Fahrenheit 451 285 words

  1. empty
    holding or containing nothing
    He felt she was walking in a circle about him, turning him end for end, shaking him quietly, and emptying his pockets, without once moving herself.
  2. centrifuge
    an apparatus that uses centrifugal force to separate particles from a suspension
    When it was all over he felt like a man who had been thrown from a cliff, whirled in a centrifuge and spat out over a waterfall that fell and fell into emptiness and emptiness and never-quite-touched-bottom-never-never-quite-no not quite-touched-bottom ... and you fell so fast you didn't touch the sides either ... never ... quite . . . touched . anything.
  3. flick
    throw or toss with a quick motion
    With his symbolic helmet numbered 451 on his stolid head, and his eyes all orange flame with the thought of what came next, he flicked the igniter and the house jumped up in a gorging fire that burned the evening sky red and yellow and black.
  4. touch
    make physical contact with, come in contact with
    Her face was slender and milk-white, and in it was a kind of gentle hunger that touched over everything with tireless curiosity.
  5. jet
    a hard black form of lignite that takes a brilliant polish and is used in jewelry or ornamentation
    "Have you ever watched the jet cars racing on the boulevards down that way?
  6. whisper
    speaking softly without vibration of the vocal cords
    His inner mind, reaching out to turn the corner for him, had heard the faintest whisper.
  7. plunge
    dash violently or with great speed or impetuosity
    He felt his hand plunge toward the telephone.
  8. fascinate
    to render motionless, as with a fixed stare or by arousing terror or awe
    "Hello," whispered Montag, fascinated as always with the dead beast, the living beast.
  9. crumple
    to gather something into small wrinkles or folds
    Beatty opening a fresh tobacco packet, crumpling the cellophane into a sound of fire.
  10. headlight
    a powerful light with reflector; attached to the front of an automobile or locomotive
    Three blocks away a few headlights glared.
  11. equate
    consider or describe as similar, equal, or analogous
    Any man who can take a TV wall apart and put it back together again, and most men can nowadays, is happier than any man who tries to slide?rule, measure, and equate the universe, which just won't be measured or equated without making man feel bestial and lonely.
  12. digest
    convert food into absorbable substances
    Condensations, Digests.
  13. flame
    the process of combustion of inflammable materials producing heat and light and (often) smoke
    With his symbolic helmet numbered 451 on his stolid head, and his eyes all orange flame with the thought of what came next, he flicked the igniter and the house jumped up in a gorging fire that burned the evening sky red and yellow and black.
  14. displace
    cause to move, usually with force or pressure
    "No! " whispered Montag, "The zipper displaces the button and a man lacks just that much time to think while dressing at. dawn, a philosophical hour, and thus a melancholy hour."
  15. stumble
    miss a step and fall or nearly fall
    He stumbled towards the bed and shoved the book clumsily under the cold pillow.
  16. glance
    throw a glance at; take a brief look at
    She glanced quickly over.
  17. sniff
    perceive by inhaling through the nose
    "Someone--the door--why doesn't the door-voice tell us--" Under the door-sill, a slow, probing sniff, an exhalation of electric steam.
  18. hurtle
    move with or as if with a rushing sound
    He felt all of the mingled relief and horror at having pulled back only in time to have just his knee slammed by the fender of a car hurtling by at ninety miles an hour.
  19. motion
    the act of changing location from one place to another
    The autumn leaves blew over the moonlit pavement in such a way as to make the girl who was moving there seem fixed to a sliding walk, letting the motion of the wind and the leaves carry her forward.
  20. cartographer
    a person who makes maps
    The people in this book, this play, this TV serial are not meant to represent any actual painters, cartographers, mechanics anywhere.
  21. whistle
    the sound made by something moving rapidly or by steam coming out of a small aperture
    He hung up his black-beetle-coloured helmet and shined it, he hung his flameproof jacket neatly; he showered luxuriously, and then, whistling, hands in pockets, walked across the upper floor of the fire station and fell down the hole.
  22. trajectory
    the path followed by an object moving through space
    It has a trajectory we decide for it.
  23. pulverize
    make into a powder by breaking up or cause to become dust
    He felt that the stars had been pulverized by the sound of the black jets and that in the morning the earth would be thought as he stood shivering in the dark, and let his lips go on moving and moving.
  24. amaze
    affect with wonder
    With the brass nozzle in his fists, with this great python spitting its venomous kerosene upon the world, the blood pounded in his head, and his hands were the hands of some amazing conductor playing all the symphonies of blazing and burning to bring down the tatters and charcoal ruins of history.
  25. metal
    any of several chemical elements that are usually shiny solids that conduct heat or electricity and can be formed into sheets etc.
    Toast popped out of the silver toaster, was seized by a spidery metal hand that drenched it with melted butter.
  26. incredible
    beyond belief or understanding
    What incredible power of identification the girl had; she was like the eager watcher of a marionette show, anticipating each flicker of an eyelid, each gesture of his hand, each flick of a finger, the moment before it began.
  27. fell
    cause to fall by or as if by delivering a blow
    He hung up his black-beetle-coloured helmet and shined it, he hung his flameproof jacket neatly; he showered luxuriously, and then, whistling, hands in pockets, walked across the upper floor of the fire station and fell down the hole.
  28. wind
    air moving (sometimes with considerable force) from an area of high pressure to an area of low pressure
    While the books went up in sparkling whirls and blew away on a wind turned dark with burning.
  29. disposable
    an item that can be disposed of after it has been used
    But instead he stood there, very cold, his face a mask of ice, listening to a man's voice (the uncle?) moving along at an easy pace: "Well, after all, this is the age of the disposable tissue.
  30. alarm
    a device that signals the occurrence of some undesirable event
    Answer the alarm swiftly. 2.
  31. subside
    sink to a lower level or form a depression
    Montag did not look back at his wife as he went trembling along the hall to the kitchen, where he stood a long .time watching the rain hit the windows before he came back down the hall in the grey light, waiting for the tremble to subside.
  32. seize
    take hold of; grab
    Toast popped out of the silver toaster, was seized by a spidery metal hand that drenched it with melted butter.
  33. suffuse
    cause to spread or flush or flood through, over, or across
    In the hall Mildred's face was suffused with excitement.
  34. captain
    the leader of a group of people
    Only the man with the Captain's hat and the sign of the Phoenix on his hat, at last, curious, his playing cards in his thin hand, talked across the long room.
  35. track
    a line or route along which something travels or moves
    "Go on," said the woman, and Montag felt himself back away and away out of the door, after Beatty, down the steps, across the lawn, where the path of kerosene lay like the track of some evil snail.
  36. collapsible
    capable of collapsing or being collapsed
    He watched the dark steaming mixture pour into a collapsible tin cup, which was handed him straight off.
  37. leap
    move forward by leaps and bounds
    But now at night he lay in his bunk, face turned to the wall, listening to whoops of laughter below and the piano-string scurry of rat feet, the violin squeaking of mice, and the great shadowing, motioned silence of the Hound leaping out like a moth in the raw light, finding, holding its victim, inserting the needle and going back to its kennel to die as if a switch had been turned.
  38. confuse
    mistake one thing for another
    Montag finished it out: "'Ah, love, let us be true To one another! for the world, which seems To lie before us like a land of dreams, So various, so beautiful, so new, Hath really neither joy, nor love, nor light, Nor certitude, nor peace, nor help for pain; And we are here as on a darkling plain Swept with confused alarms of struggle and flight, Where ignorant armies clash by night.'"
  39. surprise
    come upon or take unawares
    It was a look, almost, of pale surprise; the dark eyes were so fixed to the world that no move escaped them.
  40. switch
    control consisting of a mechanical or electrical or electronic device for making or breaking or changing the connections in a circuit
    But now at night he lay in his bunk, face turned to the wall, listening to whoops of laughter below and the piano-string scurry of rat feet, the violin squeaking of mice, and the great shadowing, motioned silence of the Hound leaping out like a moth in the raw light, finding, holding its victim, inserting the needle and going back to its kennel to die as if a switch had been turned.
  41. dwindle
    become smaller or lose substance
    And you got in and we drove back to the firehouse in beatific silence, all -dwindled away to peace."
  42. minute
    a unit of time equal to 60 seconds or 1/60th of an hour
    She had a very thin face like the dial of a small clock seen faintly in a dark room in the middle of a night when you waken to see the time and see the clock telling you the hour and the minute and the second, with a white silence and a glowing, all certainty and knowing what it has to tell of the night passing swiftly on toward further darknesses but moving also toward a new sun.
  43. stroll
    a leisurely walk (usually in some public place)
    And the men with the cigarettes in their straight-lined mouths, the men with the eyes of puff-adders, took up their load of machine and tube, their case of liquid melancholy and the slow dark sludge of nameless stuff, and strolled out the door.
  44. douse
    wet thoroughly
    Montag doused the exterior of the valise with whisky.
  45. swerve
    turn sharply; change direction abruptly
    An instant before reaching him the wild beetle cut and swerved out.
  46. incriminate
    suggest that someone is guilty
    We're stopped and searched occasionally, but there's nothing on our persons to incriminate us.
  47. peer
    look searchingly
    He stood looking up at the ventilator grille in the hall and suddenly remembered that something lay hidden behind the grille, something that seemed to peer down at him now.
  48. whirl
    the shape of something rotating rapidly
    While the books went up in sparkling whirls and blew away on a wind turned dark with burning.
  49. target
    a reference point to shoot at
    It targets itself, homes itself, and cuts off.
  50. cacophony
    loud confusing disagreeable sounds
    You drowned in music and pure cacophony.
  51. stare
    look at with fixed eyes
    There was a tiny dance of melody in the air, her Seashell was tamped in her ear again and she was listening to far people in far places, her eyes wide and staring at the fathoms of blackness above her in the ceiling.
  52. wilderness
    a wild and uninhabited area left in its natural condition
    Montag was alone in the wilderness.
  53. spray
    water in small drops in the atmosphere; blown from waves or thrown up by a waterfall
    Their names leapt in fire, burning down the years under his axe and his hose which sprayed not water but kerosene.
  54. tactile
    of or relating to or proceeding from the sense of touch
    I'll think I'm responding to the play, when it's only a tactile reaction to vibration.
  55. ravel
    disentangle
    Montag stood looking in now at this queer house, made strange by the hour of the night, by murmuring neighbour voices, by littered glass, and there on the floor, their covers torn off and spilled out like swan-feathers, the incredible books that looked so silly and really not worth bothering with, for these were nothing but black type and yellowed paper, and ravelled binding.
  56. vanish
    become invisible or unnoticeable
    Each time he made the turn, he saw only the white, unused, buckling sidewalk, with perhaps, on one night, something vanishing swiftly across a lawn before he could focus his eyes or speak.
  57. welter
    a confused multitude of things
    Faber opened the bedroom door and led Montag into a small chamber where stood a table upon which a number of metal tools lay among a welter of microscopic wire- hairs, tiny coils, bobbins, and crystals.
  58. juggernaut
    a massive inexorable force that seems to crush everything in its way
    He saw a great juggernaut of stars form in the sky and threaten to roll over and crush him.
  59. contaminate
    make impure
    He saw Faber stop up his own breath for fear of drawing that ghost into his own body, perhaps, being contaminated with the phantom exhalations and odours of a running man.
  60. pause
    cease an action temporarily
    His wife in the TV parlour paused long enough from reading her script to glance up.
  61. flutter
    flap the wings rapidly or fly with flapping movements
    The flutter of cards, motion of hands, of eyelids, the drone of the time-voice in the firehouse ceiling ". . . one thirty-five.
  62. minority
    being or relating to the smaller in number of two parts
    "Now let's take up the minorities in our civilization, shall we?
  63. drone
    an unchanging intonation
    The flutter of cards, motion of hands, of eyelids, the drone of the time-voice in the firehouse ceiling ". . . one thirty-five.
  64. machine
    any mechanical or electrical device that transmits or modifies energy to perform or assist in the performance of human tasks
    They had this machine.
  65. saccharine
    overly sweet
    He's a regular peppermint stick now, all sugar-crystal and saccharine when he isn't making veiled references to certain commercial products that every worshipper absolutely needs."
  66. limn
    make a portrait of
    Then, if he wished, Montag might rise, walk to the window, keep one eye on the TV screen, open the window, lean out, look back, and see himself dramatized, described, made
    over, standing there, limned in the bright small television screen from outside, a drama to be watched objectively, knowing that in other parlours he was large as life, in full colour, dimensionally perfect!
  67. invisible
    impossible or nearly impossible to see; imperceptible by the eye
    His wife stretched on the bed, uncovered and cold, like a body displayed on the lid of a tomb, her eyes fixed to the ceiling by invisible threads of steel, immovable.
  68. illuminate
    make lighter or brighter
    The Mechanical Hound slept but did not sleep, lived but did not live in its gently humming, gently vibrating, softly illuminated kennel back in a dark corner of the firehouse.
  69. yard
    the enclosed land around a house or other building
    The entire operation was not unlike the digging of a trench in one's yard.
  70. odd
    not divisible by two
    He stopped walking, "You are an odd one," he said, looking at her.
  71. pattern
    a perceptual structure
    And most of the time in the cafes they have the jokeboxes on and the same jokes most of the time, or the musical wall lit and all the coloured patterns running up and down, but it's only colour and all abstract.
  72. sloth
    a disinclination to work or exert yourself
    And if there were, it would be related to the great sloth which hangs upside down in a tree all day every day, sleeping its life away.
  73. search
    search or seek
    People were more often-he searched for a simile, found one in his work-torches, blazing away until they whiffed out.
  74. verbiage
    overabundance of words
    And you shrieked, 'Knowledge is power!' and 'A dwarf on a giant's shoulders of the furthest of the two!' and I summed my side up with rare serenity in, 'The folly of mistaking a metaphor for a proof, a torrent of verbiage for a spring of capital truths, and oneself as an oracle, is inborn in us, Mr. Valery once said.'"
  75. skid
    one of a pair of planks used to make a track for rolling or sliding objects
    He stood shivering in the night, looking back out as the beetle ran by and skidded back to the centre of the avenue, whirling laughter in the air all about it, gone.
  76. job
    a specific piece of work required to be done as a duty or for a specific fee
    How did you pick your work and how did you happen to think to take the job you have?
  77. filigree
    delicate and intricate ornamentation (usually in gold or silver or other fine twisted wire)
    It was good listening to the beetle hum, the sleepy mosquito buzz and delicate filigree murmur of the old man's voice at first scolding him and then consoling him in the late hour of night as he emerged from the steaming subway toward the firehouse world.
  78. beatific
    marked by utter benignity; resembling or befitting an angel or saint
    And you got in and we drove back to the firehouse in beatific silence, all -dwindled away to peace."
  79. olfactory
    of or relating to olfaction
    At night when things got dull, which was every night, the men slid down the brass poles, and set the ticking combinations of the olfactory system of the Hound and let loose rats in the firehouse area-way, and sometimes chickens, and sometimes cats that would have to be drowned anyway, and there would be betting to see which the Hound would seize first.
  80. haggle
    an instance of intense argument (as in bargaining)
    Don't haggle and nag them; you were so recently one o f them yourself.
  81. fragile
    easily broken or damaged or destroyed
    Her face, turned to him now, was fragile milk crystal with a soft and constant light in it.
  82. psychiatrist
    a physician who specializes in psychiatry
    "I've got to go to see my psychiatrist now.
  83. torch
    a light usually carried in the hand; consists of some flammable substance
    People were more often-he searched for a simile, found one in his work-torches, blazing away until they whiffed out.
  84. guarantee
    an unconditional commitment that something will happen or that something is true
    It's a fine bit of craftsmanship, a good rifle that can fetch its own target and guarantees the bull's-eye every time."
  85. brittle
    having little elasticity; hence easily cracked or fractured or snapped
    He felt her there, he saw her without opening his eyes, her hair burnt by chemicals to a brittle straw, her eyes with a kind of cataract unseen but suspect far behind the pupils, the reddened pouting lips, the body as thin as a praying mantis from dieting, and her flesh like white bacon.
  86. clarify
    make clear by removing impurities or solids, as by heating
    He clarified it.
  87. course
    a connected series of events or actions or developments
    "Of course," he said, "you're a new neighbour, aren't you?"
  88. relaxed
    without strain or anxiety
    Her cheeks were very pink and her lips were very fresh and full of colour and they looked soft and relaxed.
  89. memorize
    commit to memory; learn by heart
    But he read and the words fell through, and he thought, in a few hours, there will be Beatty, and here will be me handing this over, so no phrase must escape me, each line must be memorized.
  90. shape
    a perceptual structure
    The most significant memory he had of Mildred, really, was of a little girl in a forest without trees (how odd!) or rather a little girl lost on a plateau where there used to be trees (you could feel the memory of their shapes all about) sitting in the centre of the "living-room."
  91. objectively
    with objectivity
    Then, if he wished, Montag might rise, walk to the window, keep one eye on the TV screen, open the window, lean out, look back, and see himself dramatized, described, made
    over, standing there, limned in the bright small television screen from outside, a drama to be watched objectively, knowing that in other parlours he was large as life, in full colour, dimensionally perfect!
  92. figment
    a contrived or fantastic idea
    They're about non?existent people, figments of imagination, if they're fiction.
  93. blare
    make a loud noise
    Trumpets blared.
  94. objectivity
    judgment based on observable phenomena and uninfluenced by emotions or personal prejudices
    He slapped her face with amazing objectivity and repeated the question.
  95. victim
    an unfortunate person who suffers from some adverse circumstance
    But now at night he lay in his bunk, face turned to the wall, listening to whoops of laughter below and the piano-string scurry of rat feet, the violin squeaking of mice, and the great shadowing, motioned silence of the Hound leaping out like a moth in the raw light, finding, holding its victim, inserting the needle and going back to its kennel to die as if a switch had been turned.
  96. entire
    constituting the full quantity or extent; complete
    The entire operation was not unlike the digging of a trench in one's yard.
  97. moment
    an indefinitely short time
    At the last moment, when disaster seemed positive, he pulled his hands from his pockets and broke his fall by grasping the golden pole.
  98. pore
    any tiny hole admitting passage of a liquid (fluid or gas)
    This book has pores.
  99. corner
    the point where three areas or surfaces meet or intersect
    Before he reached the corner, however, he slowed as if a wind had sprung up from nowhere, as if someone had called his name.
  100. exaggerate
    to enlarge beyond bounds or the truth
    I exaggerate, of course.
  101. raise
    move upwards
    Perhaps his nose detected a faint perfume, perhaps the skin on the backs of his hands, on his face, felt the temperature rise at this one spot where a person's standing might raise
    the immediate atmosphere ten degrees for an instant.
  102. tiny
    very small
    He saw himself in her eyes, suspended in two shining drops of bright water, himself dark and tiny, in fine detail, the lines about his mouth, everything there, as if her eyes were two miraculous bits of violet amber that might capture and hold him intact.
  103. immense
    unusually great in size or amount or degree or especially extent or scope
    How immense a figure she was on the stage before him; what a shadow she threw on the wall with
    her slender body!
  104. avalanche
    a slide of large masses of snow and ice and mud down a mountain
    The last rolling thunder of the avalanche stoned down about his ears, not touching him.
  105. melt
    reduce or cause to be reduced from a solid to a liquid state, usually by heating
    He felt his smile slide away, melt, fold over, and down on itself like a tallow skin, like the stuff of a fantastic candle burning too long and now collapsing and now blown out.
  106. scald
    burn with a hot liquid or steam
    The pains were spikes driven in the kneecap and then only darning needles and then only common, ordinary safety pins, and after he had dragged along fifty more hops and jumps, filling his hand with slivers from the board fence, the prickling was like someone blowing a spray of scalding water on that leg.
  107. phoenix
    a legendary Arabian bird said to periodically burn itself to death and emerge from the ashes as a new phoenix; according to most versions only one phoenix lived at a time and it renewed itself every 500 years
    But he knew his mouth had only moved to say hello, and then when she seemed hypnotized by the salamander on his arm and the phoenix-disc on his chest, he spoke again.
  108. wail
    a cry of sorrow and grief
    "That's not right," wailed Mrs. Bowles.
  109. knoll
    a small natural hill
    "The man's off--" "Knoll View!"
  110. instant
    a very short time (as the time it takes the eye to blink or the heart to beat)
    Perhaps his nose detected a faint perfume, perhaps the skin on the backs of his hands, on his face, felt the temperature rise at this one spot where a person's standing might raise
    the immediate atmosphere ten degrees for an instant.
  111. figure
    alternative names for the body of a human being
    How immense a figure she was on the stage before him; what a shadow she threw on the wall with
    her slender body!
  112. nozzle
    a projecting spout from which a fluid is discharged
    With the brass nozzle in his fists, with this great python spitting its venomous kerosene upon the world, the blood pounded in his head, and his hands were the hands of some amazing conductor playing all the symphonies of blazing and burning to bring down the tatters and charcoal ruins of history.
  113. gaze
    a long fixed look
    It had an Eye. The impersonal operator of the machine could, by wearing a special optical helmet, gaze into the soul of the person whom he was pumping out.
  114. dozen
    the cardinal number that is the sum of eleven and one
    He read a dozen pages here and there and came at last to this: " `It is computed that eleven thousand persons have at several times suffered death rather than submit to break eggs at the smaller end."'
  115. pedestrian
    a person who travels by foot
    It's like being a pedestrian, only rarer.
  116. evaluate
    evaluate or estimate the nature, quality, ability, extent, or significance of
    Eventually, I could put out ears into all parts of the city, with various men, listening and evaluating.
  117. brain
    that part of the central nervous system that includes all the higher nervous centers; enclosed within the skull; continuous with the spinal cord
    Leave that stuff in the blood and the blood hits the brain like a mallet, bang, a couple of thousand times and the brain just gives up, just quits."
  118. dawn
    the first light of day
    "No! " whispered Montag, "The zipper displaces the button and a man lacks just that much time to think while dressing at. dawn, a philosophical hour, and thus a melancholy hour."
  119. chemical
    of or made from or using substances produced by or used in reactions involving atomic or molecular changes
    "All of those chemical balances and percentages on all of us here in the house are recorded in the master file downstairs.
  120. hive
    a structure that provides a natural habitation for bees; as in a hollow tree
    I'm the Queen Bee, safe in the hive.
  121. lean
    to incline or bend from a vertical position
    "Who would it be?" said Montag, leaning back against the closed door in the dark.
  122. drift
    be in motion due to some air or water current
    It was like a faint drift of greenish luminescent smoke, the motion of a single huge October leaf blowing across the lawn and away.
  123. bestial
    resembling a beast; showing lack of human sensibility
    Any man who can take a TV wall apart and put it back together again, and most men can nowadays, is happier than any man who tries to slide?rule, measure, and equate the universe, which just won't be measured or equated without making man feel bestial and lonely.
  124. brush
    an implement that has hairs or bristles firmly set into a handle
    He felt his lips move, brushing the mouthpiece of the phone.
  125. carnival
    a traveling show; having sideshows and rides and games of skill etc.
    PART III BURNING BRIGHT LIGHTS flicked on and house-doors opened all down the street, to watch the carnival set up.
  126. separate
    standing apart; not attached to or supported by anything
    So, with the feeling of a man who will die in the next hour for lack of air,.he felt his way toward his open, separate, and therefore cold bed.
  127. distill
    undergo condensation; change from a gaseous to a liquid state and fall in drops
    Montag moved back to his own house, left the window wide, checked Mildred, tucked the covers about her carefully, and then lay down with the moonlight on his cheek- bones and on the frowning ridges in his brow, with the moonlight distilled in each eye to form a silver cataract there.
  128. dramatize
    put into dramatic form
    Then, if he wished, Montag might rise, walk to the window, keep one eye on the TV screen, open the window, lean out, look back, and see himself dramatized, described, made
    over, standing there, limned in the bright small television screen from outside, a drama to be watched objectively, knowing that in other parlours he was large as life, in full colour, dimensionally perfect!
  129. insomnia
    an inability to sleep; chronic sleeplessness
    Don't think the police don't know the habits of queer ducks like that, men who walk mornings for the hell of it, or for reasons of insomnia Anyway, the police have had him charted for months, years.
  130. survive
    continue in existence after (an adversity, etc.)
    But the public, knowing what it wanted, spinning happily, let the comic?books survive.
  131. fumble
    feel about uncertainly or blindly
    Why don't you belch Shakespeare at me, you fumbling snob?
  132. compute
    make a mathematical calculation or computation
    He read a dozen pages here and there and came at last to this: " `It is computed that eleven thousand persons have at several times suffered death rather than submit to break eggs at the smaller end."'
  133. acrobat
    an athlete who performs acts requiring skill and agility and coordination
    So bring on your clubs and parties, your acrobats and magicians, your dare-devils, jet cars, motor?cycle helicopters, your sex and heroin, more of everything to do with automatic reflex.
  134. ignore
    refuse to acknowledge
    Beatty ignored her and continued "Speed up the film, Montag, quick.
  135. proclivity
    a natural inclination
    Were all firemen picked then for their looks as well as their proclivities?
  136. dimensional
    of or relating to dimensions
    And the three?dimensional sex?magazines, of course.
  137. blast
    a sudden very loud noise
    It tells you what to think and blasts it in.
  138. flap
    move in a wavy pattern or with a rising and falling motion
    He wanted above all, like the old joke, to shove a marshmallow on a stick in the furnace, while the flapping pigeon-winged books died on the porch and lawn of the house.
  139. nursery
    a child's room for a baby
    She talked to him for what seemed a long while and she talked about this and she talked about that and it was only words, like the words he had heard once in a nursery at a friend's house, a two-year-old child building word patterns, talking jargon, making pretty sounds in the air.
  140. relax
    make less taut
    Her cheeks were very pink and her lips were very fresh and full of colour and they looked soft and relaxed.
  141. straight
    having no deviations
    He stood very straight and listened to the person on the dark bed in the completely featureless night.
  142. ancient
    belonging to times long past especially of the historical period before the fall of the Western Roman Empire
    With the optical lens, of course, that was new; the rest is ancient.
  143. converge
    be adjacent or come together
    Police helicopters are converging on Avenue 87 and Elm Grove Park!"
  144. insect
    small air-breathing arthropod
    Below, the Hound had sunk back down upon its eight incredible insect legs and was humming to itself again, its multi-faceted eyes at peace.
  145. quibble
    evade the truth of a point or question by raising irrelevant objections
    Let's not quibble over individuals with memoriams.
  146. earth
    the 3rd planet from the sun; the planet we live on
    He walked out of the fire station and along the midnight street toward the subway where the silent, air-propelled train slid soundlessly down its lubricated flue in the earth and let him out with a great puff of warm air an to the cream-tiled escalator rising to the suburb.
  147. cataract
    a large waterfall; violent rush of water over a precipice
    Montag moved back to his own house, left the window wide, checked Mildred, tucked the covers about her carefully, and then lay down with the moonlight on his cheek- bones and on the frowning ridges in his brow, with the moonlight distilled in each eye to form a silver cataract there.
  148. collapse
    break down, literally or metaphorically
    He felt his smile slide away, melt, fold over, and down on itself like a tallow skin, like the stuff of a fantastic candle burning too long and now collapsing and now blown out.
  149. recite
    repeat aloud from memory
    Surely you remember the boy in your own school class who was exceptionally 'bright,' did most of the reciting and answering while the others sat like so many leaden idols, hating him.
  150. dimension
    a construct whereby objects or individuals can be distinguished
    One time, when he was a child, in a power-failure, his mother had found and lit a last candle and there had been a brief hour of rediscovery, of such illumination that space lost its vast dimensions and drew comfortably around them, and they, mother and son, alone, transformed, hoping that the power might not come on again too soon ....
  151. pan
    shallow container made of metal
    Someone produced a small frying-pan and the bacon went into it and the frying-pan was set on the fire.
  152. vast
    unusually great in size or amount or degree or especially extent or scope
    One time, when he was a child, in a power-failure, his mother had found and lit a last candle and there had been a brief hour of rediscovery, of such illumination that space lost its vast dimensions and drew comfortably around them, and they, mother and son, alone, transformed, hoping that the power might not come on again too soon ....
  153. abnormal
    not normal; not typical or usual or regular or conforming to a norm
    That's supposed to prove I'm abnormal.
  154. dilate
    become wider
    They both looked quickly about the house and Montag felt his nostrils dilate and he knew that he was trying to track himself and his nose was suddenly good enough to sense the path he had made in the air of the room and the sweat of his hand hung from the doorknob, invisible, but as numerous as the jewels of a small chandelier, he was everywhere, in and on and about everything, he was a luminous cloud, a ghost that made breathing once more impossible.
  155. cog
    tooth on the rim of gear wheel
    It growled again, a strange rasping combination of electrical sizzle, a frying sound, a scraping of metal, a turning of cogs that seemed rusty and ancient with suspicion.
  156. jabber
    talk in a noisy, excited, or declamatory manner
    Oh God, the way they jabber about people and their own children and themselves and the way they talk about their husbands and the way they talk about war, dammit, I stand here and I can't believe it!"
  157. leisure
    time available for ease and relaxation
    "Leisure."
  158. sway
    move back and forth or sideways
    The room was blazing hot, he was all fire, he was all coldness; they sat in the middle of an empty desert with three chairs and him standing, swaying, and him waiting for Mrs. Phelps to stop straightening her dress hem and Mrs. Bowles to take her fingers away from her hair.
  159. capillary
    any of the minute blood vessels connecting arterioles with venules
    Light flickered on bits of ruby glass and on sensitive capillary hairs in the nylon-brushed nostrils of the creature that quivered gently, gently, gently, its eight legs spidered under it on rubber-padded paws.
  160. cliff
    a steep high face of rock
    When it was all over he felt like a man who had been thrown from a cliff, whirled in a centrifuge and spat out over a waterfall that fell and fell into emptiness and emptiness and never-quite-touched-bottom-never-never-quite-no not quite-touched-bottom ... and you fell so fast you didn't touch the sides either ... never ... quite . . . touched . anything.
  161. husband
    a married man; a woman's partner in marriage
    Wasn't there an old joke about the wife who talked so much on the telephone that her desperate husband ran out to the nearest store and telephoned her to ask what was for dinner?
  162. focus
    the concentration of attention or energy on something
    Each time he made the turn, he saw only the white, unused, buckling sidewalk, with perhaps, on one night, something vanishing swiftly across a lawn before he could focus his eyes or speak.
  163. melancholy
    a constitutional tendency to be gloomy and depressed
    And the men with the cigarettes in their straight-lined mouths, the men with the eyes of puff-adders, took up their load of machine and tube, their case of liquid melancholy and the slow dark sludge of nameless stuff, and strolled out the door.
  164. serenity
    the absence of mental stress or anxiety
    Serenity, Montag.
  165. minimum
    the smallest possible quantity
    "At least keep it down to the minimum !" he yelled: "What?" she cried.
  166. writhe
    to move in a twisting or contorted motion, (especially when struggling)
    And then he was a shrieking blaze, a jumping, sprawling, gibbering mannikin, no longer human or known, all writhing flame on the lawn as Montag shot one continuous pulse of liquid fire on him.
  167. nomadic
    migratory
    Towns turn into motels, people in nomadic surges from place to place, following the moon tides, living tonight in the room where you slept this noon and I the night before."
  168. settle
    become resolved, fixed, established, or quiet
    Even though the people in the walls of the room had barely moved, and nothing had really been settled, you had the impression that someone had turned on a washing-machine or sucked you up in a gigantic vacuum.
  169. certitude
    total certainty or greater certainty than circumstances warrant
    Montag finished it out: "'Ah, love, let us be true To one another! for the world, which seems To lie before us like a land of dreams, So various, so beautiful, so new, Hath really neither joy, nor love, nor light, Nor certitude, nor peace, nor help for pain; And we are here as on a darkling plain Swept with confused alarms of struggle and flight, Where ignorant armies clash by night.'"
  170. sparkle
    emit or produce sparks
    While the books went up in sparkling whirls and blew away on a wind turned dark with burning.
  171. bend
    form a curve
    Her head was half bent to watch her shoes stir the circling leaves.
  172. monstrous
    distorted and unnatural in shape or size; abnormal and hideous
    They were like a monstrous crystal chandelier tinkling in a thousand chimes, he saw their Cheshire Cat smiles burning through the walls of the house, and now they were screaming at each other above the din.
  173. prattle
    speak (about unimportant matters) rapidly and incessantly
    He saw her leaning toward the great shimmering walls of colour and motion where the family talked and talked and talked to her, where the family prattled and chatted and said her name and smiled at her and said nothing of the bomb that was an inch, now a half-inch, now a quarter-inch from the top of the hotel.
  174. cymbal
    a percussion instrument consisting of a concave brass disk; makes a loud crashing sound when hit with a drumstick or when two are struck together
    Behind her the walls of the room were flooded with green and yellow and orange fireworks sizzling and bursting to some music composed almost completely of trap?drums, tom?toms, and cymbals.
  175. train
    educate for a future role or function
    He walked out of the fire station and along the midnight street toward the subway where the silent, air-propelled train slid soundlessly down its lubricated flue in the earth and let him out with a great puff of warm air an to the cream-tiled escalator rising to the suburb.
  176. pierce
    penetrate or cut through with a sharp instrument
    He felt he was one of the creatures electronically inserted between the slots of the phono-colour walls, speaking, but the speech not piercing the crystal barrier.
  177. hover
    hang in the air; fly or be suspended above
    They shook hands again and, going out of the door, they glanced at the TV. The Hound was on its way, followed by hovering helicopter cameras, silently, silently, sniffing the great night wind.
  178. oblivion
    the state of being disregarded or forgotten
    And if he kept his eye peeled quickly he would see himself, an instant before oblivion, being punctured for the benefit of how many civilian parlour-sitters who had been wakened from sleep a few minutes ago by the frantic sirening of their living-room walls to come watch the big game, the hunt, the one-man carnival.
  179. combustible
    capable of igniting and burning
    Cram them full of non?combustible data, chock them so damned full of 'facts' they feel stuffed, but absolutely `brilliant' with information.
  180. classics
    study of the literary works of ancient Greece and Rome
    "Classics cut to fit fifteen-minute radio shows, then cut again to fill a two-minute book column, winding up at last as a ten- or twelve-line dictionary resume.
  181. topple
    fall down, as if collapsing
    They turned to stare at the door and the books toppled everywhere, everywhere in heaps.
  182. tide
    the periodic rise and fall of the sea level under the gravitational pull of the moon
    Every night the waves came in and bore her off on their great tides of sound, floating her, wide-eyed, toward morning.
  183. destroy
    do away with, cause the destruction or undoing of
    "To see the firehouses burn across the land, destroyed as hotbeds of treason.
  184. mausoleum
    a large burial chamber, usually above ground
    It was like coming into the cold marbled room of a mausoleum after the moon had set.
  185. solid
    not soft or yielding to pressure
    I just like solid entertainment."
  186. layer
    single thickness of usually some homogeneous substance
    I keep him busy peeling away the layers."
  187. insert
    introduce
    But now at night he lay in his bunk, face turned to the wall, listening to whoops of laughter below and the piano-string scurry of rat feet, the violin squeaking of mice, and the great shadowing, motioned silence of the Hound leaping out like a moth in the raw light, finding, holding its victim, inserting the needle and going back to its kennel to die as if a switch had been turned.
  188. volcano
    a fissure in the earth's crust (or in the surface of some other planet) through which molten lava and gases erupt
    The fire gushing up in a volcano.
  189. alert
    warn or arouse to a sense of danger or call to a state of preparedness
    Stand alert for other alarms.
  190. sob
    weep convulsively
    She sobbed uncontrollably.
  191. taped
    recorded on tape
    The police went first and adhesive-taped the victim's mouth and bandaged him off into their glittering beetle cars, so when you arrived you found an empty house.
  192. pedant
    a person who pays more attention to formal rules and book learning than they merit
    The most important single thing we had to pound into ourselves was that we were not important, we mustn't be pedants; we were not to feel superior to anyone else in the world.
  193. flail
    an implement consisting of handle with a free swinging stick at the end; used in manual threshing
    God! He dropped a book, broke pace, almost turned, changed his mind, plunged on, yelling in concrete emptiness, the beetle scuttling after its running food, two hundred, one hundred feet away, ninety, eighty, seventy, Montag gasping, flailing his hands, legs up down out, up down out, closer, closer, hooting, calling, his eyes burnt white now as his head jerked about to confront the flashing glare, now the beetle was swallowed in its own light, now it was nothing but a torch hurtling u...
  194. hone
    sharpen with a hone
    By the time I was forty my blunt instrument had been honed to a fine cutting point for me.
  195. familiar
    a friend who is frequently in the company of another
    Stoneman and Black drew forth their rulebooks, which also contained brief histories of the Firemen of America, and laid them out where Montag, though long familiar with them, might read: "Established, 1790, to burn English-influenced books in the Colonies.
  196. arrange
    put into a proper or systematic order
    Beatty arranged his cards quietly.
  197. titter
    laugh nervously
    Mrs. Bowles tittered.
  198. react
    show a response or a reaction to something
    The pole, reacting, slid upward, and took him through the ceiling, quietly.
  199. anticipate
    regard something as probable or likely
    What incredible power of identification the girl had; she was like the eager watcher of a marionette show, anticipating each flicker of an eyelid, each gesture of his hand, each flick of a finger, the moment before it began.
  200. gather
    assemble or get together
    One of them slid down into your stomach like a black cobra down an echoing well looking for all the old water and the old time gathered there.
  201. revealing
    showing or making known
    The light from the overhead lamps seemed as bright and revealing as the midday sun and just as hot.
  202. fume
    a cloud of fine particles suspended in a gas
    They hurried downstairs, Montag staggered after them in the kerosene fumes.
  203. substitute
    a person or thing that takes or can take the place of another
    But how do I choose a substitute?
  204. aroma
    any property detected by the olfactory system
    After a moment the bacon began to flutter and dance in the pan and the sputter of it filled the morning air with its aroma.
  205. rigidity
    the physical property of being stiff and resisting bending
    The front door opened; Mildred came down the steps, running, one suitcase held with a dream-like clenching rigidity in her fist, as a beetle-taxi hissed to the curb.
  206. babble
    utter meaningless sounds, like a baby, or utter in an incoherent way
    "What?" asked Montag of that other self, the subconscious idiot that ran babbling at times, quite independent of will, habit, and conscience.
  207. float
    be afloat either on or below a liquid surface and not sink to the bottom
    Every night the waves came in and bore her off on their great tides of sound, floating her, wide-eyed, toward morning.
  208. image
    a visual representation (of an object or scene or person or abstraction) produced on a surface
    These men were all mirror-images of himself!
  209. nectar
    a sweet liquid secretion that is attractive to pollinators
    It was like a great bee come home from some field where the honey is full of poison wildness, of insanity and nightmare, its body crammed with that over-rich nectar and now it was sleeping the evil out of itself.
  210. aggravate
    make worse
    You're peculiar, you're aggravating, yet you're easy to forgive.
  211. incite
    provoke or stir up
    We're not out to incite or anger anyone yet.
  212. liquid
    fluid matter having no fixed shape but a fixed volume
    And the men with the cigarettes in their straight-lined mouths, the men with the eyes of puff-adders, took up their load of machine and tube, their case of liquid melancholy and the slow dark sludge of nameless stuff, and strolled out the door.
  213. wade
    walk (through relatively shallow water)
    He waded in and stripped in darkness to the skin, splashed his body, arms, legs, and head with raw liquor; drank it and snuffed some up his nose.
  214. ravenous
    extremely hungry
    His hands were ravenous.
  215. fugitive
    someone who is sought by law officers; someone trying to elude justice
    Wanted: Fugitive in city.
  216. consider
    think about carefully; weigh
    "And I should think you'd consider me sometimes.
  217. scuttle
    an entrance equipped with a hatch; especially a passageway between decks of a ship
    God! He dropped a book, broke pace, almost turned, changed his mind, plunged on, yelling in concrete emptiness, the beetle scuttling after its running food, two hundred, one hundred feet away, ninety, eighty, seventy, Montag gasping, flailing his hands, legs up down out, up down out, closer, closer, hooting, calling, his eyes burnt white now as his head jerked about to confront the flashing glare, now the beetle was swallowed in its own light, now it was nothing but a torch hurtling u...
  218. starve
    die of food deprivation
    I've heard rumours; the world is starving, but we're well-fed.
  219. remind
    put in the mind of someone
    The books are to remind us what asses and fools we are.
  220. luminous
    softly bright or radiant
    They both looked quickly about the house and Montag felt his nostrils dilate and he knew that he was trying to track himself and his nose was suddenly good enough to sense the path he had made in the air of the room and the sweat of his hand hung from the doorknob, invisible, but as numerous as the jewels of a small chandelier, he was everywhere, in and on and about everything, he was a luminous cloud, a ghost that made breathing once more impossible.
  221. rail
    a horizontal bar (usually of wood or metal)
    The woman on the porch reached out with contempt for them all, and struck the kitchen match against the railing.
  222. gingerly
    in a gingerly manner
    He sipped it gingerly and felt them looking at him with curiosity.
  223. threadbare
    having the nap worn away so that the threads show through
    And you yelled, 'This age thinks better of a gilded fool, than of a threadbare saint in wisdom's school!'
  224. rub
    move over something with pressure
    Have you ever heard of rubbing it under your chin?
  225. swarm
    a group of many things in the air or on the ground
    He strode in a swarm of fireflies.
  226. giggle
    laugh nervously
    She giggled.
  227. scratch
    cut the surface of; wear away the surface of
    Oh, to scratch that itch, eh?
  228. probe
    an exploratory action or expedition
    And then he shut up, for he remembered last week and the two white stones staring up at the ceiling and the pump-snake with the probing eye and the two soap-faced men with the cigarettes moving in their mouths when they talked.
  229. edge
    a line determining the limits of an area
    The object he had sent tumbling with his foot now glinted under the edge of his own bed.
  230. wax
    any of various substances of either mineral origin or plant or animal origin; they are solid at normal temperatures and insoluble in water
    She was beginning to shriek now, sitting there like a wax doll melting in its own heat.
  231. norm
    a standard or model or pattern regarded as typical
    Films and radios, magazines, books levelled down to a sort of paste pudding norm, do you follow me?"
  232. memory
    the cognitive processes whereby past experience is remembered
    The girl's face was there, really quite beautiful in memory: astonishing, in fact.
  233. environment
    the totality of surrounding conditions
    Heredity and environment are funny things.
  234. nettle
    any of numerous plants having stinging hairs that cause skin irritation on contact (especially of the genus Urtica or family Urticaceae)
    Half an hour later, cold, and moving carefully on the tracks, fully aware of his entire body, his face, his mouth, his eyes stuffed with blackness, his ears stuffed with sound, his legs prickled with burrs and nettles, he saw the fire ahead.
  235. barrier
    a structure or object that impedes free movement
    His foot, sending vibrations ahead, received back echoes of the small barrier across its path even as the foot swung.
  236. found
    food and lodging provided in addition to money
    One time, when he was a child, in a power-failure, his mother had found and lit a last candle and there had been a brief hour of rediscovery, of such illumination that space lost its vast dimensions and drew comfortably around them, and they, mother and son, alone, transformed, hoping that the power might not come on again too soon ....
  237. knead
    make uniform
    Two dozen of them flurried, wavering, indecisive, three miles off, like butterflies puzzled by autumn, and then they were plummeting down to land, one by one, here, there, softly kneading the streets where, turned back to beetles, they shrieked along the boulevards or, as suddenly, leapt back into the sir, continuing their search.
  238. tilt
    heel over
    And then, very slowly, as he walked, he tilted his head back in the rain, for just a few moments, and opened his mouth....
  239. plummet
    drop sharply
    Two dozen of them flurried, wavering, indecisive, three miles off, like butterflies puzzled by autumn, and then they were plummeting down to land, one by one, here, there, softly kneading the streets where, turned back to beetles, they shrieked along the boulevards or, as suddenly, leapt back into the sir, continuing their search.
  240. drain
    emptying something accomplished by allowing liquid to run out of it
    The images drained away, as if the water had been let out from a gigantic crystal bowl of hysterical fish.
  241. mural
    a painting that is applied to a wall surface
    For another of those impossible instants the city stood, rebuilt and unrecognizable, taller than it had ever hoped or strived to be, taller than man had built it, erected at last in gouts of shattered concrete and sparkles of torn metal into a mural hung like a reversed avalanche, a million colours, a million oddities, a door where a window should be, a top for a bottom, a side for a back, and then the city rolled over and fell down dead.
  242. musty
    covered with or smelling of mold
    Next thing they were up in musty blackness, swinging silver hatchets at doors that were, after all, unlocked, tumbling through like boys all rollick and shout.
  243. gorge
    a deep ravine (usually with a river running through it)
    With his symbolic helmet numbered 451 on his stolid head, and his eyes all orange flame with the thought of what came next, he flicked the igniter and the house jumped up in a gorging fire that burned the evening sky red and yellow and black.
  244. title
    the name of a work of art or literary composition etc.
    Titles glittered their golden eyes, falling, gone.
  245. clear
    readily apparent to the mind
    Two moonstones looked up at him in the light of his small hand-held fire; two pale moonstones buried in a creek of clear water over which the life of the world ran, not touching them.
  246. fresh
    recently made, produced, or harvested
    They walked in the warm-cool blowing night on the silvered pavement and there was the faintest breath of fresh apricots and strawberries in the air, and he looked around and realized this was quite impossible, so late in the year.
  247. bent
    used of the back and knees; stooped
    Her head was half bent to watch her shoes stir the circling leaves.
  248. scurry
    to move about or proceed hurriedly
    But now at night he lay in his bunk, face turned to the wall, listening to whoops of laughter below and the piano-string scurry of rat feet, the violin squeaking of mice, and the great shadowing, motioned silence of the Hound leaping out like a moth in the raw light, finding, holding its victim, inserting the needle and going back to its kennel to die as if a switch had been turned.
  249. rubble
    the remains of something that has been destroyed or broken up
    The crowd drew back into the houses; the great tents of the circus had slumped into charcoal and rubble and the show was well over.
  250. mallet
    a tool resembling a hammer but with a large head (usually wooden); used to drive wedges or ram down paving stones or for crushing or beating or flattening or smoothing
    Leave that stuff in the blood and the blood hits the brain like a mallet, bang, a couple of thousand times and the brain just gives up, just quits."
  251. desert
    leave someone who needs or counts on you; leave in the lurch
    The room was blazing hot, he was all fire, he was all coldness; they sat in the middle of an empty desert with three chairs and him standing, swaying, and him waiting for Mrs. Phelps to stop straightening her dress hem and Mrs. Bowles to take her fingers away from her hair.
  252. sight
    the ability to see; the visual faculty
    He held it way out, as if he were far-sighted.
  253. mediocre
    moderate to inferior in quality
    The mediocre ones run a quick hand over her.
  254. steady
    securely in position; not shaky
    He held both hands over his eyes and applied a steady pressure there as if to crush memory into place.
  255. lap
    the upper side of the thighs of a seated person
    His gaze returned unsteadily to Montag, who was now seated with the book in his lap.
  256. limp
    walk impeded by some physical limitation or injury
    Beatty shook Montag's limp hand.
  257. glare
    be sharply reflected
    Mrs. Bowles stood up and glared at Montag.
  258. spring
    move forward by leaps and bounds
    Before he reached the corner, however, he slowed as if a wind had sprung up from nowhere, as if someone had called his name.
  259. frown
    a facial expression of dislike or displeasure
    Montag moved back to his own house, left the window wide, checked Mildred, tucked the covers about her carefully, and then lay down with the moonlight on his cheek- bones and on the frowning ridges in his brow, with the moonlight distilled in each eye to form a silver cataract there.
  260. ferret
    domesticated albino variety of the European polecat bred for hunting rats and rabbits
    His fingers were like ferrets that had done some evil and now never rested, always stirred and picked and hid in pockets, moving from under Beatty's alcohol- flame stare.
  261. rhythm
    an interval during which a recurring sequence of events occurs
    The people who had been sitting a moment before, tapping their feet to the rhythm of Denham's Dentifrice, Denham's Dandy Dental Detergent, Denham's Dentifrice Dentifrice Dentifrice, one two, one two three, one two, one two three.
  262. whiff
    a short light gust of air
    People were more often-he searched for a simile, found one in his work-torches, blazing away until they whiffed out.
  263. cycle
    a periodically repeated sequence of events
    So bring on your clubs and parties, your acrobats and magicians, your dare-devils, jet cars, motor?cycle helicopters, your sex and heroin, more of everything to do with automatic reflex.
  264. temperature
    the degree of hotness or coldness of a body or environment (corresponding to its molecular activity)
    FAHRENHEIT 451: The temperature at which book-paper catches fire and burns
    PART I IT WAS A PLEASURE TO BURN IT was a special pleasure to see things eaten, to see things blackened and changed.
  265. dictum
    an authoritative declaration
    There was no dictum, no declaration, no censorship, to start with, no!
  266. vantage
    place or situation affording some advantage (especially a comprehensive view or commanding perspective)
    They leaped into the air and clutched the brass pole as if it were the last vantage point above a tidal wave passing below, and then the brass pole, to their dismay slid them down into darkness, into the blast and cough and suction of the gaseous dragon roaring to life!
  267. stifle
    impair the respiration of or obstruct the air passage of
    He had just stood there, not really trying to save himself, just stood there, joking, needling, thought Montag, and the thought was enough to stifle his sobbing and let him pause for air.
  268. skeleton
    the hard structure (bones and cartilages) that provides a frame for the body of an animal
    The skeleton needs melting and re-shaping.
  269. dusty
    covered with a layer of dust
    The men above were hurling shovelfuls of magazines into the dusty air.
  270. claw
    sharp curved horny process on the toe of a bird or some mammals or reptiles
    But who has ever torn himself from the claw that encloses you when you drop a seed in a TV parlour?
  271. exploitation
    an act that exploits or victimizes someone (treats them unfairly)
    Technology, mass exploitation, and minority pressure carried the trick, thank God. Today, thanks to them, you can stay happy all the time, you are allowed to read comics, the good old confessions, or trade?journals."
  272. stagnant
    not growing or changing; without force or vitality
    He tried to count how many times she swallowed and he thought of the visit from the two zinc-oxide-faced men with the cigarettes in their straight-lined mouths and the electronic-eyed snake winding down into the layer upon layer of night and stone and stagnant spring water, and he wanted to call out to her, how many have you taken TONIGHT! the capsules! how many will you take later and not know? and so on, every hour! or maybe not tonight, tomorrow night!
  273. insidious
    working or spreading in a hidden and usually injurious way
    "It's an insidious plan, if I do say so myself."
  274. examine
    observe, check out, and look over carefully or inspect
    He examined his eternal matchbox, the lid of which said GUARANTEED: ONE MILLION LIGHTS IN THIS IGNITER, and began to strike the chemical match abstractedly, blow out, strike, blow out, strike, speak a few words, blow out.
  275. philosophy
    the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
    "School is shortened, discipline relaxed, philosophies, histories, languages dropped, English and spelling gradually neglected, finally almost completely ignored.
  276. record
    anything (such as a document or a phonograph record or a photograph) providing permanent evidence of or information about past events
    "All of those chemical balances and percentages on all of us here in the house are recorded in the master file downstairs.
  277. chaff
    material consisting of seed coverings and small pieces of stem or leaves that have been separated from the seeds
    They rounded a corner in thunder and siren, with concussion of tyres, with scream of rubber, with a shift of kerosene bulk in the glittery brass tank, like the food in the stomach of a giant; with Montag's fingers jolting off the silver rail, swinging into cold space, with the wind tearing his hair back from his head, with the wind whistling in his teeth, and him all the while thinking of the women, the chaff women in his parlour tonight, with the kernels blown out from under them by ...
  278. ignored
    disregarded
    Beatty ignored her and continued "Speed up the film, Montag, quick.
  279. pantomime
    a performance using gestures and body movements without words
    He could only pantomime, hoping she would turn his way and see him.
  280. jargon
    specialized technical terminology characteristic of a particular subject
    She talked to him for what seemed a long while and she talked about this and she talked about that and it was only words, like the words he had heard once in a nursery at a friend's house, a two-year-old child building word patterns, talking jargon, making pretty sounds in the air.
  281. dismay
    the feeling of despair in the face of obstacles
    He looked with dismay at the floor.
  282. stolid
    having or revealing little emotion or sensibility; not easily aroused or excited
    With his symbolic helmet numbered 451 on his stolid head, and his eyes all orange flame with the thought of what came next, he flicked the igniter and the house jumped up in a gorging fire that burned the evening sky red and yellow and black.
  283. conjure
    summon into action or bring into existence, often as if by magic
    He tried to conjure up a face to fit the words, but there was no face.
  284. boil
    come to the boiling point and change from a liquid to vapor
    It drank up the green matter that flowed to the top in a slow boil.
  285. accumulate
    get or gather together
    Did it suck out all the poisons accumulated with the years?