old Sarum, their stamping grounds, was populated by
    two families separate and apart in the beginning, but unfortunately bearing the
    same name.
  833. go through
    go across or through
    “You can’t,” said Jem. “Sometimes they stretch all the way across the road, but if
    you hafta go through one you say, ‘Angel-bright, life-in-death; get off the road,
    don’t suck my breath.’
  834. sit back
    settle into a comfortable sitting position
    I sat back down.
  835. distress signal
    an internationally recognized signal sent out by a ship or plane indicating that help is needed
    There was a kitchen separate from the rest of the house, tacked onto it by a
    wooden catwalk; in the back yard was a rusty bell on a pole, used to summon
    field hands or as a distress signal; a widow’s walk was on the roof, but no widows
    walked there—from it, Simon oversaw his overseer, watched the river-boats, and
    gazed into the lives of surrounding landholders.
  836. bird dog
    a gun dog trained to locate or retrieve birds
    Tim was a liver-colored bird dog, the pet
    of Maycomb.
  837. knuckles
    a small metal weapon; worn over the knuckles on the back of the hand
    While he cleaned and bandaged
    my knuckles, he entertained me with a tale about a funny nearsighted old
    gentleman who had a cat named Hodge, and who counted all the cracks in the
    sidewalk when he went to town.
  838. collar
    a band that fits around the neck and is usually folded over
    Men’s stiff collars wilted by
    nine in the morning.
  839. go down
    move downward and lower, but not necessarily all the way
    Often as not, Miss Maudie and I
    would sit silently on her porch, watching the sky go from yellow to pink as the
    sun went down, watching flights of martins sweep low over the neighborhood and
    disappear behind the schoolhouse rooftops.
  840. two-by-four
    a timber measuring (slightly under) 2 inches by 4 inches in cross section
    Instead of a column, a rough two-by-four supported one end of the
    roof.
  841. headboard
    a vertical board or panel forming the head of a bedstead
    I pushed the pillow to the headboard and sat up.
  842. unhook
    take off a hook
    Dill’s face appeared at the screen,
    disappeared, and five minutes later he unhooked the screen and crawled out.
  843. poker
    any of various card games in which players bet that they hold the highest-ranking hand
    “We were playin‘ strip poker up yonder by the fishpool,” he said.
  844. blackboard
    sheet of slate; for writing with chalk
    Miss Caroline printed her name on the blackboard and said, “This says I am Miss
    Caroline Fisher.
  845. thunderer
    a noisemaker that makes a sound like thunder
    I guess it was because
    Atticus wasn’t a thunderer.
  846. draw a bead on
    aim with a gun
    I drew a bead on him, remembered what Atticus had said, then dropped my fists
    and walked away, “Scout’s a cow—ward!” ringing in my ears.
  847. bullet-headed
    having a small round head
    She was bullet-headed with strange almond-shaped eyes, straight nose, and
    an Indian-bow mouth.
  848. shush
    silence (someone) by uttering `shush!'
    “Reckon they wouldn’t know what it was if she didn’t tell ‘em,” whispered Cecil,
    who was immediately shushed.
  849. shut up
    cause to be quiet or not talk
    “I do, I mean it,” he
    said, when I told him to shut up.
  850. morbid
    suggesting the horror of death and decay
    Once the town was terrorized by a series of morbid
    nocturnal events: people’s chickens and household pets were found mutilated;
    although the culprit was Crazy Addie, who eventually drowned himself in
    Barker’s Eddy, people still looked at the Radley Place, unwilling to discard their
    initial suspicions.
  851. offense
    a lack of politeness; a failure to show regard for others; wounding the feelings or others
    He said he was trying to get Miss Maudie’s goat, that he had been
    trying unsuccessfully for forty years, that he was the last person in the world Miss
    Maudie would think about marrying but the first person she thought about teasing,
    and the best defense to her was spirited offense, all of which we understood
    clearly.
  852. thank
    express gratitude or show appreciation to
    “Nome thank you ma’am,” he drawled softly.
  853. cuss
    utter obscenities or profanities
    The judge asked Mr. Conner why he included the last charge;
    Mr. Conner said they cussed so loud he was sure every lady in Maycomb heard
    them.
  854. real
    being or occurring in fact or actuality; having verified existence; not illusory
    Our Cal’s a real good
    cook.”
  855. overall
    including everything
    He did have on a clean shirt and neatly mended overalls.
  856. good night
    a conventional expression of farewell
    You don’t want ’em around
    you all the time, Dill—”
    Dill breathed his patient breath, a half-sigh.
    “—good night, Atticus’s gone all day and sometimes half the night and off in the
    legislature and I don’t know what—you don’t want ‘em around all the time, Dill,
    you couldn’t do anything if they were.”
  857. cross-examination
    (law) close questioning of a hostile witness in a court of law to discredit or throw a new light on the testimony already provided in direct examination
    Never, never, never, on
    cross-examination ask a witness a question you don’t already know the answer to,
    was a tenet I absorbed with my baby-food.
  858. sound out
    speak, pronounce, or utter in a certain way
    But there came a day when Atticus told us he’d wear us out if we made any noise
    in the yard and commissioned Calpurnia to serve in his absence if she heard a
    sound out of us.
  859. entitle
    give a title to
    “Well, most folks seem to think they’re right and you’re wrong…”
    “They’re certainly entitled to think that, and they’re entitled to full respect for
    their opinions,” said Atticus, “but before I can live with other folks I’ve got to live
    with myself.
  860. make fun
    subject to laughter or ridicule
    Lastly, we
    were to stay away from that house until we were invited there, we were not to
    play an asinine game he had seen us playing or make fun of anybody on this street
    or in this town-
    “We weren’t makin‘ fun of him, we weren’t laughin’ at him,” said Jem, “we were
    just-”
    “So that was what you were doing, wasn’t it?”
  861. pull at
    pluck or pull at with the fingers
    As he told us the old tale his blue eyes would lighten and
    darken; his laugh was sudden and happy; he habitually pulled at a cowlick in the
    center of his forehead.
  862. railing
    a barrier consisting of a horizontal bar and supports
    He swung his legs over the
    railing and was sliding down a pillar when he slipped.
  863. under it
    under that
    “Do better if you go over it instead of under it,” I said.
  864. plug away
    work doggedly or persistently
    I went to the back yard and found Jem plugging away at a tin can, which seemed
    stupid with all the bluejays around.
  865. sweat
    salty fluid secreted by sweat glands
    Ladies bathed before noon, after their three-o’clock naps,
    and by nightfall were like soft teacakes with frostings of sweat and sweet talcum.
  866. tiny
    very small
    A tiny, almost invisible movement,
    and the house was still.
  867. stuck
    caught or fixed
    He wore blue linen shorts that buttoned to his shirt, his hair
    was snow white and stuck to his head like duckfluff; he was a year my senior but
    I towered over him.
  868. leftover
    not used up
    She eats all the leftover fingers and ears from the hospital.”
  869. grudge
    a resentment strong enough to justify retaliation
    “Everybody who goes home to lunch hold up your hands,” said Miss Caroline,
    breaking into my new grudge against Calpurnia.
  870. hold off
    wait before acting
    “It’s
    all over town this morning,” he announced, “all about how we held off a hundred
    folks with our bare hands…” Aunt Alexandra stared him to silence.
  871. oak tree
    a deciduous tree of the genus Quercus; has acorns and lobed leaves
    Rain-rotted shingles
    drooped over the eaves of the veranda; oak trees kept the sun away.
  872. pinprick
    small puncture (as if made by a pin)
    She put
    away from her whatever it was that gave her a pinprick of apprehension, and
    suggested that I give the family a preview in the livingroom.
  873. cold snap
    a spell of cold weather
    When people’s azaleas froze in a cold snap, it was
    because he had breathed on them.
  874. pocket knife
    a knife with a blade that folds into the handle; suitable for carrying in the pocket
    Judge Taylor looked like most judges I had
    ever seen: amiable, white-haired, slightly ruddy-faced, he was a man who ran his
    court with an alarming informality—he sometimes propped his feet up, he often
    cleaned his fingernails with his pocket knife.
  875. smell
    the faculty that enables us to distinguish scents
    She looked and smelled like a peppermint drop.
  876. daytime
    the time after sunrise and before sunset while it is light outside
    I was fairly sure Boo Radley was inside that house, but I couldn’t prove it, and
    felt it best to keep my mouth shut or I would be accused of believing in Hot
    Steams, phenomena I was immune to in the daytime.
  877. silently
    without speaking
    Often as not, Miss Maudie and I
    would sit silently on her porch, watching the sky go from yellow to pink as the
    sun went down, watching flights of martins sweep low over the neighborhood and
    disappear behind the schoolhouse rooftops.
  878. after
    happening at a time subsequent to a reference time
    John Hale Finch was ten years younger than my father, and chose to
    study medicine at a time when cotton was not worth growing; but after getting
    Uncle Jack started, Atticus derived a reasonable income from the law.
  879. knee
    hinge joint in the human leg connecting the tibia and fibula with the femur and protected in front by the patella
    I could not put out my hands to stop, they were wedged between my
    chest and knees.
  880. drink
    take in liquids
    Little Chuck brought
    water in a paper cup, and she drank it gratefully.
  881. tired
    depleted of strength or energy
    Maycomb was an old town, but it was a tired old town when I first knew it.
  882. listening
    the act of hearing attentively
    I could not remember when the lines above Atticus’s moving finger
    separated into words, but I had stared at them all the evenings in my memory,
    listening to the news of the day, Bills to Be Enacted into Laws, the diaries of
    Lorenzo Dow—anything Atticus happened to be reading when I crawled into his
    lap every night.
  883. clock
    a timepiece that shows the time of day
    The air was so cold and clear we heard the courthouse clock
    clank, rattle and strain before it struck the hour.
  884. untie
    cause to become loose
    Francis had requested a pair of knee-pants, a red
    leather booksack, five shirts and an untied bow tie.
  885. bring
    take something or somebody with oneself somewhere
    “Everybody who brings his lunch put it on top of his desk.”
  886. swear out
    deliver a warrant or summons to someone
    We do know in part what Mr. Ewell did: he did what any God-fearing,
    persevering, respectable white man would do under the circumstances—he swore
    out
    a warrant, no doubt signing it with his left hand, and Tom Robinson now sits
    before you, having taken the oath with the only good hand he possesses—his right
    hand.
  887. charlotte
    a mold lined with cake or crumbs and filled with fruit or whipped cream or custard
    She carried a tray of charlotte.
  888. before
    at or in the front
    I maintain that the Ewells
    started it all, but Jem, who was four years my senior, said it started long before
    that.
  889. white man
    a man who is White
    “Atticus says cheatin‘ a colored man is ten times worse than cheatin’ a white
    man
    ,” I muttered.
  890. homemade
    made or produced in the home or by yourself
    This was enough to make Jem march to the corner, where he stopped and leaned
    against the light-pole, watching the gate hanging crazily on its homemade hinge.
  891. dog
    a member of the genus Canis (probably descended from the common wolf) that has been domesticated by man since prehistoric times; occurs in many breeds
    Somehow, it was hotter then: a black dog
    suffered on a summer’s day; bony mules hitched to Hoover carts flicked flies in
    the sweltering shade of the live oaks on the square.
  892. reason
    a rational motive for a belief or action
    The judge decided to send the boys to the state industrial school, where
    boys were sometimes sent for no other reason than to provide them with food and
    decent shelter: it was no prison and it was no disgrace.
  893. older
    used of the older of two persons of the same name especially used to distinguish a father from his son
    She
    was always ordering me out of the kitchen, asking me why I couldn’t behave as
    well as Jem when she knew he was older, and calling me home when I wasn’t
    ready to come.
  894. Tell
    a Swiss patriot who lived in the early 14th century and who was renowned for his skill as an archer; according to legend an Austrian governor compelled him to shoot an apple from his son's head with his crossbow (which he did successfully without mishap)
    Tell it to us,” he said.
  895. wallow
    roll around, "pigs were wallowing in the mud"
    I never
    deliberately learned to read, but somehow I had been wallowing illicitly in the
    daily papers.
  896. on the fence
    characterized by indecision
    We spat ourselves dry, and Jem opened the gate slowly, lifting it aside and resting
    it on the fence.
  897. big
    above average in size or number or quantity or magnitude or extent
    “I’m big enough to fit mine,” he said.
  898. back street
    a narrow street with walls on both sides
    Wooden sawhorses blocked the road at each end of the
    Radley lot, straw was put down on the sidewalk, traffic was diverted to the back
    street
    .
  899. dryly
    in a dry laconic manner
    “Let us leave it at this,” said Atticus dryly.
  900. goddamn
    used as expletives
    “He says you goddamn whore, I’ll kill ya.”
  901. move over
    move in order to make room for someone for something
    I said what did
    you do, Stephanie, move over in the bed and make room for him?
  902. back out
    move out of a space backwards
    He evidently remembered he was engaged to me, for he ran back
    out
    and kissed me swiftly in front of Jem. “Yawl write, hear?” he bawled after us.
  903. jiggle
    move to and fro
    When Mrs. Merriweather shook her head, her black curls jiggled.
  904. sleepy-eyed
    ready to fall asleep
    They were sullen-looking, sleepy-eyed men
    who seemed unused to late hours.
  905. come alive
    stop sleeping
    My memory came alive to see Mrs. Radley occasionally open the front door, walk
    to the edge of the porch, and pour water on her cannas.
  906. sit down
    take a seat
    Sitting down, he
    wasn’t much higher than the collards.
  907. open
    affording free passage or access
    My memory came alive to see Mrs. Radley occasionally open the front door, walk
    to the edge of the porch, and pour water on her cannas.
  908. poke
    hit hard with the hand, fist, or some heavy instrument
    Miss Caroline walked up and down the rows peering and poking into lunch
    containers, nodding if the contents pleased her, frowning a little at others.
  909. last
    coming after all others in time or space or degree or being the only one remaining
    His
    first two clients were the last two persons hanged in the Maycomb County jail.
  910. come down
    move downward and lower, but not necessarily all the way
    I had spent most of the day climbing up and down, running
    errands for him, providing him with literature, nourishment and water, and was
    carrying him blankets for the night when Atticus said if I paid no attention to him,
    Jem would come down.
  911. catch up with
    catch up with and possibly overtake
    When Walter caught up with us, Jem made pleasant conversation with him.
  912. much
    (quantifier used with mass nouns) great in quantity or degree or extent
    They persisted in
    pleading Not Guilty to first-degree murder, so there was nothing much Atticus
    could do for his clients except be present at their departure, an occasion that was
    probably the beginning of my father’s profound distaste for the practice of
    criminal law.
  913. below the belt
    disregarding the rules (from the notion of an illegal low blow in boxing)
    He was a real mean one… below the belt… you ain’t called on to teach folks
    like that… them ain’t Maycomb’s ways, Miss Caroline, not really… now don’t
    you fret, ma’am.
  914. uncross
    change from a crossed to an uncrossed position
    Mr. Tate uncrossed his legs and leaned forward.
  915. suppose
    expect, believe, or suppose
    1960
    TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD
    by Harper Lee
    Copyright (C) 1960 by Harper Lee
    Copyright (C) renewed 1988 by Harper Lee
    Published by arrangement with McIntosh and Otis, Inc.
    CONTENTS
    l DEDICATION
    l PART ONE
    m Chapter 1
    m Chapter 2
    m Chapter 3
    m Chapter 4
    m Chapter 5
    m Chapter 6
    m Chapter 7
    m Chapter 8
    m Chapter 9
    m Chapter 10
    m Chapter 11
    l PART TWO
    m Chapter 12
    m Chapter 13
    m Chapter 14
    m Chapter 15
    m Chapter 16
    m Chapter 17
    m Chapter 18
    m Chapter 19
    m Chapter 20
    m Chapter 21
    m Chapter 22
    m Chap...
  916. life
    the organic phenomenon that distinguishes living organisms from nonliving ones
    The place was self-sufficient:
    modest in comparison with the empires around it, the Landing nevertheless
    produced everything required to sustain life except ice, wheat flour, and articles
    of clothing, supplied by river-boats from Mobile.
  917. bang
    the swift release of a store of affective force
    The girl-doll wore
    bangs.
  918. downtown
    the central area or commercial center of a town or city
    “Go and eat downtown today.
  919. felt
    a fabric made of compressed matted animal fibers
    She had been with us ever since Jem
    was born, and I had felt her tyrannical presence as long as I could remember.
  920. tousle
    disarrange or rumple; dishevel
    Jem was standing beside Atticus, groggy and tousled.
  921. son
    a male human offspring
    The
    Haverfords had dispatched Maycomb’s leading blacksmith in a misunderstanding
    arising from the alleged wrongful detention of a mare, were imprudent enough to
    do it in the presence of three witnesses, and insisted that the-son-of-a-bitch-had-itcoming-
    to-him was a good enough defense for anybody.
  922. grinning
    a facial expression characterized by turning up the corners of the mouth; usually shows pleasure or amusement
    The moment she was out of sight
    Francis came out head up and grinning.
  923. ways
    structure consisting of a sloping way down to the water from the place where ships are built or repaired
    The shutters and doors of the Radley house were closed on Sundays, another
    thing alien to Maycomb’s ways: closed doors meant illness and cold weather
    only.
  924. jailhouse
    a correctional institution used to detain persons who are in the lawful custody of the government (either accused persons awaiting trial or convicted persons serving a sentence)
    He covered the courthouse and jailhouse news simply by looking out his
    upstairs window.
  925. spend
    pass time in a specific way
    Their sister Alexandra was the
    Finch who remained at the Landing: she married a taciturn man who spent most
    of his time lying in a hammock by the river wondering if his trot-lines were full.
  926. corset
    a woman's close-fitting foundation garment
    Of all days Sunday was the day for formal afternoon visiting: ladies wore
    corsets, men wore coats, children wore shoes.
  927. evening
    the latter part of the day (the period of decreasing daylight from late afternoon until nightfall)
    I could not remember when the lines above Atticus’s moving finger
    separated into words, but I had stared at them all the evenings in my memory,
    listening to the news of the day, Bills to Be Enacted into Laws, the diaries of
    Lorenzo Dow—anything Atticus happened to be reading when I crawled into his
    lap every night.
  928. rusty
    covered with or consisting of rust
    His neck was dark
    gray, the backs of his hands were rusty, and his fingernails were black deep into
    the quick.
  929. crap game
    playing craps
    A small patch of earth beneath its branches was packed hard from many
    fights and furtive crap games.
  930. barge in
    enter uninvited; informal
    How would we like it if Atticus barged in on us without knocking, when we were
    in our rooms at night?
  931. raised
    located or moved above the surround or above the normal position
    Walter looked as if he had been raised on fish food: his eyes, as blue as Dill
    Harris’s, were red-rimmed and watery.
  932. sickeningly
    in a disgusting manner or to a disgusting degree
    In obedience to my father, there followed what I later realized was a sickeningly
    comic aspect of an unfunny situation: the men talked in near-whispers.
  933. talking
    an exchange of ideas via conversation
    “Wasn’t talking about your father,” she said.
  934. pick up
    take and lift upward
    Miss Caroline picked up
    her ruler, gave me half a dozen quick little pats, then told me to stand in the
    corner.
  935. diction
    the manner in which something is expressed in words
    Jem and I were accustomed to our father’s last-will-and-testament diction, and we
    were at all times free to interrupt Atticus for a translation when it was beyond our
    understanding.
  936. slap
    a blow from a flat object (as an open hand)
    Jem threw open the gate and sped to the side of the house, slapped it with his
    palm and ran back past us, not waiting to see if his foray was successful.
  937. truck
    an automotive vehicle suitable for hauling
    The old fire truck, killed by the cold, was being pushed from town
    by a crowd of men.
  938. clock tower
    a tower with a large clock visible high up on an outside face
    From the other side, however, Greek revival columns clashed with a big
    nineteenth-century clock tower housing a rusty unreliable instrument, a view
    indicating a people determined to preserve every physical scrap of the past.
  939. reading lamp
    a lamp that provides light for reading
    Dill and Jem were quiet; when I turned off my reading lamp there
    was no strip of light under the door to Jem’s room.
  940. hug
    squeeze (someone) tightly in your arms, usually with fondness
    The more we told Dill about the Radleys, the more he wanted to know, the longer
    he would stand hugging the light-pole on the corner, the more he would wonder.
  941. suddenly
    happening unexpectedly
    Jem suddenly grinned at him.
  942. swivel
    turn on a pivot
    Atticus would flee to his office directly after dinner, where
    if we sometimes looked in on him, we would find him sitting back in his swivel
    chair reading.
  943. Eddy
    founder of Christian Science in 1866 (1821-1910)
    Once the town was terrorized by a series of morbid
    nocturnal events: people’s chickens and household pets were found mutilated;
    although the culprit was Crazy Addie, who eventually drowned himself in
    Barker’s Eddy, people still looked at the Radley Place, unwilling to discard their
    initial suspicions.
  944. tennis match
    a match between tennis players
    Through the door I could see Jem on the
    sofa with a football magazine in front of his face, his head turning as if its pages
    contained a live tennis match.
    “…you’ve got to do something about her,” Aunty was saying.
  945. run off
    run away; usually includes taking something or somebody along
    I’ll run off
    again—!”
  946. parceled out
    given out in portions
    Jem parceled out our roles: I was Mrs. Radley, and all I had to do was come out
    and sweep the porch.
  947. probably
    with considerable certainty; without much doubt
    They persisted in
    pleading Not Guilty to first-degree murder, so there was nothing much Atticus
    could do for his clients except be present at their departure, an occasion that was
    probably the beginning of my father’s profound distaste for the practice of
    criminal law.
  948. bewilder
    cause to be confused emotionally
    “Atticus, I don’t know, sir… I—”
    I turned to Jem for an answer, but Jem was even more bewildered than I. He said
    he didn’t know how it got there, we did exactly as Atticus had told us, we stood
    down by the Radley gate away from everybody, we didn’t move an inch—Jem
    stopped.
  949. tranquility
    an untroubled state; free from disturbances
    When in tranquility, her grammar was as good as anybody’s in Maycomb.
  950. done
    having finished or arrived at completion
    The town decided something had to
    be done; Mr. Conner said he knew who each and every one of them was, and he
    was bound and determined they wouldn’t get away with it, so the boys came
    before the probate judge on charges of disorderly conduct, disturbing the peace,
    assault and battery, and using abusive and profane language in the presence and
    hearing of a female.
  951. glance
    throw a glance at; take a brief look at
    Jem glanced at me, his eyes twinkling: “Mr. Avery’s
    sort of shaped like a snowman, ain’t he?”
  952. all the way
    completely
    Indeed, Jem grew boastful: “I went all the way up to the house once,” he said
    to Walter.
  953. kitchen table
    a table in the kitchen
    The kitchen table was loaded with enough food to bury the
    family: hunks of salt pork, tomatoes, beans, even scuppernongs.
  954. hone
    sharpen with a hone
    Mr. Avery averaged a stick of stovewood per week; he honed it down to a
    toothpick and chewed it.
  955. truant
    one who is absent from school without permission
    The truant lady gets ’em here
    ‘cause she threatens ’em with the sheriff, but she’s give up tryin‘ to hold ’em.
  956. browbeat
    discourage or frighten with threats or a domineering manner; intimidate
    “I don’t know how he done it, but he done it—I said it all
    happened so fast I—”
    “Now let’s consider this calmly—” began Atticus, but Mr. Gilmer interrupted
    with an objection: he was not irrelevant or immaterial, but Atticus was
    browbeating the witness.
  957. moved
    being excited or provoked to the expression of an emotion
    People moved slowly then.
  958. shadow
    shade within clear boundaries
    When Miss Caroline threatened it with a similar fate the first grade exploded
    again, becoming cold sober only when the shadow of Miss Blount fell over them.
  959. fight
    be engaged in a fight; carry on a fight
    We were far too old to settle an argument with a fist-fight, so we consulted
    Atticus.
  960. gamble
    take a risk in the hope of a favorable outcome
    They did little, but
    enough to be discussed by the town and publicly warned from three pulpits: they
    hung around the barbershop; they rode the bus to Abbottsville on Sundays and
    went to the picture show; they attended dances at the county’s riverside gambling
    hell, the Dew-Drop Inn & Fishing Camp; they experimented with stumphole
    whiskey.
  961. stay off
    refrain from entering or walking onto
    It stayed off, and I
    breathed again.
  962. straighten up
    straighten oneself
    Miss Maudie straightened up and looked toward me.
  963. persevere
    be persistent, refuse to stop
    Apparently she had revived enough to
    persevere in her profession.
  964. back door
    an entrance at the rear of a building
    I unlatched the back door and held it while he crept down the steps.
  965. file out
    march out, in a file
    Saved by the bell, Miss Caroline
    watched the class file out for lunch.
  966. squeeze
    press firmly
    She picked up the limp sprout and squeezed her
    thumb up its tiny stalk.
  967. almond-shaped
    shaped like an almond
    She was bullet-headed with strange almond-shaped eyes, straight nose, and
    an Indian-bow mouth.
  968. coverall
    a loose-fitting protective garment that is worn over other clothing
    She was a
    widow, a chameleon lady who worked in her flower beds in an old straw hat and
    men’s coveralls, but after her five o’clock bath she would appear on the porch and
    reign over the street in magisterial beauty.
  969. guff
    unacceptable behavior (especially ludicrously false statements)
    Jem had probably stood as much guff
    about Atticus lawing for niggers as had I, and I took it for granted that he kept his
    temper—he had a naturally tranquil disposition and a slow fuse.
  970. hot
    used of physical heat; having a high or higher than desirable temperature or giving off heat or feeling or causing a sensation of heat or burning
    Plucking an occasional camellia,
    getting a squirt of hot milk from Miss Maudie Atkinson’s cow on a summer day,
    helping ourselves to someone’s scuppernongs was part of our ethical culture, but
    money was different.
  971. while
    a period of indeterminate length (usually short) marked by some action or condition
    “That’s okay, ma’am, you’ll get to know all the county folks after a while.
  972. besides
    in addition
    Besides, Boo could
    not live forever on the bounty of the county.
  973. hold up
    be the physical support of; carry the weight of
    “Everybody who goes home to lunch hold up your hands,” said Miss Caroline,
    breaking into my new grudge against Calpurnia.
  974. sigh
    heave or utter a sigh; breathe deeply and heavily
    He remembered her clearly, and
    sometimes in the middle of a game he would sigh at length, then go off and play
    by himself behind the car-house.
  975. stick in
    insert casually
    Some tinfoil was sticking in a knot-hole just above my eye level, winking at me in
    the afternoon sun.
  976. leastways
    if nothing else (`leastwise' is informal and `leastways' is colloquial)
    “You know she’s not used to girls,” said Jem, “leastways, not girls like you.
  977. faced
    having a face or facing especially of a specified kind or number; often used in combination
    Walking south, one
    faced its porch; the sidewalk turned and ran beside the lot.
  978. sloshed
    very drunk
    Jem sloshed water over the mud man and added more
    dirt.
  979. tribune
    (ancient Rome) an official elected by the plebeians to protect their interests
    According to Miss
    Stephanie, Boo was sitting in the livingroom cutting some items from The
    Maycomb Tribune to paste in his scrapbook.
  980. dresser
    furniture with drawers for keeping clothes
    She sat at a dresser combing her hair.
  981. trousered
    dressed in trousers
    This was a group of white-shirted, khaki-trousered, suspendered old men
    who had spent their lives doing nothing and passed their twilight days doing same
    on pine benches under the live oaks on the square.
  982. hunch
    an impression that something might be the case
    Jem gulped like a goldfish, hunched his shoulders and twitched his torso.
  983. another
    any of various alternatives; some other
    The shutters and doors of the Radley house were closed on Sundays, another
    thing alien to Maycomb’s ways: closed doors meant illness and cold weather
    only.
  984. droopy
    hanging down (as from exhaustion or weakness)
    The old house was the same, droopy and sick, but as we stared down the street we
    thought we saw an inside shutter move.
  985. puzzle
    be uncertain about; think about without fully understanding or being able to decide
    Miss Caroline looked puzzled.
  986. speak
    use language
    We stared at him until he spoke:
    “Hey.”
    “Hey yourself,” said Jem pleasantly.
  987. most
    (superlative of `many' used with count nouns and often preceded by `the') quantifier meaning the greatest in number
    Their sister Alexandra was the
    Finch who remained at the Landing: she married a taciturn man who spent most
    of his time lying in a hammock by the river wondering if his trot-lines were full.
  988. perpetrate
    perform an act, usually with a negative connotation
    You’ve perpetrated a near libel here in the front yard.
  989. potato salad
    any of various salads having chopped potatoes as the base
    Calpurnia poured milk, dished out potato salad and ham, muttering, “‘shamed of
    yourselves,” in varying degrees of intensity.
  990. tapeworm
    ribbonlike flatworms that are parasitic in the intestines of humans and other vertebrates
    His appetite
    was appalling, and he told me so many times to stop pestering him I consulted
    Atticus: “Reckon he’s got a tapeworm?”
  991. side street
    a street intersecting a main street and terminating there
    We left the corner, crossed the side street that ran in front of the Radley house,
    and stopped at the gate.
  992. Baptists
    any of various evangelical Protestant churches that believe in the baptism of voluntary believers
    The Methodists were trying to pay off their church mortgage, and had
    challenged the Baptists to a game of touch football.
  993. swing door
    a door that swings on a double hinge; opens in either direction
    Calpurnia sent me through the swinging door to the diningroom with a stinging
    smack.
  994. red-rimmed
    rimmed with red
    Walter looked as if he had been raised on fish food: his eyes, as blue as Dill
    Harris’s, were red-rimmed and watery.
  995. somehow
    in some unspecified way or manner; or by some unspecified means
    Somehow, it was hotter then: a black dog
    suffered on a summer’s day; bony mules hitched to Hoover carts flicked flies in
    the sweltering shade of the live oaks on the square.
  996. Old
    of a very early stage in development
    According to neighborhood legend, when the younger Radley boy was in his
    teens he became acquainted with some of the Cunninghams from Old Sarum, an
    enormous and confusing tribe domiciled in the northern part of the county, and
    they formed the nearest thing to a gang ever seen in Maycomb.
  997. middle
    an area that is approximately central within some larger region
    He was middle-aged then, she was fifteen years his junior.
  998. stomach
    an enlarged and muscular saclike organ of the alimentary canal; the principal organ of digestion
    He had a pink face
    and a big stomach below his belt.
  999. wedged
    wedged or packed in together
    I could not put out my hands to stop, they were wedged between my
    chest and knees.
  1000. paper bag
    a bag made of paper or plastic for holding customer's purchases
    Mr. Radley walked to town at eleven-thirty every morning and
    came back promptly at twelve, sometimes carrying a brown paper bag that the
    neighborhood assumed contained the family groceries.
  1001. scot free
    free from harm or penalty
    Funny thing, Atticus Finch might’ve got him off scot free, but wait—?
  1002. Makin
    battles in World War II in the Pacific (November 1943); United States Marines took the islands from the Japanese after bitter fighting
    Makin‘ fun of him?”
  1003. step on it
    move fast
    Don’t step on it!”
  1004. ruination
    destruction achieved by causing something to be wrecked or ruined
    Said Atticus’d be the ruination of the family an’
    he let Jem an me run wild…”
    From the look on Uncle Jack’s face, I thought I was in for it again.
  1005. stairwell
    a vertical well around which there is a stairway
    I got separated from Jem and Dill, but made my way toward
    the wall by the stairwell, knowing Jem would come for me eventually.
  1006. all over
    over the entire area
    “He’s poured it all over-”
    It was then that Calpurnia requested my presence in the kitchen.
  1007. shot
    the act of firing a projectile
    “What happened?” asked Jem.
    “Mr. Radley shot at a Negro in his collard patch.”
  1008. syrupy
    overly sweet
    Why she frowned when a child
    recited from The Grit Paper I never knew, but in some way it was associated with
    liking fiddling, eating syrupy biscuits for lunch, being a holy-roller, singing
    Sweetly Sings the Donkey and pronouncing it dunkey, all of which the state paid
    teachers to discourage.
  1009. except
    prevent from being included or considered or accepted
    The place was self-sufficient:
    modest in comparison with the empires around it, the Landing nevertheless
    produced everything required to sustain life except ice, wheat flour, and articles
    of clothing, supplied by river-boats from Mobile.
  1010. punch
    a tool for making holes or indentations
    Dill punched my shoulder, and we lowered him to the ground.
  1011. Pensacola
    a town in extreme northwest Florida
    Mr. Radley’s elder son lived
    in Pensacola; he came home at Christmas, and he was one of the few persons we
    ever saw enter or leave the place.
  1012. broomstick
    the handle of a broom
    The varmints had a lean time of it, for the Ewells gave the dump a thorough
    gleaning every day, and the fruits of their industry (those that were not eaten)
    made the plot of ground around the cabin look like the playhouse of an insane
    child: what passed for a fence was bits of tree-limbs, broomsticks and tool shafts,
    all tipped with rusty hammer-heads, snaggle-toothed rake heads, shovels, axes
    and grubbing hoes, held on with pieces of barbed wire.
  1013. enclose
    surround completely
    The fence enclosed a large garden and a narrow wooden outhouse.
  1014. rinse
    wash off soap or remaining dirt
    Calpurnia rinsed her hands and followed Jem into the yard.
  1015. congregation
    the act of congregating
    It was dim inside, with a damp
    coolness slowly dispelled by the gathering congregation.
  1016. polite
    showing regard for others in manners, speech, behavior, etc.
    I never knew how old Mr.
    Radley made his living— Jem said he “bought cotton,” a polite term for doing
    nothing—but Mr. Radley and his wife had lived there with their two sons as long
    as anybody could remember.
  1017. revive
    cause to regain consciousness
    Apparently she had revived enough to
    persevere in her profession.
  1018. slam
    close violently
    I climbed into the back seat of the car without saying
    good-bye to anyone, and at home I ran to my room and slammed the door.
  1019. in the first place
    before now
    “Well, in the first place you never stopped to gimme a
    chance to tell you my side of it—you just lit right into me.
  1020. convict
    find or declare guilty
    “You were both convicted?”
  1021. mental hygiene
    the branch of psychiatry concerned with psychological methods
    I wasn’t sure what Jem resented most, but I took umbrage at Mrs. Dubose’s
    assessment of the family’s mental hygiene.
  1022. concentrate
    make denser, stronger, or purer
    Miss Caroline, the
    sixth grade cannot concentrate on the pyramids for all this racket!”
  1023. bet
    stake on the outcome of an issue
    Bet it’s a foot longer.”
  1024. unschooled
    lacking in schooling
    Mr. Tate’s was unschooled and blunt, but
    it was equal to my father’s.
  1025. change
    become different in some particular way, without permanently losing one's or its former characteristics or essence
    “Mr. Ewell shouldn’t do that-”
    “Of course he shouldn’t, but he’ll never change his ways.
  1026. croon
    sing softly
    Francis looked at me carefully, concluded that I had been sufficiently subdued,
    and crooned softly, “Nigger-lover…”
    This time, I split my knuckle to the bone on his front teeth.
  1027. untied
    not tied
    Francis had requested a pair of knee-pants, a red
    leather booksack, five shirts and an untied bow tie.
  1028. bench
    a long seat for more than one person
    Along its walls unlighted
    kerosene lamps hung on brass brackets; pine benches served as pews.
  1029. shoelace
    a lace used for fastening shoes
    Now that I was compelled to think about
    it, reading was something that just came to me, as learning to fasten the seat of
    my union suit without looking around, or achieving two bows from a snarl of
    shoelaces.
  1030. playing
    the action of taking part in a game or sport or other recreation
    I was tired of playing Tom Rover, who suddenly lost
    his memory in the middle of a picture show and was out of the script until the
    end, when he was found in Alaska.
  1031. Methodists
    a Protestant denomination founded on the principles of John Wesley and Charles Wesley
    In England, Simon was irritated by the
    persecution of those who called themselves Methodists at the hands of their more
    liberal brethren, and as Simon called himself a Methodist, he worked his way
    across the Atlantic to Philadelphia, thence to Jamaica, thence to Mobile, and up
    the Saint Stephens.
  1032. hot chocolate
    a beverage made from cocoa powder and milk and sugar; usually drunk hot
    “Anybody want some hot chocolate?” he asked.
  1033. geranium
    any of numerous plants of the family Geraniaceae
    Against the fence, in a
    line, were six chipped-enamel slop jars holding brilliant red geraniums, cared for
    as tenderly as if they belonged to Miss Maudie Atkinson, had Miss Maudie
    deigned to permit a geranium on her premises.
  1034. scuffle
    fight or struggle in a confused way at close quarters
    From somewhere near by came scuffling, kicking sounds, sounds of shoes and
    flesh scraping dirt and roots.
  1035. tight
    closely constrained or constricted or constricting
    “Why do you think Miss Rachel locks up so tight at
    night?
  1036. tacit consent
    (law) tacit approval of someone's wrongdoing
    Jem went in grinning, and Calpurnia nodded tacit consent to having Dill in to
    supper.
  1037. ooze out
    release (a liquid) in drops or small quantities
    Microscopic grains oozed out.
  1038. window box
    a long narrow box for growing plants on a windowsill
    Uncle Jack Finch confined his passion for digging
    to his window boxes in Nashville and stayed rich.
  1039. mimosa
    a mixed drink containing champagne and orange juice
    “Do you smell my mimosa?
  1040. always
    at all times; all the time and on every occasion
    She
    was always ordering me out of the kitchen, asking me why I couldn’t behave as
    well as Jem when she knew he was older, and calling me home when I wasn’t
    ready to come.
  1041. go on
    move forward, also in the metaphorical sense
    “Well go on,” said Dill, “Scout and me’s right behind you.”
  1042. reach
    move forward or upward in order to touch; also in a metaphorical sense
    By the time we reached our front steps Walter had forgotten he was a
    Cunningham.
  1043. entangle
    twist together or entwine into a confusing mass
    After consulting a tree to ascertain from its lichen which way
    was south, and taking no lip from the subordinates who ventured to correct him,
    Colonel Maycomb set out on a purposeful journey to rout the enemy and
    entangled his troops so far northwest in the forest primeval that they were
    eventually rescued by settlers moving inland.
  1044. live down
    live so as to annul some previous behavior
    Local opinion held Mr. Underwood to be an intense, profane little man, whose
    father in a fey fit of humor christened Braxton Bragg, a name Mr. Underwood had
    done his best to live down.
  1045. come in
    to come or go into
    It was the kind of box wedding
    rings came in, purple velvet with a minute catch.
  1046. go out
    move out of or depart from
    People said he went out at night when the moon was down,
    and peeped in windows.
  1047. car
    a motor vehicle with four wheels; usually propelled by an internal combustion engine
    He remembered her clearly, and
    sometimes in the middle of a game he would sigh at length, then go off and play
    by himself behind the car-house.
  1048. ringworm
    infections of the skin or nails caused by fungi and appearing as itching circular patches
    I went so far as to pay a nickel for the
    privilege of rubbing my head against the head of Miss Rachel’s cook’s son, who
    was afflicted with a tremendous ringworm.
  1049. flare out
    become flared and widen, usually at one end
    She was not fat, but solid, and she chose
    protective garments that drew up her bosom to giddy heights, pinched in her
    waist, flared out her rear, and managed to suggest that Aunt Alexandra’s was once
    an hour-glass figure.
  1050. facts of life
    the sexual activity of conceiving and bearing offspring
    “I’m trying to tell you the facts of
    life
    .”
  1051. arthritic
    of or pertaining to arthritis
    “And you—” she pointed an
    arthritic finger at me—“what are you doing in those overalls?
  1052. held
    occupied or in the control of; often used in combination
    If he held his mouth right, Mr.
    Cunningham could get a WPA job, but his land would go to ruin if he left it, and
    he was willing to go hungry to keep his land and vote as he pleased.
  1053. rail
    a horizontal bar (usually of wood or metal)
    He swung his legs over the
    railing and was sliding down a pillar when he slipped.
  1054. nearly
    (of actions or states) slightly short of or not quite accomplished; all but
    Charles Lamb
    PART ONE
    Contents - Prev / Next
    Chapter 1
    When he was nearly thirteen, my brother Jem got his arm badly broken at the
    elbow.
  1055. Harris
    United States author who wrote the stories about Uncle Remus (1848-1908)
    “I’m Charles Baker Harris,” he said.
  1056. hole
    an opening into or through something
    Some tinfoil was sticking in a knot-hole just above my eye level, winking at me in
    the afternoon sun.
  1057. lose
    fail to keep or to maintain; cease to have, either physically or in an abstract sense
    A baseball hit into the Radley yard was a
    lost ball and no questions asked.
  1058. giggle
    laugh nervously
    I giggled at the thought of Jem in an apron.
  1059. unladylike
    lacking the behavior or manner or style considered proper for a lady
    “You’ll have a very
    unladylike scar on your wedding-ring finger.”
  1060. snow
    precipitation falling from clouds in the form of ice crystals
    He wore blue linen shorts that buttoned to his shirt, his hair
    was snow white and stuck to his head like duckfluff; he was a year my senior but
    I towered over him.
  1061. hate
    the emotion of intense dislike; a feeling of dislike so strong that it demands action
    I returned to school and hated Calpurnia steadily until a sudden shriek shattered
    my resentments.
  1062. newspaper
    a daily or weekly publication on folded sheets; contains news and articles and advertisements
    When it was time to play Boo’s big scene, Jem would sneak into the house, steal
    the scissors from the sewing-machine drawer when Calpurnia’s back was turned,
    then sit in the swing and cut up newspapers.
  1063. car door
    the door of a car
    His car door
    slammed and he drove away.
  1064. quiet
    characterized by an absence or near absence of agitation or activity
    “Nothing,” said Jem.
    Jem’s evasion told me our game was a secret, so I kept quiet.
  1065. days
    the time during which someone's life continues
    The Radley Place was inhabited by an
    unknown entity the mere description of whom was enough to make us behave for
    days on end; Mrs. Dubose was plain hell.
  1066. interested
    having or showing interest; especially curiosity or fascination or concern
    She had never told
    on us, had never played cat-and-mouse with us, she was not at all interested in our
    private lives.
  1067. legs
    staying power
    Atticus sat down in the swing and crossed his legs.
  1068. flintlock
    an obsolete gunlock that has flint embedded in the hammer; the flint makes a spark that ignites the charge
    Said Cousin Joshua said he wasn’t anything but a sewerinspector
    and tried to shoot him with an old flintlock pistol, only it just blew up in
    his hand.
  1069. wrong
    not correct; not in conformity with fact or truth
    Nobody in Maycomb had nerve enough to tell Mr. Radley that his boy
    was in with the wrong crowd.
  1070. point
    a distinguishing or individuating characteristic
    “A
    hain’t lives there,” he said cordially, pointing to the Radley house.
  1071. flying buttress
    a buttress that stands apart from the main structure and connected to it by an arch
    Starkly out of place in a town of square-faced
    stores and steep-roofed houses, the Maycomb jail was a miniature Gothic joke
    one cell wide and two cells high, complete with tiny battlements and flying
    buttresses
    .
  1072. tidiness
    the trait of being neat and orderly
    She owned a bright green square Buick and a black chauffeur, both kept in
    an unhealthy state of tidiness, but today they were nowhere to be seen.
  1073. long time
    a prolonged period of time
    Before Jem went to his room, he looked for a long time at the Radley Place.
  1074. riverside
    the bank of a river
    They did little, but
    enough to be discussed by the town and publicly warned from three pulpits: they
    hung around the barbershop; they rode the bus to Abbottsville on Sundays and
    went to the picture show; they attended dances at the county’s riverside gambling
    hell, the Dew-Drop Inn & Fishing Camp; they experimented with stumphole
    whiskey.
  1075. near miss
    an accidental collision that is narrowly avoided
    Jem, who hadn’t been near Miss Maudie’s scuppernong arbor since last summer,
    and who knew Miss Maudie wouldn’t tell Atticus if he had, issued a general
    denial.
  1076. tangle with
    get involved in or with
    Rather than risk a tangle with Calpurnia, I did as Jem told me.
  1077. on it
    on that
    She gave the money to Dill, who went to the picture show
    twenty times on it.
  1078. trudge
    walk heavily and firmly, as when weary, or through mud
    He trudged
    along, dragging the pole behind him on the sidewalk.
  1079. extra time
    playing time beyond regulation, to break a tie
    Jem arbitrated, awarded me first push with an extra time for Dill, and I folded
    myself inside the tire.
  1080. long sleeve
    a sleeve extending from shoulder to wrist
    They wore cotton sunbonnets and dresses
    with long sleeves.
  1081. forehead
    the part of the face above the eyes
    As he told us the old tale his blue eyes would lighten and
    darken; his laugh was sudden and happy; he habitually pulled at a cowlick in the
    center of his forehead.
  1082. leg
    a human limb; commonly used to refer to a whole limb but technically only the part of the limb between the knee and ankle
    As Mr.
    Radley passed by, Boo drove the scissors into his parent’s leg, pulled them out,
    wiped them on his pants, and resumed his activities.
  1083. purposeful
    serving as or indicating the existence of a purpose or goal
    All the spectators were as relaxed as Judge Taylor, except Jem. His mouth was
    twisted into a purposeful half-grin, and his eyes happy about, and he said
    something about corroborating evidence, which made me sure he was showing off.
  1084. might
    physical strength
    Miss Stephanie said old Mr. Radley said no Radley was going to any asylum,
    when it was suggested that a season in Tuscaloosa might be helpful to Boo. Boo
    wasn’t crazy, he was high-strung at times.
  1085. every night
    at the end of each day
    I could not remember when the lines above Atticus’s moving finger
    separated into words, but I had stared at them all the evenings in my memory,
    listening to the news of the day, Bills to Be Enacted into Laws, the diaries of
    Lorenzo Dow—anything Atticus happened to be reading when I crawled into his
    lap every night.
  1086. undulate
    move in a wavy pattern or with a rising and falling motion
    From time to time she would open her mouth wide, and I could see her
    tongue undulate faintly.
  1087. hooky
    failure to attend (especially school)
    “Playing hooky, I
    suppose.
  1088. scissors
    an edge tool having two crossed pivoting blades
    As Mr.
    Radley passed by, Boo drove the scissors into his parent’s leg, pulled them out,
    wiped them on his pants, and resumed his activities.
  1089. positively
    so as to be positive; in a positive manner
    One evening we were privileged
    to witness a performance by him which seemed to have been his positively last,
    for he never did it again so long as we watched.
  1090. bump
    an impact (as from a collision)
    I could only hope that Jem would outrun the tire and me, or that I
    would be stopped by a bump in the sidewalk.
  1091. return
    go or come back to place, condition, or activity where one has been before
    He returned to Saint Stephens only once, to find
    a wife, and with her established a line that ran high to daughters.
  1092. show
    make visible or noticeable
    She gave the money to Dill, who went to the picture show
    twenty times on it.
  1093. whip through
    go through very fast
    Greasy-faced
    children popped-the-whip through the crowd, and babies lunched at their mothers’
    breasts.
  1094. thigh
    the part of the leg between the hip and the knee
    His left arm was
    somewhat shorter than his right; when he stood or walked, the back of his hand
    was at right angles to his body, his thumb parallel to his thigh.
  1095. pink
    of a light shade of red
    She had bright auburn hair, pink
    cheeks, and wore crimson fingernail polish.
  1096. no matter
    in spite of everything; without regard to drawbacks
    He always spoke nicely to me, no matter what folks said he did.
  1097. waiting
    the act of waiting (remaining inactive in one place while expecting something)
    Jem threw open the gate and sped to the side of the house, slapped it with his
    palm and ran back past us, not waiting to see if his foray was successful.
  1098. hard
    resisting weight or pressure
    She was all angles and bones; she was
    nearsighted; she squinted; her hand was wide as a bed slat and twice as hard.
  1099. desk
    a piece of furniture with a writing surface and usually drawers or other compartments
    “Everybody who brings his lunch put it on top of his desk.”
  1100. squinting
    having eyes half closed in order to see better
    We had gone about five hundred yards beyond
    the Radley Place when I noticed Jem squinting at something down the street.
  1101. cheesecloth
    a coarse loosely woven cotton gauze; originally used to wrap cheeses
    Its
    windows were merely open spaces in the walls, which in the summertime were
    covered with greasy strips of cheesecloth to keep out the varmints that feasted on
    Maycomb’s refuse.
  1102. toneless
    lacking in tone or expression
    Jem was talking in an unhurried, flat
    toneless voice.
  1103. different
    unlike in nature or quality or form or degree
    I don’t want you hollerin‘ something different the minute I
    get back.”
  1104. perforate
    make a hole into or between, as for ease of separation
    “I wondered why he had those marks on him, His
    sleeves were perforated with little holes.
  1105. swish
    move with or cause to move with a whistling or hissing sound
    He flung open the gate, danced
    Dill and me through, and shooed us between two rows of swishing collards.
  1106. speck
    a very small spot
    Tim
    Johnson was not much more than a speck in the distance, but he was closer to us.
  1107. crate
    a rugged box (usually made of wood); used for shipping
    With Christmas came a
    crate of smilax and holly.
  1108. run around
    play boisterously
    “If Uncle Atticus lets you run around with stray dogs, that’s his own business,
    like Grandma says, so it ain’t your fault.
  1109. beauty parlor
    a shop where hairdressers and beauticians work
    “Yes sir, Mrs. Perkins, that J. Grimes Everett is a martyred saint, he… needed to
    get married so they ran… to the beauty parlor every Saturday afternoon… soon as
    the sun goes down.
  1110. be after
    have the will and intention to carry out some action
    That
    Stephanie’s been after my recipe for thirty years, and if she thinks I’ll give it to
    her just because I’m staying with her she’s got another think coming.”
  1111. licked
    having been got the better of
    I licked it and waited
    for a while.
  1112. receive
    get something; come into possession of
    The other boys attended the industrial school and received the best secondary
    education to be had in the state; one of them eventually worked his way through
    engineering school at Auburn.
  1113. peeved
    aroused to impatience or anger
    Calpurnia looked peeved, but Atticus
    looked exhausted.
  1114. unbleached
    not artificially colored or bleached
    An oppressive odor met us when we crossed the threshold, an odor I had met
    many times in rain-rotted gray houses where there are coal-oil lamps, water
    dippers, and unbleached domestic sheets.
  1115. slimness
    the property of an attractively thin person
    His
    eyebrows were becoming heavier, and I noticed a new slimness about his body.
  1116. flick
    throw or toss with a quick motion
    Somehow, it was hotter then: a black dog
    suffered on a summer’s day; bony mules hitched to Hoover carts flicked flies in
    the sweltering shade of the live oaks on the square.
  1117. Johnson
    36th President of the United States; was elected vice president and succeeded Kennedy when Kennedy was assassinated (1908-1973)
    “That’s old Tim Johnson, ain’t it?”
  1118. barnyard
    a yard adjoining a barn
    People caught hookworms going
    barefooted in barnyards and hog wallows.
  1119. stinginess
    a lack of generosity; a general unwillingness to part with money
    All we had
    was Simon Finch, a fur-trapping apothecary from Cornwall whose piety was
    exceeded only by his stinginess.
  1120. secede
    withdraw from an organization or communion
    (When Alabama seceded from the Union
    on January 11, 1861, Winston County seceded from Alabama, and every child in
    Maycomb County knew it.)
  1121. malted
    of grain that has been converted into malt
    By the time Mrs. Cat called the drugstore for
    an order of chocolate malted mice the class was wriggling like a bucketful of
    catawba worms.
  1122. bust
    a sculpture of the head and shoulders of a person
    “I said come here, nigger, and bust up this chiffarobe for me, I gotta nickel for
    you.
  1123. touch
    make physical contact with, come in contact with
    Now lemme think… reckon we can rock him…”
    Jem stood in thought so long that Dill made a mild concession: “I won’t say you
    ran out on a dare an‘ I’ll swap you The Gray Ghost if you just go up and touch the
    house.”
  1124. ring
    a toroidal shape
    It was the kind of box wedding
    rings came in, purple velvet with a minute catch.
  1125. fit
    meeting adequate standards for a purpose
    “I’m big enough to fit mine,” he said.
  1126. far
    at or to or from a great distance in space
    We were far too old to settle an argument with a fist-fight, so we consulted
    Atticus.
  1127. mill around
    move about in a confused manner
    The high school building had a wide downstairs hallway; people milled
    around
    booths that had been installed along each side.
  1128. chewer
    someone who chews (especially someone who chews tobacco)
    Fans crackled, feet shuffled,
    tobacco-chewers were in agony.
  1129. chin up
    raise oneself while hanging from one's hands until one's chin is level with the support bar
    Boo had drifted to a corner of the room, where he stood with his chin up, peering
    from a distance at Jem. I took him by the hand, a hand surprisingly warm for its
    whiteness.
  1130. casually
    in an unconcerned manner
    Dill stretched, yawned, and said altogether too casually.
  1131. choke
    struggle for breath; have insufficient oxygen intake
    “Then I’m goin‘ with you
    —” I choked.
  1132. head off
    prevent the occurrence of; prevent from happening
    It was clear enough to the rest of
    us: Walter Cunningham was sitting there lying his head off.
  1133. cake
    baked goods made from or based on a mixture of flour, sugar, eggs, and fat
    She made the best cakes in the neighborhood.
  1134. bump into
    collide violently with an obstacle
    We had slowed to a cautious gait, and were feeling our way forward so as not to
    bump into the tree.
  1135. scissor
    cut with or as if with scissors
    As Mr.
    Radley passed by, Boo drove the scissors into his parent’s leg, pulled them out,
    wiped them on his pants, and resumed his activities.
  1136. go in
    to come or go into
    “Let’s go in the front yard.”
  1137. wrapping
    the covering (usually paper or cellophane) in which something is wrapped
    That keeps ‘em from wrapping around you-”
    “Don’t you believe a word he says, Dill,” I said.
  1138. expansively
    in an impressively expansive manner
    “Been comin‘ to the first day o’ the first
    grade fer three year now,” he said expansively.
  1139. lemonade
    sweetened beverage of diluted lemon juice
    Calpurnia appeared in the front door and yelled, “Lemonade time!
  1140. sprint
    run very fast, usually for a short distance
    Jem and Walter returned to school ahead of me: staying behind to advise Atticus
    of Calpurnia’s iniquities was worth a solitary sprint past the Radley Place.
  1141. wire
    ligament made of metal and used to fasten things or make cages or fences etc
    We went
    to the wire fence to see if there was a puppy— Miss Rachel’s rat terrier was
    expecting— instead we found someone sitting looking at us.
  1142. explain
    make plain and comprehensible
    When we slowed to a walk at the edge of the schoolyard, Jem was
    careful to explain that during school hours I was not to bother him, I was not to
    approach him with requests to enact a chapter of Tarzan and the Ant Men, to
    embarrass him with references to his private life, or tag along behind him at
    recess and noon.
  1143. gently
    in a gentle manner
    Little Chuck’s face contracted and he said
    gently, “You mean him, ma’am?
  1144. carry
    move while supporting, either in a vehicle or in one's hands or on one's body
    Mr. Radley walked to town at eleven-thirty every morning and
    came back promptly at twelve, sometimes carrying a brown paper bag that the
    neighborhood assumed contained the family groceries.
  1145. battle of Hastings
    the decisive battle in which William the Conqueror (duke of Normandy) defeated the Saxons under Harold II (1066) and thus left England open for the Norman Conquest
    Being Southerners, it was a source of shame to some members of the family that
    we had no recorded ancestors on either side of the Battle of Hastings.
  1146. stand up
    rise to one's feet
    The boy stood up.
  1147. kept
    (especially of promises or contracts) not violated or disregarded
    Rain-rotted shingles
    drooped over the eaves of the veranda; oak trees kept the sun away.
  1148. shut-in
    someone who is incapacitated by a chronic illness or injury
    When we reached the auditorium, the whole town was there except Atticus and
    the ladies worn out from decorating, and the usual outcasts and shut-ins.
  1149. break
    destroy the integrity of; usually by force; cause to separate into pieces or fragments
    Charles Lamb
    PART ONE
    Contents - Prev / Next
    Chapter 1
    When he was nearly thirteen, my brother Jem got his arm badly broken at the
    elbow.
  1150. fat
    a soft greasy substance occurring in organic tissue and consisting of a mixture of lipids (mostly triglycerides)
    There he would stand, his arm
    around the fat pole, staring and wondering.
  1151. road
    an open way (generally public) for travel or transportation
    Wooden sawhorses blocked the road at each end of the
    Radley lot, straw was put down on the sidewalk, traffic was diverted to the back
    street.
  1152. repertoire
    the entire range of skills or aptitudes or devices used in a particular field or occupation
    But by the end of August our repertoire was vapid from countless reproductions,
    and it was then that Dill gave us the idea of making Boo Radley come out.
  1153. smile
    a facial expression characterized by turning up the corners of the mouth; usually shows pleasure or amusement
    Atticus ain’t got time to teach me anything,” I added, when Miss Caroline smiled
    and shook her head.
  1154. knock
    deliver a sharp blow or push :"He knocked the glass clear across the room"
    Jem said if Dill wanted to get himself killed, all he had to do was go up and knock
    on the front door.
  1155. Mount Everest
    a mountain in the central Himalayas on the border of Tibet and Nepal; the highest mountain peak in the world (29,028 feet high)
    Had I ever harbored the mystical
    notions about mountains that seem to obsess lawyers and judges, Aunt Alexandra
    would have been analogous to Mount Everest: throughout my early life, she was
    cold and there.
  1156. tweezer
    a hand tool for holding consisting of a compound lever for grasping
    I
    interrupted to make Uncle Jack let me know when he would pull it out, but he
    held up a bloody splinter in a pair of tweezers and said he yanked it while I was
    laughing, that was what was known as relativity.
  1157. crispness
    firm but easily broken
    Miss Maudie’s old crispness was returning:
    “The handful of people in this town with background, that’s who they are.”
  1158. awake
    not in a state of sleep; completely conscious
    Next morning I awoke, looked out the window and nearly died of fright.
  1159. refreshment
    snacks and drinks served as a light meal
    Her Missionary Society refreshments
    added to her reputation as a hostess (she did not permit Calpurnia to make the
    delicacies required to sustain the Society through long reports on Rice Christians);
    she joined and became Secretary of the Maycomb Amanuensis Club.
  1160. vital statistics
    data relating to births and deaths and health and diseases and marriages
    Jem’s mind was occupied mostly with the vital statistics of every college football
    player in the nation.
  1161. go up
    move upward
    Jem said if Dill wanted to get himself killed, all he had to do was go up and knock
    on the front door.
  1162. relativity
    the quality of being relative and having significance only in relation to something else
    I
    interrupted to make Uncle Jack let me know when he would pull it out, but he
    held up a bloody splinter in a pair of tweezers and said he yanked it while I was
    laughing, that was what was known as relativity.
  1163. retrieve
    get or find back; recover the use of
    I retrieved my plate and finished dinner in the kitchen, thankful, though,
    that I was spared the humiliation of facing them again.
  1164. filthy
    disgustingly dirty; filled or smeared with offensive matter
    He was the filthiest human I had ever seen.
  1165. wad
    a small mass of soft material
    When Jem came home he asked me where I got such a wad.
  1166. defend
    protect against a challenge or attack
    What happens in houses behind closed
    doors, what secrets-”
    “Atticus don’t ever do anything to Jem and me in the house that he don’t do in the
    yard,” I said, feeling it my duty to defend my parent.
  1167. kiss
    touch with the lips or press the lips (against someone's mouth or other body part) as an expression of love, greeting, etc.
    Calpurnia bent down and kissed me.
  1168. caste system
    a social structure in which classes are determined by heredity
    There was indeed a caste system in Maycomb, but to my mind it worked this way:
    the older citizens, the present generation of people who had lived side by side for
    years and years, were utterly predictable to one another: they took for granted
    attitudes, character shadings, even gestures, as having been repeated in each
    generation and refined by time.
  1169. cotton on
    understand, usually after some initial difficulty
    Whoever
    it was wore thick cotton pants; what I thought were trees rustling was the soft
    swish of cotton on cotton, wheek, wheek, with every step.
  1170. winking
    a reflex that closes and opens the eyes rapidly
    Some tinfoil was sticking in a knot-hole just above my eye level, winking at me in
    the afternoon sun.
  1171. scowling
    sullen or unfriendly in appearance
    Jem was scowling triumphantly.
  1172. peppermint
    red gum tree of Tasmania
    She looked and smelled like a peppermint drop.
  1173. times
    a more or less definite period of time now or previously present
    She gave the money to Dill, who went to the picture show
    twenty times on it.
  1174. at home
    at, to, or toward the place where you reside
    They did not go to church, Maycomb’s principal
    recreation, but worshiped at home; Mrs. Radley seldom if ever crossed the street
    for a mid-morning coffee break with her neighbors, and certainly never joined a
    missionary circle.
  1175. sleep
    a natural and periodic state of rest during which consciousness of the world is suspended
    Summer was our
    best season: it was sleeping on the back screened porch in cots, or trying to sleep
    in the treehouse; summer was everything good to eat; it was a thousand colors in a
    parched landscape; but most of all, summer was Dill.
  1176. thumb
    the thick short innermost digit of the forelimb
    His left arm was
    somewhat shorter than his right; when he stood or walked, the back of his hand
    was at right angles to his body, his thumb parallel to his thigh.
  1177. born
    brought into existence
    He liked
    Maycomb, he was Maycomb County born and bred; he knew his people, they
    knew him, and because of Simon Finch’s industry, Atticus was related by blood
    or marriage to nearly every family in the town.
  1178. years
    a prolonged period of time
    When enough years had gone by to enable us to look back on them, we
    sometimes discussed the events leading to his accident.
  1179. ramshackle
    in deplorable condition
    The back of the Radley house was less inviting than the front: a ramshackle porch
    ran the width of the house; there were two doors and two dark windows between
    the doors.
  1180. cold
    having a low or inadequate temperature or feeling a sensation of coldness or having been made cold by e.g. ice or refrigeration
    When people’s azaleas froze in a cold snap, it was
    because he had breathed on them.
  1181. think of
    devise or invent
    Jem wanted Dill to know once and for all that he wasn’t scared of anything: “It’s
    just that I can’t think of a way to make him come out without him gettin‘ us.”
  1182. cottonseed
    seed of cotton plants; source of cottonseed oil
    I liked his smell: it was of leather, horses,
    cottonseed.
  1183. cathedra
    a throne that is the official chair of a bishop
    I remembered something he had
    said about Judge Taylor’s ex cathedra remarks sometimes exceeding his duty, but
    that few lawyers ever did anything about them.
  1184. slushy
    being or resembling melting snow
    “You’ll see,” said Jem, and we transferred as much snow as we could from Miss
    Maudie’s yard to ours, a slushy operation.
  1185. paper
    a material made of cellulose pulp derived mainly from wood or rags or certain grasses
    Mr. Radley walked to town at eleven-thirty every morning and
    came back promptly at twelve, sometimes carrying a brown paper bag that the
    neighborhood assumed contained the family groceries.
  1186. talk about
    to consider or examine in speech or writing
    “Wasn’t talking about your father,” she said.
  1187. thirty
    the cardinal number that is the product of ten and three
    Mr. Radley walked to town at eleven-thirty every morning and
    came back promptly at twelve, sometimes carrying a brown paper bag that the
    neighborhood assumed contained the family groceries.
  1188. secondary education
    education beyond the elementary grades; provided by a high school or college preparatory school
    The other boys attended the industrial school and received the best secondary
    education
    to be had in the state; one of them eventually worked his way through
    engineering school at Auburn.
  1189. fall from grace
    revert back to bad behavior after a period of good behavior
    Atticus seemed to have
    forgotten my noontime fall from grace; he was full of questions about school.
  1190. exhilarate
    fill with sublime emotion
    I was exhilarated.
  1191. follow
    to travel behind, go after, come after
    Dill and
    I followed on his heels.
  1192. speller
    someone who spells words
    During a controversy of this character, Jeems
    Cunningham testified that his mother spelled it Cunningham on deeds and things,
    but she was really a Coningham, she was an uncertain speller, a seldom reader,
    and was given to looking far away sometimes when she sat on the front gallery in
    the evening.
  1193. circumstantial
    fully detailed and specific about particulars
    We don’t know, but there is circumstantial evidence to indicate that
    Mayella Ewell was beaten savagely by someone who led almost exclusively with
    his left.
  1194. irritate
    cause annoyance in; disturb, especially by minor irritations
    In England, Simon was irritated by the
    persecution of those who called themselves Methodists at the hands of their more
    liberal brethren, and as Simon called himself a Methodist, he worked his way
    across the Atlantic to Philadelphia, thence to Jamaica, thence to Mobile, and up
    the Saint Stephens.
  1195. hook
    a mechanical device that is curved or bent to suspend or hold or pull something
    He fingered the straps of his overalls,
    nervously picking at the metal hooks.
  1196. slick
    made slick by e.g. ice or grease
    See how they’ve been slicked up?
  1197. hypnotize
    induce hypnosis in
    With one phrase he had turned happy picknickers
    into a sulky, tense, murmuring crowd, being slowly hypnotized by gavel taps
    lessening in intensity until the only sound in the courtroom was a dim pink-pinkpink:
    the judge might have been rapping the bench with a pencil.
  1198. timberland
    land that is covered with trees and shrubs
    As a result the
    town remained the same size for a hundred years, an island in a patchwork sea of
    cottonfields and timberland.
  1199. smugness
    an excessive feeling of self-satisfaction
    Smugness faded from it, replaced by a dogged
    earnestness that fooled Judge Taylor not at all: as long as Mr. Ewell was on the
    stand, the judge kept his eyes on him, as if daring him to make a false move.
  1200. surprise
    come upon or take unawares
    We looked at her in surprise, for
    Calpurnia rarely commented on the ways of white people.
  1201. bit by bit
    a little bit at a time
    Bit by bit, I told him the day’s misfortunes. “-and she said you taught me all
    wrong, so we can’t ever read any more, ever.
  1202. apron
    a garment of cloth or leather or plastic that is tied about the waist and worn to protect your clothing
    Atticus suggested that Jem hone down his creation’s front a little, swap a broom
    for the stovewood, and put an apron on him.
  1203. bruise
    an injury that doesn't break the skin but results in some discoloration
    There was already bruises comin‘ on her
    arms, and it happened about thirty minutes before—”
    “How do you know?”
  1204. bad
    having undesirable or negative qualities
    “Atticus, that’s bad,” I said.
  1205. walk around
    walk around something
    You never really understand a person until you
    consider things from his point of view-”
    “Sir?”
    “-until you climb into his skin and walk around in it.”
  1206. shuttered
    provided with shutters or shutters as specified; often used in combination
    We went by Mrs. Dubose’s house, standing empty and shuttered, her camellias
    grown up in weeds and johnson grass.
  1207. anywhere
    at or in or to any place
    The
    Radleys, welcome anywhere in town, kept to themselves, a predilection
    unforgivable in Maycomb.
  1208. taffy
    chewy candy of sugar or syrup boiled until thick and pulled until glossy
    The high-school
    auditorium would be open, there would be a pageant for the grown-ups; applebobbing,
    taffy-pulling, pinning the tail on the donkey for the children.
  1209. supper
    a light evening meal; served in early evening if dinner is at midday or served late in the evening at bedtime
    Perhaps Calpurnia sensed that my day had been a grim one: she let me watch her
    fix supper.
  1210. emerge
    come out into view, as from concealment
    Dill and Jem emerged from a brief huddle: “If you stay you’ve got to do what we
    tell you,” Dill warned.
  1211. loose
    not affixed
    A storm of laughter broke loose when it finally occurred to the class that
    Miss Caroline had whipped me.
  1212. minutes
    a written account of what transpired at a meeting
    Jem’s free dispensation of my pledge
    irked me, but precious noontime minutes were ticking away.
  1213. hookah
    an oriental tobacco pipe with a long flexible tube connected to a container where the smoke is cooled by passing through water
    When Uncle Jack caught
    me, he kept me laughing about a preacher who hated going to church so much
    that every day he stood at his gate in his dressing-gown, smoking a hookah and
    delivering five-minute sermons to any passers-by who desired spiritual comfort.
  1214. word
    a unit of language that native speakers can identify
    Mindful of John Wesley’s strictures on the use of many words
    in buying and selling, Simon made a pile practicing medicine, but in this pursuit
    he was unhappy lest he be tempted into doing what he knew was not for the glory
    of God, as the putting on of gold and costly apparel.
  1215. locate
    discover the location of; determine the place of; find by searching or examining
    He searched the scalp above his forehead, located his guest and
    pinched it between his thumb and forefinger.
  1216. disapproval
    an inclination to withhold approval from some person or group
    Are you going to take
    out your disapproval on his children?”
  1217. immaterial
    (often followed by `to') lacking importance; not mattering one way or the other
    “Can’t see what witness’s literacy
    has to do with the case, irrelevant’n‘immaterial.”
  1218. fruity
    tasting or smelling richly of or as of fruit
    One Sunday night, lost in fruity metaphors and florid diction, Judge Taylor’s
    attention was wrenched from the page by an irritating scratching noise.
  1219. ugly
    displeasing to the senses
    You might hear some ugly talk about it at
    school, but do one thing for me if you will: you just hold your head high and keep
    those fists down.
  1220. exactly
    indicating exactness or preciseness
    “Not exactly.
  1221. syrup
    a thick sweet sticky liquid
    Atticus
    summoned Calpurnia, who returned bearing the syrup pitcher.
  1222. half
    one of two equal parts of a divisible whole
    You got anything needs readin‘ I
    can do it…”
    “How old are you,” asked Jem, “four-and-a-half?”
  1223. book
    physical objects consisting of a number of pages bound together
    When Dill reduced Dracula to dust, and Jem said the show sounded better than
    the book, I asked Dill where his father was: “You ain’t said anything about him.”
  1224. beholden
    under a moral obligation to someone
    “She said she was going to leave this world beholden to nothing and nobody.
  1225. barker
    someone who stands in front of a show (as at a carnival) and gives a loud colorful sales talk to potential customers
    Once the town was terrorized by a series of morbid
    nocturnal events: people’s chickens and household pets were found mutilated;
    although the culprit was Crazy Addie, who eventually drowned himself in
    Barker’s Eddy, people still looked at the Radley Place, unwilling to discard their
    initial suspicions.
  1226. knot
    any of various fastenings formed by looping and tying a rope (or cord) upon itself or to another rope or to another object
    Some tinfoil was sticking in a knot-hole just above my eye level, winking at me in
    the afternoon sun.
  1227. outdoors
    outside a building
    They thought I spent too much time in
    God’s outdoors and not enough time inside the house reading the Bible.”
  1228. clink
    a short light metallic sound
    Jem and I followed suit, and received a soft, “Thank
    you, thank you,” as our dimes clinked.
  1229. back down
    move backwards from a certain position
    I sat back down.
  1230. get out
    move out of or depart from
    “He can get out at night when we’re all asleep…” I said.
  1231. certainly
    definitely or positively (`sure' is sometimes used informally for `surely')
    They did not go to church, Maycomb’s principal
    recreation, but worshiped at home; Mrs. Radley seldom if ever crossed the street
    for a mid-morning coffee break with her neighbors, and certainly never joined a
    missionary circle.
  1232. Birmingham
    a city in central England; 2nd largest English city and an important industrial and transportation center
    The Governor was eager to scrape a few
    barnacles off the ship of state; there were sit-down strikes in Birmingham; bread
    lines in the cities grew longer, people in the country grew poorer.
  1233. cat
    feline mammal usually having thick soft fur and no ability to roar: domestic cats; wildcats
    Jem gave a reasonable description of Boo: Boo was about six-and-a-half feet tall,
    judging from his tracks; he dined on raw squirrels and any cats he could catch,
    that’s why his hands were bloodstained—if you ate an animal raw, you could
    never wash the blood off.
  1234. silent
    marked by absence of sound
    Jem was silent.
  1235. lengthy
    relatively long in duration; tediously protracted
    Although
    her fits had passed off, she was in every other way her old self: when Sir Walter
    Scott became involved in lengthy descriptions of moats and castles, Mrs. Dubose
    would become bored and pick on us:
    “Jeremy Finch, I told you you’d live to regret tearing up my camellias.
  1236. migrate
    move from one country or region to another and settle there
    He said the Cunninghams hadn’t taken
    anything from or off of anybody since they migrated to the New World.
  1237. hoe
    a tool with a flat blade attached at right angles to a long handle
    Jem ran to the back yard, produced the garden hoe and began digging quickly
    behind the woodpile, placing any worms he found to one side.
  1238. handkerchief
    a square piece of cloth used for wiping the eyes or nose or as a costume accessory
    Aunt Alexandra ministered to Francis, wiping his tears away with her
    handkerchief, rubbing his hair, patting his cheek.
  1239. time-honored
    acceptable for a long time
    I thought she was going to spit in it, which was the only reason anybody in
    Maycomb held out his hand: it was a time-honored method of sealing oral
    contracts.
  1240. quietly
    with low volume
    Walter had picked himself up and was standing quietly listening to Jem and me.
  1241. wrathfully
    in a wrathful manner
    Mayella sniffed wrathfully and looked at Atticus.
  1242. knobby
    having knobs
    Her hands were knobby, and the cuticles were grown up
    over her fingernails.
  1243. aridity
    a deficiency of moisture (especially when resulting from a permanent absence of rainfall)
    His voice had lost its aridity, its detachment, and he was talking to
    the jury as if they were folks on the post office corner.
  1244. kind
    having or showing a tender and considerate and helpful nature; used especially of persons and their behavior
    “First of all,” he said, “if you can learn a simple trick, Scout, you’ll get along a lot
    better with all kinds of folks.
  1245. refilling
    filling again by supplying what has been used up
    And so they went, down the row of laughing women, around the diningroom,
    refilling coffee cups, dishing out goodies as though their only regret was the
    temporary domestic disaster of losing Calpurnia.
  1246. britches
    informal term for breeches
    “You’re mighty dressed up, Miss Jean
    Louise,” she said, “Where are your britches today?”
  1247. matter
    that which has mass and occupies space
    In this matter we were lucky to have Dill.
  1248. a little
    to a small degree; somewhat
    Miss Caroline walked up and down the rows peering and poking into lunch
    containers, nodding if the contents pleased her, frowning a little at others.
  1249. Joshua
    (Old Testament) Moses' successor who led the Israelites into the Promised Land; best remembered for his destruction of Jericho
    She left the room and returned with a purple-covered book on
    which Meditations of Joshua S. St. Clair was stamped in gold.
  1250. testify
    give testimony in a court of law
    We asked Miss Maudie to elucidate: she said Miss Stephanie seemed to know so
    much about the case she might as well be called on to testify.
  1251. register
    an official written record of names or events or transactions
    I suppose she chose me because she knew my name; as I read the alphabet a faint
    line appeared between her eyebrows, and after making me read most of My First
    Reader and the stock-market quotations from The Mobile Register aloud, she
    discovered that I was literate and looked at me with more than faint distaste.
  1252. clean
    free from dirt or impurities; or having clean habits
    He did have on a clean shirt and neatly mended overalls.
  1253. houseful
    as many as a house will accommodate
    He had to take it out on
    somebody and I’d rather it be me than that houseful of children out there.
  1254. job
    a specific piece of work required to be done as a duty or for a specific fee
    Jem condescended to take me to school the first day, a job usually done by one’s
    parents, but Atticus had said Jem would be delighted to show me where my room
    was.
  1255. dark
    devoid of or deficient in light or brightness; shadowed or black
    Jem said, “He goes out, all right, when it’s pitch dark.
  1256. leftovers
    food remaining from a previous meal
    Dill made his way through the leftovers and was reaching for a can of pork and
    beans in the pantry when Miss Rachel’s Do-oo Je-sus went off in the hall.
  1257. expunge
    remove by erasing or crossing out or as if by drawing a line
    Judge Taylor told the reporter to expunge anything he happened to have written
    down after Mr. Finch if you were a nigger like me you’d be scared too, and told
    the jury to disregard the interruption.
  1258. Bam
    an ancient city in southeastern Iran; destroyed by an earthquake in 2003
    Bam, bam, bam, and the checkerboard was swept clean of my men.
  1259. pulling
    the act of pulling; applying force to move something toward or with you
    Smoke was rolling off our house and Miss Rachel’s house like fog off a
    riverbank, and men were pulling hoses toward them.
  1260. freeze
    change from a liquid to a solid when cold
    When people’s azaleas froze in a cold snap, it was
    because he had breathed on them.
  1261. picture frame
    a framework in which a picture is mounted
    Enclosed by this barricade
    was a dirty yard containing the remains of a Model-T Ford (on blocks), a
    discarded dentist’s chair, an ancient icebox, plus lesser items: old shoes, worn-out
    table radios, picture frames, and fruit jars, under which scrawny orange chickens
    pecked hopefully.
  1262. Tuscaloosa
    a university town in west central Alabama
    Miss Stephanie said old Mr. Radley said no Radley was going to any asylum,
    when it was suggested that a season in Tuscaloosa might be helpful to Boo. Boo
    wasn’t crazy, he was high-strung at times.
  1263. poking
    a sharp hand gesture (resembling a blow)
    Miss Caroline walked up and down the rows peering and poking into lunch
    containers, nodding if the contents pleased her, frowning a little at others.
  1264. closer
    (comparative of `near' or `close') within a shorter distance
    I beat him up twice but it did no good, he only grew closer to Jem. They spent
    days together in the treehouse plotting and planning, calling me only when they
    needed a third party.
  1265. wheelchair
    a movable chair mounted on large wheels; for invalids or those who cannot walk; frequently propelled by the occupant
    She was
    very old; she spent most of each day in bed and the rest of it in a wheelchair.
  1266. cross
    a marking that consists of lines that cross each other
    They did not go to church, Maycomb’s principal
    recreation, but worshiped at home; Mrs. Radley seldom if ever crossed the street
    for a mid-morning coffee break with her neighbors, and certainly never joined a
    missionary circle.
  1267. self-doubt
    lack of self-confidence
    When Aunt Alexandra went to school, self-doubt could not
    be found in any textbook, so she knew not its meaning.
  1268. faint
    deficient in magnitude; barely perceptible; lacking clarity or brightness or loudness etc
    I suppose she chose me because she knew my name; as I read the alphabet a faint
    line appeared between her eyebrows, and after making me read most of My First
    Reader and the stock-market quotations from The Mobile Register aloud, she
    discovered that I was literate and looked at me with more than faint distaste.
  1269. annoy
    cause annoyance in; disturb, especially by minor irritations
    I knew I had annoyed Miss Caroline, so I let well enough alone and stared out the
    window until recess when Jem cut me from the covey of first-graders in the
    schoolyard.
  1270. office
    place of business where professional or clerical duties are performed
    Atticus’s office in the courthouse contained little more
    than a hat rack, a spittoon, a checkerboard and an unsullied Code of Alabama.
  1271. indecision
    the trait of irresolution; a lack of firmness of character or purpose
    Burris seemed to be afraid of a child half his height, and Miss Caroline took
    advantage of his indecision: “Burris, go home.
  1272. noise
    sound of any kind (especially unintelligible or dissonant sound)
    But there came a day when Atticus told us he’d wear us out if we made any noise
    in the yard and commissioned Calpurnia to serve in his absence if she heard a
    sound out of us.
  1273. raving mad
    talking or behaving irrationally
    Why reasonable people go stark raving mad when anything involving a
    Negro comes up, is something I don’t pretend to understand… I just hope that
    Jem and Scout come to me for their answers instead of listening to the town.
  1274. nightshirt
    nightclothes worn by men
    They worked in
    pajama tops and nightshirts stuffed into their pants, but I became aware that I was
    slowly freezing where I stood.
  1275. soap
    a cleansing agent made from the salts of vegetable or animal fats
    “A good home remedy for—Burris, I want you to go home and wash
    your hair with lye soap.
  1276. snapshot
    an informal photograph; usually made with a small hand-held camera
    He reached into his
    coat pocket and brought out some snapshots.
  1277. streaked
    marked with or as if with stripes or linear discolorations
    Beneath its sweat-streaked dirt Dill’s face went white.
  1278. lonesome
    marked by dejection from being alone
    “The house got so lonesome ‘long about two
    o’clock I had to turn on the radio.”
  1279. colorless
    weak in color; not colorful
    He was a thin leathery man with
    colorless eyes, so colorless they did not reflect light.
  1280. peephole
    a hole (in a door or an oven etc) through which you can peep
    Mrs. Crenshaw thoughtfully left two peepholes for me.
  1281. move around
    pass to the other side of
    “Nobody’s moved, hardly,” said Jem.
    “They moved around some when the jury went out,” said Reverend Sykes.
  1282. hunched
    having the back and shoulders rounded; not erect
    Jem gulped like a goldfish, hunched his shoulders and twitched his torso.
  1283. instead
    in place of, or as an alternative to
    We went
    to the wire fence to see if there was a puppy— Miss Rachel’s rat terrier was
    expecting— instead we found someone sitting looking at us.
  1284. work
    activity directed toward making or doing something
    In England, Simon was irritated by the
    persecution of those who called themselves Methodists at the hands of their more
    liberal brethren, and as Simon called himself a Methodist, he worked his way
    across the Atlantic to Philadelphia, thence to Jamaica, thence to Mobile, and up
    the Saint Stephens.
  1285. next door
    at or in or to the adjacent residence
    Early one morning as we were beginning our day’s play in the back yard, Jem and
    I heard something next door in Miss Rachel Haverford’s collard patch.
  1286. pot plant
    a plant suitable for growing in a flowerpot (especially indoors)
    I kept a fire in there last
    night for my potted plants.
  1287. beginning
    the act of starting something
    They persisted in
    pleading Not Guilty to first-degree murder, so there was nothing much Atticus
    could do for his clients except be present at their departure, an occasion that was
    probably the beginning of my father’s profound distaste for the practice of
    criminal law.
  1288. go back
    return in thought or speech to something
    Now don’t you be afraid, you just go back to your desk and
    teach us some more.”
  1289. stale
    lacking freshness, palatability, or showing deterioration from age
    There was a smell of stale whiskey and pigpen about, and when I glanced around
    I discovered that these men were strangers.
  1290. up to
    busy or occupied with
    Before the first morning was over, Miss Caroline Fisher, our
    teacher, hauled me up to the front of the room and patted the palm of my hand
    with a ruler, then made me stand in the corner until noon.
  1291. jabbing
    a sharp hand gesture (resembling a blow)
    I watched
    him making jabbing motions for so long, I abandoned my post and went to him.
  1292. bucketful
    the quantity contained in a bucket
    By the time Mrs. Cat called the drugstore for
    an order of chocolate malted mice the class was wriggling like a bucketful of
    catawba worms.
  1293. go with
    go or occur together
    Dill and Jem were simply going to peep in the window with the loose shutter to
    see if they could get a look at Boo Radley, and if I didn’t want to go with them I
    could go straight home and keep my fat flopping mouth shut, that was all.
  1294. vest
    a man's sleeveless garment worn underneath a coat
    There was nowhere to go, but I turned to go and met Atticus’s vest front.
  1295. other
    not the same one or ones already mentioned or implied
    The judge decided to send the boys to the state industrial school, where
    boys were sometimes sent for no other reason than to provide them with food and
    decent shelter: it was no prison and it was no disgrace.
  1296. need
    have need of
    You got anything needs readin‘ I
    can do it…”
    “How old are you,” asked Jem, “four-and-a-half?”
  1297. trot
    ride at a trot
    Their sister Alexandra was the
    Finch who remained at the Landing: she married a taciturn man who spent most
    of his time lying in a hammock by the river wondering if his trot-lines were full.
  1298. coffee
    any of several small trees and shrubs native to the tropical Old World yielding coffee beans
    They did not go to church, Maycomb’s principal
    recreation, but worshiped at home; Mrs. Radley seldom if ever crossed the street
    for a mid-morning coffee break with her neighbors, and certainly never joined a
    missionary circle.
  1299. three
    the cardinal number that is the sum of one and one and one
    So Simon, having forgotten
    his teacher’s dictum on the possession of human chattels, bought three slaves and
    with their aid established a homestead on the banks of the Alabama River some
    forty miles above Saint Stephens.
  1300. back end
    the side of an object that is opposite its front
    Jem, somebody was-”
    “Yes you will, you’ll watch the back end of the lot and Dill’s gonna watch the
    front of the house an‘ up the street, an’ if anybody comes he’ll ring the bell.
  1301. name
    a language unit by which a person or thing is known
    Atticus had urged them to accept the state’s generosity in allowing them to plead
    Guilty to second-degree murder and escape with their lives, but they were
    Haverfords, in Maycomb County a name synonymous with jackass.
  1302. ground
    the solid part of the earth's surface
    The Maycomb school
    grounds adjoined the back of the Radley lot; from the Radley chickenyard tall
    pecan trees shook their fruit into the schoolyard, but the nuts lay untouched by the
    children: Radley pecans would kill you.
  1303. get off
    leave a vehicle, aircraft, etc.
    Two days later Dill arrived in a blaze of glory: he had ridden the train by himself
    from Meridian to Maycomb Junction (a courtesy title—Maycomb Junction was in
    Abbott County) where he had been met by Miss Rachel in Maycomb’s one taxi;
    he had eaten dinner in the diner, he had seen two twins hitched together get off
    the train in Bay St. Louis and stuck to his story regardless of threats.
  1304. outhouse
    a small outbuilding with a bench having holes through which a user can defecate
    One night, in an excessive spurt of high spirits, the boys backed around the square
    in a borrowed flivver, resisted arrest by Maycomb’s ancient beadle, Mr. Conner,
    and locked him in the courthouse outhouse.
  1305. growl
    to utter or emit low dull rumbling sounds
    “Ain’t hateful, just persuades him—‘s not like you’d chunk him in the fire,” Jem
    growled.
  1306. sip
    drink in sips
    Thus the dicta No Crawford Minds His Own
    Business, Every Third Merriweather Is Morbid, The Truth Is Not in the
    Delafields, All the Bufords Walk Like That, were simply guides to daily living:
    never take a check from a Delafield without a discreet call to the bank; Miss
    Maudie Atkinson’s shoulder stoops because she was a Buford; if Mrs. Grace
    Merriweather sips gin out of Lydia E. Pinkham bottles it’s nothing unusual—her
    mother did the same.
  1307. come up
    move upward
    None of them saw us come up.
  1308. poke into
    enter briefly
    Miss Caroline walked up and down the rows peering and poking into lunch
    containers, nodding if the contents pleased her, frowning a little at others.
  1309. tag along
    go along with, often uninvited
    When we slowed to a walk at the edge of the schoolyard, Jem was
    careful to explain that during school hours I was not to bother him, I was not to
    approach him with requests to enact a chapter of Tarzan and the Ant Men, to
    embarrass him with references to his private life, or tag along behind him at
    recess and noon.
  1310. wipe
    rub with a circular motion
    As Mr.
    Radley passed by, Boo drove the scissors into his parent’s leg, pulled them out,
    wiped them on his pants, and resumed his activities.
  1311. between
    in the interval
    Simon would have regarded with impotent fury the disturbance between the North
    and the South, as it left his descendants stripped of everything but their land, yet
    the tradition of living on the land remained unbroken until well into the twentieth
    century, when my father, Atticus Finch, went to Montgomery to read law, and his
    younger brother went to Boston to study medicine.
  1312. decided
    recognizable; marked
    The town decided something had to
    be done; Mr. Conner said he knew who each and every one of them was, and he
    was bound and determined they wouldn’t get away with it, so the boys came
    before the probate judge on charges of disorderly conduct, disturbing the peace,
    assault and battery, and using abusive and profane language in the presence and
    hearing of a female.
  1313. neck
    the part of an organism (human or animal) that connects the head to the rest of the body
    His neck was dark
    gray, the backs of his hands were rusty, and his fingernails were black deep into
    the quick.
  1314. shyly
    in a shy or timid or bashful manner
    “It is, ain’t it?” he said shyly.
  1315. sister
    a female person who has the same parents as another person
    Their sister Alexandra was the
    Finch who remained at the Landing: she married a taciturn man who spent most
    of his time lying in a hammock by the river wondering if his trot-lines were full.
  1316. pay
    give money, usually in exchange for goods or services
    You can pay me back tomorrow.”
  1317. feral
    wild and menacing
    Jem made a feral noise in his throat.
  1318. dictum
    an authoritative declaration
    So Simon, having forgotten
    his teacher’s dictum on the possession of human chattels, bought three slaves and
    with their aid established a homestead on the banks of the Alabama River some
    forty miles above Saint Stephens.
  1319. swipe
    a sweeping stroke or blow
    Jem made a tentative swipe under the bed.
  1320. closed
    not open
    The shutters and doors of the Radley house were closed on Sundays, another
    thing alien to Maycomb’s ways: closed doors meant illness and cold weather
    only.
  1321. tutorial
    a session of intensive tuition given by a tutor to an individual or to a small number of students
    Jem, educated on a half-Decimal half-
    Duncecap basis, seemed to function effectively alone or in a group, but Jem was a
    poor example: no tutorial system devised by man could have stopped him from
    getting at books.
  1322. climb
    go up or advance
    But to climb the Radley front steps
    and call, “He-y,” of a Sunday afternoon was something their neighbors never did.
  1323. skewed
    having an oblique or slanting direction or position
    He was sitting behind his table; his chair was skewed to
    one side, his legs were crossed and one arm was resting on the back of his chair.
  1324. saddlebag
    a large bag (or pair of bags) hung over a saddle
    He sent them packing
    next day armed with their charts and five quarts of shinny in their saddlebags
    two apiece and one for the Governor.
  1325. block off
    obstruct access to
    When Jem an‘ I fuss
    Atticus doesn’t ever just listen to Jem’s side of it, he hears mine too, an’ in the
    second place you told me never to use words like that except in ex-extreme
    provocation, and Francis provocated me enough to knock his block off—”
    Uncle Jack scratched his head.
  1326. asinine
    devoid of intelligence
    Lastly, we
    were to stay away from that house until we were invited there, we were not to
    play an asinine game he had seen us playing or make fun of anybody on this street
    or in this town-
    “We weren’t makin‘ fun of him, we weren’t laughin’ at him,” said Jem, “we were
    just-”
    “So that was what you were doing, wasn’t it?”
  1327. major premise
    the premise of a syllogism that contains the major term (which is the predicate of the conclusion)
    I pulled at his sleeve, and we were followed up the sidewalk by a
    philippic on our family’s moral degeneration, the major premise of which was
    that half the Finches were in the asylum anyway, but if our mother were living we
    would not have come to such a state.
  1328. laugh
    produce laughter
    As he told us the old tale his blue eyes would lighten and
    darken; his laugh was sudden and happy; he habitually pulled at a cowlick in the
    center of his forehead.
  1329. rose
    any of many shrubs of the genus Rosa that bear roses
    I rose graciously on Walter’s behalf: “Ah—Miss Caroline?”
  1330. mule
    hybrid offspring of a male donkey and a female horse; usually sterile
    Somehow, it was hotter then: a black dog
    suffered on a summer’s day; bony mules hitched to Hoover carts flicked flies in
    the sweltering shade of the live oaks on the square.
  1331. torso
    the body excluding the head and neck and limbs
    Jem scooped up an armful of dirt, patted it into a mound on which he added
    another load, and another until he had constructed a torso.
  1332. shoo
    drive away by crying `shoo!'
    He flung open the gate, danced
    Dill and me through, and shooed us between two rows of swishing collards.
  1333. spent
    depleted of energy, force, or strength
    Their sister Alexandra was the
    Finch who remained at the Landing: she married a taciturn man who spent most
    of his time lying in a hammock by the river wondering if his trot-lines were full.
  1334. dress
    put on clothes
    She also wore high-heeled pumps and
    a red-and-white-striped dress.
  1335. rarely
    not often
    We looked at her in surprise, for
    Calpurnia rarely commented on the ways of white people.
  1336. button
    a round fastener sewn to shirts and coats etc to fit through buttonholes
    He wore blue linen shorts that buttoned to his shirt, his hair
    was snow white and stuck to his head like duckfluff; he was a year my senior but
    I towered over him.
  1337. smugly
    in a smug manner
    As Judge Taylor banged his gavel, Mr. Ewell was sitting smugly in the witness
    chair, surveying his handiwork.
  1338. adult
    a fully developed person from maturity onward
    Jem felt his age and gravitated to the adults, leaving me to
    entertain our cousin.
  1339. finally
    as the end result of a succession or process
    “Yeb’m,” he finally mumbled.
  1340. fight down
    fight against or resist strongly
    I was trying to fight down the automatic terror rising in me.
  1341. doorknob
    a knob used to release the catch when opening a door (often called `doorhandle' in Great Britain)
    His
    fingers found the front doorknob.
  1342. picking
    the act of picking (crops or fruit or hops etc.)
    He fingered the straps of his overalls,
    nervously picking at the metal hooks.
  1343. waistline
    the narrowing of the body between the ribs and hips
    He looked thoughtfully at it for a moment, then he molded a big stomach
    below the figure’s waistline.
  1344. reform school
    correctional institution for the detention and discipline and training of young or first offenders
    If you aren’t sent to the
    reform school before next week, my name’s not Dubose!”
  1345. live with
    tolerate or accommodate oneself to
    “Well, most folks seem to think they’re right and you’re wrong…”
    “They’re certainly entitled to think that, and they’re entitled to full respect for
    their opinions,” said Atticus, “but before I can live with other folks I’ve got to live
    with myself.
  1346. glassful
    the quantity a glass will hold
    Jem gulped down his second glassful and slapped his chest.
  1347. beat up
    give a beating to; subject to a beating, either as a punishment or as an act of aggression
    She was pretty well beat up, but I heaved her to her feet and she
    washed her face in a bucket in the corner and said she was all right.
  1348. catch it
    receive punishment; be scolded or reprimanded
    One afternoon as I raced by,
    something caught my eye and caught it in such a way that I took a deep breath, a
    long look around, and went back.
  1349. go under
    go under, "The raft sank and its occupants drowned"
    The neighborhood thought when Mr. Radley went under Boo would come out,
    but it had another think coming: Boo’s elder brother returned from Pensacola and
    took Mr. Radley’s place.
  1350. standing room
    room for passengers or spectators to stand
    The old
    men ahead of them would take most of the standing room.
  1351. blanket
    bedding that keeps a person warm in bed
    I had spent most of the day climbing up and down, running
    errands for him, providing him with literature, nourishment and water, and was
    carrying him blankets for the night when Atticus said if I paid no attention to him,
    Jem would come down.
  1352. curve
    the trace of a point whose direction of motion changes
    The Radley Place jutted into a sharp curve beyond our house.
  1353. side pocket
    a pocket on the side of a billiard table
    Mr. Tate reached in his side pocket and withdrew a long switchblade knife.
  1354. footlights
    theater light at the front of a stage that illuminate the set and actors
    The auditorium
    was filling with people; the Maycomb County High School band had assembled
    in front below the stage; the stage footlights were on and the red velvet curtain
    rippled and billowed from the scurrying going on behind it.
  1355. hose
    a flexible pipe for conveying a liquid or gas
    When the men attached its hose to a hydrant, the hose burst
    and water shot up, tinkling down on the pavement.
  1356. redden
    turn red or redder
    “No sir,” said Jem, reddening.
  1357. Andrew Jackson
    7th president of the US; successfully defended New Orleans from the British in 1815; expanded the power of the presidency (1767-1845)
    I said if he wanted to take a broad view of the thing, it really began with Andrew
    Jackson
    .
  1358. schooldays
    the time of life when you are going to school
    Contents - Prev / Next
    Chapter 4
    The remainder of my schooldays were no more auspicious than the first.
  1359. delete
    cut or eliminate
    Atticus told me to delete the adjectives and I’d have
    the facts.
  1360. stay put
    stay put (in a certain place)
    “I thought I told you and Jem to stay put,” he said.
  1361. girl
    a young woman
    I swear, Scout,
    sometimes you act so much like a girl it’s mortifyin’.”
  1362. corrugated iron
    usually galvanized sheet iron or sheet steel shaped into straight parallel ridges and hollows
    The cabin’s plank walls were supplemented with sheets of
    corrugated iron, its roof shingled with tin cans hammered flat, so only its general
    shape suggested its original design: square, with four tiny rooms opening onto a
    shotgun hall, the cabin rested uneasily upon four irregular lumps of limestone.
  1363. patch
    a small contrasting part of something
    Early one morning as we were beginning our day’s play in the back yard, Jem and
    I heard something next door in Miss Rachel Haverford’s collard patch.
  1364. afraid
    filled with fear or apprehension
    But Dill got him the third day, when he told Jem that folks in Meridian certainly
    weren’t as afraid as the folks in Maycomb, that he’d never seen such scary folks
    as the ones in Maycomb.
  1365. five
    the cardinal number that is the sum of four and one
    During his first five years in Maycomb, Atticus practiced economy more than
    anything; for several years thereafter he invested his earnings in his brother’s
    education.
  1366. a lot
    to a very great degree or extent
    “First of all,” he said, “if you can learn a simple trick, Scout, you’ll get along a lot
    better with all kinds of folks.
  1367. horn-rimmed
    having the frame made of horn or tortoise shell or plastic that simulates either
    Mr. Heck Tate sat looking intently at Boo through his horn-rimmed glasses.
  1368. jammed
    filled to capacity
    He stuck her sunhat on the
    snowman’s head and jammed her hedge-clippers into the crook of his arm.
  1369. damn
    something of little value
    Jem, that damn lady says Atticus’s been
    teaching me to read and for him to stop it-”
    “Don’t worry, Scout,” Jem comforted me.
  1370. dry up
    lose water or moisture
    When it comes fall this dries up and the
    wind blows it all over Maycomb County!”
  1371. brown
    of a color similar to that of wood or earth
    Mr. Radley walked to town at eleven-thirty every morning and
    came back promptly at twelve, sometimes carrying a brown paper bag that the
    neighborhood assumed contained the family groceries.
  1372. drop
    let fall to the ground
    They did little, but
    enough to be discussed by the town and publicly warned from three pulpits: they
    hung around the barbershop; they rode the bus to Abbottsville on Sundays and
    went to the picture show; they attended dances at the county’s riverside gambling
    hell, the Dew-Drop Inn & Fishing Camp; they experimented with stumphole
    whiskey.
  1373. unsanitary
    not sanitary or healthful
    But Cecil
    said his mother said it was unsanitary to eat after folks.
  1374. flip
    turn upside down, or throw so as to reverse
    A flip of the coin revealed the uncompromising lineaments of Aunt Alexandra
    and Francis.
  1375. look away
    avert one's gaze
    He seemed uncomfortable; he cleared his throat and looked away.
  1376. spoke
    support consisting of a radial member of a wheel joining the hub to the rim
    We stared at him until he spoke:
    “Hey.”
    “Hey yourself,” said Jem pleasantly.
  1377. hooked
    curved down like an eagle's beak
    The big man blinked and hooked his thumbs in his
    overall straps.
  1378. liked
    found pleasant or attractive; often used as a combining form
    He liked
    Maycomb, he was Maycomb County born and bred; he knew his people, they
    knew him, and because of Simon Finch’s industry, Atticus was related by blood
    or marriage to nearly every family in the town.
  1379. despise
    look down on with disdain
    I hate you an‘ despise you an’
    hope you die tomorrow!”
  1380. must
    a necessary or essential thing
    So to school
    you must go.”
  1381. blink
    a reflex that closes and opens the eyes rapidly
    The boy blinked.
  1382. shaking
    the act of causing something to move up and down (or back and forth) with quick movements
    Miss Caroline pointed a shaking finger not at the floor nor at a desk, but to a
    hulking individual unknown to me.
  1383. contentious
    inclined or showing an inclination to dispute or disagree, even to engage in law suits
    “Ain’t got no mother,” was the answer, “and their paw’s right contentious.”
  1384. assault and battery
    an assault in which the assailant makes physical contact
    The town decided something had to
    be done; Mr. Conner said he knew who each and every one of them was, and he
    was bound and determined they wouldn’t get away with it, so the boys came
    before the probate judge on charges of disorderly conduct, disturbing the peace,
    assault and battery, and using abusive and profane language in the presence and
    hearing of a female.
  1385. make it
    succeed in a big way; get to the top
    Two live oaks stood at the edge of the Radley lot; their roots reached out into the
    side-road and made it bumpy.
  1386. highway
    a major road for any form of motor transport
    He had walked ten or eleven of
    the fourteen miles to Maycomb, off the highway in the scrub bushes lest the
    authorities be seeking him, and had ridden the remainder of the way clinging to
    the backboard of a cotton wagon.
  1387. hymn
    a song of praise (to God or to a saint or to a nation)
    I could not
    remember not being able to read hymns.
  1388. connive at
    give one's silent approval to
    Before Jem looks at anyone else he
    looks at me, and I’ve tried to live so I can look squarely back at him… if I
    connived at something like this, frankly I couldn’t meet his eye, and the day I
    can’t do that I’ll know I’ve lost him.
  1389. pulpit
    a platform raised above the surrounding level to give prominence to the person on it
    They did little, but
    enough to be discussed by the town and publicly warned from three pulpits: they
    hung around the barbershop; they rode the bus to Abbottsville on Sundays and
    went to the picture show; they attended dances at the county’s riverside gambling
    hell, the Dew-Drop Inn & Fishing Camp; they experimented with stumphole
    whiskey.
  1390. stolidly
    in a stolid manner
    “Doesn’t make it right,” said Jem stolidly.
  1391. chance
    an unknown and unpredictable phenomenon that causes an event to result one way rather than another
    What Jem called
    the Dewey Decimal System was school-wide by the end of my first year, so I had
    no chance to compare it with other teaching techniques.
  1392. thin
    of relatively small extent from one surface to the opposite or in cross section
    He was a thin leathery man with
    colorless eyes, so colorless they did not reflect light.
  1393. tingle
    cause a stinging or tingling sensation
    A minute later, nerves still tingling,
    Jem and I were on the sidewalk headed for home.
  1394. cellophane
    a transparent paperlike product that is impervious to moisture and used to wrap candy or cigarettes etc.
    Hey, look—”
    Some invisible signal had made the lunchers on the square rise and scatter bits of
    newspaper, cellophane, and wrapping paper.
  1395. toilet paper
    a soft thin absorbent paper for use in toilets
    He
    declared Egyptians walked that way; I said if they did I didn’t see how they got
    anything done, but Jem said they accomplished more than the Americans ever
    did, they invented toilet paper and perpetual embalming, and asked where would
    we be today if they hadn’t?
  1396. come around
    change one's position or opinion
    “Tell you, Atticus,” Cousin
    Ike would say, “the Missouri Compromise was what licked us, but if I had to go
    through it agin I’d walk every step of the way there an‘ every step back jist like I
    did before an’ furthermore we’d whip ‘em this time… now in 1864, when
    Stonewall Jackson came around by—I beg your pardon, young folks.
  1397. worrying
    the act of harassing someone
    There are just some kind of men who—who’re so
    busy worrying about the next world they’ve never learned to live in this one, and
    you can look down the street and see the results.”
  1398. mantelpiece
    shelf that projects from wall above fireplace
    Jem read for perhaps twenty minutes, during which time I looked at the
    soot-stained mantelpiece, out the window, anywhere to keep from looking at her.
  1399. evidence
    your basis for belief or disbelief; knowledge on which to base belief
    The evidence boils down to you-did—I-didn’t.
  1400. sill
    structural member consisting of a continuous horizontal timber forming the lowest member of a framework or supporting structure
    Think maybe I can make it stick on
    the window sill, at least.”
  1401. touched
    having come into contact
    “You touched the house once!”
  1402. later
    happening at a time subsequent to a reference time
    Jem was
    the product of their first year of marriage; four years later I was born, and two
    years later our mother died from a sudden heart attack.
  1403. foolproof
    not liable to failure
    It had been
    a placid week: I had minded Aunty; Jem had outgrown the treehouse, but helped
    Dill and me construct a new rope ladder for it; Dill had hit upon a foolproof plan
    to make Boo Radley come out at no cost to ourselves (place a trail of lemon drops
    from the back door to the front yard and he’d follow it, like an ant).
  1404. raise up
    change the arrangement or position of
    I raised up on my elbow, facing Dill’s outline.
  1405. high
    (literal meaning) being at or having a relatively great or specific elevation or upward extension (sometimes used in combinations like `knee-high')
    He returned to Saint Stephens only once, to find
    a wife, and with her established a line that ran high to daughters.
  1406. confuse
    mistake one thing for another
    According to neighborhood legend, when the younger Radley boy was in his
    teens he became acquainted with some of the Cunninghams from Old Sarum, an
    enormous and confusing tribe domiciled in the northern part of the county, and
    they formed the nearest thing to a gang ever seen in Maycomb.
  1407. stare down
    overcome or cause to waver or submit by (or as if by) staring
    The old house was the same, droopy and sick, but as we stared down the street we
    thought we saw an inside shutter move.
  1408. populate
    inhabit or live in; be an inhabitant of
    Old Sarum, their stamping grounds, was populated by
    two families separate and apart in the beginning, but unfortunately bearing the
    same name.
  1409. drunkenly
    showing effects of much strong drink
    The remains
    of a picket drunkenly guarded the front yard— a “swept” yard that was never
    swept— where johnson grass and rabbit-tobacco grew in abundance.
  1410. Saturday
    the seventh and last day of the week; observed as the Sabbath by Jews and some Christians
    Atticus kept us in fits that evening, gravely reading columns of print about a man
    who sat on a flagpole for no discernible reason, which was reason enough for Jem
    to spend the following Saturday aloft in the treehouse.
  1411. snug
    enjoying or affording comforting warmth and shelter especially in a small space
    It was all
    right for Miss Maudie to talk—she was old and snug on her porch.
  1412. rake
    a long-handled tool with a row of teeth at its head; used to move leaves or loosen soil
    “Now get the basket and haul all the snow you can rake up
    from the back yard to the front.
  1413. icebox
    white goods in which food can be stored at low temperatures
    Enclosed by this barricade
    was a dirty yard containing the remains of a Model-T Ford (on blocks), a
    discarded dentist’s chair, an ancient icebox, plus lesser items: old shoes, worn-out
    table radios, picture frames, and fruit jars, under which scrawny orange chickens
    pecked hopefully.
  1414. rope ladder
    a ladder with side pieces of rope
    It had been
    a placid week: I had minded Aunty; Jem had outgrown the treehouse, but helped
    Dill and me construct a new rope ladder for it; Dill had hit upon a foolproof plan
    to make Boo Radley come out at no cost to ourselves (place a trail of lemon drops
    from the back door to the front yard and he’d follow it, like an ant).
  1415. screaming
    resembling a scream in effect
    Mrs. Radley ran screaming into the street that Arthur was killing them all, but
    when the sheriff arrived he found Boo still sitting in the livingroom, cutting up the
    Tribune.
  1416. chop
    cut with a hacking tool
    Miss Caroline seemed unaware that the ragged, denim-shirted
    and floursack-skirted first grade, most of whom had chopped cotton and fed hogs
    from the time they were able to walk, were immune to imaginative literature.
  1417. white woman
    a woman who is White
    Until my father explained it to me later, I did not understand the
    subtlety of Tom’s predicament: he would not have dared strike a white woman
    under any circumstances and expect to live long, so he took the first opportunity
    to run—a sure sign of guilt.
  1418. gray
    of an achromatic color of any lightness intermediate between the extremes of white and black
    The house was low,
    was once white with a deep front porch and green shutters, but had long ago
    darkened to the color of the slate-gray yard around it.
  1419. sulky
    sullen or moody
    With one phrase he had turned happy picknickers
    into a sulky, tense, murmuring crowd, being slowly hypnotized by gavel taps
    lessening in intensity until the only sound in the courtroom was a dim pink-pinkpink:
    the judge might have been rapping the bench with a pencil.
  1420. khaki
    a sturdy twilled cloth of a yellowish brown color used especially for military uniforms
    A thin man in khaki pants came up the aisle and deposited a coin.
  1421. saliva
    a clear liquid secreted into the mouth by the salivary glands and mucous glands of the mouth; moistens the mouth and starts the digestion of starches
    When she drew it away, it trailed a
    long silver thread of saliva.
  1422. wads
    a large number or amount
    Inside, surrounded by wads of damp cotton, was a white,
    waxy, perfect camellia.
  1423. case
    an occurrence of something
    “Sometimes it’s better to bend
    the law a little in special cases.
  1424. wall
    an architectural partition with a height and length greater than its thickness; used to divide or enclose an area or to support another structure
    We leaped over the low wall that separated Miss Rachel’s yard from our
    driveway.
  1425. gargle
    rinse one's mouth and throat with mouthwash
    You go gargle—right now, you hear me?”
  1426. telephone operator
    someone who helps callers get the person they are calling
    Eula May was Maycomb’s leading telephone operator.
  1427. soft
    yielding readily to pressure or weight
    Ladies bathed before noon, after their three-o’clock naps,
    and by nightfall were like soft teacakes with frostings of sweat and sweet talcum.
  1428. fast
    acting or moving or capable of acting or moving quickly
    As the year passed, released from school thirty minutes before Jem, who had to
    stay until three o’clock, I ran by the Radley Place as fast as I could, not stopping
    until I reached the safety of our front porch.
  1429. starch
    a complex carbohydrate found chiefly in seeds, fruits, tubers, roots and stem pith of plants, notably in corn, potatoes, wheat, and rice; an important foodstuff and used otherwise especially in adhesives and as fillers and stiffeners for paper and textiles
    She had put so much starch
    in my dress it came up like a tent when I sat down.
  1430. be born
    come into existence through birth
    She had been with us ever since Jem
    was born, and I had felt her tyrannical presence as long as I could remember.
  1431. become
    come into existence
    According to neighborhood legend, when the younger Radley boy was in his
    teens he became acquainted with some of the Cunninghams from Old Sarum, an
    enormous and confusing tribe domiciled in the northern part of the county, and
    they formed the nearest thing to a gang ever seen in Maycomb.
  1432. seat
    any support where you can sit (especially the part of a chair or bench etc. on which you sit)
    Maycomb, some twenty miles east of Finch’s Landing, was the county
    seat of Maycomb County.
  1433. reporter
    a person who investigates and reports or edits news stories
    “No…” Atticus walked to the court reporter’s desk and bent down to the furiously
    scribbling hand.
  1434. straight face
    a serious facial expression giving no evidence of interest or amusement
    All the time Ewell was on the stand I couldn’t dare look at John and keep a
    straight face.
  1435. erratically
    in an erratic unpredictable manner
    He walked erratically, as if his right legs were shorter than his left legs.
  1436. look across
    be oriented in a certain direction
    She looked across
    the street at us.
  1437. package
    a wrapped container
    I see it-”
    Jem looked around, reached up, and gingerly pocketed a tiny shiny package.
  1438. Mardi Gras
    the last day before Lent
    “It’s like we were goin‘ to Mardi Gras,” said Jem. “What’s all this for, Cal?”
    “I don’t want anybody sayin‘ I don’t look after my children,” she muttered.
  1439. take off
    remove clothes
    When they saw Jem and me with Calpurnia, the men stepped back and took off
    their hats; the women crossed their arms at their waists, weekday gestures of
    respectful attention.
  1440. nagging
    continually complaining or faultfinding
    Contents - Prev / Next
    Chapter 5
    My nagging got the better of Jem eventually, as I knew it would, and to my relief
    we slowed down the game for a while.
  1441. crisscrossed
    marked with crossing lines
    A network of tiny lines crisscrossed her palms, brown with dirt
    and dried blood.
  1442. have a fit
    get very angry and fly into a rage
    Today she had
    antagonized Jem for nearly two hours with no intention of having a fit, and I felt
    hopelessly trapped.
  1443. innards
    internal organs collectively (especially those in the abdominal cavity)
    “These are his innards,” and our hands were thrust into a plate of
    cold spaghetti.
  1444. underwater
    beneath the surface of the water
    He walked quickly, but I thought he moved like an underwater
    swimmer: time had slowed to a nauseating crawl.
  1445. really
    in actual fact
    I said if he wanted to take a broad view of the thing, it really began with Andrew
    Jackson.
  1446. see the light
    change for the better
    She’s going to tell your father
    and then you’ll wish you never saw the light of day!
  1447. wear out
    deteriorate through use or stress
    He was
    worn out, dirty beyond belief, and home.
  1448. arms
    weapons considered collectively
    As I was the last to leave, I saw her sink
    down into her chair and bury her head in her arms.
  1449. seldom
    not often
    When it healed, and Jem’s fears of never being able to play football were
    assuaged, he was seldom self-conscious about his injury.
  1450. frowning
    showing displeasure or anger
    He walked to the corner of the lot, then back again, studying the simple terrain as
    if deciding how best to effect an entry, frowning and scratching his head.
  1451. round the bend
    informal or slang terms for mentally irregular
    “Why, Atticus said he went round the bend at the University.
  1452. watch out
    be vigilant, be on the lookout or be careful
    “Dill, you watch out, now,” I warned.
  1453. kind of
    to some (great or small) extent
    “First of all,” he said, “if you can learn a simple trick, Scout, you’ll get along a lot
    better with all kinds of folks.
  1454. simply
    in a simple manner; without extravagance or embellishment
    As the Cunninghams had no money to pay a lawyer, they simply paid us with
    what they had.
  1455. lunch
    a midday meal
    “Everybody who goes home to lunch hold up your hands,” said Miss Caroline,
    breaking into my new grudge against Calpurnia.
  1456. wriggling
    moving in a twisting or snake-like or wormlike fashion
    Hours of wintertime had found me in the treehouse, looking over at the
    schoolyard, spying on multitudes of children through a two-power telescope Jem
    had given me, learning their games, following Jem’s red jacket through wriggling
    circles of blind man’s buff, secretly sharing their misfortunes and minor victories.
  1457. bedroom
    a room used primarily for sleeping
    There were six bedrooms upstairs, four for the eight female children, one for
    Welcome Finch, the sole son, and one for visiting relatives.
  1458. furtive
    secret and sly or sordid
    “Something furtive,” Aunt Alexandra said.
  1459. smooth-faced
    lacking hair on the face
    A balding, smooth-faced man, he could have been
    anywhere between forty and sixty.
  1460. second
    coming next after the first in position in space or time or degree or magnitude
    Atticus had urged them to accept the state’s generosity in allowing them to plead
    Guilty to second-degree murder and escape with their lives, but they were
    Haverfords, in Maycomb County a name synonymous with jackass.
  1461. haul
    draw slowly or heavily
    Before the first morning was over, Miss Caroline Fisher, our
    teacher, hauled me up to the front of the room and patted the palm of my hand
    with a ruler, then made me stand in the corner until noon.
  1462. chain
    a series of (usually metal) rings or links fitted into one another to make a flexible ligament
    Nobody knew what form of intimidation Mr. Radley employed to keep Boo out of
    sight, but Jem figured that Mr. Radley kept him chained to the bed most of the
    time.
  1463. perspire
    excrete perspiration through the pores in the skin
    Then he took off his glasses and
    wiped them, and we saw another “first”: we had never seen him sweat—he was
    one of those men whose faces never perspired, but now it was shining tan.
  1464. rehash
    present or use over, with no or few changes
    Jem and I would listen
    respectfully to Atticus and Cousin Ike rehash the war.
  1465. write
    write or name the letters that comprise the conventionally accepted form of (a word or part of a word)
    Miss Caroline
    caught me writing and told me to tell my father to stop teaching me.
  1466. pantry
    a small storeroom for storing foods or wines
    Jem, there’s some wrapping paper in the
    pantry, I think.
  1467. real property
    property consisting of houses and land
    Contents - Prev / Next
    Chapter 11
    When we were small, Jem and I confined our activities to the southern
    neighborhood, but when I was well into the second grade at school and
    tormenting Boo Radley became passe, the business section of Maycomb drew us
    frequently up the street past the real property of Mrs. Henry Lafayette Dubose.
  1468. pretty
    pleasing by delicacy or grace; not imposing
    She was a pretty little thing.
  1469. furniture
    furnishings that make a room or other area ready for occupancy
    Boo bit it off one night when he couldn’t find
    any cats and squirrels to eat.); she sat in the livingroom and cried most of the
    time, while Boo slowly whittled away all the furniture in the house.
  1470. toe
    one of the digits of the foot
    The next day Dill said, “You’re too scared even
    to put your big toe in the front yard.”
  1471. in that
    (formal) in or into that thing or place
    “It was sticking in that tree yonder, the one comin‘ from
    school.”
  1472. reasonable
    showing reason or sound judgment
    John Hale Finch was ten years younger than my father, and chose to
    study medicine at a time when cotton was not worth growing; but after getting
    Uncle Jack started, Atticus derived a reasonable income from the law.
  1473. bucket
    a roughly cylindrical vessel that is open at the top
    Molasses buckets appeared from nowhere, and the ceiling danced with metallic
    light.
  1474. grind
    reduce to small pieces or particles by pounding or abrading
    When he passed we would look at the ground and say,
    “Good morning, sir,” and he would cough in reply.
  1475. virgin forest
    forest or woodland having a mature or overly mature ecosystem more or less uninfluenced by human activity
    She
    chanted mournfully about Maycomb County being older than the state, that it was
    a part of the Mississippi and Alabama Territories, that the first white man to set
    foot in the virgin forests was the Probate Judge’s great-grandfather five times
    removed, who was never heard of again.
  1476. glisten
    be shiny, as if wet
    Miss Maudie’s old sunhat glistened with snow crystals.
  1477. shrieked
    uttered in a shrill scream as of pain or terror
    Jem, naturally, was Boo: he went
    under the front steps and shrieked and howled from time to time.
  1478. wait on
    work for or be a servant to
    “Grandma says all men should learn to cook, that men oughta be careful with
    their wives and wait on ‘em when they don’t feel good,” said my cousin.
  1479. resume
    take up or begin anew
    As Mr.
    Radley passed by, Boo drove the scissors into his parent’s leg, pulled them out,
    wiped them on his pants, and resumed his activities.
  1480. few
    a quantifier that can be used with count nouns and is often preceded by `a'; a small but indefinite number
    Mr. Radley’s elder son lived
    in Pensacola; he came home at Christmas, and he was one of the few persons we
    ever saw enter or leave the place.
  1481. pat
    hit lightly
    Before the first morning was over, Miss Caroline Fisher, our
    teacher, hauled me up to the front of the room and patted the palm of my hand
    with a ruler, then made me stand in the corner until noon.
  1482. douse
    wet thoroughly
    There went with the house the usual legend about the Yankees: one Finch female,
    recently engaged, donned her complete trousseau to save it from raiders in the
    neighborhood; she became stuck in the door to the Daughters’ Staircase but was
    doused with water and finally pushed through.
  1483. viscous
    having a relatively high resistance to flow
    Occasionally it would say, “Pt,” like some viscous
    substance coming to a boil.
  1484. feeling
    a physical sensation that you experience
    “I’m feeling all right, really.”
  1485. pork
    meat from a domestic hog or pig
    Dill made his way through the leftovers and was reaching for a can of pork and
    beans in the pantry when Miss Rachel’s Do-oo Je-sus went off in the hall.
  1486. overnight
    during or for the length of one night
    Jem sat from after
    breakfast until sunset and would have remained overnight had not Atticus severed
    his supply lines.
  1487. myopic
    unable to see distant objects clearly
    Instead,
    Maycomb grew and sprawled out from its hub, Sinkfield’s Tavern, because
    Sinkfield reduced his guests to myopic drunkenness one evening, induced them to
    bring forward their maps and charts, lop off a little here, add a bit there, and
    adjust the center of the county to meet his requirements.
  1488. hexagonal
    having six sides or divided into hexagons
    My arms were beginning to tingle, and they were red with
    small hexagonal marks.
  1489. gardenia
    any of various shrubs and small trees of the genus Gardenia having large fragrant white or yellow flowers
    Mr. Ewell wrote on the back of the envelope and looked up complacently to see
    Judge Taylor staring at him as if he were some fragrant gardenia in full bloom on
    the witness stand, to see Mr. Gilmer half-sitting, half-standing at his table.
  1490. piece of paper
    paper used for writing or printing
    Dill took a piece of paper from his pocket and gave it to Jem. The three of us
    walked cautiously toward the old house.
  1491. tray
    an open receptacle for holding or displaying or serving articles or food
    She carried a tray of charlotte.
  1492. dress up
    put on special clothes to appear particularly appealing and attractive
    One or two of the jury looked vaguely like dressed-up
    Cunninghams.
  1493. running
    the act of running; traveling on foot at a fast pace
    Routine
    contentment was: improving our treehouse that rested between giant twin
    chinaberry trees in the back yard, fussing, running through our list of dramas
    based on the works of Oliver Optic, Victor Appleton, and Edgar Rice Burroughs.
  1494. queasy
    causing or able to cause nausea
    The name Ewell gave me a queasy feeling.
  1495. guilty
    responsible for or chargeable with a reprehensible act
    Atticus had urged them to accept the state’s generosity in allowing them to plead
    Guilty to second-degree murder and escape with their lives, but they were
    Haverfords, in Maycomb County a name synonymous with jackass.
  1496. kin
    a person having kinship with another or others
    She never let a chance escape her to point out the shortcomings of other tribal
    groups to the greater glory of our own, a habit that amused Jem rather than
    annoyed him: “Aunty better watch how she talks—scratch most folks in
    Maycomb and they’re kin to us.”
  1497. lightning rod
    a metallic conductor that is attached to a high point and leads to the ground; protects the building from destruction by lightning
    Lightning rods guarding some graves denoted dead who rested
    uneasily; stumps of burned-out candles stood at the heads of infant graves.
  1498. junction
    an act of joining or adjoining things
    Two days later Dill arrived in a blaze of glory: he had ridden the train by himself
    from Meridian to Maycomb Junction (a courtesy title—Maycomb Junction was in
    Abbott County) where he had been met by Miss Rachel in Maycomb’s one taxi;
    he had eaten dinner in the diner, he had seen two twins hitched together get off
    the train in Bay St. Louis and stuck to his story regardless of threats.
  1499. darky
    (ethnic slur) offensive term for Black people
    That darky’s wife.
  1500. in this
    (formal) in or into that thing or place
    Mindful of John Wesley’s strictures on the use of many words
    in buying and selling, Simon made a pile practicing medicine, but in this pursuit
    he was unhappy lest he be tempted into doing what he knew was not for the glory
    of God, as the putting on of gold and costly apparel.
  1501. idea
    the content of cognition; the main thing you are thinking about
    He said it began the summer Dill came to us, when Dill first gave us the idea
    of making Boo Radley come out.
  1502. rise
    move upward
    I rose graciously on Walter’s behalf: “Ah—Miss Caroline?”
  1503. hipped
    having hips; or having hips as specified (usually in combination)
    Atticus said one
    time the reason Aunty’s so hipped on the family is because all we’ve got’s
    background and not a dime to our names.”
  1504. play tricks
    deceive somebody
    No, only last summer—no, summer before last,
    when… time was playing tricks on me.
  1505. straw
    plant fiber used e.g. for making baskets and hats or as fodder
    Wooden sawhorses blocked the road at each end of the
    Radley lot, straw was put down on the sidewalk, traffic was diverted to the back
    street.
  1506. empty
    holding or containing nothing
    I returned and gazed around the curve at the empty road.
  1507. squalor
    sordid dirtiness
    Out there in J. Grimes Everett’s land there’s nothing but
    sin and squalor.”
  1508. scrape
    cut the surface of; wear away the surface of
    Jem said if we waited until it snowed some
    more we could scrape it all up for a snowman.
  1509. halfway
    at half the distance; at the middle
    Halfway through the collards I tripped; as I tripped the roar of a shotgun shattered
    the neighborhood.
  1510. scamper
    to move about or proceed hurriedly
    Below us, heads turned, feet scraped the floor, babies were shifted to shoulders,
    and a few children scampered out of the courtroom.
  1511. bus
    a vehicle carrying many passengers; used for public transport
    They did little, but
    enough to be discussed by the town and publicly warned from three pulpits: they
    hung around the barbershop; they rode the bus to Abbottsville on Sundays and
    went to the picture show; they attended dances at the county’s riverside gambling
    hell, the Dew-Drop Inn & Fishing Camp; they experimented with stumphole
    whiskey.
  1512. bow tie
    a man's tie that ties in a bow
    Francis had requested a pair of knee-pants, a red
    leather booksack, five shirts and an untied bow tie.
  1513. bit
    a small piece or quantity of something
    Bit by bit, I told him the day’s misfortunes. “-and she said you taught me all
    wrong, so we can’t ever read any more, ever.
  1514. steam engine
    external-combustion engine in which heat is used to raise steam which either turns a turbine or forces a piston to move up and down in a cylinder
    Jem thought he had enough to buy a
    miniature steam engine for himself and a twirling baton for me.
  1515. mildly
    to a moderate degree
    If the remainder of the school year
    were as fraught with drama as the first day, perhaps it would be mildly
    entertaining, but the prospect of spending nine months refraining from reading
    and writing made me think of running away.
  1516. pitcher
    (baseball) the person who does the pitching
    Atticus
    summoned Calpurnia, who returned bearing the syrup pitcher.
  1517. box
    a (usually rectangular) container; may have a lid
    We
    ran home, and on the front porch we looked at a small box patchworked with bits
    of tinfoil collected from chewing-gum wrappers.
  1518. surprised
    taken unawares or suddenly and feeling wonder or astonishment
    He seemed surprised when he saw most of the back
    yard in the front yard, but he said we had done a jim-dandy job.
  1519. ripple
    a small wave on the surface of a liquid
    Old Mrs. Radley died that winter, but her death caused hardly a ripple—the
    neighborhood seldom saw her, except when she watered her cannas.
  1520. tooth
    hard bonelike structures in the jaws of vertebrates; used for biting and chewing or for attack and defense
    There was a long jagged scar that ran across his face;
    what teeth he had were yellow and rotten; his eyes popped, and he drooled most
    of the time.
  1521. live in
    live in the house where one works
    Mr. Radley’s elder son lived
    in
    Pensacola; he came home at Christmas, and he was one of the few persons we
    ever saw enter or leave the place.
  1522. push back
    cause to move back by force or influence
    He pushed back my bangs and
    looked at me.
  1523. handed
    having or involving the use of hands
    Mr. Tate handed the rifle to Atticus; Jem and I nearly
    fainted.
  1524. tremble
    move or jerk quickly and involuntarily up and down or sideways
    I got to my feet, trembling as I thawed.
  1525. pestering
    causing irritation or annoyance
    His appetite
    was appalling, and he told me so many times to stop pestering him I consulted
    Atticus: “Reckon he’s got a tapeworm?”
  1526. school day
    any day on which school is in session
    Jem said he reckoned he wasn’t, he’d passed
    the Radley Place every school day of his life.
  1527. envelope
    a flat (usually rectangular) container for a letter, thin package, etc.
    Jem put the note in an envelope.
  1528. come by
    obtain, especially accidentally
    As
    Maycomb County was farm country, nickels and dimes were hard to come by for
    doctors and dentists and lawyers.
  1529. business
    the principal activity in your life that you do to earn money
    But there came a day, barely within Jem’s memory, when Boo Radley was heard
    from and was seen by several people, but not by Jem. He said Atticus never talked
    much about the Radleys: when Jem would question him Atticus’s only answer
    was for him to mind his own business and let the Radleys mind theirs, they had a
    right to; but when it happened Jem said Atticus shook his head and said, “Mm,
    mm, mm.”
  1530. edge
    a line determining the limits of an area
    My memory came alive to see Mrs. Radley occasionally open the front door, walk
    to the edge of the porch, and pour water on her cannas.
  1531. mandrake
    a plant of southern Europe and North Africa having purple flowers, yellow fruits and a forked root formerly thought to have magical powers
    I so often wondered how she could be
    Atticus’s and Uncle Jack’s sister that I revived half-remembered tales of
    changelings and mandrake roots that Jem had spun long ago.
  1532. confusing
    causing confusion or disorientation
    According to neighborhood legend, when the younger Radley boy was in his
    teens he became acquainted with some of the Cunninghams from Old Sarum, an
    enormous and confusing tribe domiciled in the northern part of the county, and
    they formed the nearest thing to a gang ever seen in Maycomb.
  1533. enunciate
    express or state clearly
    Prejudice,” she enunciated carefully.
  1534. rotted
    damaged by decay; hence unsound and useless
    Rain-rotted shingles
    drooped over the eaves of the veranda; oak trees kept the sun away.
  1535. reassure
    cause to feel sure; give reassurance to
    I reassured him: “Can’t anybody tell what you’re
    gonna do lest they live in the house with you, and even I can’t tell sometimes.”
  1536. notice
    the act of noticing or paying attention
    No one had noticed him, probably, because Miss Caroline and I had entertained
    the class most of the morning.
  1537. wrap
    cloak that is folded or wrapped around a person
    That keeps ‘em from wrapping around you-”
    “Don’t you believe a word he says, Dill,” I said.
  1538. getting
    the act of acquiring something
    John Hale Finch was ten years younger than my father, and chose to
    study medicine at a time when cotton was not worth growing; but after getting
    Uncle Jack started, Atticus derived a reasonable income from the law.
  1539. trunk
    the main stem of a tree; usually covered with bark; the bole is usually the part that is commercially useful for lumber
    I’m gonna put em in my trunk.”
  1540. each
    (used of count nouns) every one considered individually
    The town decided something had to
    be done; Mr. Conner said he knew who each and every one of them was, and he
    was bound and determined they wouldn’t get away with it, so the boys came
    before the probate judge on charges of disorderly conduct, disturbing the peace,
    assault and battery, and using abusive and profane language in the presence and
    hearing of a female.
  1541. foam at the mouth
    be in a state of uncontrolled anger
    He’ll
    probably follow the road…”
    I thought mad dogs foamed at the mouth, galloped, leaped and lunged at throats,
    and I thought they did it in August.
  1542. two-step
    a ballroom dance in duple meter; marked by sliding steps
    Jem skipped two steps, put his foot on the porch, heaved himself to it, and
    teetered a long moment.
  1543. get around
    move around; move from place to place
    After my bout with Cecil Jacobs
    when I committed myself to a policy of cowardice, word got around that Scout
    Finch wouldn’t fight any more, her daddy wouldn’t let her.
  1544. wash
    clean with some chemical process
    Jem gave a reasonable description of Boo: Boo was about six-and-a-half feet tall,
    judging from his tracks; he dined on raw squirrels and any cats he could catch,
    that’s why his hands were bloodstained—if you ate an animal raw, you could
    never wash the blood off.
  1545. kerosene lamp
    a lamp that burns oil (as kerosine) for light
    Along its walls unlighted
    kerosene lamps hung on brass brackets; pine benches served as pews.
  1546. face up
    deal with (something unpleasant) head on
    “Scared of arrest, scared you’d have to face up to what you did?”
  1547. songbird
    any bird having a musical call
    He
    likened Tom’s death to the senseless slaughter of songbirds by hunters and
    children, and Maycomb thought he was trying to write an editorial poetical
    enough to be reprinted in The Montgomery Advertiser.
  1548. grimly
    in a grim implacable manner
    “That is three-fourths colored folks and one-fourth Stephanie Crawford,” said
    Miss Maudie grimly.
  1549. go over
    examine so as to determine accuracy, quality, or condition
    “Do better if you go over it instead of under it,” I said.
  1550. defense
    the act of defending someone or something against attack or injury
    The
    Haverfords had dispatched Maycomb’s leading blacksmith in a misunderstanding
    arising from the alleged wrongful detention of a mare, were imprudent enough to
    do it in the presence of three witnesses, and insisted that the-son-of-a-bitch-had-itcoming-
    to-him was a good enough defense for anybody.
  1551. fun
    activities that are enjoyable or amusing
    I never thought it as much fun as Tarzan, and I
    played that summer with more than vague anxiety despite Jem’s assurances that
    Boo Radley was dead and nothing would get me, with him and Calpurnia there in
    the daytime and Atticus home at night.
  1552. clear
    readily apparent to the mind
    I thought I had made things sufficiently clear.
  1553. contradict
    prove negative; show to be false
    “There’s
    some folks who don’t eat like us,” she whispered fiercely, “but you ain’t called on
    to contradict ‘em at the table when they don’t.
  1554. craw
    a pouch in many birds and some lower animals that resembles a stomach for storage and preliminary maceration of food
    Bob Ewell’s got a
    kitchen knife in his craw.”
  1555. scat
    flee; take to one's heels; cut and run
    So scat,” he said to me.
  1556. impressionistic
    of or relating to or based on an impression rather than on facts or reasoning
    No comment
    seemed to be expected of us, and the class received these impressionistic
    revelations in silence.
  1557. dinner
    the main meal of the day served in the evening or at midday
    “Come on home to dinner with us, Walter,” he said.
  1558. marry
    take in marriage
    Their sister Alexandra was the
    Finch who remained at the Landing: she married a taciturn man who spent most
    of his time lying in a hammock by the river wondering if his trot-lines were full.
  1559. pause
    cease an action temporarily
    Miss Maudie’s benevolence extended to Jem and Dill, whenever they paused in
    their pursuits: we reaped the benefits of a talent Miss Maudie had hitherto kept
    hidden from us.
  1560. rattle
    make short successive sounds
    The air was so cold and clear we heard the courthouse clock
    clank, rattle and strain before it struck the hour.
  1561. mutt
    an inferior dog or one of mixed breed
    Besides being the sassiest, most disrespectful mutts who
    ever passed her way, we were told that it was quite a pity our father had not
    remarried after our mother’s death.
  1562. lock up
    secure by locking
    “Why do you think Miss Rachel locks up so tight at
    night?
  1563. cover
    provide with a covering or cause to be covered
    At first we saw nothing but a kudzu-covered front porch,
    but a closer inspection revealed an arc of water descending from the leaves and
    splashing in the yellow circle of the street light, some ten feet from source to
    earth, it seemed to us.
  1564. roll
    move by turning over or rotating
    Miss Caroline inspected her roll-book.
  1565. dim
    lacking in light; not bright or harsh
    I was proceeding on the dim theory, aside from the innate
    attractiveness of such words, that if Atticus discovered I had picked them up at
    school he wouldn’t make me go.
  1566. drunk
    someone who is intoxicated
    “He never drunk a drop in
    his life—nome, yes he did.
  1567. clear the air
    dispel differences or negative emotions
    Best way to clear the air is
    to have it all out in the open.
  1568. fight back
    defend oneself
    “Did you scream and fight back?”
  1569. hushing
    a fricative sound (especially as an expression of disapproval)
    “I’m sorry if I spoke sharply, Heck,” Atticus said simply, “but nobody’s hushing
    this up.
  1570. record book
    a compilation of the known facts regarding something or someone
    To reach the courtroom, on the second floor, one passed sundry sunless county
    cubbyholes: the tax assessor, the tax collector, the county clerk, the county
    solicitor, the circuit clerk, the judge of probate lived in cool dim hutches that
    smelled of decaying record books mingled with old damp cement and stale urine.
  1571. uncontrollably
    in an uncontrolled manner
    His voice
    rose uncontrollably, “Atticus, what’s the matter?”
  1572. reshape
    shape anew or differently
    Mrs. Merriweather
    galloped to me, reshaped the chicken wire, and thrust me inside.
  1573. cook
    transform by heating
    We lived on the main residential street in town— Atticus, Jem and I, plus
    Calpurnia our cook.
  1574. someday
    some unspecified time in the future
    Someday, maybe, Scout can
    thank him for covering her up.”
  1575. carve
    engrave or cut by chipping away at a surface
    Jem let me do the honors: I pulled out two small images carved in soap.
  1576. evasion
    the act of physically escaping from something (an opponent or a pursuer or an unpleasant situation) by some adroit maneuver
    “Nothing,” said Jem.
    Jem’s evasion told me our game was a secret, so I kept quiet.
  1577. sneeze
    exhale spasmodically, as when an irritant entered one's nose
    Besides making change in the collection plate every Sunday, Mr. Avery sat on the
    porch every night until nine o’clock and sneezed.
  1578. airtight
    not allowing air or gas to pass in or out
    “Well, he can make somebody’s will so airtight can’t anybody meddle with it.”
  1579. arbor
    a framework that supports climbing plants
    Our tacit treaty with Miss Maudie was that we could play on her lawn, eat her
    scuppernongs if we didn’t jump on the arbor, and explore her vast back lot, terms
    so generous we seldom spoke to her, so careful were we to preserve the delicate
    balance of our relationship, but Jem and Dill drove me closer to her with their
    behavior.
  1580. plate
    dish on which food is served or from which food is eaten
    Jem ran to the kitchen and asked Calpurnia to set an extra plate, we
    had company.
  1581. scurrying
    moving with great haste
    Soft taffeta-like sounds and
    muffled scurrying sounds filled me with helpless dread.
  1582. nowhere
    not anywhere; in or at or to no place
    There was no hurry, for there was nowhere to go,
    nothing to buy and no money to buy it with, nothing to see outside the boundaries
    of Maycomb County.
  1583. boot
    footwear that covers the whole foot and lower leg
    He was long-nosed, wore boots with shiny metal eye-holes, boot pants
    and a lumber jacket.
  1584. Adolf Hitler
    German Nazi dictator during World War II (1889-1945)
    When his turn came, he went to the
    front of the room and began, “Old Hitler—”
    Adolf Hitler, Cecil,” said Miss Gates.
  1585. come before
    be the predecessor of
    The town decided something had to
    be done; Mr. Conner said he knew who each and every one of them was, and he
    was bound and determined they wouldn’t get away with it, so the boys came
    before
    the probate judge on charges of disorderly conduct, disturbing the peace,
    assault and battery, and using abusive and profane language in the presence and
    hearing of a female.
  1586. basement
    the lowermost portion of a structure partly or wholly below ground level; often used for storage
    The sheriff hadn’t the heart to put him in jail alongside Negroes, so
    Boo was locked in the courthouse basement.
  1587. philippic
    a speech of violent denunciation
    I pulled at his sleeve, and we were followed up the sidewalk by a
    philippic on our family’s moral degeneration, the major premise of which was
    that half the Finches were in the asylum anyway, but if our mother were living we
    would not have come to such a state.
  1588. hushed
    in a softened tone
    I turned to Calpurnia but was hushed before I opened my mouth.
  1589. may
    thorny Eurasian shrub of small tree having dense clusters of white to scarlet flowers followed by deep red berries; established as an escape in eastern North America
    Miss Stephanie said old Mr. Radley said no Radley was going to any asylum,
    when it was suggested that a season in Tuscaloosa might be helpful to Boo. Boo
    wasn’t crazy, he was high-strung at times.
  1590. itch
    an irritating cutaneous sensation that produces a desire to scratch
    “Do you itch, Jem?” I asked as politely as I could.
  1591. groggy
    stunned or confused and slow to react (as from blows or drunkenness or exhaustion)
    Jem was standing beside Atticus, groggy and tousled.
  1592. leafed
    having leaves or leaves as specified; often used in combination
    From her desk she produced a thick volume, leafed through its pages and read for
    a moment.
  1593. papoose
    an American Indian infant
    Those unable to sit were strapped papoose-style on their mothers’ backs,
    or resided in extra cotton bags.
  1594. speak up
    express one's opinion openly and without fear or hesitation
    Mr. Underwood spoke up.
  1595. tell on
    give away information about somebody
    She had never told
    on
    us, had never played cat-and-mouse with us, she was not at all interested in our
    private lives.
  1596. comfortable
    providing or experiencing physical well-being or relief (`comfy' is informal)
    “I’d feel mighty comfortable if you did
    now,” he said.
  1597. moving
    in motion
    I could not remember when the lines above Atticus’s moving finger
    separated into words, but I had stared at them all the evenings in my memory,
    listening to the news of the day, Bills to Be Enacted into Laws, the diaries of
    Lorenzo Dow—anything Atticus happened to be reading when I crawled into his
    lap every night.
  1598. hardware
    instrumentalities (tools or implements) made of metal
    At each seat was a cheap
    cardboard fan bearing a garish Garden of Gethsemane, courtesy Tyndal’s
    Hardware Co. (You-Name-It-We-Sell-It).
  1599. bend
    form a curve
    Calpurnia bent down and kissed me.
  1600. woodpile
    a pile or stack of wood to be used for fuel
    Jem ran to the back yard, produced the garden hoe and began digging quickly
    behind the woodpile, placing any worms he found to one side.
  1601. sleepy
    ready to fall asleep
    They were sullen-looking, sleepy-eyed men
    who seemed unused to late hours.
  1602. soil erosion
    the washing away of soil by the flow of water
    And for goodness’
    sake put some of the county back where it belongs, the soil erosion’s bad enough
    as it is.”
  1603. careful
    exercising caution or showing care or attention
    When we slowed to a walk at the edge of the schoolyard, Jem was
    careful to explain that during school hours I was not to bother him, I was not to
    approach him with requests to enact a chapter of Tarzan and the Ant Men, to
    embarrass him with references to his private life, or tag along behind him at
    recess and noon.
  1604. rug
    floor covering consisting of a piece of thick heavy fabric (usually with nap or pile)
    He carried my baton in one hand; its filthy yellow tassel trailed on the rug.
  1605. swear
    to declare or affirm solemnly and formally as true
    I swear, Scout,
    sometimes you act so much like a girl it’s mortifyin’.”
  1606. top
    the upper part of anything
    Jem had his little sister to think of the
    time I dared him to jump off the top of the house: “If I got killed, what’d become
    of you?” he asked.
  1607. same
    same in identity
    The old house was the same, droopy and sick, but as we stared down the street we
    thought we saw an inside shutter move.
  1608. asleep
    in a state of sleep
    “He can get out at night when we’re all asleep…” I said.
  1609. burst
    come open suddenly and violently, as if from internal pressure
    I was bursting
    with a sudden thought.
  1610. fingering
    the placement of the fingers for playing different notes (or sequences of notes) on a musical instrument
    He picked up the camellia,
    and when I went off to bed I saw him fingering the wide petals.
  1611. glad
    showing or causing joy and pleasure; especially made happy
    Knowing that Mr. Radley’s word was his bond, the judge was
    glad to do so.
  1612. classmate
    an acquaintance that you go to school with
    He was much older than the parents of our school contemporaries, and
    there was nothing Jem or I could say about him when our classmates said, “My
    father—”
    Jem was football crazy.
  1613. burned-out
    destroyed or badly damaged by fire
    Lightning rods guarding some graves denoted dead who rested
    uneasily; stumps of burned-out candles stood at the heads of infant graves.
  1614. wishful thinking
    the illusion that what you wish for is actually true
    It was wishful thinking.
  1615. club member
    someone who is a member of a club
    “Whoa now, just a minute,” said a club member, holding up his walking stick.
  1616. bawl
    cry loudly
    He evidently remembered he was engaged to me, for he ran back
    out and kissed me swiftly in front of Jem. “Yawl write, hear?” he bawled after us.
  1617. hated
    treated with contempt
    I returned to school and hated Calpurnia steadily until a sudden shriek shattered
    my resentments.
  1618. meet
    come together
    She was a Graham
    from Montgomery; Atticus met her when he was first elected to the state
    legislature.
  1619. rippled
    shaken into waves or undulations as by wind
    Tom Robinson’s powerful shoulders rippled under his thin shirt.
  1620. end
    either extremity of something that has length
    The Radley Place was inhabited by an
    unknown entity the mere description of whom was enough to make us behave for
    days on end; Mrs. Dubose was plain hell.
  1621. conclude
    bring to a close
    “She
    likes Jem better’n she likes me, anyway,” I concluded, and suggested that Atticus
    lose no time in packing her off.
  1622. do away with
    terminate, end, or take out
    We oughta do away with juries.”
  1623. screwdriver
    a hand tool for driving screws; has a tip that fits into the head of a screw
    I said you got a screwdriver, Miss
    Mayella?
  1624. being
    the state or fact of existing
    When it healed, and Jem’s fears of never being able to play football were
    assuaged, he was seldom self-conscious about his injury.
  1625. bear
    be pregnant with
    He liked
    Maycomb, he was Maycomb County born and bred; he knew his people, they
    knew him, and because of Simon Finch’s industry, Atticus was related by blood
    or marriage to nearly every family in the town.
  1626. clown
    a person who amuses others by ridiculous behavior
    “I think I’ll be a clown when I get grown,” said Dill.
  1627. year of grace
    any year of the Christian era
    There is a tendency in
    this year of grace, 1935, for certain people to use this phrase out of context, to
    satisfy all conditions.
  1628. eased
    (of pain or sorrow) made easier to bear
    We eased in beside Miss Maudie, who looked around.
  1629. dispel
    to cause to separate and go in different directions
    It was dim inside, with a damp
    coolness slowly dispelled by the gathering congregation.
  1630. run out
    use up all one's strength and energy and stop working
    “You gonna run out on a dare?” asked Dill.
  1631. riding boot
    a boot without laces that is worn for riding horses; part of a riding habit
    He wore the only English riding boots I had ever seen.
  1632. ear
    the sense organ for hearing and equilibrium
    “In a pig’s ear you did, Dill.
  1633. siren
    a warning signal that is a loud wailing sound
    We had no chance to find out: Miss Rachel went off like the town fire siren: “Doo-
    o Jee-sus, Dill Harris!
  1634. time of day
    clock time
    “Where are you two going at this time of day?” she shouted.
  1635. puzzlement
    confusion resulting from failure to understand
    Wondering what bargain we had made, I turned to the class for an
    answer, but the class looked back at me in puzzlement.
  1636. belt
    endless loop of flexible material between two rotating shafts or pulleys
    He was a real mean one… below the belt… you ain’t called on to teach folks
    like that… them ain’t Maycomb’s ways, Miss Caroline, not really… now don’t
    you fret, ma’am.
  1637. reason out
    decide by reasoning; draw or come to a conclusion
    Mr. Link Deas eventually
    received the impression that Helen was coming to work each morning from the
    wrong direction, and dragged the reason out of her.
  1638. usual
    occurring or encountered or experienced or observed frequently or in accordance with regular practice or procedure
    “We’ll consider it sealed without the usual formality,” Atticus said, when he saw
    me preparing to spit.
  1639. figured
    (of e.g. fabric design) adorned with patterns
    Nobody knew what form of intimidation Mr. Radley employed to keep Boo out of
    sight, but Jem figured that Mr. Radley kept him chained to the bed most of the
    time.
  1640. lean back
    move the upper body backwards and down
    In possession of his court once more, Judge Taylor leaned back in his chair.
  1641. high school
    a public secondary school usually including grades 9 through 12
    It was then my burning ambition
    to grow up and twirl with the Maycomb County High School band.
  1642. stage
    any distinct time period in a sequence of events
    Bad language is
    a stage all children go through, and it dies with time when they learn they’re not
    attracting attention with it.
  1643. turn on
    cause to operate by flipping a switch
    “The house got so lonesome ‘long about two
    o’clock I had to turn on the radio.”
  1644. parent
    a father or mother; one who begets or one who gives birth to or nurtures and raises a child; a relative who plays the role of guardian
    As Mr.
    Radley passed by, Boo drove the scissors into his parent’s leg, pulled them out,
    wiped them on his pants, and resumed his activities.
  1645. cynical
    believing the worst of human nature and motives; having a sneering disbelief in e.g. selflessness of others
    The witnesses for the state, with the exception of
    the sheriff of Maycomb County, have presented themselves to you gentlemen, to
    this court, in the cynical confidence that their testimony would not be doubted,
    confident that you gentlemen would go along with them on the assumption—the
    evil assumption—that all Negroes lie, that all Negroes are basically immoral
    beings, that all Negro men are not to be trusted around our women, an assumption
    one associates with minds of their caliber.
  1646. sundown
    the time in the evening at which the sun begins to fall below the horizon
    Every thing that happens in this town’s out to the
    Quarters before sundown.”
  1647. release
    grant freedom to; free from confinement
    If the judge released Arthur, Mr. Radley would see to it that Arthur gave no
    further trouble.
  1648. dazedly
    in a daze; in a dazed manner
    Tim Johnson came into sight, walking dazedly in the inner rim of the curve
    parallel to the Radley house.
  1649. tacky
    tastelessly showy
    “Aw, tacky.
  1650. in a way
    from some points of view
    Aunt Alexandra managed to smile in a way that conveyed a gentle apology to
    Cousin Lily and firm disapproval to me.
  1651. scrubbed
    made clean by scrubbing
    Inside were two scrubbed and polished pennies, one on top of the other.
  1652. get along with
    have smooth relations
    “I mean, is he good to you, is he easy to get along with?”
  1653. attention
    the process whereby a person concentrates on some features of the environment to the (relative) exclusion of others
    Miss
    Scout, if you give me your attention I’ll tell you what entailment is.
  1654. cut across
    cut using a diagonal line
    A Negro would not pass the Radley Place at night, he would cut
    across
    to the sidewalk opposite and whistle as he walked.
  1655. left over
    not used up
    He did a fair job, only one spring and two tiny pieces left over, but the watch
    would not run.
  1656. stays
    a woman's close-fitting foundation garment
    “Arthur Radley just stays in the house, that’s all,” said Miss Maudie.
  1657. inaudible
    impossible to hear; imperceptible by the ear
    Jem’s lips moved, but his, “Yes sir,” was inaudible.
  1658. negligee
    a loose dressing gown for women
    Miss Rachel Haverford’s
    excuse for a glass of neat whiskey every morning was that she never got over the
    fright of finding a rattler coiled in her bedroom closet, on her washing, when she
    went to hang up her negligee.
  1659. churchgoer
    a religious person who goes to church regularly
    Judge Taylor was not a Sunday-night
    churchgoer: Mrs. Taylor was.
  1660. tax system
    a legal system for assessing and collecting taxes
    “Oh, Scout, it’s like reorganizing the tax systems of the counties and things.
  1661. in on
    participating in or knowledgeable out
    How would we like it if Atticus barged in on us without knocking, when we were
    in our rooms at night?
  1662. awkwardly
    in an awkward manner
    It was twenty miles east of Finch’s Landing, awkwardly inland for
    such an old town.
  1663. slow down
    lose velocity; move more slowly
    Contents - Prev / Next
    Chapter 5
    My nagging got the better of Jem eventually, as I knew it would, and to my relief
    we slowed down the game for a while.
  1664. own
    belonging to or on behalf of a specified person (especially yourself); preceded by a possessive
    But there came a day, barely within Jem’s memory, when Boo Radley was heard
    from and was seen by several people, but not by Jem. He said Atticus never talked
    much about the Radleys: when Jem would question him Atticus’s only answer
    was for him to mind his own business and let the Radleys mind theirs, they had a
    right to; but when it happened Jem said Atticus shook his head and said, “Mm,
    mm, mm.”
  1665. concede
    give over; surrender or relinquish to the physical control of another
    It was all right to shut him up, Mr.
    Radley conceded, but insisted that Boo not be charged with anything: he was not
    a criminal.
  1666. suspiciously
    with suspicion
    Our father’s mouth was suspiciously firm,
    as if he were trying to hold it in line.
  1667. frosting
    a flavored sugar topping used to coat and decorate cakes
    Ladies bathed before noon, after their three-o’clock naps,
    and by nightfall were like soft teacakes with frostings of sweat and sweet talcum.
  1668. duress
    compulsory force or threat
    Mr. Merriweather, a faithful Methodist under duress, apparently saw nothing
    personal in singing, “Amazing Grace, how sweet the sound, that saved a wretch
    like me…” It was the general opinion of Maycomb, however, that Mrs.
    Merriweather had sobered him up and made a reasonably useful citizen of him.
  1669. O.K.
    in a satisfactory or adequate manner
    You’ll grow up waiting on tables if somebody
    doesn’t change your ways—a Finch waiting on tables at the O.K. Café—hah!”
  1670. cross-eyed
    having convergent strabismus
    As I made my way
    home, I felt very old, but when I looked at the tip of my nose I could see fine
    misty beads, but looking cross-eyed made me dizzy so I quit.
  1671. sound asleep
    sleeping deeply
    But the officers of the court, the ones present—Atticus, Mr. Gilmer, Judge Taylor
    sound asleep, and Bert, were the only ones whose behavior seemed normal.
  1672. black tie
    a black bow tie worn with a dinner jacket
    He was a short, stocky man in a black suit, black tie,
    white shirt, and a gold watch-chain that glinted in the light from the frosted
    windows.
  1673. nauseated
    feeling nausea; feeling about to vomit
    Dizzy and nauseated, I lay on the cement
    and shook my head still, pounded my ears to silence, and heard Jem’s voice:
    “Scout, get away from there, come on!”
  1674. dining table
    a table at which meals are served
    At Christmas dinner, I sat at the little table in the diningroom; Jem and Francis sat
    with the adults at the dining table.
  1675. make sure
    make a point of doing something; act purposefully and intentionally
    “Only a week longer, I think,” she said, “just to make sure…”
    Jem rose.
  1676. mash
    to compress with violence, out of natural shape or condition
    “Why couldn’t I mash him?”
  1677. wholehearted
    with unconditional and enthusiastic devotion
    I could see nothing in Mayella’s expression to justify Atticus’s assumption that he
    had secured her wholehearted cooperation.
  1678. teeny
    (used informally) very small
    There’s a little teeny light way off somewhere, though.”
  1679. crumple
    to gather something into small wrinkles or folds
    Tim Johnson leaped, flopped over and crumpled on the
    sidewalk in a brown-and-white heap.
  1680. yet
    up to the present time
    Simon would have regarded with impotent fury the disturbance between the North
    and the South, as it left his descendants stripped of everything but their land, yet
    the tradition of living on the land remained unbroken until well into the twentieth
    century, when my father, Atticus Finch, went to Montgomery to read law, and his
    younger brother went to Boston to study medicine.
  1681. look out
    be vigilant, be on the lookout or be careful
    Next morning I awoke, looked out the window and nearly died of fright.
  1682. stay over
    stay overnight
    “He can stay over sometimes after school,
    too.
  1683. busted
    out of working order (`busted' is an informal substitute for `broken')
    “Not the same chiffarobe you busted up?” asked Atticus.
  1684. narrowed
    made narrow; limited in breadth
    Miss Maudie’s eyes narrowed.
  1685. trashy
    tastelessly showy
    It’s hard to explain—ignorant, trashy people use it
    when they think somebody’s favoring Negroes over and above themselves.
  1686. unforgivable
    not excusable
    The
    Radleys, welcome anywhere in town, kept to themselves, a predilection
    unforgivable in Maycomb.
  1687. doorway
    the entrance (the space in a wall) through which you enter or leave a room or building; the space that a door can close
    When I appeared in the doorway, Aunty would look as if she regretted her
    request; I was usually mud-splashed or covered with sand.
  1688. lots
    a large number or amount
    Why, he can do lots of things.”
  1689. invite
    ask someone in a friendly way to do something
    Lastly, we
    were to stay away from that house until we were invited there, we were not to
    play an asinine game he had seen us playing or make fun of anybody on this street
    or in this town-
    “We weren’t makin‘ fun of him, we weren’t laughin’ at him,” said Jem, “we were
    just-”
    “So that was what you were doing, wasn’t it?”
  1690. as well
    in addition
    She
    was always ordering me out of the kitchen, asking me why I couldn’t behave as
    well
    as Jem when she knew he was older, and calling me home when I wasn’t
    ready to come.
  1691. worn out
    drained of energy or effectiveness; extremely tired; completely exhausted
    He was
    worn out, dirty beyond belief, and home.
  1692. edification
    uplifting enlightenment
    “No,” said Atticus, “putting his life’s history on display for the edification of the
    neighborhood.”
  1693. unhurried
    relaxed and leisurely; without hurry or haste
    Jem was talking in an unhurried, flat
    toneless voice.
  1694. refill
    fill something that had previously been emptied
    And so they went, down the row of laughing women, around the diningroom,
    refilling coffee cups, dishing out goodies as though their only regret was the
    temporary domestic disaster of losing Calpurnia.
  1695. rested
    not tired; refreshed as by sleeping or relaxing
    Routine
    contentment was: improving our treehouse that rested between giant twin
    chinaberry trees in the back yard, fussing, running through our list of dramas
    based on the works of Oliver Optic, Victor Appleton, and Edgar Rice Burroughs.
  1696. hateful
    evoking or deserving hatred
    Dill said striking a match under a turtle was hateful.
  1697. flagpole
    a tall staff or pole on which a flag is raised
    Atticus kept us in fits that evening, gravely reading columns of print about a man
    who sat on a flagpole for no discernible reason, which was reason enough for Jem
    to spend the following Saturday aloft in the treehouse.
  1698. double-barreled
    having two barrels mounted side by side
    Mr. Underwood and a double-barreled shotgun were leaning out his window
    above The Maycomb Tribune office.
  1699. bottom
    the lower side of anything
    Jem held up the bottom wire and motioned Dill under it.
  1700. telephone
    electronic equipment that converts sound into electrical signals that can be transmitted over distances and then converts received signals back into sounds
    The telephone rang and Atticus left the breakfast table to answer it.
  1701. red
    red color or pigment; the chromatic color resembling the hue of blood
    In
    rainy weather the streets turned to red slop; grass grew on the sidewalks, the
    courthouse sagged in the square.
  1702. warm
    having or producing a comfortable and agreeable degree of heat or imparting or maintaining heat
    The cats had long
    conversations with one another, they wore cunning little clothes and lived in a
    warm house beneath a kitchen stove.
  1703. stumble
    miss a step and fall or nearly fall
    Atticus rose at his usual ungodly hour
    and was in the livingroom behind the Mobile Register when we stumbled in.
  1704. jump off
    jump down from an elevated point
    Jem had his little sister to think of the
    time I dared him to jump off the top of the house: “If I got killed, what’d become
    of you?” he asked.
  1705. wave
    (physics) a movement up and down or back and forth
    The Dewey Decimal System consisted, in part, of Miss Caroline waving cards at
    us on which were printed “the,” “cat,” “rat,” “man,” and “you.”
  1706. mocker
    someone who jeers or mocks or treats something with contempt or calls out in derision
    High above us in the darkness a solitary mocker poured out his repertoire in
    blissful unawareness of whose tree he sat in, plunging from the shrill kee, kee of
    the sunflower bird to the irascible qua-ack of a bluejay, to the sad lament of Poor
    Will, Poor Will, Poor Will.
  1707. store
    a mercantile establishment for the retail sale of goods or services
    They ambled across the square, shuffled in and out of
    the stores around it, took their time about everything.
  1708. drove
    a group of animals (a herd or flock) moving together
    As Mr.
    Radley passed by, Boo drove the scissors into his parent’s leg, pulled them out,
    wiped them on his pants, and resumed his activities.
  1709. papa
    an informal term for a father; probably derived from baby talk
    “Reason I can’t pass the first grade, Mr. Finch, is I’ve had to stay out ever‘ spring
    an’ help Papa with the choppin‘, but there’s another’n at the house now that’s
    field size.”
  1710. small
    limited or below average in number or quantity or magnitude or extent
    Any stealthy small crimes committed in
    Maycomb were his work.
  1711. squeak
    make a high-pitched, screeching noise
    The gate squeaked.
  1712. confine
    place limits on (extent or access)
    Uncle Jack Finch confined his passion for digging
    to his window boxes in Nashville and stayed rich.
  1713. devilry
    wicked and cruel behavior
    Dill was a villain’s villain: he could get into any character part assigned him, and
    appear tall if height was part of the devilry required.
  1714. swimmer
    a person who travels through the water by swimming
    He walked quickly, but I thought he moved like an underwater
    swimmer: time had slowed to a nauseating crawl.
  1715. land
    the solid part of the earth's surface
    It was customary for the men in the family to remain on Simon’s homestead,
    Finch’s Landing, and make their living from cotton.
  1716. easy
    posing no difficulty; requiring little effort
    It was not often that she made crackling bread, she said she never had time, but
    with both of us at school today had been an easy one for her.
  1717. greasy
    containing an unusual amount of grease or oil
    Greasy-faced
    children popped-the-whip through the crowd, and babies lunched at their mothers’
    breasts.
  1718. steam
    water at boiling temperature diffused in the atmosphere
    I mean it, now-”
    “Yawl hush,” growled Jem, “you act like you believe in Hot Steams.”
  1719. calomel
    a tasteless colorless powder used medicinally as a cathartic
    Perhaps she had given him
    a dose of calomel.
  1720. inch
    a unit of length equal to one twelfth of a foot
    As for me, I knew nothing except what I gathered from Time
    magazine and reading everything I could lay hands on at home, but as I inched
    sluggishly along the treadmill of the Maycomb County school system, I could not
    help receiving the impression that I was being cheated out of something.
  1721. row
    an arrangement of objects or people side by side in a line
    Miss Caroline walked up and down the rows peering and poking into lunch
    containers, nodding if the contents pleased her, frowning a little at others.
  1722. broke
    lacking funds
    A storm of laughter broke loose when it finally occurred to the class that
    Miss Caroline had whipped me.
  1723. gentleman
    a man of refinement
    Little Chuck Little was another member of the population who didn’t know where
    his next meal was coming from, but he was a born gentleman.
  1724. part
    one of the portions into which something is regarded as divided and which together constitute a whole
    1960
    TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD
    by Harper Lee
    Copyright (C) 1960 by Harper Lee
    Copyright (C) renewed 1988 by Harper Lee
    Published by arrangement with McIntosh and Otis, Inc.
    CONTENTS
    l DEDICATION
    l PART ONE
    m Chapter 1
    m Chapter 2
    m Chapter 3
    m Chapter 4
    m Chapter 5
    m Chapter 6
    m Chapter 7
    m Chapter 8
    m Chapter 9
    m Chapter 10
    m Chapter 11
    l PART TWO
    m Chapter 12
    m Chapter 13
    m Chapter 14
    m Chapter 15
    m Chapter 16
    m Chapter 17
    m Chapter 18
    m Chapter 19
    m Chapter 20
    m Chapter 21
    m Chapter 22...
  1725. hurry
    move very fast
    There was no hurry, for there was nowhere to go,
    nothing to buy and no money to buy it with, nothing to see outside the boundaries
    of Maycomb County.
  1726. pleasantly
    in an enjoyable manner
    We stared at him until he spoke:
    “Hey.”
    “Hey yourself,” said Jem pleasantly.
  1727. crossed
    placed crosswise
    They did not go to church, Maycomb’s principal
    recreation, but worshiped at home; Mrs. Radley seldom if ever crossed the street
    for a mid-morning coffee break with her neighbors, and certainly never joined a
    missionary circle.
  1728. running away
    the act of leaving (without permission) the place you are expected to be
    If the remainder of the school year
    were as fraught with drama as the first day, perhaps it would be mildly
    entertaining, but the prospect of spending nine months refraining from reading
    and writing made me think of running away.
  1729. noticed
    being perceived or observed
    No one had noticed him, probably, because Miss Caroline and I had entertained
    the class most of the morning.
  1730. serve
    devote (part of) one's life or efforts to, as of countries, institutions, or ideas
    But there came a day when Atticus told us he’d wear us out if we made any noise
    in the yard and commissioned Calpurnia to serve in his absence if she heard a
    sound out of us.
  1731. on that
    on that
    “Please,” I pleaded, “can’tcha just think about it for a minute—
    by yourself on that place—”
    “Shut up!”
  1732. as needed
    according to need (physicians use PRN in writing prescriptions)
    Jem would reappear as needed in the shapes of the sheriff,
    assorted townsfolk, and Miss Stephanie Crawford, who had more to say about the
    Radleys than anybody in Maycomb.
  1733. law
    the collection of rules imposed by authority
    Simon would have regarded with impotent fury the disturbance between the North
    and the South, as it left his descendants stripped of everything but their land, yet
    the tradition of living on the land remained unbroken until well into the twentieth
    century, when my father, Atticus Finch, went to Montgomery to read law, and his
    younger brother went to Boston to study medicine.
  1734. corroborative
    serving to support or corroborate
    Tom Robinson was toying with them.
    “…absence of any corroborative evidence, this man was indicted on a capital
    charge and is now on trial for his life…”
    I punched Jem. “How long’s he been at it?”
  1735. William Jennings Bryan
    United States lawyer and politician who advocated free silver and prosecuted John Scopes (1925) for teaching evolution in a Tennessee high school (1860-1925)
    “Look at all those folks—you’d think William Jennings Bryan was
    speakin‘.”
  1736. mutilate
    destroy or injure severely
    Once the town was terrorized by a series of morbid
    nocturnal events: people’s chickens and household pets were found mutilated;
    although the culprit was Crazy Addie, who eventually drowned himself in
    Barker’s Eddy, people still looked at the Radley Place, unwilling to discard their
    initial suspicions.
  1737. twilight
    the time of day immediately following sunset
    But I kept aloof from their more foolhardy schemes for a
    while, and on pain of being called a girl, I spent most of the remaining twilights
    that summer sitting with Miss Maudie Atkinson on her front porch.
  1738. ravel
    disentangle
    “Gracious child, I was raveling a thread, wasn’t even thinking about your father,
    but now that I am I’ll say this: Atticus Finch is the same in his house as he is on
    the public streets.
  1739. advertiser
    someone whose business is advertising
    We were surprised one morning to see a cartoon in the Montgomery Advertiser
    above the caption, “Maycomb’s Finch.”
  1740. hitch
    to hook or entangle
    Somehow, it was hotter then: a black dog
    suffered on a summer’s day; bony mules hitched to Hoover carts flicked flies in
    the sweltering shade of the live oaks on the square.
  1741. unburdened
    not burdened with difficulties or responsibilities
    As he lived in Mobile, he could
    not inform on me to school authorities, but he managed to tell everything he knew
    to Aunt Alexandra, who in turn unburdened herself to Atticus, who either forgot it
    or gave me hell, whichever struck his fancy.
  1742. stark naked
    (used informally) completely unclothed
    He never loosened a scrap of his clothing
    until he undressed at bedtime, and to Jem and me, this was the equivalent of him
    standing before us stark naked.
  1743. latch
    catch for fastening a door or gate; a bar that can be lowered or slid into a groove
    He came up the back steps, latched the door behind him, and
    sat on his cot.
  1744. sling
    a simple weapon consisting of a looped strap in which a projectile is whirled and then released
    “Well, it was all slung about, like there was a fight.”
  1745. Confederate Army
    the southern army during the American Civil War
    For the life of me, I did not understand how he could sit there in cold
    blood and read a newspaper when his only son stood an excellent chance of being
    murdered with a Confederate Army relic.
  1746. Spanish-American War
    a war between the United States and Spain in 1898
    Backstage, Cecil and I found the narrow hallway teeming with people: adults in
    homemade three-corner hats, Confederate caps, Spanish-American War hats, and
    World War helmets.
  1747. mushy
    having the consistency of mush
    I looked back at my mushy footprints.
  1748. scrapbook
    an album into which clippings or notes or pictures can be pasted
    According to Miss
    Stephanie, Boo was sitting in the livingroom cutting some items from The
    Maycomb Tribune to paste in his scrapbook.
  1749. palliation
    easing the severity of a pain or a disease without removing the cause
    She was a less than satisfactory source of
    palliation, but she did give Jem a hot biscuit-and-butter which he tore in half and
    shared with me.
  1750. postponement
    act of putting off to a future time
    John Taylor was kind enough to give us a postponement…”
    “If you shouldn’t be defendin‘ him, then why are you doin’ it?”
  1751. quell
    suppress or crush completely
    Through all the headshaking,
    quelling of nausea and Jem-yelling, I had heard another sound, so low I
    could not have heard it from the sidewalk.
  1752. jerking
    an abrupt spasmodic movement
    “Shoot no wonder, then,” said Jem, jerking his thumb at me.
  1753. elbow
    hinge joint between the forearm and upper arm and the corresponding joint in the forelimb of a quadruped
    Charles Lamb
    PART ONE
    Contents - Prev / Next
    Chapter 1
    When he was nearly thirteen, my brother Jem got his arm badly broken at the
    elbow.
  1754. drool
    saliva spilling from the mouth
    There was a long jagged scar that ran across his face;
    what teeth he had were yellow and rotten; his eyes popped, and he drooled most
    of the time.
  1755. though
    (postpositive) however
    I retrieved my plate and finished dinner in the kitchen, thankful, though,
    that I was spared the humiliation of facing them again.
  1756. facing
    an ornamental coating to a building
    I retrieved my plate and finished dinner in the kitchen, thankful, though,
    that I was spared the humiliation of facing them again.
  1757. slow
    not moving quickly; taking a comparatively long time
    When we slowed to a walk at the edge of the schoolyard, Jem was
    careful to explain that during school hours I was not to bother him, I was not to
    approach him with requests to enact a chapter of Tarzan and the Ant Men, to
    embarrass him with references to his private life, or tag along behind him at
    recess and noon.
  1758. switch
    control consisting of a mechanical or electrical or electronic device for making or breaking or changing the connections in a circuit
    Jem procured some peachtree switches from the back yard, plaited them, and bent
    them into bones to be covered with dirt.
  1759. starkly
    in a stark manner
    Starkly out of place in a town of square-faced
    stores and steep-roofed houses, the Maycomb jail was a miniature Gothic joke
    one cell wide and two cells high, complete with tiny battlements and flying
    buttresses.
  1760. frown
    a facial expression of dislike or displeasure
    He walked to the corner of the lot, then back again, studying the simple terrain as
    if deciding how best to effect an entry, frowning and scratching his head.
  1761. motivated
    provided with a motive or given incentive for action
    Tim Johnson was advancing at a snail’s pace, but he was not playing or sniffing at
    foliage: he seemed dedicated to one course and motivated by an invisible force
    that was inching him toward us.
  1762. leap
    move forward by leaps and bounds
    We leaped over the low wall that separated Miss Rachel’s yard from our
    driveway.
  1763. impedimenta
    the baggage and equipment carried by an army
    There was no sign of piano, organ, hymn-books, church programs—the familiar
    ecclesiastical impedimenta we saw every Sunday.
  1764. abusive
    characterized by physical or psychological maltreatment
    The town decided something had to
    be done; Mr. Conner said he knew who each and every one of them was, and he
    was bound and determined they wouldn’t get away with it, so the boys came
    before the probate judge on charges of disorderly conduct, disturbing the peace,
    assault and battery, and using abusive and profane language in the presence and
    hearing of a female.
  1765. chew up
    censure severely or angrily
    They put the women out in huts when their time came, whatever that was; they
    had no sense of family—I knew that’d distress Aunty—they subjected children to
    terrible ordeals when they were thirteen; they were crawling with yaws and
    earworms, they chewed up and spat out the bark of a tree into a communal pot
    and then got drunk on it.
  1766. square deal
    fair treatment
    The one place where a man ought to get a square deal is in a courtroom, be he
    any color of the rainbow, but people have a way of carrying their resentments
    right into a jury box.
  1767. no matter what happens
    in spite of all obstacles
    “I don’t want either of you bearing a
    grudge about this thing, no matter what happens.”
  1768. majority rule
    the doctrine that the numerical majority of an organized group can make decisions binding on the whole group
    The one thing that doesn’t abide by majority rule is a person’s
    conscience.”
  1769. untrammeled
    not confined or limited
    He liked to tell things his own way, untrammeled by
    state or defense, and sometimes it took him a while.
  1770. squat
    sit on one's heels
    He stopped in front of
    the dog, squatted, turned around and tapped his finger on his forehead above his
    left eye.
  1771. wearing
    (geology) the mechanical process of wearing or grinding something down (as by particles washing over it)
    I looked down and found myself clutching a brown woolen blanket I was wearing
    around my shoulders, squaw-fashion.
  1772. recess
    a state of abeyance or suspended business
    When we slowed to a walk at the edge of the schoolyard, Jem was
    careful to explain that during school hours I was not to bother him, I was not to
    approach him with requests to enact a chapter of Tarzan and the Ant Men, to
    embarrass him with references to his private life, or tag along behind him at
    recess and noon.
  1773. beyond
    farther along in space or time or degree
    The Radley Place jutted into a sharp curve beyond our house.
  1774. below
    in or to a place that is lower
    He was a real mean one… below the belt… you ain’t called on to teach folks
    like that… them ain’t Maycomb’s ways, Miss Caroline, not really… now don’t
    you fret, ma’am.
  1775. involve
    contain as a part
    Aunt Alexandra’s
    vision of my deportment involved playing with small stoves, tea sets, and wearing
    the Add-A-Pearl necklace she gave me when I was born; furthermore, I should be
    a ray of sunshine in my father’s lonely life.
  1776. first name
    the name that precedes the surname
    “I have a Ewell here, but I don’t have a
    first name… would you spell your first name for me?”
  1777. wispy
    thin and weak
    A shock of wispy newwashed
    hair stood up from his forehead; his nose was thin, pointed, and shiny; he
    had no chin to speak of—it seemed to be part of his crepey neck.
    “—so help me God,” he crowed.
  1778. come on
    move towards
    Come on home to dinner with us, Walter,” he said.
  1779. sew
    create (clothes) with cloth
    When it was time to play Boo’s big scene, Jem would sneak into the house, steal
    the scissors from the sewing-machine drawer when Calpurnia’s back was turned,
    then sit in the swing and cut up newspapers.
  1780. God
    the supernatural being conceived as the perfect and omnipotent and omniscient originator and ruler of the universe; the object of worship in monotheistic religions
    Mindful of John Wesley’s strictures on the use of many words
    in buying and selling, Simon made a pile practicing medicine, but in this pursuit
    he was unhappy lest he be tempted into doing what he knew was not for the glory
    of God, as the putting on of gold and costly apparel.
  1781. keep on
    allow to remain in a place or position or maintain a property or feature
    “No sir,” I murmured, and made a final stand: “But if I keep on goin‘ to school,
    we can’t ever read any more…”
    “That’s really bothering you, isn’t it?”
  1782. jimmy
    to move or force, especially in an effort to get something open
    I suppose I should include Uncle Jimmy, Aunt Alexandra’s husband, but as he
    never spoke a word to me in my life except to say, “Get off the fence,” once, I
    never saw any reason to take notice of him.
  1783. soaking
    the act of making something completely wet
    In Maycomb County, it was easy to tell when someone bathed regularly, as
    opposed to yearly lavations: Mr. Ewell had a scalded look; as if an overnight
    soaking had deprived him of protective layers of dirt, his skin appeared to be
    sensitive to the elements.
  1784. Dixie
    the southern states that seceded from the United States in 1861
    I picked up a football magazine, found a picture of
    Dixie Howell, showed it to Jem and said, “This looks like you.”
  1785. move back
    pull back or move away or backward
    Then it turned and moved back across Jem, walked along
    the porch and off the side of the house, returning as it had come.
  1786. win
    a victory (as in a race or other competition)
    Calpurnia always won,
    mainly because Atticus always took her side.
  1787. monosyllabic
    having or characterized by or consisting of one syllable
    My
    replies were monosyllabic and he did not press me.
  1788. connive
    form intrigues (for) in an underhand manner
    Before Jem looks at anyone else he
    looks at me, and I’ve tried to live so I can look squarely back at him… if I
    connived at something like this, frankly I couldn’t meet his eye, and the day I
    can’t do that I’ll know I’ve lost him.
  1789. usually
    under normal conditions
    Jem condescended to take me to school the first day, a job usually done by one’s
    parents, but Atticus had said Jem would be delighted to show me where my room
    was.
  1790. massage
    kneading and rubbing parts of the body to increase circulation and promote relaxation
    As they passed under a streetlight, Atticus reached out and
    massaged Jem’s hair, his one gesture of affection.
  1791. misdemeanor
    a crime less serious than a felony
    In Maycomb County, hunting out of season was a
    misdemeanor at law, a capital felony in the eyes of the populace.
  1792. copy out
    copy very carefully and as accurately as possible
    She would set me a writing task by scrawling the alphabet firmly across the
    top of a tablet, then copying out a chapter of the Bible beneath.
  1793. sit-down
    a strike in which workers refuse to leave the workplace until a settlement is reached
    The Governor was eager to scrape a few
    barnacles off the ship of state; there were sit-down strikes in Birmingham; bread
    lines in the cities grew longer, people in the country grew poorer.
  1794. deep
    having great spatial extension or penetration downward or inward from an outer surface or backward or laterally or outward from a center; sometimes used in combination
    The house was low,
    was once white with a deep front porch and green shutters, but had long ago
    darkened to the color of the slate-gray yard around it.
  1795. window frame
    the framework that supports a window
    The
    fire was well into the second floor and had eaten its way to the roof: window
    frames
    were black against a vivid orange center.
  1796. excuse
    a defense of some offensive behavior or some failure to keep a promise etc.
    “Well, Burris,” said Miss Caroline, “I think we’d better excuse you for the rest of
    the afternoon.
  1797. unhitch
    unfasten or release from or as if from a hitch
    He unhitched his
    watch and chain and placed them on the table, saying, “With the court’s
    permission—”
    Judge Taylor nodded, and then Atticus did something I never saw him do before
    or since, in public or in private: he unbuttoned his vest, unbuttoned his collar,
    loosened his tie, and took off his coat.
  1798. fatalistic
    of or relating to fatalism
    “Don’t you oh well me, sir,” Miss Maudie replied, recognizing Jem’s fatalistic
    noises, “you are not old enough to appreciate what I said.”
  1799. budge
    move very slightly
    We were accustomed to prompt, if not always cheerful acquiescence to Atticus’s
    instructions, but from the way he stood Jem was not thinking of budging.
  1800. best
    (superlative of `good') having the most positive qualities
    The other boys attended the industrial school and received the best secondary
    education to be had in the state; one of them eventually worked his way through
    engineering school at Auburn.
  1801. make noise
    emit a noise
    “No you ain’t, you’ll just make noise.”
  1802. missionary
    someone sent on a mission--especially a religious or charitable mission to a foreign country
    They did not go to church, Maycomb’s principal
    recreation, but worshiped at home; Mrs. Radley seldom if ever crossed the street
    for a mid-morning coffee break with her neighbors, and certainly never joined a
    missionary circle.
  1803. fuzzy
    covering with fine light hairs
    The moon was setting and the lattice-work
    shadows were fading into fuzzy nothingness.
  1804. yellow
    yellow color or pigment; the chromatic color resembling the hue of sunflowers or ripe lemons
    There was a long jagged scar that ran across his face;
    what teeth he had were yellow and rotten; his eyes popped, and he drooled most
    of the time.
  1805. distance
    the property created by the space between two objects or points
    When I was almost six and Jem was nearly ten, our summertime boundaries
    (within calling distance of Calpurnia) were Mrs. Henry Lafayette Dubose’s house
    two doors to the north of us, and the Radley Place three doors to the south.
  1806. tired of
    having a strong distaste from surfeit
    He was clearly tired of
    being our character man.
  1807. kerosene
    a flammable hydrocarbon oil used as fuel in lamps and heaters
    When you’ve done that, treat your scalp with kerosene.”
  1808. sit up
    change to an upright sitting position
    I pushed the pillow to the headboard and sat up.
  1809. all of a sudden
    happening unexpectedly
    “We-ll,” I said, “who’s so high and mighty all of a sudden?”
  1810. come back
    go back to something earlier
    Mr. Radley walked to town at eleven-thirty every morning and
    came back promptly at twelve, sometimes carrying a brown paper bag that the
    neighborhood assumed contained the family groceries.
  1811. do the honors
    act as the host and receive or introduce one's guests
    Jem let me do the honors: I pulled out two small images carved in soap.
  1812. do in
    get rid of (someone who may be a threat) by killing
    “Wonder what he does in there,” he would murmur.
  1813. sibilant
    of speech sounds produced by forcing air through a constricted passage (as `f', `s', `z', or `th' in both `thin' and `then')
    She had a curious habit of
    prefacing everything she said with a soft sibilant sound.
  1814. cow
    female of domestic cattle: "`moo-cow' is a child's term"
    You don’t have to learn much out of books that way—it’s like if
    you wanta learn about cows, you go milk one, see?”
  1815. wrongful
    not just or fair
    The
    Haverfords had dispatched Maycomb’s leading blacksmith in a misunderstanding
    arising from the alleged wrongful detention of a mare, were imprudent enough to
    do it in the presence of three witnesses, and insisted that the-son-of-a-bitch-had-itcoming-
    to-him was a good enough defense for anybody.
  1816. enema
    an injection of a liquid through the anus to stimulate evacuation; sometimes used for diagnostic purposes
    Turning
    to face our accusers, we would see only a couple of farmers studying the enema
    bags in the Mayco Drugstore window.
  1817. remind
    put in the mind of someone
    He
    reminded me of a car stuck in a sandbed.
  1818. slop
    deep soft mud in water or slush
    In
    rainy weather the streets turned to red slop; grass grew on the sidewalks, the
    courthouse sagged in the square.
  1819. figure
    alternative names for the body of a human being
    Nobody knew what form of intimidation Mr. Radley employed to keep Boo out of
    sight, but Jem figured that Mr. Radley kept him chained to the bed most of the
    time.
  1820. turtle
    any of various aquatic and land reptiles having a bony shell and flipper-like limbs for swimming
    “Lemme think a minute…
    it’s sort of like making a turtle come out…”
    “How’s that?” asked Dill.
  1821. blow over
    disappear gradually
    If we just let
    them know we forgive ‘em, that we’ve forgotten it, then this whole thing’ll blow
    over
    .”
  1822. Stonewall Jackson
    general in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War whose troops at the first Battle of Bull Run stood like a stone wall (1824-1863)
    “Tell you, Atticus,” Cousin
    Ike would say, “the Missouri Compromise was what licked us, but if I had to go
    through it agin I’d walk every step of the way there an‘ every step back jist like I
    did before an’ furthermore we’d whip ‘em this time… now in 1864, when
    Stonewall Jackson came around by—I beg your pardon, young folks.
  1823. out loud
    using the voice; not silently
    She wants me to come every afternoon after school and Saturdays and
    read to her out loud for two hours.
  1824. roly-poly
    short and plump
    A roly-poly had found his way inside the house; I reasoned that the tiny varmint
    had crawled up the steps and under the door.
  1825. lick
    pass the tongue over
    I licked it and waited
    for a while.
  1826. revived
    restored to consciousness or life or vigor
    Apparently she had revived enough to
    persevere in her profession.
  1827. stuff
    the tangible substance that goes into the makeup of a physical object
    He died years ago and they stuffed him up the chimney.”
  1828. lye
    a strong solution of sodium or potassium hydroxide
    “A good home remedy for—Burris, I want you to go home and wash
    your hair with lye soap.
  1829. cry
    shed tears because of sadness, rage, or pain
    He waited until he was sure she was crying, then he shuffled out of the building.
  1830. find out
    find out, learn, or determine with certainty, usually by making an inquiry or other effort
    “You’ll find out.”
  1831. squirrel
    a kind of arboreal rodent having a long bushy tail
    Jem gave a reasonable description of Boo: Boo was about six-and-a-half feet tall,
    judging from his tracks; he dined on raw squirrels and any cats he could catch,
    that’s why his hands were bloodstained—if you ate an animal raw, you could
    never wash the blood off.
  1832. dreamlike
    resembling a dream
    What happened after that had a dreamlike quality: in a dream I saw the jury
    return, moving like underwater swimmers, and Judge Taylor’s voice came from
    far away and was tiny.
  1833. teem
    be teeming, be abuzz
    Thus we came to know Dill as a pocket Merlin, whose head teemed
    with eccentric plans, strange longings, and quaint fancies.
  1834. akimbo
    with hands on hips and elbows extending outward
    She was now standing arms akimbo, her
    shoulders drooping a little, her head cocked to one side, her glasses winking in the
    sunlight.
  1835. faded
    having lost freshness or brilliance of color
    For some reason,
    my first year of school had wrought a great change in our relationship:
    Calpurnia’s tyranny, unfairness, and meddling in my business had faded to gentle
    grumblings of general disapproval.
  1836. forefinger
    the finger next to the thumb
    He searched the scalp above his forehead, located his guest and
    pinched it between his thumb and forefinger.
  1837. put down
    put in a horizontal position
    Wooden sawhorses blocked the road at each end of the
    Radley lot, straw was put down on the sidewalk, traffic was diverted to the back
    street.
  1838. roomful
    the quantity a room will hold
    You’ve got a roomful of things.
  1839. jacket
    a short coat
    Hours of wintertime had found me in the treehouse, looking over at the
    schoolyard, spying on multitudes of children through a two-power telescope Jem
    had given me, learning their games, following Jem’s red jacket through wriggling
    circles of blind man’s buff, secretly sharing their misfortunes and minor victories.
  1840. gingerly
    in a gingerly manner
    I see it-”
    Jem looked around, reached up, and gingerly pocketed a tiny shiny package.
  1841. woman
    an adult female person (as opposed to a man)
    Mrs. Dubose lived two doors up the street from us;
    neighborhood opinion was unanimous that Mrs. Dubose was the meanest old
    woman who ever lived.
  1842. right smart
    (Southern or Midland) considerable
    “I said somethin‘ like, why Miss Mayella, that’s right smart o’you to treat ’em.
  1843. lie
    be lying, be prostrate; be in a horizontal position
    Their sister Alexandra was the
    Finch who remained at the Landing: she married a taciturn man who spent most
    of his time lying in a hammock by the river wondering if his trot-lines were full.
  1844. last-ditch
    of something done as a final recourse (especially to prevent a crisis or disaster)
    Mr. Cunningham displayed
    no interest in his son, so I tackled his entailment once more in a last-ditch effort to
    make him feel at home.
  1845. dig
    turn up, loosen, or remove earth
    Uncle Jack Finch confined his passion for digging
    to his window boxes in Nashville and stayed rich.
  1846. sharply
    very suddenly and to a great degree
    Jem’s ears reddened from Atticus’s compliment, but he looked up sharply when
    he saw Atticus stepping back.
  1847. acquittal
    a judgment of not guilty
    It was either a straight acquittal or nothing.”
  1848. sleeve
    the part of a garment that is attached at the armhole and that provides a cloth covering for the arm
    I pulled at his sleeve, and we were followed up the sidewalk by a
    philippic on our family’s moral degeneration, the major premise of which was
    that half the Finches were in the asylum anyway, but if our mother were living we
    would not have come to such a state.
  1849. cigar
    a roll of tobacco for smoking
    He permitted smoking in his courtroom
    but did not himself indulge: sometimes, if one was lucky, one had the privilege of
    watching him put a long dry cigar into his mouth and munch it slowly up.
  1850. jab
    poke or thrust abruptly
    I watched
    him making jabbing motions for so long, I abandoned my post and went to him.
  1851. past
    earlier than the present time; no longer current
    At last
    the sawhorses were taken away, and we stood watching from the front porch
    when Mr. Radley made his final journey past our house.
  1852. squatting
    the act of assuming or maintaining a crouching position with the knees bent and the buttocks near the heels
    Somewhere, I had received
    the impression that Fine Folks were people who did the best they could with the
    sense they had, but Aunt Alexandra was of the opinion, obliquely expressed, that
    the longer a family had been squatting on one patch of land the finer it was.
  1853. backwards
    in a manner or order or direction the reverse of normal
    “You got it backwards, Dill,” said Jem. “Clowns are sad, it’s folks that laugh at
    them.”
  1854. waxy
    made of or covered with wax
    Inside, surrounded by wads of damp cotton, was a white,
    waxy, perfect camellia.
  1855. fade
    become less clearly visible or distinguishable; disappear gradually or seemingly
    The tang was fading, anyway.
  1856. moon
    the natural satellite of the Earth
    In spite of our warnings and explanations it
    drew him as the moon draws water, but drew him no nearer than the light-pole on
    the corner, a safe distance from the Radley gate.
  1857. creep
    move slowly; in the case of people or animals with the body near the ground
    Jem and I crept around the yard for days.
  1858. lost
    having lost your bearings; confused as to time or place or personal identity
    A baseball hit into the Radley yard was a
    lost ball and no questions asked.
  1859. Tarzan
    a man raised by apes who was the hero of a series of novels by Edgar Rice Burroughs
    He played the character parts formerly
    thrust upon me— the ape in Tarzan, Mr. Crabtree in The Rover Boys, Mr. Damon
    in Tom Swift.
  1860. slip
    move obliquely or sideways, usually in an uncontrolled manner
    Less than two weeks later we found a whole package of chewing gum, which we
    enjoyed, the fact that everything on the Radley Place was poison having slipped
    Jem’s memory.
  1861. advantage
    the quality of having a superior or more favorable position
    Burris seemed to be afraid of a child half his height, and Miss Caroline took
    advantage of his indecision: “Burris, go home.
  1862. remain
    continue in a place, position, or situation
    It was customary for the men in the family to remain on Simon’s homestead,
    Finch’s Landing, and make their living from cotton.
  1863. bittersweet
    having a taste that is a mixture of bitterness and sweetness
    The warm bittersweet smell of clean Negro welcomed us as we entered the
    churchyard—Hearts of Love hairdressing mingled with asafoetida, snuff, Hoyt’s
    Cologne, Brown’s Mule, peppermint, and lilac talcum.
  1864. declare
    state emphatically and authoritatively
    Jem said, “Scout, you can be Mrs. Radley-”
    “I declare if I will.
  1865. navigate
    direct carefully and safely
    When I was able to navigate, I ran back to them as fast as my shaking knees
    would carry me.
  1866. turn off
    cause to stop operating by disengaging a switch
    Dill and Jem were quiet; when I turned off my reading lamp there
    was no strip of light under the door to Jem’s room.
  1867. testimony
    something that serves as evidence
    Mr. Ewell, you will keep your testimony within the confines
    of Christian English usage, if that is possible.
  1868. sack
    a bag made of paper or plastic for holding customer's purchases
    Later, a sack of hickory nuts appeared on the back steps.
  1869. protest
    a formal and solemn declaration of objection
    “But he’s gone and drowned his dinner in
    syrup,” I protested.
  1870. rankle
    gnaw into; make resentful or angry
    Atticus’s remarks were still rankling, which made me miss the request in Jem’s
    question.
  1871. wedge
    something solid that is usable as an inclined plane (shaped like a V) that can be pushed between two things to separate them
    I could not put out my hands to stop, they were wedged between my
    chest and knees.
  1872. rifle
    a shoulder firearm with a long barrel and a rifled bore
    He declined to let
    us take our air rifles to the Landing (I had already begun to think of shooting
    Francis) and said if we made one false move he’d take them away from us for
    good.
  1873. jubilantly
    in a joyous manner
    Jem picked up a rock and threw it jubilantly at the carhouse.
  1874. smelly
    offensively malodorous
    I pushed my
    way through dark smelly bodies and burst into the circle of light.
  1875. shred
    a small piece of cloth or paper
    I understood, pondered a while, and concluded that the only way I could retire
    with a shred of dignity was to go to the bathroom, where I stayed long enough to
    make them think I had to go.
  1876. arbitrate
    act between parties with a view to reconciling differences
    Jem arbitrated, awarded me first push with an extra time for Dill, and I folded
    myself inside the tire.
  1877. peeled
    (used informally) completely unclothed
    It was an ancient paint-peeled frame
    building, the only church in Maycomb with a steeple and bell, called First
    Purchase because it was paid for from the first earnings of freed slaves.
  1878. rimmed
    having a rim or a rim of a specified kind
    Walter looked as if he had been raised on fish food: his eyes, as blue as Dill
    Harris’s, were red-rimmed and watery.
  1879. mother
    a woman who has given birth to a child (also used as a term of address to your mother)
    Our mother died when I was two, so I never felt her absence.
  1880. long ago
    of the distant or comparatively distant past
    The house was low,
    was once white with a deep front porch and green shutters, but had long ago
    darkened to the color of the slate-gray yard around it.
  1881. pinched
    as if squeezed uncomfortably tight
    He searched the scalp above his forehead, located his guest and
    pinched it between his thumb and forefinger.
  1882. break camp
    leave a camp
    When Atticus returned he told me to break camp.
  1883. twinkle
    gleam or glow intermittently
    Jem glanced at me, his eyes twinkling: “Mr. Avery’s
    sort of shaped like a snowman, ain’t he?”
  1884. encourage
    inspire with confidence; give hope or courage to
    As this was his first complete sentence in several days, I encouraged him: “About
    what?”
  1885. staring
    (used of eyes) open and fixed as if in fear or wonder
    There he would stand, his arm
    around the fat pole, staring and wondering.
  1886. immoral
    deliberately violating accepted principles of right and wrong
    The witnesses for the state, with the exception of
    the sheriff of Maycomb County, have presented themselves to you gentlemen, to
    this court, in the cynical confidence that their testimony would not be doubted,
    confident that you gentlemen would go along with them on the assumption—the
    evil assumption—that all Negroes lie, that all Negroes are basically immoral
    beings, that all Negro men are not to be trusted around our women, an assumption
    one associates with minds of their caliber.
  1887. learned
    having or showing profound knowledge
    I never
    deliberately learned to read, but somehow I had been wallowing illicitly in the
    daily papers.
  1888. becoming
    according with custom or propriety
    When Miss Caroline threatened it with a similar fate the first grade exploded
    again, becoming cold sober only when the shadow of Miss Blount fell over them.
  1889. memory
    the cognitive processes whereby past experience is remembered
    But there came a day, barely within Jem’s memory, when Boo Radley was heard
    from and was seen by several people, but not by Jem. He said Atticus never talked
    much about the Radleys: when Jem would question him Atticus’s only answer
    was for him to mind his own business and let the Radleys mind theirs, they had a
    right to; but when it happened Jem said Atticus shook his head and said, “Mm,
    mm, mm.”
  1890. telling
    disclosing unintentionally
    He had been on the verge of telling me something all evening; his face would
    brighten and he would lean toward me, then he would change his mind.
  1891. bite
    to grip, cut off, or tear with or as if with the teeth or jaws
    Walter stood where he was, biting his lip.
  1892. guilt
    the state of having committed an offense
    Mr. Avery said it was written on the Rosetta Stone that when
    children disobeyed their parents, smoked cigarettes and made war on each other,
    the seasons would change: Jem and I were burdened with the guilt of contributing
    to the aberrations of nature, thereby causing unhappiness to our neighbors and
    discomfort to ourselves.
  1893. stand watch
    watch over so as to protect
    At last
    the sawhorses were taken away, and we stood watching from the front porch
    when Mr. Radley made his final journey past our house.
  1894. supposed
    based primarily on surmise rather than adequate evidence
    You’re supposed to mark ’em absent the rest of the year…”
    “But what about their parents?” asked Miss Caroline, in genuine concern.
  1895. sunbonnet
    a large bonnet that shades the face; worn by girls and women
    They wore cotton sunbonnets and dresses
    with long sleeves.
  1896. plead
    appeal or request earnestly
    Atticus had urged them to accept the state’s generosity in allowing them to plead
    Guilty to second-degree murder and escape with their lives, but they were
    Haverfords, in Maycomb County a name synonymous with jackass.
  1897. tub
    a relatively large open container that you fill with water and use to wash the body
    If she found a blade of nut grass in her yard it was like the Second
    Battle of the Marne: she swooped down upon it with a tin tub and subjected it to
    blasts from beneath with a poisonous substance she said was so powerful it’d kill
    us all if we didn’t stand out of the way.
  1898. canna
    any plant of the genus Canna having large sheathing leaves and clusters of large showy flowers
    My memory came alive to see Mrs. Radley occasionally open the front door, walk
    to the edge of the porch, and pour water on her cannas.
  1899. reassured
    having confidence restored; freed from anxiety
    I reassured him: “Can’t anybody tell what you’re
    gonna do lest they live in the house with you, and even I can’t tell sometimes.”
  1900. sneak out
    leave furtively and stealthily
    “He sneaked out of the house—turn ‘round—sneaked up,
    an’ went like this!”
  1901. eat at
    become ground down or deteriorate
    Yo‘ folks might be better’n the Cunninghams but it
    don’t count for nothin’ the way you’re disgracin‘ ’em—if you can’t act fit to eat
    at
    the table you can just set here and eat in the kitchen!”
  1902. allergic
    characterized by or caused by allergy
    On Saturdays, armed with our nickels, when Jem
    permitted me to accompany him (he was now positively allergic to my presence
    when in public), we would squirm our way through sweating sidewalk crowds
    and sometimes hear, “There’s his chillun,” or, “Yonder’s some Finches.”
  1903. realized
    successfully completed or brought to an end
    When Atticus went
    inside the house to retrieve a file he had forgotten to take to work that morning,
    Jem finally realized that he had been done in by the oldest lawyer’s trick on
    record.
  1904. burlap
    coarse jute fabric
    She was bending over
    some small bushes, wrapping them in burlap bags.
  1905. under that
    under that
    “Bob Ewell’s lyin‘ on the ground under
    that
    tree down yonder with a kitchen knife stuck up under his ribs.
  1906. suitcase
    a portable rectangular container for carrying clothes
    Calpurnia picked up Aunty’s heavy suitcase and opened the door.
  1907. interest
    a sense of concern with and curiosity about someone or something
    North Alabama was full of Liquor Interests, Big
    Mules, steel companies, Republicans, professors, and other persons of no
    background.
  1908. wheeled
    having wheels; often used in combination
    “Not being wheeled around
    yet, am I? Neither’s your father.
  1909. life history
    an account of the series of events making up a person's life
    “No,” said Atticus, “putting his life’s history on display for the edification of the
    neighborhood.”
  1910. tightly
    in a tight or constricted manner
    “Scout, he’s stuck…” breathed Jem. “Oh God…”
    Mr. Avery was wedged tightly.
  1911. yelling
    uttering a loud inarticulate cry as of pain or excitement
    Through all the headshaking,
    quelling of nausea and Jem-yelling, I had heard another sound, so low I
    could not have heard it from the sidewalk.
  1912. covered
    overlaid or spread or topped with or enclosed within something; sometimes used as a combining form
    At first we saw nothing but a kudzu-covered front porch,
    but a closer inspection revealed an arc of water descending from the leaves and
    splashing in the yellow circle of the street light, some ten feet from source to
    earth, it seemed to us.
  1913. fold
    bend or lay so that one part covers the other
    Jem arbitrated, awarded me first push with an extra time for Dill, and I folded
    myself inside the tire.
  1914. fighting
    the act of fighting; any contest or struggle
    Atticus had
    promised me he would wear me out if he ever heard of me fighting any more; I
    was far too old and too big for such childish things, and the sooner I learned to
    hold in, the better off everybody would be.
  1915. tie up
    secure with or as if with ropes
    You reckon you could tie up my hand?
  1916. staircase
    a way of access (upward and downward) consisting of a set of steps
    Simple enough; but
    the daughters’ rooms could be reached only by one staircase, Welcome’s room
    and the guestroom only by another.
  1917. circle
    ellipse in which the two axes are of equal length; a plane curve generated by one point moving at a constant distance from a fixed point
    They did not go to church, Maycomb’s principal
    recreation, but worshiped at home; Mrs. Radley seldom if ever crossed the street
    for a mid-morning coffee break with her neighbors, and certainly never joined a
    missionary circle.
  1918. teeth
    the kind and number and arrangement of teeth (collectively) in a person or animal
    There was a long jagged scar that ran across his face;
    what teeth he had were yellow and rotten; his eyes popped, and he drooled most
    of the time.
  1919. taffeta
    a crisp smooth lustrous fabric
    Soft taffeta-like sounds and
    muffled scurrying sounds filled me with helpless dread.
  1920. bloodstained
    covered with blood
    Jem gave a reasonable description of Boo: Boo was about six-and-a-half feet tall,
    judging from his tracks; he dined on raw squirrels and any cats he could catch,
    that’s why his hands were bloodstained—if you ate an animal raw, you could
    never wash the blood off.
  1921. husky
    deep and harsh sounding as if from shouting or illness or emotion
    The last
    syllable, held to a husky hum, was followed by Zeebo saying, “That we call the
    sweet forever.”
  1922. sluggishly
    in a sluggish manner
    As for me, I knew nothing except what I gathered from Time
    magazine and reading everything I could lay hands on at home, but as I inched
    sluggishly along the treadmill of the Maycomb County school system, I could not
    help receiving the impression that I was being cheated out of something.
  1923. crowd
    a large number of things or people considered together
    Nobody in Maycomb had nerve enough to tell Mr. Radley that his boy
    was in with the wrong crowd.
  1924. make up
    form or compose
    She had wanted to make up with me, that was it.
  1925. barbershop
    a shop where men can get their hair cut
    They did little, but
    enough to be discussed by the town and publicly warned from three pulpits: they
    hung around the barbershop; they rode the bus to Abbottsville on Sundays and
    went to the picture show; they attended dances at the county’s riverside gambling
    hell, the Dew-Drop Inn & Fishing Camp; they experimented with stumphole
    whiskey.
  1926. manacle
    shackle that consists of a metal loop that can be locked around the wrist; usually used in pairs
    Still in wrist manacles, he wandered two miles out of
    Meridian where he discovered a small animal show and was immediately engaged
    to wash the camel.
  1927. wondering
    showing curiosity
    Their sister Alexandra was the
    Finch who remained at the Landing: she married a taciturn man who spent most
    of his time lying in a hammock by the river wondering if his trot-lines were full.
  1928. forgotten
    not noticed inadvertently
    So Simon, having forgotten
    his teacher’s dictum on the possession of human chattels, bought three slaves and
    with their aid established a homestead on the banks of the Alabama River some
    forty miles above Saint Stephens.
  1929. ticking
    a metallic tapping sound
    Jem’s free dispensation of my pledge
    irked me, but precious noontime minutes were ticking away.
  1930. missed
    not caught with the senses or the mind
    “I missed you today,” she said.
  1931. discard
    anything that is cast aside or discarded
    Once the town was terrorized by a series of morbid
    nocturnal events: people’s chickens and household pets were found mutilated;
    although the culprit was Crazy Addie, who eventually drowned himself in
    Barker’s Eddy, people still looked at the Radley Place, unwilling to discard their
    initial suspicions.
  1932. crumble
    break or fall apart into fragments
    I watched our Absolute Morphodite go
    black and crumble; Miss Maudie’s sunhat settled on top of the heap.
  1933. naming
    the verbal act of naming
    Atticus said naming people after Confederate generals
    made slow steady drinkers.
  1934. over here
    in a specified area or place
    “Don’t yawl
    come over here for a while,” he called.
  1935. ringing
    the sound of a bell ringing
    Shoulder up, I reeled around to face Boo Radley and his bloody fangs; instead, I
    saw Dill ringing the bell with all his might in Atticus’s face.
  1936. look back
    look towards one's back
    When enough years had gone by to enable us to look back on them, we
    sometimes discussed the events leading to his accident.
  1937. get it on
    have sexual intercourse with
    “I can’t get it on in the dark.”
  1938. hinge
    a joint that holds two parts together so that one can swing relative to the other
    This was enough to make Jem march to the corner, where he stopped and leaned
    against the light-pole, watching the gate hanging crazily on its homemade hinge.
  1939. peek
    throw a glance at; take a brief look at
    Jem peeked up the sidewalk.
  1940. hardware store
    a store selling hardware
    It stood on no lonely hill, but was wedged
    between Tyndal’s Hardware Store and The Maycomb Tribune office.
  1941. nauseating
    causing or able to cause nausea
    He walked quickly, but I thought he moved like an underwater
    swimmer: time had slowed to a nauseating crawl.
  1942. throaty
    sounding as if pronounced low in the throat
    He was beginning to preface some things he said with a
    throaty noise, and I thought he must at last be getting old, but he looked the same.
  1943. sewing
    joining or attaching by stitches
    When it was time to play Boo’s big scene, Jem would sneak into the house, steal
    the scissors from the sewing-machine drawer when Calpurnia’s back was turned,
    then sit in the swing and cut up newspapers.
  1944. dirty
    soiled or likely to soil with dirt or grime
    When we went in the house I
    saw he had been crying; his face was dirty in the right places, but I thought it odd
    that I had not heard him.
  1945. grandparent
    a parent of your father or mother
    Henry and his wife deposited Francis at his grandparents’ every
    Christmas, then pursued their own pleasures.
  1946. trial
    the act of testing something
    Dill was becoming
    something of a trial anyway, following Jem about.
  1947. look up to
    feel admiration for
    I looked up to see Miss Caroline standing in the middle of the
    room, sheer horror flooding her face.
  1948. balance
    harmonious arrangement or relation of parts or elements within a whole (as in a design)
    Our tacit treaty with Miss Maudie was that we could play on her lawn, eat her
    scuppernongs if we didn’t jump on the arbor, and explore her vast back lot, terms
    so generous we seldom spoke to her, so careful were we to preserve the delicate
    balance of our relationship, but Jem and Dill drove me closer to her with their
    behavior.
  1949. resilient
    recovering readily from adversity, depression, or the like
    As I
    passed the bed I stepped on something warm, resilient, and rather smooth.
  1950. puzzled
    filled with bewilderment
    Miss Caroline looked puzzled.
  1951. good morning
    a conventional expression of greeting or farewell
    When he passed we would look at the ground and say,
    Good morning, sir,” and he would cough in reply.
  1952. rear end
    the fleshy part of the human body that you sit on
    “Miss Maudie’s rear end.”
  1953. doll
    a small replica of a person; used as a toy
    Jem looked from the girl-doll to me.
  1954. wheat flour
    flour prepared from wheat
    The place was self-sufficient:
    modest in comparison with the empires around it, the Landing nevertheless
    produced everything required to sustain life except ice, wheat flour, and articles
    of clothing, supplied by river-boats from Mobile.
  1955. country people
    people living in the same country; compatriots
    Most of
    the county, it seemed, was there: the hall was teeming with slicked-up country
    people
    .
  1956. fire
    the process of combustion of inflammable materials producing heat and light and (often) smoke
    I told Jem if he set fire to the Radley house I was going to tell Atticus on him.
  1957. throat
    the passage to the stomach and lungs; in the front part of the neck below the chin and above the collarbone
    “…Mr. Nathan put cement in that tree, Atticus, an‘ he did it to stop us findin’
    things—he’s crazy, I reckon, like they say, but Atticus, I swear to God he ain’t
    ever harmed us, he ain’t ever hurt us, he coulda cut my throat from ear to ear that
    night but he tried to mend my pants instead… he ain’t ever hurt us, Atticus—”
    Atticus said, “Whoa, son,” so gently that I was greatly heartened.
  1958. keep out
    prevent from entering; shut out
    Jem and I had always enjoyed the free run of Miss Maudie’s yard if we kept out
    of her azaleas, but our contact with her was not clearly defined.
  1959. appear
    come into sight or view
    I suppose she chose me because she knew my name; as I read the alphabet a faint
    line appeared between her eyebrows, and after making me read most of My First
    Reader and the stock-market quotations from The Mobile Register aloud, she
    discovered that I was literate and looked at me with more than faint distaste.
  1960. create
    bring into existence
    Business was excellent when
    Governor William Wyatt Bibb, with a view to promoting the newly created
    county’s domestic tranquility, dispatched a team of surveyors to locate its exact
    center and there establish its seat of government.
  1961. hour
    a period of time equal to 1/24th of a day
    A day was twenty-four
    hours long but seemed longer.
  1962. portrait painter
    a painter or drawer of portraits
    “Son, I can’t tell what you’re going to be—an engineer, a
    lawyer, or a portrait painter.
  1963. packed
    filled to capacity
    We
    had just come to her gate when Jem snatched my baton and ran flailing wildly up
    the steps into Mrs. Dubose’s front yard, forgetting everything Atticus had said,
    forgetting that she packed a pistol under her shawls, forgetting that if Mrs.
    Dubose missed, her girl Jessie probably wouldn’t.
  1964. leaning
    the act of deviating from a vertical position
    I turned to Atticus, but Atticus had gone to the jail and was leaning against it with
    his face to the wall.
  1965. sob
    weep convulsively
    Jem’s breath came in sobs: “Fence by the
    schoolyard!—hurry,
  1966. fetch
    go or come after and bring or take back
    I’ll just fetch you
    some cool water.”
  1967. so long
    a farewell remark
    He couldn’t have
    cared less, so long as he could pass and punt.
  1968. soon
    in the near future
    It’ll be in all
    the grades soon.
  1969. disgrace
    a state of dishonor
    The judge decided to send the boys to the state industrial school, where
    boys were sometimes sent for no other reason than to provide them with food and
    decent shelter: it was no prison and it was no disgrace.
  1970. fey
    suggestive of an elf in strangeness and otherworldliness
    Local opinion held Mr. Underwood to be an intense, profane little man, whose
    father in a fey fit of humor christened Braxton Bragg, a name Mr. Underwood had
    done his best to live down.
  1971. curdle
    turn from a liquid to a solid mass
    Aunt Alexandra had got it backwards: the business part of the meeting
    was blood-curdling, the social hour was dreary.
  1972. pick at
    eat like a bird
    He fingered the straps of his overalls,
    nervously picking at the metal hooks.
  1973. safely
    with safety; in a safe manner
    Safely on our porch, panting and out of breath, we looked
    back.
  1974. fretfully
    in a fretful manner
    Sometimes a baby would cry out fretfully,
    and a child would scurry out, but the grown people sat as if they were in church.
  1975. hold out
    wait uncompromisingly for something desirable
    Hold out your
    hand.”
  1976. midair
    some point in the air; above ground level
    Our activities halted when any of the neighbors appeared, and once I
    saw Miss Maudie Atkinson staring across the street at us, her hedge clippers
    poised in midair.
  1977. sneak
    to go stealthily or furtively
    When it was time to play Boo’s big scene, Jem would sneak into the house, steal
    the scissors from the sewing-machine drawer when Calpurnia’s back was turned,
    then sit in the swing and cut up newspapers.
  1978. primly
    in a prissy manner
    “State will not prejudice the witness against counsel for the defense,” murmured
    Judge Taylor primly, “at least not at this time.”
  1979. marksmanship
    skill in shooting
    Marksmanship’s a gift of God, a talent—oh, you have to
    practice to make it perfect, but shootin’s different from playing the piano or the
    like.
  1980. jingle
    a metallic sound
    I think some money changed hands in this transaction, for as we trotted
    around the corner past the Radley Place I heard an unfamiliar jingle in Jem’s
    pockets.
  1981. blow
    be in motion due to some air or water current
    “There goes the meanest man ever God blew breath into,” murmured Calpurnia,
    and she spat meditatively into the yard.
  1982. line
    a length (straight or curved) without breadth or thickness; the trace of a moving point
    He returned to Saint Stephens only once, to find
    a wife, and with her established a line that ran high to daughters.
  1983. law practice
    the practice of law
    Atticus’s office was in the courthouse when he began his law practice, but after
    several years of it he moved to quieter quarters in the Maycomb Bank building.
  1984. pod
    the vessel that contains the seeds of a plant (not the seeds themselves)
    Refreshed by food, Dill recited this narrative: having been
    bound in chains and left to die in the basement (there were basements in
    Meridian) by his new father, who disliked him, and secretly kept alive on raw
    field peas by a passing farmer who heard his cries for help (the good man poked a
    bushel pod by pod through the ventilator), Dill worked himself free by pulling the
    chains from the wall.
  1985. ambrosia
    (classical mythology) the food and drink of the gods; mortals who ate it became immortal
    But her cooking made up for everything: three kinds of meat, summer vegetables
    from her pantry shelves; peach pickles, two kinds of cake and ambrosia
    constituted a modest Christmas dinner.
  1986. hugging
    affectionate play (or foreplay without contact with the genital organs)
    The more we told Dill about the Radleys, the more he wanted to know, the longer
    he would stand hugging the light-pole on the corner, the more he would wonder.
  1987. get a look
    see something for a brief time
    Dill and Jem were simply going to peep in the window with the loose shutter to
    see if they could get a look at Boo Radley, and if I didn’t want to go with them I
    could go straight home and keep my fat flopping mouth shut, that was all.
  1988. a few
    more than one but indefinitely small in number
    He made a few hesitant steps and stopped in front of the Radley
    gate; then he tried to turn around, but was having difficulty.
  1989. sit by
    be inactive or indifferent while something is happening
    Contents - Prev / Next
    Chapter 6
    “Yes,” said our father, when Jem asked him if we could go over and sit by Miss
    Rachel’s fishpool with Dill, as this was his last night in Maycomb.
  1990. trouble
    a source of difficulty
    If the judge released Arthur, Mr. Radley would see to it that Arthur gave no
    further trouble.
  1991. free
    able to act at will; not hampered; not under compulsion or restraint
    Jem’s free dispensation of my pledge
    irked me, but precious noontime minutes were ticking away.
  1992. skew
    turn or place at an angle
    He was sitting behind his table; his chair was skewed to
    one side, his legs were crossed and one arm was resting on the back of his chair.
  1993. hollowness
    the state of being hollow: having an empty space within
    His cheeks were thin to hollowness; his mouth was
    wide; there were shallow, almost delicate indentations at his temples, and his gray
    eyes were so colorless I thought he was blind.
  1994. objective case
    the case of nouns serving as the direct object of a verb
    To all
    parties present and participating in the life of the county, Aunt Alexandra was one
    of the last of her kind: she had river-boat, boarding-school manners; let any moral
    come along and she would uphold it; she was born in the objective case; she was
    an incurable gossip.
  1995. business suit
    a suit of clothes traditionally worn by businessmen
    He wore an ordinary business suit, which
    made him look somehow like every other man: gone were his high boots, lumber
    jacket, and bullet-studded belt.
  1996. livery stable
    stable where horses and vehicles are kept for hire
    Each child did what he wanted to do, with assistance from other children if
    there was anything to be moved, such as placing a light buggy on top of the livery
    stable
    .
  1997. unsuccessfully
    without success
    He said he was trying to get Miss Maudie’s goat, that he had been
    trying unsuccessfully for forty years, that he was the last person in the world Miss
    Maudie would think about marrying but the first person she thought about teasing,
    and the best defense to her was spirited offense, all of which we understood
    clearly.
  1998. rover
    someone who leads a wandering unsettled life
    He played the character parts formerly
    thrust upon me— the ape in Tarzan, Mr. Crabtree in The Rover Boys, Mr. Damon
    in Tom Swift.
  1999. wrist
    a joint between the distal end of the radius and the proximal row of carpal bones
    Jem grabbed his left
    wrist and my right wrist, I grabbed my left wrist and Jem’s right wrist, we
    crouched, and Dill sat on our saddle.
  2000. finale
    the closing section of a musical composition
    Then the assembled
    company would sing, “Maycomb County, Maycomb County, we will aye be true
    to thee,” as the grand finale, and Mrs. Merriweather would mount the stage with
    the state flag.
  2001. right hand
    the hand that is on the right side of the body
    He was among the most diminutive of men, but when Burris Ewell turned toward
    him, Little Chuck’s right hand went to his pocket.
  2002. gravitate
    move toward
    Jem felt his age and gravitated to the adults, leaving me to
    entertain our cousin.
  2003. ninety-eight
    being eight more than ninety
    Mrs. Dubose won, all ninety-eight pounds of her.
  2004. cheekbone
    the arch of bone beneath the eye that forms the prominence of the cheek
    His cheekbones were sharp
    and his mouth was wide, with a thin upper lip and a full lower lip.
  2005. full
    containing as much or as many as is possible or normal
    Their sister Alexandra was the
    Finch who remained at the Landing: she married a taciturn man who spent most
    of his time lying in a hammock by the river wondering if his trot-lines were full.
  2006. alphabet
    a character set that includes letters and is used to write a language
    Then she went to the blackboard and printed the alphabet in enormous square
    capitals, turned to the class and asked, “Does anybody know what these are?”
  2007. shriek
    sharp piercing cry
    I returned to school and hated Calpurnia steadily until a sudden shriek shattered
    my resentments.
  2008. fingered
    having or resembling a finger or fingers; often used in combination
    He fingered the straps of his overalls,
    nervously picking at the metal hooks.
  2009. quick
    moving quickly and lightly
    Miss Caroline picked up
    her ruler, gave me half a dozen quick little pats, then told me to stand in the
    corner.
  2010. saved
    rescued; especially from the power and consequences of sin
    If I could have explained these things to Miss Caroline, I would have saved
    myself some inconvenience and Miss Caroline subsequent mortification, but it
    was beyond my ability to explain things as well as Atticus, so I said, “You’re
    shamin‘ him, Miss Caroline.
  2011. growing
    relating to or suitable for growth
    John Hale Finch was ten years younger than my father, and chose to
    study medicine at a time when cotton was not worth growing; but after getting
    Uncle Jack started, Atticus derived a reasonable income from the law.
  2012. every last
    (used as intensive) every
    “I know every last one of you’s in there a-layin‘ on the floor!
  2013. talking to
    a lengthy rebuke
    Talking to Francis gave me the sensation of settling slowly to the bottom of the
    ocean.
  2014. bullet hole
    a hole made by a bullet passing through it
    Seventeen bullet holes in him.
  2015. guts
    fortitude and determination
    “He had guts enough to pester a poor colored woman, he had guts enough to
    pester Judge Taylor when he thought the house was empty, so do you think he’da
    met you to your face in daylight?”
  2016. allege
    report or maintain
    The
    Haverfords had dispatched Maycomb’s leading blacksmith in a misunderstanding
    arising from the alleged wrongful detention of a mare, were imprudent enough to
    do it in the presence of three witnesses, and insisted that the-son-of-a-bitch-had-itcoming-
    to-him was a good enough defense for anybody.
  2017. set
    put into a certain place or abstract location
    I told Jem if he set fire to the Radley house I was going to tell Atticus on him.
  2018. sit around
    be around, often idly or without specific purpose
    Afterwards, the adults made for the
    livingroom and sat around in a dazed condition.
  2019. incestuous
    relating to or involving incest
    Would you say the Finches have an Incestuous Streak?”
  2020. crying
    the process of shedding tears (usually accompanied by sobs or other inarticulate sounds)
    He waited until he was sure she was crying, then he shuffled out of the building.
  2021. Christmas Eve
    the day before Christmas
    Every Christmas Eve day we met Uncle Jack at Maycomb
    Junction, and he would spend a week with us.
  2022. close
    at or within a short distance in space or time or having elements near each other
    The shutters and doors of the Radley house were closed on Sundays, another
    thing alien to Maycomb’s ways: closed doors meant illness and cold weather
    only.
  2023. announce
    make known; make an announcement
    Miss Blount, a native Maycombian as yet uninitiated in the mysteries of the
    Decimal System, appeared at the door hands on hips and announced: “If I hear
    another sound from this room I’ll burn up everybody in it.
  2024. pronouncement
    an authoritative declaration
    Having never questioned Jem’s pronouncements, I saw no reason to begin now.
  2025. foggy
    filled or abounding with fog or mist
    There was a man Dill had heard of who had a boat that he rowed across to a foggy
    island where all these babies were; you could order one—
    “That’s a lie.
  2026. save
    bring into safety
    If I could have explained these things to Miss Caroline, I would have saved
    myself some inconvenience and Miss Caroline subsequent mortification, but it
    was beyond my ability to explain things as well as Atticus, so I said, “You’re
    shamin‘ him, Miss Caroline.
  2027. candy
    a rich sweet made of flavored sugar and often combined with fruit or nuts
    When he returned he was
    carrying a candy box.
  2028. run down
    injure or kill by running over, as with a vehicle
    Jem looked at me furiously, could not decline, ran down the sidewalk, treaded
    water at the gate, then dashed in and retrieved the tire.
  2029. amble
    walk leisurely
    They ambled across the square, shuffled in and out of
    the stores around it, took their time about everything.
  2030. cowhide
    the hide of a cow
    Just inside the railing that divided the
    spectators from the court, the witnesses sat on cowhide-bottomed chairs.
  2031. furthermore
    in addition
    Furthermore, I couldn’t help noticing
    that my father had served for years in the state legislature, elected each time
    without opposition, innocent of the adjustments my teachers thought essential to
    the development of Good Citizenship.
  2032. younger
    used of the younger of two persons of the same name especially used to distinguish a son from his father
    Simon would have regarded with impotent fury the disturbance between the North
    and the South, as it left his descendants stripped of everything but their land, yet
    the tradition of living on the land remained unbroken until well into the twentieth
    century, when my father, Atticus Finch, went to Montgomery to read law, and his
    younger brother went to Boston to study medicine.
  2033. hesitate
    pause or hold back in uncertainty or unwillingness
    Jem hesitated at the door.
  2034. care
    the work of providing treatment for or attending to someone or something
    He couldn’t have
    cared less, so long as he could pass and punt.
  2035. hang around
    be about
    They did little, but
    enough to be discussed by the town and publicly warned from three pulpits: they
    hung around the barbershop; they rode the bus to Abbottsville on Sundays and
    went to the picture show; they attended dances at the county’s riverside gambling
    hell, the Dew-Drop Inn & Fishing Camp; they experimented with stumphole
    whiskey.
  2036. rubbing
    effort expended in moving one object over another with pressure
    Contents - Prev / Next
    Chapter 3
    Catching Walter Cunningham in the schoolyard gave me some pleasure, but when
    I was rubbing his nose in the dirt Jem came by and told me to stop.
  2037. dumpy
    short and thick; as e.g. having short legs and heavy musculature
    Or two dumpy countrywomen in straw hats
    sitting in a Hoover cart.
  2038. wholeheartedly
    without reserve; without reservation
    Ladies seemed to live in faint horror of
    men, seemed unwilling to approve wholeheartedly of them.
  2039. twenty
    the cardinal number that is the sum of nineteen and one
    Maycomb, some twenty miles east of Finch’s Landing, was the county
    seat of Maycomb County.
  2040. terrify
    fill with terror; frighten greatly
    He was one of the few men of science who never terrified me, probably because
    he never behaved like a doctor.
  2041. accuse
    blame for, make a claim of wrongdoing or misbehavior against
    I was fairly sure Boo Radley was inside that house, but I couldn’t prove it, and
    felt it best to keep my mouth shut or I would be accused of believing in Hot
    Steams, phenomena I was immune to in the daytime.
  2042. litigant
    (law) a party to a lawsuit; someone involved in litigation
    When asked upon what
    grounds, Judge Taylor said, “Champertous connivance,” and declared he hoped to
    God the litigants were satisfied by each having had their public say.
  2043. maniac
    an insane person
    Atticus would snap off the radio and say, “Hmp!” I asked him
    once why he was impatient with Hitler and Atticus said, “Because he’s a maniac.”
  2044. riled
    aroused to impatience or anger
    “When he’s—riled, has he ever beaten you?”
  2045. almost
    (of actions or states) slightly short of or not quite accomplished; all but
    When I was almost six and Jem was nearly ten, our summertime boundaries
    (within calling distance of Calpurnia) were Mrs. Henry Lafayette Dubose’s house
    two doors to the north of us, and the Radley Place three doors to the south.
  2046. scoop
    the shovel or bucket of a dredge or backhoe
    Jem scooped up an armful of dirt, patted it into a mound on which he added
    another load, and another until he had constructed a torso.
  2047. maddening
    extremely annoying or displeasing
    “Huh?”
    In addition to Jem’s newly developed characteristics, he had acquired a
    maddening air of wisdom.
  2048. go across
    go across or through
    Rather nervous, I took a seat beside Miss Maudie and wondered why ladies put on
    their hats to go across the street.
  2049. color in
    add color to
    There was no color in his face except at
    the tip of his nose, which was moistly pink.
  2050. married
    joined in matrimony
    Their sister Alexandra was the
    Finch who remained at the Landing: she married a taciturn man who spent most
    of his time lying in a hammock by the river wondering if his trot-lines were full.
  2051. strip
    take off or remove
    Simon would have regarded with impotent fury the disturbance between the North
    and the South, as it left his descendants stripped of everything but their land, yet
    the tradition of living on the land remained unbroken until well into the twentieth
    century, when my father, Atticus Finch, went to Montgomery to read law, and his
    younger brother went to Boston to study medicine.
  2052. pleading
    begging
    They persisted in
    pleading Not Guilty to first-degree murder, so there was nothing much Atticus
    could do for his clients except be present at their departure, an occasion that was
    probably the beginning of my father’s profound distaste for the practice of
    criminal law.
  2053. encumber
    hold back
    Walking toward the office, Dill and I fell into step behind Atticus and Jem. Dill
    was encumbered by the chair, and his pace was slower.
  2054. fall
    descend in free fall under the influence of gravity
    When Miss Caroline threatened it with a similar fate the first grade exploded
    again, becoming cold sober only when the shadow of Miss Blount fell over them.
  2055. sin
    an act that is regarded by theologians as a transgression of God's will
    “But we can’t have communion with you all-”
    Apparently deciding that it was easier to define primitive baptistry than closed
    communion, Miss Maudie said: “Foot-washers believe anything that’s pleasure is
    a sin.
  2056. subside
    sink to a lower level or form a depression
    “Well, the night of November twenty-one I was comin‘ in from the woods with a
    load o’kindlin’ and just as I got to the fence I heard Mayella screamin‘ like a
    stuck hog inside the house—”
    Here Judge Taylor glanced sharply at the witness and must have decided his
    speculations devoid of evil intent, for he subsided sleepily.
  2057. article of clothing
    a covering designed to be worn on a person's body
    The place was self-sufficient:
    modest in comparison with the empires around it, the Landing nevertheless
    produced everything required to sustain life except ice, wheat flour, and articles
    of clothing
    , supplied by river-boats from Mobile.
  2058. jet-black
    of the blackest black; similar to the color of jet or coal
    His age was
    beginning to show, his one sign of inner turmoil, the strong line of his jaw melted
    a little, one became aware of telltale creases forming under his ears, one noticed
    not his jet-black hair but the gray patches growing at his temples.
  2059. overrule
    rule against
    Overruled.”
  2060. pinch
    squeeze tightly between the fingers
    He searched the scalp above his forehead, located his guest and
    pinched it between his thumb and forefinger.
  2061. basket
    a container that is usually woven and has handles
    The
    Cunninghams never took anything they can’t pay back—no church baskets and no
    scrip stamps.
  2062. padded
    softened by the addition of cushions or padding
    The following Monday afternoon Jem and I climbed the steep front steps to Mrs.
    Dubose’s house and padded down the open hallway.
  2063. identify
    recognize as being; establish the identity of someone or something
    She identified him as the one, so I took him in.
  2064. plastering
    the application of plaster
    Jem scooped up some snow and began plastering it on.
  2065. cold weather
    a period of unusually cold weather
    The shutters and doors of the Radley house were closed on Sundays, another
    thing alien to Maycomb’s ways: closed doors meant illness and cold weather
    only.
  2066. discarded
    thrown away
    If Walter had owned any shoes he
    would have worn them the first day of school and then discarded them until midwinter.
  2067. blind
    unable to see
    Hours of wintertime had found me in the treehouse, looking over at the
    schoolyard, spying on multitudes of children through a two-power telescope Jem
    had given me, learning their games, following Jem’s red jacket through wriggling
    circles of blind man’s buff, secretly sharing their misfortunes and minor victories.
  2068. takin
    large heavily built goat antelope of eastern Himalayan area
    My curiosity burst: “Why were you all takin‘ up collection for Tom Robinson’s
    wife?”
  2069. rock
    material consisting of the aggregate of minerals like those making up the Earth's crust
    Now lemme think… reckon we can rock him…”
    Jem stood in thought so long that Dill made a mild concession: “I won’t say you
    ran out on a dare an‘ I’ll swap you The Gray Ghost if you just go up and touch the
    house.”
  2070. penmanship
    beautiful handwriting
    If I reproduced
    her penmanship satisfactorily, she rewarded me with an open-faced sandwich of
    bread and butter and sugar.
  2071. Robert E. Lee
    American general who led the Confederate Armies in the American Civil War (1807-1870)
    “…Robert E. Lee Ewell!”
  2072. dry
    free from liquid or moisture; lacking natural or normal moisture or depleted of water; or no longer wet
    When it comes fall this dries up and the
    wind blows it all over Maycomb County!”
  2073. thinking
    endowed with the capacity to reason
    He
    seemed to be thinking again.
  2074. fence in
    enclose with a fence
    Reverend Sykes used his pulpit more freely to express his views on
    individual lapses from grace: Jim Hardy had been absent from church for five
    Sundays and he wasn’t sick; Constance Jackson had better watch her ways—she
    was in grave danger for quarreling with her neighbors; she had erected the only
    spite fence in the history of the Quarters.
  2075. out of the way
    in a remote location or at a distance from the usual route
    If she found a blade of nut grass in her yard it was like the Second
    Battle of the Marne: she swooped down upon it with a tin tub and subjected it to
    blasts from beneath with a poisonous substance she said was so powerful it’d kill
    us all if we didn’t stand out of the way.
  2076. call on
    have recourse to or make an appeal or request for help or information to
    “There’s
    some folks who don’t eat like us,” she whispered fiercely, “but you ain’t called on
    to contradict ‘em at the table when they don’t.
  2077. biscuit
    small round bread leavened with baking-powder or soda
    She was a less than satisfactory source of
    palliation, but she did give Jem a hot biscuit-and-butter which he tore in half and
    shared with me.
  2078. cellar
    the lowermost portion of a structure partly or wholly below ground level; often used for storage
    Our houses had no
    cellars; they were built on stone blocks a few feet above the ground, and the entry
    of reptiles was not unknown but was not commonplace.
  2079. stewing
    an extreme state of worry and agitation
    My confidence in pulpit Gospel lessened at the vision of Miss Maudie stewing
    forever in various Protestant hells.
  2080. stumping
    campaigning for something by making political speeches (stump speeches)
    Jem knew as well as I that it was difficult to walk
    fast without stumping a toe, tripping on stones, and other inconveniences, and I
    was barefooted.
  2081. munch
    chew noisily
    He permitted smoking in his courtroom
    but did not himself indulge: sometimes, if one was lucky, one had the privilege of
    watching him put a long dry cigar into his mouth and munch it slowly up.
  2082. together
    in contact with each other or in proximity
    He had probably never seen three quarters together at the same time
    in his life.
  2083. doubt
    the state of being unsure of something
    “I don’t want you all to be
    disappointed, but I doubt if there’ll be enough snow for a snowball, even.”
  2084. scrub
    wash thoroughly
    Inside were two scrubbed and polished pennies, one on top of the other.
  2085. bounce
    spring back; spring away from an impact
    There was no acknowledgement save he-en bouncing off the distant
    schoolhouse wall.
  2086. suffocate
    deprive of oxygen and prevent from breathing
    Ground, sky and houses melted into a mad palette, my ears throbbed, I was
    suffocating.
  2087. costumed
    dressed in clothing characteristic of a period, country, or class
    She thought it
    would be adorable if some of the children were costumed to represent the
    county’s agricultural products: Cecil Jacobs would be dressed up to look like a
    cow; Agnes Boone would make a lovely butterbean, another child would be a
    peanut, and on down the line until Mrs. Merriweather’s imagination and the
    supply of children were exhausted.
  2088. cool
    neither warm nor very cold; giving relief from heat
    I’ll just fetch you
    some cool water.”
  2089. separate
    standing apart; not attached to or supported by anything
    I could not remember when the lines above Atticus’s moving finger
    separated into words, but I had stared at them all the evenings in my memory,
    listening to the news of the day, Bills to Be Enacted into Laws, the diaries of
    Lorenzo Dow—anything Atticus happened to be reading when I crawled into his
    lap every night.
  2090. cut
    separate with or as if with an instrument
    A Negro would not pass the Radley Place at night, he would cut
    across to the sidewalk opposite and whistle as he walked.
  2091. interrupt
    make a break in
    Atticus was expounding upon farm problems
    when Walter interrupted to ask if there was any molasses in the house.
  2092. defending
    attempting to or designed to prevent an opponent from winning or scoring
    “I’m simply defending a Negro—his name’s Tom Robinson.
  2093. top off
    fill to the point of almost overflowing
    He did not begin to calm down until he had cut the tops off every camellia bush
    Mrs. Dubose owned, until the ground was littered with green buds and leaves.
  2094. unscrew
    loosen something by unscrewing it
    He unscrewed the
    fountain-pen cap and placed it gently on his table.
  2095. snake
    limbless scaly elongate reptile; some are venomous
    “How does a snake feel?”
  2096. show up
    appear or become visible; make a showing
    That’n never
    showed up, did it?
  2097. event
    something that happens at a given place and time
    When enough years had gone by to enable us to look back on them, we
    sometimes discussed the events leading to his accident.
  2098. for the time being
    temporarily
    He said Miss
    Maudie would stay with Miss Stephanie for the time being.
  2099. puny
    (used especially of persons) of inferior size
    You
    look right puny for goin’ on seven.”
  2100. believe
    accept as true; take to be true
    Miss Stephanie
    Crawford said he was so upright he took the word of God as his only law, and we
    believed her, because Mr. Radley’s posture was ramrod straight.
  2101. water
    binary compound that occurs at room temperature as a clear colorless odorless tasteless liquid; freezes into ice below 0 degrees centigrade and boils above 100 degrees centigrade; widely used as a solvent
    In spite of our warnings and explanations it
    drew him as the moon draws water, but drew him no nearer than the light-pole on
    the corner, a safe distance from the Radley gate.
  2102. run along
    be in line with; form a line along
    You
    run along now and let me get supper on the table.”
  2103. fountain pen
    a pen that is supplied with ink from a reservoir in its barrel
    He drew out an envelope,
    then reached into his vest pocket and unclipped his fountain pen.
  2104. furiously
    in a manner marked by extreme or violent energy
    Jem looked at me furiously, could not decline, ran down the sidewalk, treaded
    water at the gate, then dashed in and retrieved the tire.
  2105. eventually
    after an unspecified period of time or an especially long delay
    Once the town was terrorized by a series of morbid
    nocturnal events: people’s chickens and household pets were found mutilated;
    although the culprit was Crazy Addie, who eventually drowned himself in
    Barker’s Eddy, people still looked at the Radley Place, unwilling to discard their
    initial suspicions.
  2106. light bulb
    electric lamp consisting of a transparent or translucent glass housing containing a wire filament (usually tungsten) that emits light when heated by electricity
    There was a light bulb on the
    end.
  2107. football field
    the playing field on which football is played
    It was the size
    of a football field.
  2108. hands down
    with no difficulty
    Mr. Tate ran his hands down his thighs.
  2109. Old Testament
    the collection of books comprising the sacred scripture of the Hebrews and recording their history as the chosen people; the first half of the Christian Bible
    Miss Maudie’s face likened such an
    occurrence unto an Old Testament pestilence.
  2110. sense
    the faculty through which the external world is apprehended
    Then he jumped, landed unhurt, and his sense of responsibility
    left him until confronted by the Radley Place.
  2111. needed
    necessary for relief or supply
    Jem would reappear as needed in the shapes of the sheriff,
    assorted townsfolk, and Miss Stephanie Crawford, who had more to say about the
    Radleys than anybody in Maycomb.
  2112. pew
    long bench with backs; used in church by the congregation
    With that, Calpurnia led us to the church door where we were greeted by
    Reverend Sykes, who led us to the front pew.
  2113. nightfall
    the time of day immediately following sunset
    Ladies bathed before noon, after their three-o’clock naps,
    and by nightfall were like soft teacakes with frostings of sweat and sweet talcum.
  2114. three-legged
    having or as if having three legs
    John looked at him as if he were a three-legged chicken or a square
    egg.
  2115. plus
    on the positive side or higher end of a scale
    We lived on the main residential street in town— Atticus, Jem and I, plus
    Calpurnia our cook.
  2116. mine
    excavation in the earth from which ores and minerals are extracted
    “I’m big enough to fit mine,” he said.
  2117. expect
    regard something as probable or likely
    We went
    to the wire fence to see if there was a puppy— Miss Rachel’s rat terrier was
    expecting— instead we found someone sitting looking at us.
  2118. snap off
    break a piece from a whole
    Atticus would snap off the radio and say, “Hmp!” I asked him
    once why he was impatient with Hitler and Atticus said, “Because he’s a maniac.”
  2119. dished
    shaped like a dish or pan
    Calpurnia poured milk, dished out potato salad and ham, muttering, “‘shamed of
    yourselves,” in varying degrees of intensity.
  2120. whalebone
    a horny material from the upper jaws of certain whales; used as the ribs of fans or as stays in corsets
    Aunt Alexandra rose and smoothed the various whalebone ridges along her hips.
  2121. dipper
    a ladle that has a cup with a long handle
    An oppressive odor met us when we crossed the threshold, an odor I had met
    many times in rain-rotted gray houses where there are coal-oil lamps, water
    dippers, and unbleached domestic sheets.
  2122. pad
    a flat mass of soft material used for protection, stuffing, or comfort
    The following Monday afternoon Jem and I climbed the steep front steps to Mrs.
    Dubose’s house and padded down the open hallway.
  2123. take exception
    raise a formal objection in a court of law
    “Don’t see how any jury could convict on what we heard—”
    “Now don’t you be so confident, Mr. Jem, I ain’t ever seen any jury decide in
    favor of a colored man over a white man…” But Jem took exception to Reverend
    Sykes, and we were subjected to a lengthy review of the evidence with Jem’s
    ideas on the law regarding rape: it wasn’t rape if she let you, but she had to be
    eighteen—in Alabama, that is—and Mayella was nineteen.
  2124. bulb
    anything with a round shape resembling a teardrop
    There was a light bulb on the
    end.
  2125. get married
    take in marriage
    Don’t say anything about it yet, but we’re gonna get married as soon as
    we’re big enough.
  2126. benignly
    in a benign manner
    He turned slowly in his swivel chair and looked benignly at
    the witness.
  2127. protrude
    extend out or project