Mark Twain's "The Prince and the Pauper" Chapters 1-17 606 words

Vocabulary study list for Mark Twain's "The Prince and the Pauper" (Chapters 1-17).
  1. bedraggle
    make wet and dirty, as from rain
    His doublet and trunks were of rich material, but faded and threadbare, and their gold-lace adornments were sadly tarnished; his ruff was rumpled and damaged; the plume in his slouched hat was broken and had a bedraggled and disreputable look; at h
  2. liege
    a feudal lord entitled to allegiance and service
    "But is it not I that speed him hence, my liege?
  3. pauper
    a person who is very poor
    But there was no talk about the other baby, Tom Canty, lapped in his poor rags, except among the family of paupers whom he had just come to trouble with his presence.
  4. halberd
    a pike fitted with an ax head
    The soldiers presented arms with their halberds, opened the gates, and presented again as the little Prince of Poverty passed in, in his fluttering rags, to join hands with the Prince of Limitless Plenty.
  5. doublet
    a man's close-fitting jacket; worn during the Renaissance
    'They were dressed in striped hose of black and tawny, velvet caps graced at the sides with silver roses, and doublets of murrey and blue cloth, embroidered on the front and back with the three feathers, the prince's blazon, woven in gold.
  6. servitor
    someone who performs the duties of an attendant for someone else
    Tom's first movement there was to reach for a cup of water; but a silk-and-velvet servitor seized it, dropped upon one knee, and offered it to him on a golden salver.
  7. doff
    remove
    Doff thy rags, and don these splendours, lad!
  8. twinned
    being two identical
    Will any be in all the land maintain there can be two, not of one blood and birth, so marvellously twinned?
  9. halberdier
    a guard who carries a halberd (as a symbol of his duty)
    The grand terrace of stone steps leading down to the water, spacious enough to mass the army of a German principality upon, was a picture to see, with its ranks of royal halberdiers in polished armour, and its troops of brilliantly costumed servito
  10. grace
    elegance and beauty of movement or expression
    Gode gyffe us alle grace, to yelde dew thankes to our Lorde Gode, Gode of Inglonde, for verely He hathe shoyd Hym selff Gode of Inglonde, or rather an Inglyssh Gode, yf we consydyr and pondyr welle alle Hys procedynges with us from tyme to tyme.
  11. King of England
    the sovereign ruler of England
    Long live Edward, King of England!"
  12. man-at-arms
    a heavily armed and mounted soldier in medieval times
    At each side of the gilded gate stood a living statue--that is to say, an erect and stately and motionless man-at-arms, clad from head to heel in shining steel armour.
  13. ruffian
    a cruel and brutal fellow
    Suddenly a great drunken ruffian collared him and said--
    "Out to this time of night again, and hast not brought a farthing home, I warrant me!
  14. Lord Chancellor
    the highest officer of the Crown who is head of the judiciary and who presides in the House of Lords
    His attendants perceiving that he was awake, one of them asked his pleasure concerning the Lord Chancellor, who was waiting without.
  15. embroider
    decorate with needlework
    Some of them were decorated with banners and streamers; some with cloth-of-gold and arras embroidered with coats-of-arms; others with silken flags that had numberless little silver bells fastened to them, which shook out tiny showers of joyous musi
  16. attaint
    bring shame or dishonor upon
    One of the nobles knelt at the royal couch, and said--
    "The King's majesty knoweth that the Hereditary Great Marshal of England lieth attainted in the Tower.
  17. yokel
    a person who is not very intelligent or interested in culture
    Stand forth, Yokel, Burns, and Hodge--show your adornments!"
  18. tarry
    leave slowly and hesitantly
    But why not tarry yet a little?
  19. bine
    European twining plant whose flowers are used chiefly to flavor malt liquors; cultivated in America
    Bing'd out bien Morts and toure, and toure, Bing out of the Rome vile bine, And toure the Cove that cloy'd your duds, Upon the Chates to trine.'
  20. optimum
    most desirable possible under a restriction expressed or implied
    Ande I for my partt wylle wyssh that hys Grace allways have, and evyn now from the begynynge, Governares, Instructores and offyceres of ryght jugmente, ne optimum ingenium non optima educatione deprevetur.
  21. assemblage
    several things grouped together or considered as a whole
    After grace, Tom (being instructed) rose--and the whole house with him --and drank from a portly golden loving-cup with the Princess Elizabeth; from her it passed to the Lady Jane, and then traversed the general assemblage.
  22. buskin
    a boot reaching halfway up to the knee
    Within was a comely boy, tanned and brown with sturdy outdoor sports and exercises, whose clothing was all of lovely silks and satins, shining with jewels; at his hip a little jewelled sword and dagger; dainty buskins on his feet, with red heels; a
  23. distemper
    any of various infectious viral diseases of animals
    And hear ye further, and proclaim it: whoso speaketh of this his distemper worketh against the peace and order of these realms, and shall to the gallows!
  24. cudgel
    a club that is used as a weapon
    "We lads of Offal Court do strive against each other with the cudgel, like to the fashion of the 'prentices, sometimes."
  25. raiment
    especially fine or decorative clothing
    But thy good Nan and thy Bet shall have raiment and lackeys enow, and that soon, too: my cofferer shall look to it.
  26. hereditary
    occurring among members of a family usually by heredity
    One of the nobles knelt at the royal couch, and said--
    "The King's majesty knoweth that the Hereditary Great Marshal of England lieth attainted in the Tower.
  27. meddle
    intrude in other people's affairs or business; interfere unwantedly
    Canty roared out--
    "Thou'lt meddle, wilt thou?
  28. close corporation
    a corporation owned by a few people; shares have no public market
    It was a close corporation, so to speak; it was a narrow town, of a single street a fifth of a mile long, its population was but a village population and everybody in it knew all his fellow-townsmen intimately, and had known their fathers and mothe
  29. Chancellor
    the British cabinet minister responsible for finance
    His attendants perceiving that he was awake, one of them asked his pleasure concerning the Lord Chancellor, who was waiting without.
  30. prate
    speak (about unimportant matters) rapidly and incessantly
    Thy prating drives me mad!
  31. cozen
    be false to; be dishonest with
    Hast been minded to cozen me, the good King thy father, who loveth thee, and kindly useth thee, with a sorry jest?"
  32. palmistry
    telling fortunes by lines on the palm of the hand
    Her gift of palmistry and other sorts of fortune-telling begot for her at last a witch's name and fame.
  33. executor
    a person appointed by a testator to carry out the terms of the will
    The body of illustrious men named by the late King as his executors appeared, to ask Tom's approval of certain acts of theirs--rather a form, and yet not wholly a form, since there was no Protector as yet.
  34. obeisance
    bending the head or body or knee as a sign of reverence or submission or shame or greeting
    All night long the glories of his royal estate shone upon him; he moved among great lords and ladies, in a blaze of light, breathing perfumes, drinking in delicious music, and answering the reverent obeisances of the glittering throng as it parted
  35. habituate
    make psychologically or physically used (to something)
    Two frowsy girls and a middle-aged woman cowered against the wall in one corner, with the aspect of animals habituated to harsh usage, and expecting and dreading it now.
  36. cease
    put an end to a state or an activity
    The Strand had ceased to be a country-road then, and regarded itself as a street, but by a strained construction; for, though there was a tolerably compact row of houses on one side of it, there were only some scattered great buildings on the other
  37. forlorn
    marked by or showing hopelessness
    At night Tom reached home so wet and tired and hungry that it was not possible for his father and grandmother to observe his forlorn condition and not be moved--after their fashion; wherefore they gave him a brisk cuffing at once and sent him to be
  38. pensioner
    the beneficiary of a pension fund
    The youth who had first spoken, shouted to his comrades--
    "Ho, swine, slaves, pensioners of his grace's princely father, where be your manners?
  39. impostor
    a person who makes deceitful pretenses
    Presently he said--
    "Now were he impostor and called himself prince, look you THAT would be natural; that would be reasonable.
  40. Court
    Australian woman tennis player who won many major championships (born in 1947)
    The house which Tom's father lived in was up a foul little pocket called Offal Court, out of Pudding Lane.
  41. easement
    (law) the privilege of using something that is not your own (as using another's land as a right of way to your own land)
    Give thy misgivings easement, good my lord.
  42. jeer
    laugh at with contempt and derision
    Father Andrew also taught Tom a little Latin, and how to read and write; and would have done the same with the girls, but they were afraid of the jeers of their friends, who could not have endured such a queer accomplishment in them.
  43. realm
    a domain in which something is dominant
    And hear ye further, and proclaim it: whoso speaketh of this his distemper worketh against the peace and order of these realms, and shall to the gallows!
  44. moment
    an indefinitely short time
    He stopped and considered a moment, then fell into his imaginings again, and passed on outside the walls of London.
  45. rheum
    a watery discharge from the mucous membranes (especially from the eyes or nose)
    Hendon muttered--
    "See, now, how like a man it was to let him lie here uncovered and fill his body with deadly rheums.
  46. malady
    impairment of normal physiological function affecting part or all of an organism
    Kiss me once again, and go to thy trifles and amusements; for my malady distresseth me.
  47. ruff
    a high tight collar
    He found himself as finely clothed as before, but everything different, everything changed, from his ruff to his stockings.
  48. impale
    pierce with a sharp stake or point
    In the times of which we are writing, the Bridge furnished 'object lessons' in English history for its children--namely, the livid and decaying heads of renowned men impaled upon iron spikes atop of its gateways.
  49. scurvy
    a condition caused by deficiency of ascorbic acid (vitamin C)
    The attendants flew to his assistance; but he put them aside, and said--
    "Trouble me not--it is nothing but a scurvy faintness.
  50. requite
    make repayment for or return something
    Tom dropped upon his knees with a glad cry--
    "God requite thy mercy, O my King, and save thee long to bless thy land!"
  51. observe
    watch attentively
    At night Tom reached home so wet and tired and hungry that it was not possible for his father and grandmother to observe his forlorn condition and not be moved--after their fashion; wherefore they gave him a brisk cuffing at once and sent him to be
  52. bugle
    a brass instrument without valves; used for military calls and fanfares
    There was a bugle-blast and a proclamation, and a fat butler appeared in a high perch in the leftward wall, followed by his servitors bearing with impressive solemnity a royal baron of beef, smoking hot and ready for the knife.
  53. multitude
    a large indefinite number
    When it came out that the little ladies were to accompany him to the Lord Mayor's banquet in the evening, his heart gave a bound of relief and delight, for he felt that he should not be friendless, now, among that multitude of strangers; whereas, a
  54. apparel
    clothing in general
    A description of it is still extant in the quaint wording of a chronicler who witnessed it:
    'Space being made, presently entered a baron and an earl appareled after the Turkish fashion in long robes of bawdkin powdered with gold; hats on their hea
  55. arbitrament
    the act of deciding as an arbiter; giving authoritative judgment
    Near four hundred years ago, as your grace knoweth, there being ill blood betwixt John, King of England, and the King of France, it was decreed that two champions should fight together in the lists, and so settle the dispute by what is called the arbit
  56. usage
    the act of using
    To wit, that he shall deny to none that he is the true prince, and heir to England's greatness; that he shall uphold his princely dignity, and shall receive, without word or sign of protest, that reverence and observance which unto it do appertain of righ
  57. mock
    treat with contempt
    Daily the mock prince was received with elaborate ceremonials borrowed by Tom from his romantic readings; daily the great affairs of the mimic kingdom were discussed in the royal council, and daily his mimic highness issued decrees to his imaginary
  58. confuse
    mistake one thing for another
    He hesitated, a little confused, then turned timidly toward the King, saying, "I may go now?"
  59. conjure
    summon into action or bring into existence, often as if by magic
    To wit, that he shall deny to none that he is the true prince, and heir to England's greatness; that he shall uphold his princely dignity, and shall receive, without word or sign of protest, that reverence and observance which unto it do appertain of righ
  60. resolve
    find the solution
    His fear rose higher and higher; and trembling he softly opened the door to the antechamber, resolved to fly and seek the prince, and, through him, protection and release.
  61. straw
    plant fiber used e.g. for making baskets and hats or as fodder
    There were the remains of a blanket or two, and some bundles of ancient and dirty straw, but these could not rightly be called beds, for they were not organised; they were kicked into a general pile, mornings, and selections made from the mass at n
  62. besmirch
    smear so as to make dirty or stained
    His body was bruised, his hands were bleeding, and his rags were all besmirched with mud.
  63. compassion
    a deep awareness of and sympathy for another's suffering
    These 'vagaries' were soon on exhibition before them; but they only moved their compassion and their sorrow, not their mirth.
  64. invoke
    request earnestly (something from somebody); ask for aid or protection
    The boon was granted, as your Majesty knoweth; and there hath been no time, these four hundred years, that that line has failed of an heir; and so, even unto this day, the head of that ancient house still weareth his hat or helm before the King's Majesty,
  65. ceremonious
    characterized by pomp and ceremony and stately display
    His speech and manners became curiously ceremonious and courtly, to the vast admiration and amusement of his intimates.
  66. two-step
    a ballroom dance in duple meter; marked by sliding steps
    After a moment's thought, the servant said--
    "When he came, none came with him; but now I remember me that as the two stepped into the throng of the Bridge, a ruffian-looking man plunged out from some near place; and just as he was joining them--"
  67. misgiving
    uneasiness about the fitness of an action
    But . . . have you no misgivings as to . . . as to .
  68. wind rose
    weather map showing the frequency and strength of winds from different directions
    I will keep this diligently in my remembrance, that this day's lesson be not lost upon me, and my people suffer thereby; for learning softeneth the heart and breedeth gentleness and charity." {1}
    The lights began to twinkle, it came on to rain, the wi
  69. coiner
    a skilled worker who coins or stamps money
    In Germany coiners be boiled to death in OIL--not cast in of a sudden, but by a rope let down into the oil by degrees, and slowly; first the feet, then the legs, then--"
    "O prithee no more, my lord, I cannot bear it!" cried Tom, covering his eyes
  70. gorgeous
    dazzlingly beautiful
    He only begged just enough to save himself, for the laws against mendicancy were stringent, and the penalties heavy; so he put in a good deal of his time listening to good Father Andrew's charming old tales and legends about giants and fairies, dwarfs and
  71. burst
    come open suddenly and violently, as if from internal pressure
    The soldier that had maltreated Tom obeyed promptly; and as the prince burst through the portal, half-smothered with royal wrath, the soldier fetched him a sounding box on the ear that sent him whirling to the roadway, and said--
    "Take that, thou
  72. Henry VIII
    son of Henry VII and King of England from 1509 to 1547; his divorce from Catherine of Aragon resulted in his break with the Catholic Church in 1534 and his excommunication 1538, leading to the start of the Reformation in England (1491-1547)
    This stern-countenanced invalid was the dread Henry VIII.
  73. wainscoting
    wooden panels that can be used to line the walls of a room
    Hanging upon hooks in the oaken wainscoting were the several pieces of a suit of shining steel armour, covered all over with beautiful designs exquisitely inlaid in gold.
  74. manikin
    a life-size dummy used to display clothes
    Who art thou, manikin?"
  75. betray
    deliver to an enemy by treachery
    The King was silent and thoughtful a while, and his face betrayed a growing distress and uneasiness.
  76. mischance
    an unpredictable outcome that is unfortunate
    "I pray thee of thy grace believe me, I did but speak the truth, most dread lord; for I am the meanest among thy subjects, being a pauper born, and 'tis by a sore mischance and accident I am here, albeit I was therein nothing blameful.
  77. forestall
    keep from happening or arising; make impossible
    He made two or three further efforts to help himself, but being promptly forestalled each time, he finally gave up, with a sigh of resignation and a murmured "Beshrew me, but I marvel they do not require to breathe for me also!"
  78. suborn
    incite to commit a crime or an evil deed
    Briefly, then, this brother did deftly magnify my faults and make them crimes; ending his base work with finding a silken ladder in mine apartments--conveyed thither by his own means--and did convince my father by this, and suborned evidence of ser
  79. hive
    a structure that provides a natural habitation for bees; as in a hollow tree
    All Offal Court was just such another hive as Canty's house.
  80. overshot
    having an upper part projecting beyond the lower
    Once the giddy little Lady Jane fired a simple Greek phrase at Tom. The Princess Elizabeth's quick eye saw by the serene blankness of the target's front that the shaft was overshot; so she tranquilly delivered a return volley of sounding Greek on
  81. ease
    freedom from difficulty or hardship or effort
    None may palter with the King's command, or fit it to his ease, where it doth chafe, with deft evasions.
  82. surprise
    come upon or take unawares
    To wit, that he shall deny to none that he is the true prince, and heir to England's greatness; that he shall uphold his princely dignity, and shall receive, without word or sign of protest, that reverence and observance which unto it do appertain of righ
  83. mutilate
    destroy or injure severely
    These stood up and stripped away some of their rags, exposing their backs, criss-crossed with ropy old welts left by the lash; one turned up his hair and showed the place where a left ear had once been; another showed a brand upon his shoulder--the letter
  84. beguile
    attract; cause to be enamored
    Pleasure him with sports, beguile him in wholesome ways, so that his health come again."
  85. restore
    bring back into original existence, use, function, or position
    Sweet heaven grant it be so--then wilt thou fetch him away and restore me!"
  86. boon
    a desirable state
    The boon was granted, as your Majesty knoweth; and there hath been no time, these four hundred years, that that line has failed of an heir; and so, even unto this day, the head of that ancient house still weareth his hat or helm before the King's M
  87. sandbar
    a bar of sand
    Snags and sandbars grew less and less frequent, and Tom grew more and more at his ease, seeing that all were so lovingly bent upon helping him and overlooking his mistakes.
  88. sumptuous
    rich and superior in quality
    Tom played with the jewelled dagger that hung upon his thigh; he examined the costly and exquisite ornaments of the room; he tried each of the sumptuous chairs, and thought how proud he would be if the Offal Court herd could only peep in and see hi
  89. sheriff
    the principal law-enforcement officer in a county
    In a little while the measured tread of military men was heard approaching, and the culprits entered the presence in charge of an under- sheriff and escorted by a detail of the king's guard.
  90. starve
    die of food deprivation
    When he came home empty-handed at night, he knew his father would curse him and thrash him first, and that when he was done the awful grandmother would do it all over again and improve on it; and that away in the night his starving mother would sli
  91. dismay
    the feeling of despair in the face of obstacles
    Soon every saloon, every marble hall, had its groups of glittering lords and ladies, and other groups of dazzling lesser folk, talking earnestly together in whispers, and every face had in it dismay.
  92. gawk
    look with amazement; look stupidly
    The next instant one of the soldiers snatched him rudely away, and sent him spinning among the gaping crowd of country gawks and London idlers.
  93. comely
    according with custom or propriety
    Within was a comely boy, tanned and brown with sturdy outdoor sports and exercises, whose clothing was all of lovely silks and satins, shining with jewels; at his hip a little jewelled sword and dagger; dainty buskins on his feet, with red heels; a
  94. amaze
    affect with wonder
    The hose drifted backward along the line, to the Chief Steward of the Household, the Constable of the Tower, Norroy King-at-Arms, the Master of the Wardrobe, the Chancellor Royal of the Duchy of Lancaster, the Third Groom of the Stole, the Head Ranger of
  95. contemplate
    think intently and at length, as for spiritual purposes
    The little prince contemplated the little pauper gravely a moment, then said--
    "And prithee, why not?
  96. gaudy
    tastelessly showy
    A few minutes later the little Prince of Wales was garlanded with Tom's fluttering odds and ends, and the little Prince of Pauperdom was tricked out in the gaudy plumage of royalty.
  97. utter
    without qualification; used informally as (often pejorative) intensifiers
    It is not meet that one of my degree should utter the thing."
  98. clad
    having an outer covering especially of thin metal
    His dream-people were so fine that he grew to lament his shabby clothing and his dirt, and to wish to be clean and better clad.
  99. whisper
    speaking softly without vibration of the vocal cords
    The whisper--for it was whispered always--flew from menial to menial, from lord to lady, down all the long corridors, from story to story, from saloon to saloon, "The prince hath gone mad, the prince hath gone mad!"
  100. illuminate
    make lighter or brighter
    There was a line of bonfires stretching as far as one could see, up and down the Thames; London Bridge was illuminated; Southwark Bridge likewise; the entire river was aglow with the flash and sheen of coloured lights; and constant explosions of fi
  101. tower
    a structure taller than its diameter; can stand alone or be attached to a larger building
    Tom could always find something going on around the Maypole in Cheapside, and at the fairs; and now and then he and the rest of London had a chance to see a military parade when some famous unfortunate was carried prisoner to the Tower, by land or
  102. splatter
    dash a liquid upon or against
    "In summer, sir, we wade and swim in the canals and in the river, and each doth duck his neighbour, and splatter him with water, and dive and shout and tumble and--"
    "'Twould be worth my father's kingdom but to enjoy it once!
  103. contrive
    make or work out a plan for; devise
    Ah, yes, this was plainly the right way out of the difficulty; therefore she set her wits to work at once to contrive that test.
  104. perceive
    to become aware of through the senses
    Let them not perceive that thou art much changed from thy wont, for thou knowest how tenderly thy old play-fellows bear thee in their hearts and how 'twould grieve them.
  105. traverse
    travel across
    After grace, Tom (being instructed) rose--and the whole house with him --and drank from a portly golden loving-cup with the Princess Elizabeth; from her it passed to the Lady Jane, and then traversed the general assemblage.
  106. assent
    to agree or express agreement
    Tom signified assent with a gesture and a murmured word, for he was already learning, and in his simple heart was resolved to acquit himself as best he might, according to the King's command.
  107. morsel
    a small amount of solid food; a mouthful
    She had saved a morsel for him to eat, also; but the boy's pains had swept away all appetite--at least for black and tasteless crusts.
  108. vanish
    become invisible or unnoticeable
    Presently a command was given, and immediately all living creatures vanished from the steps.
  109. distress
    a state of adversity (danger or affliction or need)
    At the end of half an hour it suddenly occurred to him that the prince was gone a long time; then right away he began to feel lonely; very soon he fell to listening and longing, and ceased to toy with the pretty things about him; he grew uneasy, then rest
  110. gentle
    soft and mild; not harsh or stern or severe
    He said--and his face grew gentle as he began to speak--
    "How now, my lord Edward, my prince?
  111. mangy
    having many worn or threadbare spots in the nap
    He made himself so killingly funny that he was the envy and admiration of the whole mangy rabble.
  112. silver bell
    any of various deciduous trees of the genus Halesia having white bell-shaped flowers
    Some of them were decorated with banners and streamers; some with cloth-of-gold and arras embroidered with coats-of-arms; others with silken flags that had numberless little silver bells fastened to them, which shook out tiny showers of joyous musi
  113. desire
    the feeling that accompanies an unsatisfied state
    One desire came in time to haunt him day and night: it was to see a real prince, with his own eyes.
  114. banquet
    a ceremonial dinner party for many people
    Lord Hertford said--
    "Touching the King's majesty's ordainment concerning books and such like serious matters, it may peradventure please your highness to ease your time with lightsome entertainment, lest you go wearied to the banquet and suffer h
  115. retire
    withdraw from active participation
    When the waiting gentlemen had retired, Lord St. John said--
    "His majesty commandeth, that for due and weighty reasons of state, the prince's grace shall hide his infirmity in all ways that be within his power, till it be passed and he be as he wa
  116. memory
    the cognitive processes whereby past experience is remembered
    To wit, that he shall deny to none that he is the true prince, and heir to England's greatness; that he shall uphold his princely dignity, and shall receive, without word or sign of protest, that reverence and observance which unto it do appertain of righ
  117. scrivener
    someone employed to make written copies of documents and manuscripts
    "Just then the crowd lapped them up and closed them in, and I saw no more, being called by my master, who was in a rage because a joint that the scrivener had ordered was forgot, though I take all the saints to witness that to blame ME for that mis
  118. ragamuffin
    a dirty shabbily clothed urchin
    And he shall be cured!--ay, made whole and sound --then will he make himself a name--and proud shall I be to say, 'Yes, he is mine--I took him, a homeless little ragamuffin, but I saw what was in him, and I said his name would be heard some day--be
  119. fell
    cause to fall by or as if by delivering a blow
    For a long time his pain and hunger, and the swearing and fighting going on in the building, kept him awake; but at last his thoughts drifted away to far, romantic lands, and he fell asleep in the company of jewelled and gilded princelings who live
  120. interpose
    introduce
    A sounding blow upon the Prince's shoulder from Canty's broad palm sent him staggering into goodwife Canty's arms, who clasped him to her breast, and sheltered him from a pelting rain of cuffs and slaps by interposing her own person.
  121. uncharted
    (of unknown regions) not yet surveyed or investigated
    The Master of Ceremonies was not present: there was no one who felt safe to venture upon this uncharted sea, or risk the attempt to solve this solemn problem.
  122. crowd
    a large number of things or people considered together
    The next instant one of the soldiers snatched him rudely away, and sent him spinning among the gaping crowd of country gawks and London idlers.
  123. exclaim
    utter aloud; often with surprise, horror, or joy
    Lifting up his hands, he exclaimed--
    "Thou the KING?
  124. consequential
    having important issues or results
    The sheriff, however, saw nothing consequential in the inquiry; he answered, with simple directness--
    "Indeed did she, your Majesty, and most righteously, as all aver.
  125. decree
    a legally binding command or decision entered on the court record (as if issued by a court or judge)
    Daily the mock prince was received with elaborate ceremonials borrowed by Tom from his romantic readings; daily the great affairs of the mimic kingdom were discussed in the royal council, and daily his mimic highness issued decrees to his imaginary
  126. sordid
    foul and run-down and repulsive
    The Prince said--
    "Offend me not with thy sordid matters.
  127. Mary Magdalene
    sinful woman Jesus healed of evil spirits; she became a follower of Jesus
    Dost not recall how that the old Baron Marley, being mad, forgot the favour of his own countenance that he had known for sixty years, and held it was another's; nay, even claimed he was the son of Mary Magdalene, and that his head was made of Spani
  128. murky
    (of liquids) clouded as with sediment
    There was a cold drizzle of rain; the atmosphere was murky; it was a melancholy day.
  129. ruined
    destroyed physically or morally
    Deal not hardly with me, sir, else am I ruined."
  130. menial
    used of unskilled work (especially domestic work)
    The whisper--for it was whispered always--flew from menial to menial, from lord to lady, down all the long corridors, from story to story, from saloon to saloon, "The prince hath gone mad, the prince hath gone mad!"
  131. chapter
    a subdivision of a written work; usually numbered and titled
    Chapter I. The birth of the Prince and the Pauper.
  132. astonish
    affect with wonder
    Full-grown people brought their perplexities to Tom for solution, and were often astonished at the wit and wisdom of his decisions.
  133. accolade
    a tangible symbol signifying approval or distinction
    "Rise, Sir Miles Hendon, Knight," said the King, gravely--giving the accolade with Hendon's sword--"rise, and seat thyself.
  134. remove
    remove something concrete, as by lifting, pushing, or taking off, or remove something abstract
    The poor Chancellor was not long in removing himself from this dangerous vicinity; nor did the commission waste time in giving the royal assent to the work of the slavish Parliament, and appointing the morrow for the beheading of the premier peer o
  135. taint
    place under suspicion or cast doubt upon
    Is the prince to tarry uninstalled, because, forsooth, the realm lacketh an Earl Marshal free of treasonable taint to invest him with his honours?
  136. infuriate
    make furious
    This speech infuriated the swine to such a degree that they set about their work without waste of time.
  137. trumpet
    a brass musical instrument with a brilliant tone; has a narrow tube and a flared bell and is played by means of valves
    This done, a flourish of trumpets resounded from within.
  138. blurt
    utter impulsively
    A secretary made report that forasmuch as the late King had provided in his will for conferring the ducal degree upon the Earl of Hertford and raising his brother, Sir Thomas Seymour, to the peerage, and likewise Hertford's son to an earldom, together wit
  139. reverent
    feeling or showing profound respect or veneration
    All night long the glories of his royal estate shone upon him; he moved among great lords and ladies, in a blaze of light, breathing perfumes, drinking in delicious music, and answering the reverent obeisances of the glittering throng as it parted
  140. groom
    someone employed in a stable to take care of the horses
    My Lord d'Arcy, First Groom of the Chamber, was there, to do goodness knows what; but there he was--let that suffice.
  141. inscribe
    carve, cut, or etch into a material or surface
    To those good-mannered and agreeable children Susie and Clara Clemens this book is affectionately inscribed by their father.
  142. instant
    a very short time (as the time it takes the eye to blink or the heart to beat)
    The next instant one of the soldiers snatched him rudely away, and sent him spinning among the gaping crowd of country gawks and London idlers.
  143. array
    an impressive display
    Tom stared in glad wonder at the vast pile of masonry, the wide-spreading wings, the frowning bastions and turrets, the huge stone gateway, with its gilded bars and its magnificent array of colossal granite lions, and other the signs and symbols of
  144. frontage
    the extent of land abutting on a street or water
    At this moment the party burst suddenly out of darkness into light; and not only into light, but into the midst of a multitude of singing, dancing, and shouting people, massed together on the river frontage.
  145. mummery
    meaningless ceremonies and flattery
    There's fine mummeries here.
  146. tush
    the fleshy part of the human body that you sit on
    " Tush, he MUST be the prince!
  147. jostle
    make one's way by jostling, pushing, or shoving
    People jostled him, and some gave him rough speech; but it was all lost on the musing boy.
  148. gaze
    a long fixed look
    Poor Tom came slowly walking past the low-bowing groups, trying to bow in return, and meekly gazing upon his strange surroundings with bewildered and pathetic eyes.
  149. greave
    armor plate that protects legs below the knee
    Tom put on the greaves, the gauntlets, the plumed helmet, and such other pieces as he could don without assistance, and for a while was minded to call for help and complete the matter, but bethought him of the nuts he had brought away from dinner,
  150. knight
    originally a person of noble birth trained to arms and chivalry; today in Great Britain a person honored by the sovereign for personal merit
    Next he drew the beautiful sword, and bowed, kissing the blade, and laying it across his breast, as he had seen a noble knight do, by way of salute to the lieutenant of the Tower, five or six weeks before, when delivering the great lords of Norfolk
  151. loath
    (usually followed by `to') strongly opposed
    He encouraged Humphrey to talk, and he was nothing loath.
  152. overtax
    tax excessively
    He wondered if they would believe the marvellous tale he should tell when he got home, or if they would shake their heads, and say his overtaxed imagination had at last upset his reason.
  153. master
    a person who has general authority over others
    Ryght honorable, Salutem in Christo Jesu, and Syr here ys no lesse joynge and rejossynge in thes partees for the byrth of our prynce, hoom we hungurde for so longe, then ther was (I trow), inter vicinos att the byrth of S. J. Baptyste, as thys berer, M
  154. touch
    make physical contact with, come in contact with
    Lord Hertford said--
    " Touching the King's majesty's ordainment concerning books and such like serious matters, it may peradventure please your highness to ease your time with lightsome entertainment, lest you go wearied to the banquet and suffer h
  155. prostrate
    stretched out and lying at full length along the ground
    His victims sprawled this way and that, but the mob-tide poured over their prostrate forms and dashed itself against the champion with undiminished fury.
  156. receive
    get something; come into possession of
    VI. Tom receives instructions.
  157. prisoner
    a person who is confined; especially a prisoner of war
    The Prince a prisoner.
  158. garment
    an article of clothing
    Would'st have them take off their garment, and sleep without--like the beasts?"
  159. office
    place of business where professional or clerical duties are performed
    But this duke standeth between thee and thine honours: I will have another in his stead that shall bring no taint to his great office.
  160. pilaster
    a rectangular column that usually projects about a third of its width from the wall to which it is attached
    It is a spacious apartment, with gilded pillars and pilasters, and pictured walls and ceilings.
  161. grandeur
    the quality of being magnificent or splendid or grand
    After which, he would go forth in his rags and beg a few farthings, eat his poor crust, take his customary cuffs and abuse, and then stretch himself upon his handful of foul straw, and resume his empty grandeurs in his dreams.
  162. callow
    young and inexperienced
    "The law doth not permit a child to make or meddle in any weighty matter, good my liege, holding that its callow wit unfitteth it to cope with the riper wit and evil schemings of them that are its elders.
  163. yeoman
    in former times was free and cultivated his own land
    Now to the sound of gay music the Yeomen of the Guard entered,--"the tallest and mightiest men in England, they being carefully selected in this regard,"--but we will let the chronicler tell about it:--
    "The Yeomen of the Guard entered, bareheaded
  164. fantastic
    extravagantly fanciful in design, construction, appearance
    The speech of this fantastic figure was received with an explosion of jeers and laughter.
  165. warrant
    formal and explicit approval
    Suddenly a great drunken ruffian collared him and said--
    "Out to this time of night again, and hast not brought a farthing home, I warrant me!
  166. unchristian
    not of a Christian faith
    "It seemeth a rude unchristian thing, and ill contrived, that English law denieth privileges to Englishmen to waste them on the devil!" cried Tom, with honest heat.
  167. captive
    a person who is confined; especially a prisoner of war
    His spirits sank lower and lower as he moved between the glittering files of bowing courtiers; for he recognised that he was indeed a captive now, and might remain for ever shut up in this gilded cage, a forlorn and friendless prince, except God in
  168. stupefy
    make dull or stupid or muddle with drunkenness or infatuation
    The man stared down, stupefied, upon the lad, then shook his head and muttered--
    "Gone stark mad as any Tom o' Bedlam!"--then collared him once more, and said with a coarse laugh and an oath, "But mad or no mad, I and thy Gammer Canty will soon fi
  169. treason
    a crime that undermines the offender's government
    When he came home empty-handed at night, he knew his father would curse him and thrash him first, and that when he was done the awful grandmother would do it all over again and improve on it; and that away in the night his starving mother would slip to hi
  170. Jewry
    Jews collectively
    Tom disembarked, and he and his gallant procession crossed Cheapside and made a short march through the Old Jewry and Basinghall Street to the Guildhall.
  171. revile
    spread negative information about
    It did touch me to a sort of tenderness to see the gallant way she met her lot--cursing and reviling all the crowd that gaped and gazed around her, whilst the flames licked upward toward her face and catched her thin locks and crackled about her ol
  172. grant
    let have
    Sweet heaven grant it be so--then wilt thou fetch him away and restore me!"
  173. lap
    the upper side of the thighs of a seated person
    There was no talk in all England but of the new baby, Edward Tudor, Prince of Wales, who lay lapped in silks and satins, unconscious of all this fuss, and not knowing that great lords and ladies were tending him and watching over him--and not carin
  174. welt
    a raised mark on the skin (as produced by the blow of a whip); characteristic of many allergic reactions
    These stood up and stripped away some of their rags, exposing their backs, criss-crossed with ropy old welts left by the lash; one turned up his hair and showed the place where a left ear had once been; another showed a brand upon his shoulder--the
  175. irreverence
    an irreverent mental attitude
    I meant the King's grace no irreverence."
  176. ordeal
    a severe or trying experience
    Somewhat after one in the afternoon, Tom resignedly underwent the ordeal of being dressed for dinner.
  177. archbishop
    a bishop of highest rank
    In the beginning, a shirt was taken up by the Chief Equerry in Waiting, who passed it to the First Lord of the Buckhounds, who passed it to the Second Gentleman of the Bedchamber, who passed it to the Head Ranger of Windsor Forest, who passed it to the Th
  178. bend
    form a curve
    There was silence now; and there was no head there but was bent in reverence, except this man's.
  179. lapse
    drop to a lower level, as in one's morals or standards
    As the young girls passed him, he said in a low voice--
    "I pray ye, ladies, seem not to observe his humours, nor show surprise when his memory doth lapse--it will grieve you to note how it doth stick at every trifle."
  180. announce
    make known; make an announcement
    The Lord St. John was announced, and after making obeisance to Tom, he said--
    "I come upon the King's errand, concerning a matter which requireth privacy.
  181. ceremony
    a formal event performed on a special occasion
    The Master of Ceremonies was not present: there was no one who felt safe to venture upon this uncharted sea, or risk the attempt to solve this solemn problem.
  182. inane
    devoid of intelligence
    Men born and reared upon the Bridge found life unendurably dull and inane elsewhere.
  183. ancient
    belonging to times long past especially of the historical period before the fall of the Western Roman Empire
    In the ancient city of London, on a certain autumn day in the second quarter of the sixteenth century, a boy was born to a poor family of the name of Canty, who did not want him.
  184. splendid
    characterized by grandeur
    By day, London was a sight to see, with gay banners waving from every balcony and housetop, and splendid pageants marching along.
  185. glance
    throw a glance at; take a brief look at
    The two lords exchanged significant glances, and Hertford stepped quickly toward the door.
  186. eagerly
    with eagerness; in an eager manner
    The prince twisted himself loose, unconsciously brushed his profaned shoulder, and eagerly said--
    "Oh, art HIS father, truly?
  187. banish
    expel, as if by official decree
    At last she perceived that there was not going to be any peace for her until she should devise a test that should prove, clearly and without question, whether this lad was her son or not, and so banish these wearing and worrying doubts.
  188. concern
    something that interests you because it is important or affects you
    The Lord St. John was announced, and after making obeisance to Tom, he said--
    "I come upon the King's errand, concerning a matter which requireth privacy.
  189. restorative
    tending to impart new life and vigor to
    In mine own person will I go before my Parliament, and with mine own hand will I seal the warrant that rids me of--"
    His voice failed; an ashen pallor swept the flush from his cheeks; and the attendants eased him back upon his pillows, and hurriedly assi
  190. spurn
    reject with contempt
    The prince spurned the nearest boy with his foot, and said fiercely--
    "Take thou that, till the morrow come and I build thee a gibbet!"
  191. panoply
    a complete and impressive array
    This martial panoply belonged to the true prince--a recent present from Madam Parr the Queen.
  192. commandment
    something that is commanded
    To wit, that he shall deny to none that he is the true prince, and heir to England's greatness; that he shall uphold his princely dignity, and shall receive, without word or sign of protest, that reverence and observance which unto it do appertain of righ
  193. mimic
    imitate (a person or manner), especially for satirical effect
    Daily the mock prince was received with elaborate ceremonials borrowed by Tom from his romantic readings; daily the great affairs of the mimic kingdom were discussed in the royal council, and daily his mimic highness issued decrees to his imaginary
  194. spacious
    (of buildings and rooms) having ample space
    He was presently conducted with much state to a spacious and ornate apartment, where a table was already set for one.
  195. flash
    emit a brief burst of light
    The crowd jeered and laughed; but the young prince sprang to the gate with his face flushed, and his eyes flashing with indignation, and cried out,--
    "How dar'st thou use a poor lad like that?
  196. damaged
    harmed or injured or spoiled
    His doublet and trunks were of rich material, but faded and threadbare, and their gold-lace adornments were sadly tarnished; his ruff was rumpled and damaged; the plume in his slouched hat was broken and had a bedraggled and disreputable look; at h
  197. wont
    an established custom
    To wit, that he shall deny to none that he is the true prince, and heir to England's greatness; that he shall uphold his princely dignity, and shall receive, without word or sign of protest, that reverence and observance which unto it do appertain of righ
  198. brawl
    to quarrel noisily, angrily or disruptively
    Drunkenness, riot and brawling were the order, there, every night and nearly all night long.
  199. odd
    not divisible by two
    "'Tis an odd one.
  200. accident
    an unfortunate mishap; especially one causing damage or injury
    "I pray thee of thy grace believe me, I did but speak the truth, most dread lord; for I am the meanest among thy subjects, being a pauper born, and 'tis by a sore mischance and accident I am here, albeit I was therein nothing blameful.
  201. cataclysm
    a sudden violent change in the earth's surface
    There was a sudden paling of cheeks in the superstitious assemblage, and a general, though unexpressed, desire to get out of the place--all of which was lost upon Tom, who was dead to everything but the proposed cataclysm.
  202. plebeian
    of or associated with the great masses of people
    Then followed such a thing as England had never seen before--the sacred person of the heir to the throne rudely buffeted by plebeian hands, and set upon and torn by dogs.
  203. spring
    move forward by leaps and bounds
    The crowd jeered and laughed; but the young prince sprang to the gate with his face flushed, and his eyes flashing with indignation, and cried out,--
    "How dar'st thou use a poor lad like that?
  204. illustrious
    widely known and esteemed
    When the illustrious maidens were gone, Tom turned wearily to his keepers and said--
    "May it please your lordships to grant me leave to go into some corner and rest me?"
  205. regal
    belonging to or befitting a supreme ruler
    His head grew to be full of these wonderful things, and many a night as he lay in the dark on his scant and offensive straw, tired, hungry, and smarting from a thrashing, he unleashed his imagination and soon forgot his aches and pains in delicious pictur
  206. hives
    an itchy skin eruption characterized by weals with pale interiors and well-defined red margins; usually the result of an allergic response to insect bites or food or drugs
    The houseless prince, the homeless heir to the throne of England, still moved on, drifting deeper into the maze of squalid alleys where the swarming hives of poverty and misery were massed together.
  207. degree
    a specific identifiable position in a continuum or series or especially in a process
    The King my father"--
    "In sooth, you forget, sir, her low degree.
  208. ruin
    an irrecoverable state of devastation and destruction
    Deal not hardly with me, sir, else am I ruined."
  209. proceed
    move ahead; travel onward in time or space
    Observing that Tom did not seem to know how to proceed, Hertford whispered him to make a sign with his hand, and not trouble himself to speak unless he chose.
  210. gusty
    blowing in puffs or short intermittent blasts
    I will keep this diligently in my remembrance, that this day's lesson be not lost upon me, and my people suffer thereby; for learning softeneth the heart and breedeth gentleness and charity." {1}
    The lights began to twinkle, it came on to rain, the wind
  211. drizzle
    very light rain; stronger than mist but less than a shower
    There was a cold drizzle of rain; the atmosphere was murky; it was a melancholy day.
  212. elder
    a person who is older than you are
    Tom's remarks, and Tom's performances, were reported by the boys to their elders; and these, also, presently began to discuss Tom Canty, and to regard him as a most gifted and extraordinary creature.
  213. scimitar
    a curved oriental saber; the edge is on the convex side of the blade
    A description of it is still extant in the quaint wording of a chronicler who witnessed it:
    'Space being made, presently entered a baron and an earl appareled after the Turkish fashion in long robes of bawdkin powdered with gold; hats on their heads of c
  214. fret
    be agitated or irritated
    But he could only fret and toss in his bed; he could not go to sleep, the deep stillness was so painful, so awful, so oppressive.
  215. emerge
    come out into view, as from concealment
    There was a flourish of trumpets within; and the Prince's uncle, the future great Duke of Somerset, emerged from the gateway, arrayed in a 'doublet of black cloth-of-gold, and a cloak of crimson satin flowered with gold, and ribanded with nets of s
  216. likewise
    in like or similar manner
    "Parents have I, sir, and a grand-dam likewise that is but indifferently precious to me, God forgive me if it be offence to say it--also twin sisters, Nan and Bet."
    "Then is thy grand-dam not over kind to thee, I take it?"
  217. cradle
    a baby bed with sides and rockers
    He is my sister's son; are not his voice, his face, his form, familiar to me from his cradle?
  218. privilege
    a special advantage or immunity or benefit not enjoyed by all
    Uttered I here a command, the which none but a king might hold privilege and prerogative to utter, would such commandment be obeyed, and none rise up to say me nay?"
  219. ward
    a person who is under the protection or in the custody of another
    After some further talk, in which the Lord St. John covered up his mistake as well as he could by repeated protests that his faith was thoroughly grounded now, and could not be assailed by doubts again, the Lord Hertford relieved his fellow-keeper, and sa
  220. swarm
    a group of many things in the air or on the ground
    Scaffoldings were about, everywhere, and swarms of workmen; for it was undergoing elaborate repairs.
  221. affliction
    a cause of great suffering and distress
    It was a heavy affliction to them to see the beloved prince so stricken.
  222. wander
    to move or cause to move in a sinuous, spiral, or circular course
    He wandered here and there in the city, hardly noticing where he was going, or what was happening around him.
  223. mincing
    affectedly dainty or refined
    One January day, on his usual begging tour, he tramped despondently up and down the region round about Mincing Lane and Little East Cheap, hour after hour, bare-footed and cold, looking in at cook-shop windows and longing for the dreadful pork-pies
  224. hindrance
    any obstruction that impedes or is burdensome
    The boon was granted, as your Majesty knoweth; and there hath been no time, these four hundred years, that that line has failed of an heir; and so, even unto this day, the head of that ancient house still weareth his hat or helm before the King's Majesty,
  225. swab
    cleaning implement consisting of absorbent material fastened to a handle; for cleaning floors
    Then all flung themselves upon their knees about him and sent up a chorus of ironical wailings, and mocking supplications, whilst they swabbed their eyes with their soiled and ragged sleeves and aprons--
    "Be gracious to us, O sweet King!"
  226. foul
    highly offensive; arousing aversion or disgust
    The house which Tom's father lived in was up a foul little pocket called Offal Court, out of Pudding Lane.
  227. filch
    make off with belongings of others
    Seemeth it not strange that madness should filch from his memory his father's very lineaments; the customs and observances that are his due from such as be about him; and, leaving him his Latin, strip him of his Greek and French?
  228. several
    (used with count nouns) of an indefinite number more than 2 or 3 but not many
    Splendid carriages, with splendid people in them and splendid servants outside, were arriving and departing by several other noble gateways that pierced the royal enclosure.
  229. overwrought
    deeply agitated especially from emotion
    Humphrey had hardly been dismissed when my Lord Hertford arrived with more trouble for Tom.
    He said that the Lords of the Council, fearing that some overwrought report of the King's damaged health might have leaked out and got abroad, they deemed
  230. sink
    fall or descend to a lower place or level
    She cried out--
    "O my lord, on thy knees?--and to ME!"
    Then she fled away in fright; and Tom, smitten with despair, sank down, murmuring--
    "There is no help, there is no hope.
  231. comfort
    a state of being relaxed and feeling no pain
    "True, true--that is well--be comforted, tremble not so; there is none here would hurt thee; there is none here but loves thee.
  232. fade out
    become weaker
    Gradually the wrath faded out of the old King's face, and he said--
    "Kiss me, my prince.
  233. denounce
    speak out against
    Therefore there was but one course to pursue--find his way to the Guildhall, make himself known, and denounce the impostor.
  234. dance
    taking a series of rhythmical steps (and movements) in time to music
    Everybody took a holiday, and high and low, rich and poor, feasted and danced and sang, and got very mellow; and they kept this up for days and nights together.
  235. admire
    feel admiration for
    He turned himself this way and that before the great mirror, admiring his finery; then walked away, imitating the prince's high-bred carriage, and still observing results in the glass.
  236. analyse
    break down into components or essential features
    He lay silent a few moments, trying to analyse his confused thoughts and impressions, and get some sort of meaning out of them; then suddenly he burst out in a rapturous but guarded voice--
    "I see it all, I see it all!
  237. deign
    do something that one considers to be below one's dignity
    Bet!"
    A dim form appeared at his side, and a voice said--
    "Wilt deign to deliver thy commands?"
  238. supplicate
    ask for humbly or earnestly, as in prayer
    By this time the boy was on his knees, and supplicating with his eyes and uplifted hands as well as with his tongue.
  239. disport
    occupy in an agreeable, entertaining or pleasant fashion
    He was soon in the midst of a crowd of boys who were running, jumping, playing at ball and leap-frog, and otherwise disporting themselves, and right noisily, too.
  240. protector
    a person who cares for persons or property
    The body of illustrious men named by the late King as his executors appeared, to ask Tom's approval of certain acts of theirs--rather a form, and yet not wholly a form, since there was no Protector as yet.
  241. accoutrement
    clothing that is worn or carried, but not part of your main clothing
    They were followed by an officer bearing the civic mace, after whom came another carrying the city's sword; then several sergeants of the city guard, in their full accoutrements, and with badges on their sleeves; then the Garter King-at-arms, in hi
  242. accord
    concurrence of opinion
    The beams were painted red or blue or black, according to the owner's taste, and this gave the houses a very picturesque look.
  243. amiss
    in an improper or mistaken or unfortunate manner
    Hendon was puzzled, and said--
    "What's amiss?"
  244. ornamental
    serving an esthetic rather than a useful purpose
    They were all dressed alike, and in the fashion which in that day prevailed among serving-men and 'prentices{1}--that is to say, each had on the crown of his head a flat black cap about the size of a saucer, which was not useful as a covering, it being of
  245. raise
    move upwards
    Raise me!
  246. countenance
    the appearance conveyed by a person's face
    Thou hast the same hair, the same eyes, the same voice and manner, the same form and stature, the same face and countenance that I bear.
  247. unsightly
    unpleasant to look at
    A grim and unsightly picture met his eye.
  248. pardon
    accept an excuse for
    Thy pardon, I had not meant to laugh.
  249. lineament
    the characteristic parts of a person's face: eyes and nose and mouth and chin
    Seemeth it not strange that madness should filch from his memory his father's very lineaments; the customs and observances that are his due from such as be about him; and, leaving him his Latin, strip him of his Greek and French?
  250. canker
    an ulceration (especially of the lips or lining of the mouth)
    Dost canker thy soul with sordid business when all that be leal men and true make holiday?"
  251. precede
    be earlier in time; go back further
    Tom and his little ladies were received with due ceremony by the Lord Mayor and the Fathers of the City, in their gold chains and scarlet robes of state, and conducted to a rich canopy of state at the head of the great hall, preceded by heralds mak
  252. stump
    the base part of a tree that remains standing after the tree has been felled
    He thought it was summer, and he was playing, all alone, in the fair meadow called Goodman's Fields, when a dwarf only a foot high, with long red whiskers and a humped back, appeared to him suddenly and said, "Dig by that stump."
  253. pathetic
    deserving or inciting pity
    Poor Tom came slowly walking past the low-bowing groups, trying to bow in return, and meekly gazing upon his strange surroundings with bewildered and pathetic eyes.
  254. assist
    give help or assistance; be of service
    Tom was assisted to his feet, and approached the Majesty of England, humble and trembling.
  255. shelter
    protective covering that provides protection from the weather
    Right gladly will they serve the son of him who hath done so generously by them--and the more that that son is himself as poor and as forlorn as any that be sheltered here this day, or ever shall be."
  256. culprit
    someone who perpetrates wrongdoing
    In a little while the measured tread of military men was heard approaching, and the culprits entered the presence in charge of an under-sheriff and escorted by a detail of the king's guard.
  257. emblazon
    decorate with heraldic arms
    Some of them were decorated with banners and streamers; some with cloth-of-gold and arras embroidered with coats-of-arms; others with silken flags that had numberless little silver bells fastened to them, which shook out tiny showers of joyous music whene
  258. respond
    show a response or a reaction to something
    About his neck hung the order of the Garter, and several princely foreign orders;' and wherever light fell upon him jewels responded with a blinding flash.
  259. stingy
    unwilling to spend
    Thy troubles will vanish there, and likewise thy sad distemper--
    "'She loved her husband dearilee, But another man--'
    "These be noble large stitches!"--holding the garment up and viewing it admiringly--"they have a grandeur and a majesty that do cause t
  260. undiminished
    not lessened or diminished
    His victims sprawled this way and that, but the mob-tide poured over their prostrate forms and dashed itself against the champion with undiminished fury.
  261. seize
    take hold of; grab
    As soon as he reached the great gate, he seized the bars, and tried to shake them, shouting--
    "Open!
  262. odds
    the likelihood of a thing occurring rather than not occurring
    A few minutes later the little Prince of Wales was garlanded with Tom's fluttering odds and ends, and the little Prince of Pauperdom was tricked out in the gaudy plumage of royalty.
  263. venture
    any venturesome undertaking especially one with an uncertain outcome
    The Master of Ceremonies was not present: there was no one who felt safe to venture upon this uncharted sea, or risk the attempt to solve this solemn problem.
  264. salute
    greet in a friendly way
    The soldier brought his halberd to a present-arms and said mockingly--
    "I salute your gracious Highness."
  265. ashen
    anemic looking from illness or emotion
    In mine own person will I go before my Parliament, and with mine own hand will I seal the warrant that rids me of--"
    His voice failed; an ashen pallor swept the flush from his cheeks; and the attendants eased him back upon his pillows, and hurried
  266. badge
    an emblem (a small piece of plastic or cloth or metal) that signifies your status (rank or membership or affiliation etc.)
    They were followed by an officer bearing the civic mace, after whom came another carrying the city's sword; then several sergeants of the city guard, in their full accoutrements, and with badges on their sleeves; then the Garter King-at-arms, in hi
  267. sparkle
    emit or produce sparks
    Within was a comely boy, tanned and brown with sturdy outdoor sports and exercises, whose clothing was all of lovely silks and satins, shining with jewels; at his hip a little jewelled sword and dagger; dainty buskins on his feet, with red heels; and on h
  268. King John
    youngest son of Henry II; King of England from 1199 to 1216; succeeded to the throne on the death of his brother Richard I; lost his French possessions; in 1215 John was compelled by the barons to sign the Magna Carta (1167-1216)
    King John restored De Courcy's titles and possessions, and said, 'Name thy wish and thou shalt have it, though it cost me half my kingdom;' whereat De Courcy, kneeling, as I do now, made answer, 'This, then, I ask, my liege; that I and my successor
  269. wake
    stop sleeping
    Thou'rt mad yet--poor lad, thou'rt mad yet: would I had never woke to know it again!
  270. stare
    look at with fixed eyes
    Tom stared in glad wonder at the vast pile of masonry, the wide-spreading wings, the frowning bastions and turrets, the huge stone gateway, with its gilded bars and its magnificent array of colossal granite lions, and other the signs and symbols of
  271. devise
    a will disposing of real property
    At last she perceived that there was not going to be any peace for her until she should devise a test that should prove, clearly and without question, whether this lad was her son or not, and so banish these wearing and worrying doubts.
  272. infirmity
    the state of being weak in health or body (especially from old age)
    When the waiting gentlemen had retired, Lord St. John said--
    "His majesty commandeth, that for due and weighty reasons of state, the prince's grace shall hide his infirmity in all ways that be within his power, till it be passed and he be as he wa
  273. profane
    grossly irreverent toward what is held to be sacred
    The prince twisted himself loose, unconsciously brushed his profaned shoulder, and eagerly said--
    "Oh, art HIS father, truly?
  274. beseech
    ask for or request earnestly
    The boon was granted, as your Majesty knoweth; and there hath been no time, these four hundred years, that that line has failed of an heir; and so, even unto this day, the head of that ancient house still weareth his hat or helm before the King's Majesty,
  275. branding
    the act of stigmatizing
    And still I begged again, and was sold for a slave--here on my cheek under this stain, if I washed it off, ye might see the red S the branding-iron left there!
  276. intercede
    act between parties with a view to reconciling differences
    "No, good your Majesty, my punishment was appointed for this day, and peradventure it may be annulled, as unbefitting the season of mourning that is come upon us; I know not, and so have made bold to come hither and remind your Grace about your gracious p
  277. patrician
    a person of refined upbringing and manners
    V. Tom as a patrician.
  278. portal
    a grand and imposing entrance (often extended metaphorically)
    The soldier that had maltreated Tom obeyed promptly; and as the prince burst through the portal, half-smothered with royal wrath, the soldier fetched him a sounding box on the ear that sent him whirling to the roadway, and said--
    "Take that, thou
  279. unscathed
    not injured
    Set thy mind at ease--thy back shall go unscathed--I will see to it."
  280. dreary
    lacking in liveliness or charm or surprise
    His old dreams had been so pleasant; but this reality was so dreary!
  281. confirm
    strengthen or make more firm
    Were he a thousand times mad, yet is he Prince of Wales, and I the King will confirm it.
  282. disjointed
    taken apart at the joints
    In disjointed and trembling syllables the man gave the information desired.
  283. council
    a body serving in an administrative capacity
    Daily the mock prince was received with elaborate ceremonials borrowed by Tom from his romantic readings; daily the great affairs of the mimic kingdom were discussed in the royal council, and daily his mimic highness issued decrees to his imaginary
  284. solder
    join or fuse with solder
    These and twenty other cries broke out at once! and almost before the poor little victim could draw a breath he was crowned with a tin basin, robed in a tattered blanket, throned upon a barrel, and sceptred with the tinker's soldering-iron.
  285. decay
    the organic phenomenon of rotting
    It was small, decayed, and rickety, but it was packed full of wretchedly poor families.
  286. flee
    run away quickly
    She cried out--
    "O my lord, on thy knees?--and to ME!"
    Then she fled away in fright; and Tom, smitten with despair, sank down, murmuring--
    "There is no help, there is no hope.
  287. guardian angel
    an angel believed to have special affection for a particular individual
    Tom's guardian angels, the two lords, had had less comfort in the interview than the other parties to it.
  288. vast
    unusually great in size or amount or degree or especially extent or scope
    His speech and manners became curiously ceremonious and courtly, to the vast admiration and amusement of his intimates.
  289. turmoil
    a violent disturbance
    There was but one person in it who offered a pleading word for the captive, and he was not heeded; he was hardly even heard, so great was the turmoil.
  290. brimstone
    an old name for sulfur
    "Poor lad, his diet is brimstone, now, and over hot for a delicate taste.
  291. appoint
    assign a duty, responsibility or obligation to
    The poor Chancellor was not long in removing himself from this dangerous vicinity; nor did the commission waste time in giving the royal assent to the work of the slavish Parliament, and appointing the morrow for the beheading of the premier peer o
  292. mitre
    joint that forms a corner; usually both sides are bevelled at a 45-degree angle to form a 90-degree corner
    By the glory of God, an' thou gettest not about that traitor's business, thy mitre shall have holiday the morrow for lack of a head to grace withal!"
  293. knave
    a deceitful and unreliable scoundrel
    They cried out--
    "The loving-cup, the loving-cup! make the sour knave drink the loving-cup, else will we feed him to the fishes."
  294. crackle
    make a crackling sound
    It did touch me to a sort of tenderness to see the gallant way she met her lot--cursing and reviling all the crowd that gaped and gazed around her, whilst the flames licked upward toward her face and catched her thin locks and crackled about her ol
  295. pounce
    move down on as if in an attack
    Over this he wore a mantle of white cloth-of-gold, pounced with the triple-feathered crest, lined with blue satin, set with pearls and precious stones, and fastened with a clasp of brilliants.
  296. slovenly
    negligent of neatness especially in dress and person; habitually dirty and unkempt
    "The master, being wroth with what he termed such slovenly and doltish work, did promise that he would soundly whip me for it--and--"
    "Whip THEE!" said Tom, astonished out of his presence of mind.
  297. ablution
    the ritual washing of a priest's hands or of sacred vessels
    Hendon despatched his ablutions with alacrity, then drew back the other chair and was about to place himself at table, when the boy said, indignantly--
    "Forbear!
  298. requirement
    required activity
    The Taster to his highness the Prince of Wales was there also, prepared to taste any suspicious dish upon requirement, and run the risk of being poisoned.
  299. endure
    undergo or be subjected to
    Father Andrew also taught Tom a little Latin, and how to read and write; and would have done the same with the girls, but they were afraid of the jeers of their friends, who could not have endured such a queer accomplishment in them.
  300. askew
    turned or twisted to one side
    One summer's day he saw poor Anne Askew and three men burned at the stake in Smithfield, and heard an ex-Bishop preach a sermon to them which did not interest him.
  301. precious
    of high worth or cost
    "Parents have I, sir, and a grand-dam likewise that is but indifferently precious to me, God forgive me if it be offence to say it--also twin sisters, Nan and Bet."
    "Then is thy grand-dam not over kind to thee, I take it?"
  302. title
    the name of a work of art or literary composition etc.
    There is none other of us but the Lady Edith, my cousin--she was sixteen then--beautiful, gentle, good, the daughter of an earl, the last of her race, heiress of a great fortune and a lapsed title.
  303. fare
    the sum charged for riding in a public conveyance
    Fared we forth naked, there is none could say which was you, and which the Prince of Wales.
  304. pedlar
    someone who travels about selling his wares (as on the streets or at carnivals)
    There were huge stalwart men, brown with exposure, long-haired, and clothed in fantastic rags; there were middle-sized youths, of truculent countenance, and similarly clad; there were blind mendicants, with patched or bandaged eyes; crippled ones, with wo
  305. creep
    move slowly; in the case of people or animals with the body near the ground
    As soon as the snorings of the head of the house and his mother showed that they were asleep, the young girls crept to where the Prince lay, and covered him tenderly from the cold with straw and rags; and their mother crept to him also, and stroked
  306. taunt
    harass with persistent criticism or carping
    Presently they began to taunt him and mock at him, purposely to goad him into a higher and still more entertaining fury.
  307. baleful
    threatening or foreshadowing evil or tragic developments
    Then he turned toward the company: his gentle manner changed, and baleful lightnings began to play from his eyes.
  308. crime
    (criminal law) an act punishable by law; usually considered an evil act
    Remember I am party to thy crime if I but listen."
  309. incline
    lower or bend (the head or upper body), as in a nod or bow
    Tom noticed this, and it strongly inclined his sympathies toward her in her perilous and unfriended situation.
  310. present
    temporal sense; intermediate between past and future; now existing or happening or in consideration
    The soldiers presented arms with their halberds, opened the gates, and presented again as the little Prince of Poverty passed in, in his fluttering rags, to join hands with the Prince of Limitless Plenty.
  311. riddle
    pierce with many holes
    What riddle is this?
  312. agitate
    move or cause to move back and forth
    The river itself, as far as the eye could reach citywards, was so thickly covered with watermen's boats and with pleasure-barges, all fringed with coloured lanterns, and gently agitated by the waves, that it resembled a glowing and limitless garden
  313. carnation
    Eurasian plant with pink to purple-red spice-scented usually double flowers; widely cultivated in many varieties and many colors
    Now came twelve French gentlemen, in splendid habiliments, consisting of pourpoints of white damask barred with gold, short mantles of crimson velvet lined with violet taffeta, and carnation coloured hauts-de-chausses, and took their way down the s
  314. guardian
    a person who cares for persons or property
    Tom's guardian angels, the two lords, had had less comfort in the interview than the other parties to it.
  315. grateful
    feeling or showing gratitude
    The King took the frightened face between his hands, and gazed earnestly and lovingly into it awhile, as if seeking some grateful sign of returning reason there, then pressed the curly head against his breast, and patted it tenderly.
  316. blast
    a sudden very loud noise
    A prolonged trumpet- blast followed, and a proclamation, "Way for the high and mighty the Lord Edward, Prince of Wales!"
  317. gape
    look with amazement; look stupidly
    The next instant one of the soldiers snatched him rudely away, and sent him spinning among the gaping crowd of country gawks and London idlers.
  318. bold
    fearless and daring
    "Thou'rt a gentle comforter, sweet lady," said Tom, gratefully, "and my heart moveth me to thank thee for't, an' I may be so bold."
  319. waif
    a homeless child especially one forsaken or orphaned
    The tidings struck a chill to the heart of the poor little waif, and sent a shudder through his frame.
  320. petulant
    easily irritated or annoyed
    All gaiety was gone from the company; some were sullen and silent, some were irritable and petulant, none were gentle-humoured, all were thirsty.
  321. high treason
    a crime that undermines the offender's government
    He also made up his mind that Tom should be allowed a reasonable time for spiritual preparation, and then be hanged, drawn and quartered, according to the law and usage of the day in cases of high treason.
  322. miscarriage
    a natural loss of the products of conception
    "Just then the crowd lapped them up and closed them in, and I saw no more, being called by my master, who was in a rage because a joint that the scrivener had ordered was forgot, though I take all the saints to witness that to blame ME for that miscarr
  323. redoubtable
    inspiring fear
    Near four hundred years ago, as your grace knoweth, there being ill blood betwixt John, King of England, and the King of France, it was decreed that two champions should fight together in the lists, and so settle the dispute by what is called the arbitram
  324. dissipate
    to cause to separate and go in different directions
    The little King observed his perplexity, and dissipated it with a word.
  325. revelry
    unrestrained merrymaking
    By midnight the revelry was at its height.
  326. scatter
    to cause to separate and go in different directions
    The Strand had ceased to be a country-road then, and regarded itself as a street, but by a strained construction; for, though there was a tolerably compact row of houses on one side of it, there were only some scattered great buildings on the other
  327. diligence
    conscientiousness in paying proper attention to a task; giving the degree of care required in a given situation
    To wit, that he shall deny to none that he is the true prince, and heir to England's greatness; that he shall uphold his princely dignity, and shall receive, without word or sign of protest, that reverence and observance which unto it do appertain of righ
  328. picturesque
    suggesting or suitable for a picture; pretty as a picture
    The beams were painted red or blue or black, according to the owner's taste, and this gave the houses a very picturesque look.
  329. damage
    the occurrence of a change for the worse
    His doublet and trunks were of rich material, but faded and threadbare, and their gold-lace adornments were sadly tarnished; his ruff was rumpled and damaged; the plume in his slouched hat was broken and had a bedraggled and disreputable look; at h
  330. assisted
    having help; often used as a combining form
    Tom was assisted to his feet, and approached the Majesty of England, humble and trembling.
  331. law of the land
    a phrase used in the Magna Carta to refer to the then established law of the kingdom (as distinct from Roman or civil law); today it refers to fundamental principles of justice commensurate with due process
    I have run from my master, and when I am found--the heavy curse of heaven fall on the law of the land that hath commanded it!--I
  332. effect
    a phenomenon that follows and is caused by some previous phenomenon
    By-and-by Tom's reading and dreaming about princely life wrought such a strong effect upon him that he began to ACT the prince, unconsciously.
  333. muddle
    make into a puddle
    Then his poor muddled head nodded a while and presently drooped to his shoulder; and the business of the empire came to a standstill for want of that august factor, the ratifying power.
  334. streamer
    a long flag; often tapering
    Some of them were decorated with banners and streamers; some with cloth-of-gold and arras embroidered with coats-of-arms; others with silken flags that had numberless little silver bells fastened to them, which shook out tiny showers of joyous musi
  335. profound
    situated at or extending to great depth; too deep to have been sounded or plumbed
    The poor mother's interruptions having ceased, and the Prince's pains having gradually lost their power to disturb him, utter weariness at last sealed his eyes in a profound and restful sleep.
  336. civic
    of or relating or belonging to a city
    They were followed by an officer bearing the civic mace, after whom came another carrying the city's sword; then several sergeants of the city guard, in their full accoutrements, and with badges on their sleeves; then the Garter King-at-arms, in hi
  337. brave
    possessing or displaying courage; able to face and deal with danger or fear without flinching
    He was touched by her brave and costly defence of him, and by her commiseration; and he thanked her in very noble and princely words, and begged her to go to her sleep and try to forget her sorrows.
  338. dismiss
    stop associating with
    Will it please your royal highness to dismiss all that attend you here, save my lord the Earl of Hertford?"
  339. jaunty
    having a cheerful, lively, and self-confident air
    Within was a comely boy, tanned and brown with sturdy outdoor sports and exercises, whose clothing was all of lovely silks and satins, shining with jewels; at his hip a little jewelled sword and dagger; dainty buskins on his feet, with red heels; and on h
  340. abroad
    to or in a foreign country
    Let none list to this false and foolish matter, upon pain of death, nor discuss the same, nor carry it abroad.
  341. acquit
    pronounce not guilty of criminal charges
    Tom signified assent with a gesture and a murmured word, for he was already learning, and in his simple heart was resolved to acquit himself as best he might, according to the King's command.
  342. marvel
    be amazed at
    He made two or three further efforts to help himself, but being promptly forestalled each time, he finally gave up, with a sigh of resignation and a murmured "Beshrew me, but I marvel they do not require to breathe for me also!"
  343. budge
    move very slightly
    The 'ruffler,' or chief, answered--
    "Five and twenty sturdy budges, bulks, files, clapperdogeons and maunders, counting the dells and doxies and other morts. {7} Most are here, the rest are wandering eastward, along the winter lay.
  344. flutter
    flap the wings rapidly or fly with flapping movements
    The soldiers presented arms with their halberds, opened the gates, and presented again as the little Prince of Poverty passed in, in his fluttering rags, to join hands with the Prince of Limitless Plenty.
  345. deny
    declare untrue; contradict
    To wit, that he shall deny to none that he is the true prince, and heir to England's greatness; that he shall uphold his princely dignity, and shall receive, without word or sign of protest, that reverence and observance which unto it do appertain
  346. gibbet
    alternative terms for gallows
    The prince spurned the nearest boy with his foot, and said fiercely--
    "Take thou that, till the morrow come and I build thee a gibbet!"
  347. bandy
    discuss lightly
    So go thy ways, and set quick about it, for I like not much bandying of words, being not over-patient in my nature."
  348. conduct
    (behavioral attributes) the way a person behaves toward other people
    Tom, heavy-hearted, was conducted from the presence, for this last sentence was a death-blow to the hope he had cherished that now he would be set free.
  349. solemnity
    a trait of dignified seriousness
    The Lord Chief Butler was there, and stood behind Tom's chair, overseeing the solemnities, under command of the Lord Great Steward and the Lord Head Cook, who stood near.
  350. preserve
    keep in safety and protect from harm, decay, loss, or destruction
    THE PRINCE AND THE PAUPER
    by Mark Twain

    Hugh Latimer, Bishop of Worcester, to Lord Cromwell, on the birth of the Prince of Wales (afterward Edward VI.).
    From the National Manuscripts preserved by the British Government.
  351. threadbare
    having the nap worn away so that the threads show through
    His doublet and trunks were of rich material, but faded and threadbare, and their gold-lace adornments were sadly tarnished; his ruff was rumpled and damaged; the plume in his slouched hat was broken and had a bedraggled and disreputable look; at h
  352. den
    the habitation of wild animals
    Give ye good den, and God be with ye!"
  353. transmitting
    the act of sending a message; causing a message to be transmitted
    I will set down a tale as it was told to me by one who had it of his father, which latter had it of HIS father, this last having in like manner had it of HIS father--and so on, back and still back, three hundred years and more, the fathers transmitting
  354. accommodating
    obliging; willing to do favors
    A child's facility in accommodating itself to circumstances was never more strikingly illustrated.
  355. stanza
    a fixed number of lines of verse forming a unit of a poem
    Dot-and-go-One disencumbered himself of his timber leg and took his place, upon sound and healthy limbs, beside his fellow-rascal; then they roared out a rollicking ditty, and were reinforced by the whole crew, at the end of each stanza, in a rousi
  356. tranquil
    (of a body of water) free from disturbance by heavy waves
    may visit the sacred person of the Prince of Wales with blows; wherefore, when he faulteth, 'tis I that take them; and meet it is and right, for that it is mine office and my livelihood." {1}
    Tom stared at the tranquil boy, observing to himself, "
  357. fantasy
    imagination unrestricted by reality
    Thou'lt soon be well: 'tis but a passing fantasy.
  358. emergence
    the act of emerging
    What is the custom and usage in this emergence?
  359. gruesome
    shockingly repellent; inspiring horror
    Shake of this gruesome dream.
  360. musician
    someone who plays a musical instrument (as a profession)
    Besides the rowers, these tenders carried each a number of men-at-arms in glossy helmet and breastplate, and a company of musicians.
  361. ornate
    marked by complexity and richness of detail
    He was presently conducted with much state to a spacious and ornate apartment, where a table was already set for one.
  362. covetous
    immoderately desirous of acquiring e.g. wealth
    I have two brothers: Arthur, my elder, with a soul like to his father's; and Hugh, younger than I, a mean spirit, covetous, treacherous, vicious, underhanded--a reptile.
  363. evince
    give expression to
    This continued, and Tom began to evince a growing distress.
  364. stretch
    extend one's limbs or muscles, or the entire body
    After which, he would go forth in his rags and beg a few farthings, eat his poor crust, take his customary cuffs and abuse, and then stretch himself upon his handful of foul straw, and resume his empty grandeurs in his dreams.
  365. purse
    a container used for carrying money and small personal items or accessories (especially by women)
    Through wit and courage I won to the free air at last, and fled hither straight; and am but just arrived, right poor in purse and raiment, and poorer still in knowledge of what these dull seven years have wrought at Hendon Hall, its people and belo
  366. bereaved
    sorrowful through loss or deprivation
    Tom discovered Charing Village presently, and rested himself at the beautiful cross built there by a bereaved king of earlier days; then idled down a quiet, lovely road, past the great cardinal's stately palace, toward a far more mighty and majesti
  367. somewhat
    to a small degree or extent
    Over-study hath done this, and somewhat too much of confinement.
  368. plead
    appeal or request earnestly
    But lived ever an impostor yet, who, being called prince by the king, prince by the court, prince by all, DENIED his dignity and pleaded against his exaltation?
  369. delight
    a feeling of extreme pleasure or satisfaction
    Tom's breath came quick and short with excitement, and his eyes grew big with wonder and delight.
  370. mendicant
    a pauper who lives by begging
    There were huge stalwart men, brown with exposure, long-haired, and clothed in fantastic rags; there were middle-sized youths, of truculent countenance, and similarly clad; there were blind mendicants, with patched or bandaged eyes; crippled ones,
  371. throng
    a large gathering of people
    All night long the glories of his royal estate shone upon him; he moved among great lords and ladies, in a blaze of light, breathing perfumes, drinking in delicious music, and answering the reverent obeisances of the glittering throng as it parted
  372. limpid
    clear and bright
    Arrived at the Dowgate, the fleet was towed up the limpid Walbrook (whose channel has now been for two centuries buried out of sight under acres of buildings) to Bucklersbury, past houses and under bridges populous with merry-makers and brilliantly
  373. arrive
    reach a destination; arrive by movement or progress
    Splendid carriages, with splendid people in them and splendid servants outside, were arriving and departing by several other noble gateways that pierced the royal enclosure.
  374. manifest
    clearly revealed to the mind or the senses or judgment
    The lords and doctors manifested their gratification also.
  375. posture
    the arrangement of the body and its limbs
    The woman sank back to a sitting posture on the floor, and, covering her eyes with her hands, gave way to heart-broken sobs and wailings.
  376. scoff
    laugh at with contempt and derision
    He spoke of it once to some of his Offal Court comrades; but they jeered him and scoffed him so unmercifully that he was glad to keep his dream to himself after that.
  377. muse
    reflect deeply on a subject
    People jostled him, and some gave him rough speech; but it was all lost on the musing boy.
  378. vagary
    an unexpected and inexplicable change in something (in a situation or a person's behavior, etc.)
    All those that were present had been well drilled within the hour to remember that the prince was temporarily out of his head, and to be careful to show no surprise at his vagaries.
  379. damask
    a fabric of linen or cotton or silk or wool with a reversible pattern woven into it
    Now came twelve French gentlemen, in splendid habiliments, consisting of pourpoints of white damask barred with gold, short mantles of crimson velvet lined with violet taffeta, and carnation coloured hauts-de-chausses, and took their way down the s
  380. corner
    the point where three areas or surfaces meet or intersect
    By night, it was again a sight to see, with its great bonfires at every corner, and its troops of revellers making merry around them.
  381. ermine
    mustelid of northern hemisphere in its white winter coat
    He was 'magnificently habited in a doublet of white satin, with a front-piece of purple cloth-of-tissue, powdered with diamonds, and edged with ermine.
  382. confirming
    serving to support or corroborate
    A secretary made report that forasmuch as the late King had provided in his will for conferring the ducal degree upon the Earl of Hertford and raising his brother, Sir Thomas Seymour, to the peerage, and likewise Hertford's son to an earldom, together wit
  383. delighted
    greatly pleased
    With this he dragged the frantic and struggling prince away, and disappeared up a front court followed by a delighted and noisy swarm of human vermin.
  384. grinder
    machinery that processes materials by grinding or crushing
    There were huge stalwart men, brown with exposure, long-haired, and clothed in fantastic rags; there were middle-sized youths, of truculent countenance, and similarly clad; there were blind mendicants, with patched or bandaged eyes; crippled ones, with wo
  385. grisly
    shockingly repellent; inspiring horror
    The spirit of compassion took control of him, to the exclusion of all other considerations; he never thought of the offended laws, or of the grief or loss which these three criminals had inflicted upon their victims; he could think of nothing but the scaf
  386. ditty
    a short simple song (or the words of a poem intended to be sung)
    Dot-and-go-One disencumbered himself of his timber leg and took his place, upon sound and healthy limbs, beside his fellow-rascal; then they roared out a rollicking ditty, and were reinforced by the whole crew, at the end of each stanza, in a rousi
  387. drift
    be in motion due to some air or water current
    For a long time his pain and hunger, and the swearing and fighting going on in the building, kept him awake; but at last his thoughts drifted away to far, romantic lands, and he fell asleep in the company of jewelled and gilded princelings who live
  388. approach
    move towards
    Poor little Tom, in his rags, approached, and was moving slowly and timidly past the sentinels, with a beating heart and a rising hope, when all at once he caught sight through the golden bars of a spectacle that almost made him shout for joy.
  389. disembark
    go ashore
    Tom disembarked, and he and his gallant procession crossed Cheapside and made a short march through the Old Jewry and Basinghall Street to the Guildhall.
  390. gesture
    motion of hands or body to emphasize or help to express a thought or feeling
    But they were waved aside with a right royal gesture, and they stopped stock still where they were, like so many statues.
  391. loathe
    find repugnant
    "I do, I do--I know him not, I loathe him, and will die before I will go with him."
  392. stern
    of a stern or strict bearing or demeanor; forbidding in aspect
    Before him, at a little distance, reclined a very large and very fat man, with a wide, pulpy face, and a stern expression.
  393. scabbard
    a sheath for a sword or dagger or bayonet
    Let the chronicler speak again:--
    "First come Gentlemen, Barons, Earls, Knights of the Garter, all richly dressed and bareheaded; next comes the Chancellor, between two, one of which carries the royal sceptre, the other the Sword of State in a red sca
  394. lackey
    a male servant (especially a footman)
    But thy good Nan and thy Bet shall have raiment and lackeys enow, and that soon, too: my cofferer shall look to it.
  395. preamble
    a preliminary introduction to a statute or constitution (usually explaining its purpose)
    Another secretary began to read a preamble concerning the expenses of the late King's household, which had amounted to 28,000 pounds during the preceding six months--a sum so vast that it made Tom Canty gasp; he gasped again when the fact appeared
  396. prodigious
    so great in size or force or extent as to elicit awe
    He bathed his bleeding feet in the brook which flowed then where Farringdon Street now is; rested a few moments, then passed on, and presently came upon a great space with only a few scattered houses in it, and a prodigious church.
  397. axis
    a straight line through a body or figure that satisfies certain conditions
    After breakfast he was conducted, with regal ceremony, attended by his great officers and his guard of fifty Gentlemen Pensioners bearing gilt battle- axes, to the throne-room, where he proceeded to transact business of state.
  398. famished
    extremely hungry
    Nightfall found him leg-weary, half- famished, and his desire as far from accomplishment as ever; so he supped at the Tabard Inn and went to bed, resolved to make an early start in the morning, and give the town an exhaustive search.
  399. victim
    an unfortunate person who suffers from some adverse circumstance
    A victim of treachery.
  400. blithe
    carefree and happy and lighthearted
    He bore himself right gracefully, and all the more so because he was not thinking of how he was doing it, his mind being charmed and occupied with the blithe sights and sounds about him--and besides, nobody can be very ungraceful in nicely-fitting
  401. appendage
    a part that is joined to something larger
    He was only an ornamental appendage at this time, and was seldom called upon to exercise his function; but there had been times, not many generations past, when the office of taster had its perils, and was not a grandeur to be desired.
  402. petition
    a formal message requesting something that is submitted to an authority
    Then he dropped upon one knee and said--
    "My poor service went not beyond the limit of a subject's simple duty, and therefore hath no merit; but since your Majesty is pleased to hold it worthy some reward, I take heart of grace to make petition to
  403. sight
    the ability to see; the visual faculty
    By day, London was a sight to see, with gay banners waving from every balcony and housetop, and splendid pageants marching along.
  404. reading
    written material intended to be read
    His dreamings and readings worked certain changes in him, by-and-by.
  405. remain
    continue in a place, position, or situation
    There were the remains of a blanket or two, and some bundles of ancient and dirty straw, but these could not rightly be called beds, for they were not organised; they were kicked into a general pile, mornings, and selections made from the mass at n
  406. harass
    annoy continually or chronically
    It pursued her, it harassed her, it clung to her, and refused to be put away or ignored.
  407. rickety
    inclined to shake as from weakness or defect
    It was small, decayed, and rickety, but it was packed full of wretchedly poor families.
  408. humble
    marked by meekness or modesty; not arrogant or prideful
    The prince, with princely delicacy and breeding, sent away the servants, so that his humble guest might not be embarrassed by their critical presence; then he sat near by, and asked questions while Tom ate.
  409. misery
    a state of ill-being due to affliction or misfortune
    The houseless prince, the homeless heir to the throne of England, still moved on, drifting deeper into the maze of squalid alleys where the swarming hives of poverty and misery were massed together.
  410. chorus
    a company of actors who comment (by speaking or singing in unison) on the action in a classical Greek play
    A snug sense of comfort stole over him, which was rudely broken, the next moment, by a chorus of piping cackles and coarse laughter.
  411. confess
    admit (to a wrongdoing)
    "It grieves me to confess it had indeed escaped me," said Tom, in a hesitating voice; and blushed again.
  412. costume
    the attire characteristic of a country or a time or a social class
    It was a sufficiently ugly costume.
  413. hilarious
    marked by or causing boisterous merriment or convulsive laughter
    In the midst of his grief he began to be conscious of hilarious noises and shoutings, apparently but a block or two away.
  414. slight
    (quantifier used with mass nouns) small in quantity or degree; not much or almost none or (with `a') at least some
    "Yes; but it is a slight thing, and your worship knoweth that the poor man-at-arms--"
    "Peace!
  415. pleading
    begging
    His twitching nose was pleading more urgently than ever for relief.
  416. irritate
    cause annoyance in; disturb, especially by minor irritations
    The King was irritated, now, and said he would stop here--it was Hendon's place to come to him, not his to go to Hendon.
  417. ejaculation
    the discharge of semen in males
    The startled Prince sprang partly up, but a sharp reminder from his stiffened bruises brought him to himself, and he sank back among his foul straw with a moan and the ejaculation--
    "Alas! it was no dream, then!"
  418. measure
    determine the measurements of something or somebody, take measurements of
    And while she listened, the measured breathing was broken by a soft, startled cry, such as one utters in a troubled dream.
  419. chaplain
    a clergyman ministering to some institution
    A chaplain said grace, and Tom was about to fall to, for hunger had long been constitutional with him, but was interrupted by my lord the Earl of Berkeley, who fastened a napkin about his neck; for the great post of Diaperers to the Prince of Wales
  420. pursue
    follow in or as if in pursuit
    It pursued her, it harassed her, it clung to her, and refused to be put away or ignored.
  421. portly
    euphemisms for `fat'
    After grace, Tom (being instructed) rose--and the whole house with him --and drank from a portly golden loving-cup with the Princess Elizabeth; from her it passed to the Lady Jane, and then traversed the general assemblage.
  422. empty
    holding or containing nothing
    When he came home empty-handed at night, he knew his father would curse him and thrash him first, and that when he was done the awful grandmother would do it all over again and improve on it; and that away in the night his starving mother would sli
  423. loll
    be lazy or idle
    A bright fire was burning in the middle of the floor, at the other end of the barn; and around it, and lit weirdly up by the red glare, lolled and sprawled the motliest company of tattered gutter-scum and ruffians, of both sexes, he had ever read o
  424. ornament
    something used to beautify
    Tom played with the jewelled dagger that hung upon his thigh; he examined the costly and exquisite ornaments of the room; he tried each of the sumptuous chairs, and thought how proud he would be if the Offal Court herd could only peep in and see hi
  425. throttle
    a valve that regulates the supply of fuel to the engine
    Vanish, lest I throttle thee!"
  426. stringent
    demanding strict attention to rules and procedures
    He only begged just enough to save himself, for the laws against mendicancy were stringent, and the penalties heavy; so he put in a good deal of his time listening to good Father Andrew's charming old tales and legends about giants and fairies, dwa
  427. woe
    misery resulting from affliction
    They ran forward with woe and dismay in their faces, exclaiming--
    "Oh, poor Tom, poor lad!"
  428. surety
    something clearly established
    He said--
    "Of a surety thou must remember me, my lord.
  429. stroke
    a single complete movement
    As soon as the snorings of the head of the house and his mother showed that they were asleep, the young girls crept to where the Prince lay, and covered him tenderly from the cold with straw and rags; and their mother crept to him also, and stroked
  430. brevity
    the attribute of being brief or fleeting
    During the forenoon, Tom had an enjoyable hour, by permission of his keepers, Hertford and St. John, with the Lady Elizabeth and the little Lady Jane Grey; though the spirits of the princesses were rather subdued by the mighty stroke that had fallen upon
  431. sullen
    showing a brooding ill humor
    After a considerable time--he could not tell how long--his senses struggled to a half-consciousness, and as he lay with closed eyes vaguely wondering where he was and what had been happening, he noted a murmurous sound, the sullen beating of rain u
  432. spurious
    plausible but false
    To wit, that a spurious Prince of Wales was being feasted by the city in his stead.
  433. flame
    the process of combustion of inflammable materials producing heat and light and (often) smoke
    Presently a wicked light flamed up in his eye, and he muttered, "Yet will not I die till HE go before."
  434. suppress
    to put down by force or authority
    She bent heedfully and warily over him, scarcely breathing in her suppressed excitement, and suddenly flashed the light in his face and struck the floor by his ear with her knuckles.
  435. troth
    a solemn pledge of fidelity
    I was wild--in troth I might go yet farther and say VERY wild, though 'twas a wildness of an innocent sort, since it hurt none but me, brought shame to none, nor loss, nor had in it any taint of crime or baseness, or what might not beseem mine hono
  436. piping
    a long tube made of metal or plastic that is used to carry water or oil or gas etc.
    A snug sense of comfort stole over him, which was rudely broken, the next moment, by a chorus of piping cackles and coarse laughter.
  437. encounter
    come together
    By his command a repast was brought such as Tom had never encountered before except in books.
  438. irksome
    so lacking in interest as to cause mental weariness
    Sith thou art no more Prince of Wales but King, thou canst order matters as thou wilt, with none to say thee nay; wherefore it is not in reason that thou wilt longer vex thyself with dreary studies, but wilt burn thy books and turn thy mind to things less
  439. inarticulate
    without or deprived of the use of speech or words
    'Tis strange, strange--"
    The King dropped into inarticulate mumblings, shaking his grey head weakly from time to time, and gropingly trying to recollect what he had done with the Seal.
  440. grim
    harshly uninviting or formidable in manner or appearance
    The Strand had ceased to be a country-road then, and regarded itself as a street, but by a strained construction; for, though there was a tolerably compact row of houses on one side of it, there were only some scattered great buildings on the other, these
  441. evidence
    your basis for belief or disbelief; knowledge on which to base belief
    Briefly, then, this brother did deftly magnify my faults and make them crimes; ending his base work with finding a silken ladder in mine apartments--conveyed thither by his own means--and did convince my father by this, and suborned evidence of ser
  442. probation
    a trial period during which your character and abilities are tested to see whether you are suitable for work or for membership
    I fought out my long probation in the continental wars, tasting sumptuously of hard knocks, privation, and adventure; but in my last battle I was taken captive, and during the seven years that have waxed and waned since then, a foreign dungeon hath
  443. deft
    skillful in physical movements; especially of the hands
    None may palter with the King's command, or fit it to his ease, where it doth chafe, with deft evasions.
  444. glimpse
    a brief or incomplete view
    At a respectful distance were many country folk, and people from the city, waiting for any chance glimpse of royalty that might offer.
  445. mirth
    great merriment
    With boisterous mirth they dropped upon their knees in a body and did mock homage to their prey.
  446. inlay
    decorate the surface of by inserting wood, stone, and metal
    Hanging upon hooks in the oaken wainscoting were the several pieces of a suit of shining steel armour, covered all over with beautiful designs exquisitely inlaid in gold.
  447. court
    an assembly (including one or more judges) to conduct judicial business
    Privately, after a while, Tom organised a royal court!
  448. sufficiency
    the quality of being sufficient for the end in view
    Would thread were bread, seeing one getteth a year's sufficiency for a farthing, and such a brave big needle without cost, for mere love.
  449. curious
    eager to investigate and learn or learn more (sometimes about others' concerns)
    To wit, that he shall deny to none that he is the true prince, and heir to England's greatness; that he shall uphold his princely dignity, and shall receive, without word or sign of protest, that reverence and observance which unto it do appertain of righ
  450. ken
    range of what one can know or understand
    My father is a baronet--one of the smaller lords by knight service {2}--Sir Richard Hendon of Hendon Hall, by Monk's Holm in Kent."
  451. vantage
    place or situation affording some advantage (especially a comprehensive view or commanding perspective)
    From their lofty vantage-ground the giants Gog and Magog, the ancient guardians of the city, contemplated the spectacle below them with eyes grown familiar to it in forgotten generations.
  452. wallow
    roll around, "pigs were wallowing in the mud"
    "We dance and sing about the Maypole in Cheapside; we play in the sand, each covering his neighbour up; and times we make mud pastry--oh the lovely mud, it hath not its like for delightfulness in all the world!--we do fairly wallow in the mud, sir,
  453. delicate
    developed with extreme delicacy and subtlety
    Tom hesitated, looked distressed, and was about to stammer out something at hazard, when Lord St. John took the word and answered for him with the easy grace of a courtier accustomed to encounter delicate difficulties and to be ready for them--
    "H
  454. coffer
    a chest especially for storing valuables
    Another secretary began to read a preamble concerning the expenses of the late King's household, which had amounted to 28,000 pounds during the preceding six months--a sum so vast that it made Tom Canty gasp; he gasped again when the fact appeared that 20
  455. behalf
    as the agent of or on someone's part (usually expressed as "on behalf of" rather than "in behalf of")
    Once the giddy little Lady Jane fired a simple Greek phrase at Tom. The Princess Elizabeth's quick eye saw by the serene blankness of the target's front that the shaft was overshot; so she tranquilly delivered a return volley of sounding Greek on Tom's <
  456. homage
    respectful deference
    With boisterous mirth they dropped upon their knees in a body and did mock homage to their prey.
  457. blare
    make a loud noise
    When the meal was over at last and he marched away in the midst of his bright pageant, with the happy noises in his ears of blaring bugles, rolling drums, and thundering acclamations, he felt that if he had seen the worst of dining in public it was
  458. wrath
    intense anger (usually on an epic scale)
    The soldier that had maltreated Tom obeyed promptly; and as the prince burst through the portal, half-smothered with royal wrath, the soldier fetched him a sounding box on the ear that sent him whirling to the roadway, and said--
    "Take that, thou
  459. admiral
    the supreme commander of a fleet; ranks above a vice admiral and below a fleet admiral
    And after them came a knight, then the Lord High Admiral, and with him five nobles, in doublets of crimson velvet, voyded low on the back and before to the cannell-bone, laced on the breasts with chains of silver; and over that, short cloaks of cri
  460. aloft
    at or on or to the masthead or upper rigging of a ship
    High aloft on the palace walls a long line of red tongues of flame leapt forth with a thunder-crash; the massed world on the river burst into a mighty roar of welcome; and Tom Canty, the cause and hero of it all, stepped into view and slightly bowe
  461. instruct
    impart skills or knowledge to
    He lay down upon a sumptuous divan, and proceeded to instruct himself with honest zeal.
  462. ambassador
    a diplomat of the highest rank; accredited as representative from one country to another
    They were of the suite of the French ambassador, and were followed by twelve cavaliers of the suite of the Spanish ambassador, clothed in black velvet, unrelieved by any ornament.
  463. expose
    to show, make visible or apparent
    These stood up and stripped away some of their rags, exposing their backs, criss-crossed with ropy old welts left by the lash; one turned up his hair and showed the place where a left ear had once been; another showed a brand upon his shoulder--the
  464. jest
    activity characterized by good humor
    I know not what thou mean'st; I but know I am THY father, as thou shalt soon have cause to--"
    "Oh, jest not, palter not, delay not!--I
  465. annul
    cancel officially
    "No, good your Majesty, my punishment was appointed for this day, and peradventure it may be annulled, as unbefitting the season of mourning that is come upon us; I know not, and so have made bold to come hither and remind your Grace about your gra
  466. lively
    full of life and energy
    A lively prelude arose from the musicians on the water; and two ushers with white wands marched with a slow and stately pace from the portal.
  467. patch
    a small contrasting part of something
    His left arm was in a sling, and he wore a large green patch over his left eye; he limped slightly, and used an oaken staff as a support.
  468. hovel
    small crude shelter used as a dwelling
    O Tom Canty, born in a hovel, bred in the gutters of London, familiar with rags and dirt and misery, what a spectacle is this!
  469. mannered
    having unnatural mannerisms
    To those good- mannered and agreeable children Susie and Clara Clemens this book is affectionately inscribed by their father.
  470. tassel
    adornment consisting of a bunch of cords fastened at one end
    Their halberd staves were covered with crimson velvet, fastened with gilt nails, and ornamented with gold tassels.
  471. rude
    belonging to an early stage of technical development; characterized by simplicity and (often) crudeness
    A great shout went up at this, and one rude fellow said--
    "Marry, art thou his grace's messenger, beggar?"
  472. chamberlain
    an officer who manages the household of a king or nobleman
    He was the prince; his special comrades were guards, chamberlains, equerries, lords and ladies in waiting, and the royal family.
  473. dawn
    the first light of day
    A sudden purpose dawned in his face.
  474. stupor
    marginal consciousness
    Then his stupor began to lighten.
  475. martial
    suggesting war or military life
    This martial panoply belonged to the true prince--a recent present from Madam Parr the Queen.
  476. vagrant
    a wanderer who has no established residence or visible means of support
    He said sharply--
    "Ye mannerless vagrants, is this your recognition of the royal boon I have promised?"
  477. clasp
    hold firmly and tightly
    Over this he wore a mantle of white cloth-of-gold, pounced with the triple-feathered crest, lined with blue satin, set with pearls and precious stones, and fastened with a clasp of brilliants.
  478. quaint
    attractively old-fashioned (but not necessarily authentic)
    "It is a quaint and marvellous thought!
  479. orgy
    a wild gathering involving excessive drinking and promiscuity
    The night was come, the gang had just finished feasting, an orgy was beginning; the can of liquor was passing from mouth to mouth.
  480. lack
    the state of needing something that is absent or unavailable
    By the glory of God, an' thou gettest not about that traitor's business, thy mitre shall have holiday the morrow for lack of a head to grace withal!"
  481. sob
    weep convulsively
    The woman sank back to a sitting posture on the floor, and, covering her eyes with her hands, gave way to heart-broken sobs and wailings.
  482. commoner
    a person who holds no title
    At a lower table the Court grandees and other guests of noble degree were seated, with the magnates of the city; the commoners took places at a multitude of tables on the main floor of the hall.
  483. trifling
    not worth considering
    He walked up and down the floor, filled with nameless fears, listening, starting at every trifling sound.
  484. crave
    have a craving, appetite, or great desire for
    But craving pardon if I do offend, seemeth it not strange that madness could so change his port and manner?--not but that his port and speech are princely still, but that they DIFFER, in one unweighty trifle or another, from what his custom was afo
  485. wend
    direct one's course or way
    "Certain witness did see them wending thither, good your Majesty; this bred the suspicion, and dire effects have since confirmed and justified it.
  486. don
    teacher at a university or college (especially at Cambridge or Oxford)
    Doff thy rags, and don these splendours, lad!
  487. magnate
    a very wealthy or powerful businessman
    At a lower table the Court grandees and other guests of noble degree were seated, with the magnates of the city; the commoners took places at a multitude of tables on the main floor of the hall.
  488. propriety
    correct or appropriate behavior
    A secretary made report that forasmuch as the late King had provided in his will for conferring the ducal degree upon the Earl of Hertford and raising his brother, Sir Thomas Seymour, to the peerage, and likewise Hertford's son to an earldom, together wit
  489. freight
    goods carried by a large vehicle
    Oh, my child! unsay these words that be freighted with death for thee, and ruin for all that be near to thee.
  490. fickle
    liable to sudden unpredictable change
    You should have seen that fickle crowd snatch off their hats then.
  491. bastion
    projecting part of a rampart or other fortification
    Tom stared in glad wonder at the vast pile of masonry, the wide-spreading wings, the frowning bastions and turrets, the huge stone gateway, with its gilded bars and its magnificent array of colossal granite lions, and other the signs and symbols of
  492. deceive
    cause someone to believe an untruth
    But he lost his arts upon the girl; he could deceive my father, but none else.
  493. plunge
    dash violently or with great speed or impetuosity
    After a moment's thought, the servant said--
    "When he came, none came with him; but now I remember me that as the two stepped into the throng of the Bridge, a ruffian-looking man plunged out from some near place; and just as he was joining them--"
  494. legend
    a story about mythical or supernatural beings or events
    It may be history, it may be only a legend, a tradition.
  495. lettuce
    any of various plants of the genus Lactuca
    Tom examined the turnips and the lettuce with interest, and asked what they were, and if they were to be eaten; for it was only recently that men had begun to raise these things in England in place of importing them as luxuries from Holland. {1} H
  496. divan
    a long backless sofa (usually with pillows against a wall)
    He lay down upon a sumptuous divan, and proceeded to instruct himself with honest zeal.
  497. idle
    not in action or at work
    Tom discovered Charing Village presently, and rested himself at the beautiful cross built there by a bereaved king of earlier days; then idled down a quiet, lovely road, past the great cardinal's stately palace, toward a far more mighty and majesti
  498. gratitude
    a feeling of thankfulness and appreciation
    Then he stretched himself across the door, on the floor, saying contentedly--
    "I have lodged worse for seven years; 'twould be but ill gratitude to Him above to find fault with this."
  499. cower
    crouch or curl up
    Two frowsy girls and a middle-aged woman cowered against the wall in one corner, with the aspect of animals habituated to harsh usage, and expecting and dreading it now.
  500. amazed
    filled with the emotional impact of overwhelming surprise or shock
    The hose drifted backward along the line, to the Chief Steward of the Household, the Constable of the Tower, Norroy King-at-Arms, the Master of the Wardrobe, the Chancellor Royal of the Duchy of Lancaster, the Third Groom of the Stole, the Head Ranger of
  501. blanch
    turn pale, as if in fear
    Poor Tom was listening, as well as his dazed faculties would let him, to the beginning of this speech; but when the words 'me, the good King' fell upon his ear, his face blanched, and he dropped as instantly upon his knees as if a shot had brought
  502. swift
    moving very fast
    "Now mark ye," continued Hendon, "I took this lad under my protection when a mob of such as thou would have mishandled him, mayhap killed him; dost imagine I will desert him now to a worser fate?--for whether thou art his father or no--and sooth to say, I
  503. plumage
    the light horny waterproof structure forming the external covering of birds
    A few minutes later the little Prince of Wales was garlanded with Tom's fluttering odds and ends, and the little Prince of Pauperdom was tricked out in the gaudy plumage of royalty.
  504. champion
    someone who has won first place in a competition
    His victims sprawled this way and that, but the mob-tide poured over their prostrate forms and dashed itself against the champion with undiminished fury.
  505. aver
    to declare or affirm solemnly and formally as true
    The sheriff, however, saw nothing consequential in the inquiry; he answered, with simple directness--
    "Indeed did she, your Majesty, and most righteously, as all aver.
  506. fang
    canine tooth of a carnivorous animal; used to seize and tear its prey
    Ho, there, Lion! ho, Fangs!"
  507. weave
    pattern of weaving or structure of a fabric
    'They were dressed in striped hose of black and tawny, velvet caps graced at the sides with silver roses, and doublets of murrey and blue cloth, embroidered on the front and back with the three feathers, the prince's blazon, woven in gold.
  508. statue
    a sculpture representing a human or animal
    At each side of the gilded gate stood a living statue--that is to say, an erect and stately and motionless man-at-arms, clad from head to heel in shining steel armour.
  509. simple
    having few parts; not complex or complicated or involved
    It may be that the wise and the learned believed it in the old days; it may be that only the unlearned and the simple loved it and credited it.
  510. antic
    ludicrously odd
    There be Punch-and-Judy shows, and monkeys--oh such antic creatures! and so bravely dressed!--and there be plays wherein they that play do shout and fight till all are slain, and 'tis so fine to see, and costeth but a farthing--albeit 'tis main har
  511. haunt
    follow stealthily or recur constantly and spontaneously to
    One desire came in time to haunt him day and night: it was to see a real prince, with his own eyes.
  512. crash
    break violently or noisily; smash;
    High aloft on the palace walls a long line of red tongues of flame leapt forth with a thunder- crash; the massed world on the river burst into a mighty roar of welcome; and Tom Canty, the cause and hero of it all, stepped into view and slightly bowe
  513. contrived
    showing effects of planning or manipulation
    The poor woman was smitten almost helpless with surprise and grief; but she contrived to hide her emotions, and to soothe the boy to sleep again; then she crept apart and communed miserably with herself upon the disastrous result of her experiment.
  514. depart
    go away or leave
    Splendid carriages, with splendid people in them and splendid servants outside, were arriving and departing by several other noble gateways that pierced the royal enclosure.
  515. livid
    furiously angry
    In the times of which we are writing, the Bridge furnished 'object lessons' in English history for its children--namely, the livid and decaying heads of renowned men impaled upon iron spikes atop of its gateways.
  516. forsake
    leave someone who needs or counts on you; leave in the lurch
    He said to himself, "It is the ancient Grey Friars' Church, which the king my father hath taken from the monks and given for a home for ever for poor and forsaken children, and new-named it Christ's Church.
  517. marred
    blemished by injury or rough wear
    The redeemed creature was loud in her gratitude, and proceeded to obey, whilst Tom looked on with eager expectancy, a little marred by apprehension; the courtiers at the same time manifesting decided discomfort and uneasiness.
  518. reinforce
    strengthen and support with rewards
    Dot-and-go-One disencumbered himself of his timber leg and took his place, upon sound and healthy limbs, beside his fellow-rascal; then they roared out a rollicking ditty, and were reinforced by the whole crew, at the end of each stanza, in a rousi
  519. instruction
    the activities of educating or instructing; activities that impart knowledge or skill
    VI. Tom receives instructions.
  520. schooling
    the act of teaching at school
    The King said--
    "'Twas not according to his schooling and ability, but showeth that his mind is but diseased, not stricken fatally.
  521. spawn
    the mass of eggs deposited by fish or amphibians or molluscs
    The soldier that had maltreated Tom obeyed promptly; and as the prince burst through the portal, half-smothered with royal wrath, the soldier fetched him a sounding box on the ear that sent him whirling to the roadway, and said--
    "Take that, thou beggar'
  522. eccentricity
    strange and unconventional behavior
    This new eccentricity of the prince's ruined mind made all the hearts about him ache; but the sad sight moved none to merriment.
  523. defiance
    a hostile challenge
    How soldier-like he faced the smutty rabble and flung back his high defiance!
  524. instructions
    a manual usually accompanying a technical device and explaining how to install or operate it
    VI. Tom receives instructions.
  525. tribulation
    an annoying or frustrating or catastrophic event
    None smiled; but all were sore perplexed, and looked one to the other in deep tribulation for counsel.
  526. behead
    cut the head of
    The poor Chancellor was not long in removing himself from this dangerous vicinity; nor did the commission waste time in giving the royal assent to the work of the slavish Parliament, and appointing the morrow for the beheading of the premier peer o
  527. dim
    lacking in light; not bright or harsh
    His cudgel crashed down upon the meddler's head: there was a groan, a dim form sank to the ground among the feet of the crowd, and the next moment it lay there in the dark alone.
  528. King of France
    the sovereign ruler of France
    Near four hundred years ago, as your grace knoweth, there being ill blood betwixt John, King of England, and the King of France, it was decreed that two champions should fight together in the lists, and so settle the dispute by what is called the a
  529. irritable
    easily irritated or annoyed
    All gaiety was gone from the company; some were sullen and silent, some were irritable and petulant, none were gentle-humoured, all were thirsty.
  530. misfortune
    an unfortunate state resulting from unfavorable outcomes
    Then, fired by the story of Miles's wrongs, he loosed his tongue and poured the history of his own recent misfortunes into the ears of his astonished listener.
  531. filing
    the entering of a legal document into the public record
    Filing off on the right and left, they formed two long lines, extending from the gateway of the palace to the water's edge.
  532. bough
    any of the larger branches of a tree
    The youth looked about him, discovered a bough sticking in the ground, with a small bit of rag tied to it, then led the way into the forest, watching for similar boughs and finding them at intervals; they were evidently guides to the point he was a
  533. dancing
    taking a series of rhythmical steps (and movements) in time to music
    At this moment the party burst suddenly out of darkness into light; and not only into light, but into the midst of a multitude of singing, dancing, and shouting people, massed together on the river frontage.
  534. terror
    an overwhelming feeling of fear and anxiety
    Whilst he lay there benumbed with terror, dreadful tidings were speeding through the palace.
  535. absorb
    suck or take up or in
    And still his desire to look just once upon a real prince, in the flesh, grew upon him, day by day, and week by week, until at last it absorbed all other desires, and became the one passion of his life.
  536. indistinct
    not clearly defined or easy to perceive or understand
    Now, far down the echoing corridors we hear a bugle-blast, and the indistinct cry, "Place for the King!
  537. retribution
    the act of correcting for your wrongdoing
    Justice and Retribution.
  538. mace
    spice made from the dried fleshy covering of the nutmeg seed
    They were followed by an officer bearing the civic mace, after whom came another carrying the city's sword; then several sergeants of the city guard, in their full accoutrements, and with badges on their sleeves; then the Garter King-at-arms, in hi
  539. indiscretion
    the trait of being injudicious
    A secretary made report that forasmuch as the late King had provided in his will for conferring the ducal degree upon the Earl of Hertford and raising his brother, Sir Thomas Seymour, to the peerage, and likewise Hertford's son to an earldom, together wit
  540. straight
    having no deviations
    They were all dressed alike, and in the fashion which in that day prevailed among serving-men and 'prentices{1}--that is to say, each had on the crown of his head a flat black cap about the size of a saucer, which was not useful as a covering, it being of
  541. experience
    the content of direct observation or participation in an event
    Miles reflected during some moments, then said to himself, "Yes, that is the thing to do--by any other means it were impossible to get at it--and certes, this hour's experience has taught me 'twould be most wearing and inconvenient to continue it a
  542. remark
    make or write a comment on
    Tom's remarks, and Tom's performances, were reported by the boys to their elders; and these, also, presently began to discuss Tom Canty, and to regard him as a most gifted and extraordinary creature.
  543. spasm
    a painful and involuntary muscular contraction
    The sick man died within the hour, being torn with spasms and retchings."
  544. seek
    try to locate or discover, or try to establish the existence of
    As long as he had been able to rage against the mob, and threaten it royally, and royally utter commands that were good stuff to laugh at, he was very entertaining; but when weariness finally forced him to be silent, he was no longer of use to his torment
  545. pheasant
    large long-tailed gallinaceous bird native to the Old World but introduced elsewhere
    And after them came a knight, then the Lord High Admiral, and with him five nobles, in doublets of crimson velvet, voyded low on the back and before to the cannell-bone, laced on the breasts with chains of silver; and over that, short cloaks of crimson sa
  546. sacred
    made or declared or believed to be holy; devoted to a deity or some religious ceremony or use
    The prince picked himself out of the mud, and made fiercely at the sentry, shouting--
    "I am the Prince of Wales, my person is sacred; and thou shalt hang for laying thy hand upon me!"
  547. principality
    territory ruled by a prince
    The grand terrace of stone steps leading down to the water, spacious enough to mass the army of a German principality upon, was a picture to see, with its ranks of royal halberdiers in polished armour, and its troops of brilliantly costumed servito
  548. villain
    a wicked or evil person; someone who does evil deliberately
    Hendon followed after him, passed him, and plunged down the stairs two steps at a stride, muttering, "'Tis that scurvy villain that claimed he was his son.
  549. blasphemy
    blasphemous language (expressing disrespect for God or for something sacred)
    There be base and weakling imitations left, but no true blasphemy."
  550. squander
    spend thoughtlessly; throw away
    A secretary made report that forasmuch as the late King had provided in his will for conferring the ducal degree upon the Earl of Hertford and raising his brother, Sir Thomas Seymour, to the peerage, and likewise Hertford's son to an earldom, together wit
  551. crook
    a long staff with one end being hook shaped
    The streets were very narrow, and crooked, and dirty, especially in the part where Tom Canty lived, which was not far from London Bridge.
  552. intensified
    made more intense
    And when he awoke in the morning and looked upon the wretchedness about him, his dream had had its usual effect--it had intensified the sordidness of his surroundings a thousandfold.
  553. settle
    become resolved, fixed, established, or quiet
    "Then 'tis settled, and there is nought more to say."
  554. derision
    the act of deriding or treating with contempt
    A wild burst of laughter followed, partly of derision and partly of delight in the excellence of the joke.
  555. vex
    cause annoyance in; disturb, especially by minor irritations
    Sith thou art no more Prince of Wales but King, thou canst order matters as thou wilt, with none to say thee nay; wherefore it is not in reason that thou wilt longer vex thyself with dreary studies, but wilt burn thy books and turn thy mind to thin
  556. calamity
    an event resulting in great loss and misfortune
    They come to testify their royal masters' sense of the heavy calamity which hath visited your Grace and the realm of England."
  557. augmented
    added to or made greater in amount or number or strength
    Banish sorrow--I will betake me to my books again, and study so ill that they must in justice treble thy wage, so mightily shall the business of thine office be augmented."
  558. whit
    a tiny or scarcely detectable amount
    "Even so, your worship--for, as I said before, as to that detestable joint, the babe unborn is no whit more blameless than--"
    "Art here YET! And prating still!
  559. knuckle
    a joint of a finger when the fist is closed
    She bent heedfully and warily over him, scarcely breathing in her suppressed excitement, and suddenly flashed the light in his face and struck the floor by his ear with her knuckles.
  560. stocks
    a frame that supports a boat while it is under construction
    They begged, and were whipped at the cart's tail, naked from the girdle up, till the blood ran; then set in the stocks to be pelted; they begged again, were whipped again, and deprived of an ear; they begged a third time--poor devils, what else cou
  561. stumble
    miss a step and fall or nearly fall
    When the nuts were all gone, he stumbled upon some inviting books in a closet, among them one about the etiquette of the English court.
  562. dwell
    inhabit or live in; be an inhabitant of
    Then he smiled inwardly at the thought, "'Tis not for nought I have dwelt but among princes in my reading, and taught my tongue some slight trick of their broidered and gracious speech withal!"
  563. animate
    make lively
    "We will see, as to that!" exclaimed John Canty, striding past Hendon to get at the boy; "by force shall he--"
    "If thou do but touch him, thou animated offal, I will spit thee like a goose!" said Hendon, barring the way and laying his hand upon hi
  564. awe
    an overwhelming feeling of wonder or admiration
    But Tom's influence among these young people began to grow now, day by day; and in time he came to be looked up to, by them, with a sort of wondering awe, as a superior being.
  565. estate
    extensive landed property (especially in the country) retained by the owner for his own use
    All night long the glories of his royal estate shone upon him; he moved among great lords and ladies, in a blaze of light, breathing perfumes, drinking in delicious music, and answering the reverent obeisances of the glittering throng as it parted
  566. boisterous
    full of rough and exuberant animal spirits
    With boisterous mirth they dropped upon their knees in a body and did mock homage to their prey.
  567. compensate
    make amends for; pay compensation for
    Tom experienced a glow of pride and a renewed sense of the compensating advantages of the kingly office.
  568. afflict
    cause physical pain or suffering in
    Petitions were read, and proclamations, patents, and all manner of wordy, repetitious, and wearisome papers relating to the public business; and at last Tom sighed pathetically and murmured to himself, "In what have I offended, that the good God should ta
  569. threat
    declaration of an intention or a determination to inflict harm on another
    But whether this scurvy ruffian be thy father or no, 'tis all one, he shall not have thee to beat thee and abuse, according to his threat, so thou prefer to bide with me."
  570. content
    satisfied or showing satisfaction with things as they are
    Contents.
  571. fringed
    surrounded as with a border or fringe; sometimes used in combination
    The river itself, as far as the eye could reach citywards, was so thickly covered with watermen's boats and with pleasure-barges, all fringed with coloured lanterns, and gently agitated by the waves, that it resembled a glowing and limitless garden
  572. paltry
    contemptibly small in amount
    Thy troubles will vanish there, and likewise thy sad distemper--
    "'She loved her husband dearilee, But another man--'
    "These be noble large stitches!"--holding the garment up and viewing it admiringly--"they have a grandeur and a majesty that do cause t
  573. course
    a connected series of events or actions or developments
    Tom had three hundred and eighty-four servants beside these; but they were not all in that room, of course, nor the quarter of them; neither was Tom aware yet that they existed.
  574. attend
    be present at (meetings, church services, university), etc.
    Will it please your royal highness to dismiss all that attend you here, save my lord the Earl of Hertford?"
  575. pluck
    pull lightly but sharply with a plucking motion
    " Pluck the lad from him--to the horse-pond wi' the cub!"
  576. nip
    sever or remove by pinching or snipping
    He looked about for extra covering, but finding none, doffed his doublet and wrapped the lad in it, saying, "I am used to nipping air and scant apparel, 'tis little I shall mind the cold!"--then walked up and down the room, to keep his blood in mot
  577. goad
    stab or urge on as if with a pointed stick
    Presently they began to taunt him and mock at him, purposely to goad him into a higher and still more entertaining fury.
  578. kindle
    catch fire
    For an instant he felt himself the most forlorn, outcast, and forsaken of God's creatures--then another cry shook the night with its far-reaching thunders: "Long live King Edward the Sixth!" and this made his eyes kindle, and thrilled him with pri
  579. depressing
    causing sad feelings of gloom and inadequacy
    While this depressing thought was passing through her mind, her ear caught the regular breathing of the boy, and she knew he had fallen asleep.
  580. couple
    two items of the same kind
    But the father and the grandmother were a couple of fiends.
  581. require
    have need of
    "Ah, good your worship, require me not to answer.
  582. heedless
    marked by or paying little heed or attention
    Dost not recall how that the old Baron Marley, being mad, forgot the favour of his own countenance that he had known for sixty years, and held it was another's; nay, even claimed he was the son of Mary Magdalene, and that his head was made of Spanish glas
  583. ineffectual
    not producing an intended effect
    There were huge stalwart men, brown with exposure, long-haired, and clothed in fantastic rags; there were middle-sized youths, of truculent countenance, and similarly clad; there were blind mendicants, with patched or bandaged eyes; crippled ones, with wo
  584. buffet
    a piece of furniture that stands at the side of a dining room; has shelves and drawers
    Then followed such a thing as England had never seen before--the sacred person of the heir to the throne rudely buffeted by plebeian hands, and set upon and torn by dogs.
  585. ensue
    issue or terminate (in a specified way, state, etc.); end
    Silence ensued around the slumbering child, and the sages of the realm ceased from their deliberations.
  586. pallid
    abnormally deficient in color as suggesting physical or emotional distress
    The hose drifted backward along the line, to the Chief Steward of the Household, the Constable of the Tower, Norroy King-at-Arms, the Master of the Wardrobe, the Chancellor Royal of the Duchy of Lancaster, the Third Groom of the Stole, the Head Ranger of
  587. interval
    the distance between things
    Still, hope was as stubborn now as doubt had been before; she could not bring herself to accept the verdict of the test; she must try the thing again--the failure must have been only an accident; so she startled the boy out of his sleep a second and a thi
  588. recall
    call to mind
    Dost not recall how that the old Baron Marley, being mad, forgot the favour of his own countenance that he had known for sixty years, and held it was another's; nay, even claimed he was the son of Mary Magdalene, and that his head was made of Spani
  589. alacrity
    liveliness and eagerness
    Hendon despatched his ablutions with alacrity, then drew back the other chair and was about to place himself at table, when the boy said, indignantly--
    "Forbear!
  590. steady
    securely in position; not shaky
    Great nobles walked upon each side of him, making him lean upon them, and so steady his steps.
  591. comment
    a statement that expresses a personal opinion or belief or adds information
    He took up a towel, from under the boy's nose, and handed it to him without comment.
  592. interminable
    tiresomely long; seemingly without end
    Such people would naturally imagine that the mighty and interminable procession which moved through its street night and day, with its confused roar of shouts and cries, its neighings and bellowing and bleatings and its muffled thunder-tramp, was t
  593. moor
    come into or dock at a wharf
    He hath over cumme alle our yllnesse with Hys excedynge goodnesse, so that we are now moor then compellyd to serve Hym, seke Hys glory, promott Hys wurde, yf the Devylle of alle Devylles be natt in us.
  594. repute
    the state of being held in high esteem and honor
    As he lay thinking and planning, he presently began to reason thus: The boy would escape from the ruffian, his reputed father, if possible; would he go back to London and seek his former haunts?
  595. treble
    having or denoting a high range
    Banish sorrow--I will betake me to my books again, and study so ill that they must in justice treble thy wage, so mightily shall the business of thine office be augmented."
  596. extant
    still in existence; not extinct or destroyed or lost
    A description of it is still extant in the quaint wording of a chronicler who witnessed it:
    'Space being made, presently entered a baron and an earl appareled after the Turkish fashion in long robes of bawdkin powdered with gold; hats on their hea
  597. rousing
    capable of arousing enthusiasm or excitement
    Dot-and-go-One disencumbered himself of his timber leg and took his place, upon sound and healthy limbs, beside his fellow-rascal; then they roared out a rollicking ditty, and were reinforced by the whole crew, at the end of each stanza, in a rousing</
  598. livelihood
    the financial means whereby one lives
    may visit the sacred person of the Prince of Wales with blows; wherefore, when he faulteth, 'tis I that take them; and meet it is and right, for that it is mine office and my livelihood." {1}
    Tom stared at the tranquil boy, observing to himself, "
  599. default
    an option that is selected automatically unless an alternative is specified
    So the matter, which was a weighty one, was like to go against the English monarch by default.
  600. mien
    dignified manner or conduct
    "The Lady Elizabeth, my sister, is fourteen, and the Lady Jane Grey, my cousin, is of mine own age, and comely and gracious withal; but my sister the Lady Mary, with her gloomy mien and--Look you: do thy sisters forbid their servants to smile, les
  601. vigilant
    carefully observant or attentive; on the lookout for possible danger
    More than once, in truth, Tom was near to breaking down and confessing himself unequal to his tremendous part; but the tact of the Princess Elizabeth saved him, or a word from one or the other of the vigilant lords, thrown in apparently by chance,
  602. marrow
    the fatty network of connective tissue that fills the cavities of bones
    Down on your marrow bones, all of ye, and do reverence to his kingly port and royal rags!"
  603. granted
    acknowledged as a supposition
    The boon was granted, as your Majesty knoweth; and there hath been no time, these four hundred years, that that line has failed of an heir; and so, even unto this day, the head of that ancient house still weareth his hat or helm before the King's M
  604. glaze
    a coating for ceramics, metal, etc.
    The windows were small, glazed with little diamond-shaped panes, and they opened outward, on hinges, like doors.
  605. prelude
    something that serves as a preceding event or introduces what follows
    A lively prelude arose from the musicians on the water; and two ushers with white wands marched with a slow and stately pace from the portal.
  606. ceaseless
    uninterrupted in time and indefinitely long continuing
    The air was laden with music; the river banks were beruffled with joy-flames; the distant city lay in a soft luminous glow from its countless invisible bonfires; above it rose many a slender spire into the sky, incrusted with sparkling lights, wherefore i