WIlliam Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing 251 words

  1. troth
    a solemn pledge of fidelity
    By my troth I speake my thought Clau.
  2. Balthasar
    (New Testament) one of the three sages from the east who came bearing gifts for the infant Jesus
    Enter don Pedro, Claudio, Benedicke, Balthasar, and Iohn the bastard.
  3. slander
    words falsely spoken that damage the reputation of another
    Why he is the Princes ieaster, a very dull foole, onely his gift is, in deuising impossible slanders, none but Libertines delight in him, and the commendation is not in his witte, but in his villanie, for hee both pleaseth men and angers them, and then they laugh at him, and beat him: I am sure he is in the Fleet, I would he had boorded me Bene.
  4. tush
    the fleshy part of the human body that you sit on
    Bor. Thou should'st rather aske if it were possible anie villanie should be so rich? for when rich villains haue neede of poore ones, poore ones may make what price they will Con. I wonder at it Bor. That shewes thou art vnconfirm'd, thou knowest that the fashion of a doublet, or a hat, or a cloake, is nothing to a man Con. Yes, it is apparell Bor. I meane the fashion Con. Yes the fashion is the fashion Bor. Tush, I may as well say the foole's the foole, but seest thou not what a defo...
  5. rime
    ice crystals forming a white deposit (especially on objects outside)
    I meane in singing, but in louing, Leander the good swimmer, Troilous the first imploier of pandars, and a whole booke full of these quondam carpet-mongers, whose name yet runne smoothly in the euen rode of a blanke verse, why they were neuer so truely turned ouer and ouer as my poore selfe in loue: marrie I cannot shew it rime, I haue tried, I can finde out no rime to Ladie but babie, an innocent rime: for scorne, horne, a hard rime: for schoole foole, a babling rime: verie ominous e...
  6. flout
    treat with contemptuous disregard
    Nay mocke not, mocke not; the body of your discourse is sometime guarded with fragments, and the guardes are but slightly basted on neither, ere you flout old ends any further, examine your conscience, and so I leaue you.
  7. double tongue
    play fast notes on a wind instrument
    Ile tell thee how Beatrice prais'd thy wit the other day: I said thou hadst a fine wit: true saies she, a fine little one: no said I, a great wit: right saies shee, a great grosse one: nay said I, a good wit: iust said she, it hurts no body: nay said I, the gentleman is wise: certaine said she, a wise gentleman: nay said I, he hath the tongues: that I beleeue said shee, for hee swore a thing to me on munday night, which he forswore on tuesday morning: there's a double tongue, there's ...
  8. predestinate
    established or prearranged unalterably
    God keepe your Ladiship still in that minde, so some Gentleman or other shall scape a predestinate scratcht face Beat.
  9. catechize
    give religious instructions to
    O God defend me how am I beset, What kinde of catechizing call you this?
  10. verge
    the limit beyond which something happens or changes
    Nay, that were a punishment too good for them, if they should haue any allegiance in them, being chosen for the Princes watch Verges.
  11. requite
    make repayment for or return something
    This can be no tricke, the conference was sadly borne, they haue the truth of this from Hero, they seeme to pittie the Lady: it seemes her affections haue the full bent: loue me? why it must be requited: I heare how I am censur'd, they say I will beare my selfe proudly, if I perceiue the loue come from her: they say too, that she will rather die than giue any signe of affection: I did neuer thinke to marry, I must not seeme proud, happy are they that heare their detractions, and can p...
  12. bine
    European twining plant whose flowers are used chiefly to flavor malt liquors; cultivated in America
    For looke where Beatrice like a Lapwing runs Close by the ground, to heare our conference Vrs. The pleasant'st angling is to see the fish Cut with her golden ores the siluer streame, And greedily deuoure the treacherous baite: So angle we for Beatrice, who euen now, Is couched in the wood- bine couerture, Feare you not my part of the Dialogue Her. Then go we neare her that her eare loose nothing, Of the false sweete baite that we lay for it: No truely Vrsula, she is too disdainfull, I ...
  13. warrant
    formal and explicit approval
    Come, you shake the head at so long a breathing, but I warrant thee Claudio, the time shall not goe dully by vs, I will in the interim, vndertake one of Hercules labors, which is, to bring Signior Benedicke and the Lady Beatrice into a mountaine of affection, th' one with th' other, I would faine haue it a match, and I doubt not but to fashion it, if you three will but minister such assistance as I shall giue you direction Leonato.
  14. sext
    the fourth of the seven canonical hours; about noon
    Sext.
  15. belie
    be in contradiction with
    Why had I not with charitable hand Tooke vp a beggars issue at my gates, Who smeered thus, and mir'd with infamie, I might haue said, no part of it is mine: This shame deriues it selfe from vnknowne loines, But mine, and mine I lou'd, and mine I prais'd, And mine that I was proud on mine so much, That I my selfe, was to my selfe not mine: Valewing of her, why she, O she is falne Into a pit of Inke, that the wide sea Hath drops too few to wash her cleane againe, And salt too little, which may...
  16. writ
    (law) a legal document issued by a court or judicial officer
    Leo. This saies shee now when shee is beginning to write to him, for shee'll be vp twenty times a night, and there will she sit in her smocke, till she haue writ a sheet of paper: my daughter tells vs all Clau.
  17. dotage
    mental infirmity as a consequence of old age; sometimes shown by foolish infatuations
    I would shee had bestowed this dotage on mee, I would haue daft all other respects, and made her halfe my selfe: I pray you tell Benedicke of it, and heare what he will say Leon.
  18. sufferance
    patient endurance especially of pain or distress
    Con. If not a present remedy, yet a patient sufferance Ioh. I wonder that thou (being as thou saist thou art, borne vnder Saturne) goest about to apply a morall medicine, to a mortifying mischiefe: I cannot hide what I am: I must bee sad when I haue cause, and smile at no mans iests, eat when I haue stomacke, and wait for no mans leisure: sleepe when I am drowsie, and tend on no mans businesse, laugh when I am merry, and claw no man in his humor Con. Yea, but you must not make the ful...
  19. bird nest
    nest where birds lay their eggs and hatch their young
    The flat transgression of a Schoole-boy, who being ouer-ioyed with finding a birds nest, shewes it his companion, and he steales it Pedro.
  20. cupid
    a symbol for love in the form of a cherubic naked boy with wings and a bow and arrow
    Now Vrsula, when Beatrice doth come, As we do trace this alley vp and downe, Our talke must onely be of Benedicke, When I doe name him, let it be thy part, To praise him more then euer man did merit, My talke to thee must be how Benedicke Is sicke in loue with Beatrice; of this matter, Is little Cupids crafty arrow made, That onely wounds by heare-say: now begin, Enter Beatrice.
  21. impediment
    something immaterial that interferes with or delays action or progress
    Any barre, any crosse, any impediment, will be medicinable to me, I am sicke in displeasure to him, and whatsoeuer comes athwart his affection, ranges euenly with mine, how canst thou crosse this marriage?
  22. launce
    very small silvery eellike schooling fishes that burrow into sandy beaches
    But she would spell him backward: if faire fac'd, She would sweare the gentleman should be her sister: If blacke, why Nature drawing of an anticke, Made a foule blot: if tall, a launce ill headed: If low, an agot very vildlie cut: If speaking, why a vane blowne with all windes: If silent, why a blocke moued with none.
  23. lechery
    unrestrained indulgence in sexual activity
    Call vp the right master Constable, we haue here recouered the most dangerous peece of lechery, that euer was knowne in the Common-wealth Watch.1.
  24. lapwing
    large crested Old World plover having wattles and spurs
    For looke where Beatrice like a Lapwing runs Close by the ground, to heare our conference Vrs. The pleasant'st angling is to see the fish Cut with her golden ores the siluer streame, And greedily deuoure the treacherous baite: So angle we for Beatrice, who euen now, Is couched in the wood-bine couerture, Feare you not my part of the Dialogue Her. Then go we neare her that her eare loose nothing, Of the false sweete baite that we lay for it: No truely Vrsula, she is too disdainfull, I ...
  25. Europa
    the 4th largest of Jupiter's satellites; covered with a smooth shell of frozen water
    I thinke he thinkes vpon the sauage bull: Tush, feare not man, wee'll tip thy hornes with gold, And all Europa shall reioyce at thee, As once Europa did at lusty Ioue, When he would play the noble beast in loue Ben. Bull Ioue sir, had an amiable low, And some such strange bull leapt your fathers Cow, A got a Calfe in that same noble feat, Much like to you, for you haue iust his bleat.
  26. ambo
    a platform raised above the surrounding level to give prominence to the person on it
    Exeunt. ambo.
  27. transgression
    the act of transgressing; the violation of a law or a duty or moral principle
    The flat transgression of a Schoole-boy, who being ouer-ioyed with finding a birds nest, shewes it his companion, and he steales it Pedro.
  28. master
    a person who has general authority over others
    Well, euery one cannot master a griefe, but hee that has it Clau.
  29. break bread
    have a meal, usually with company
    A good old man sir, hee will be talking as they say, when the age is in, the wit is out, God helpe vs, it is a world to see: well said yfaith neighbour Verges, well, God's a good man, and two men ride of a horse, one must ride behinde, an honest soule yfaith sir, by my troth he is, as euer broke bread, but God is to bee worshipt, all men are not alike, alas good neighbour Leon.
  30. ape
    any of various primates with short tails or no tail at all
    What should I doe with him? dresse him in my apparell, and make him my waiting gentlewoman? he that hath a beard, is more then a youth: and he that hath no beard, is lesse then a man: and hee that is more then a youth, is not for mee: and he that is lesse then a man, I am not for him: therefore I will euen take sixepence in earnest of the Berrord, and leade his Apes into hell Leon.
  31. temporize
    draw out a discussion or process in order to gain time
    Well, you will temporize with the houres, in the meane time, good Signior Benedicke, repaire to Leonatoes, commend me to him, and tell him I will not faile him at supper, for indeede he hath made great preparation Bene.
  32. waster
    someone who dissipates resources self-indulgently
    Bring me a father that so lou'd his childe, Whose ioy of her is ouer-whelmed like mine, And bid him speake of patience, Measure his woe the length and bredth of mine, And let it answere euery straine for straine, As thus for thus, and such a griefe for such, In euery lineament, branch, shape, and forme: If such a one will smile and stroke his beard, And sorrow, wagge, crie hem, when he should grone, Patch griefe with prouerbs, make misfortune drunke, With candle- wasters: bring him yet...
  33. examine
    observe, check out, and look over carefully or inspect
    Nay mocke not, mocke not; the body of your discourse is sometime guarded with fragments, and the guardes are but slightly basted on neither, ere you flout old ends any further, examine your conscience, and so I leaue you.
  34. husband
    a married man; a woman's partner in marriage
    I can see yet without spectacles, and I see no such matter: there's her cosin, and she were not possest with a furie, exceedes her as much in beautie, as the first of Maie doth the last of December: but I hope you haue no intent to turne husband, haue you?
  35. grace
    elegance and beauty of movement or expression
    Please it your grace leade on?
  36. primus
    the presiding bishop of the Episcopal Church of Scotland
    Much adoe about Nothing Actus primus, Scena prima.
  37. meddle
    intrude in other people's affairs or business; interfere unwantedly
    True, and they are to meddle with none but the Princes subiects: you shall also make no noise in the streetes: for, for the Watch to babble and talke, is most tollerable, and not to be indured Watch.
  38. buckler
    armor carried on the arm to intercept blows
    A most manly wit Margaret, it will not hurt a woman: and so I pray thee call Beatrice, I giue thee the bucklers Mar. Giue vs the swords, wee haue bucklers of our owne Bene.
  39. contaminate
    make impure
    Bor. The poyson of that lies in you to temper, goe you to the Prince your brother, spare not to tell him, that hee hath wronged his Honor in marrying the renowned Claudio, whose estimation do you mightily hold vp, to a contaminated stale, such a one as Hero Iohn.
  40. willow tree
    any of numerous deciduous trees and shrubs of the genus Salix
    Troth my Lord, I haue played the part of Lady Fame, I found him heere as melancholy as a Lodge in a Warren, I told him, and I thinke, told him true, that your grace had got the will of this young Lady, and I offered him my company to a willow tree, either to make him a garland, as being forsaken, or to binde him a rod, as being worthy to be whipt Pedro.
  41. lye
    a strong solution of sodium or potassium hydroxide
    Call me a foole, Trust not my reading, nor my obseruations, Which with experimental seale doth warrant The tenure of my booke: trust not my age, My reuerence, calling, nor diuinitie, If this sweet Ladie lye not guiltlesse heere, Vnder some biting error Leo. Friar, it cannot be: Thou seest that all the Grace that she hath left, Is, that she wil not adde to her damnation, A sinne of periury, she not denies it: Why seek'st thou then to couer with excuse, That which appeares in proper nak...
  42. orchard
    garden consisting of a small cultivated wood without undergrowth
    Old. As the euents stamps them, but they haue a good couer: they shew well outward, the Prince and Count Claudio walking in a thick pleached alley in my orchard, were thus ouer-heard by a man of mine: the Prince discouered to Claudio that hee loued my niece your daughter, and meant to acknowledge it this night in a dance, and if hee found her accordant, hee meant to take the present time by the top, and instantly breake with you of it Leo. Hath the fellow any wit that told you this?
  43. counterfeit
    not genuine; imitating something superior
    May be she doth but counterfeit Claud.
  44. fare
    the sum charged for riding in a public conveyance
    Yea iust so much as you may take vpon a kniues point, and choake a daw withall: you haue no stomacke signior, fare you well.
  45. affection
    a positive feeling of liking
    I heard him sweare his affection Bor. So did I too, and he swore he would marrie her to night Iohn.
  46. extenuate
    lessen or to try to lessen the seriousness or extent of
    I know what you would say: if I haue knowne (her, You will say, she did imbrace me as a husband, And so extenuate the forehand sinne: No Leonato, I neuer tempted her with word too large, But as a brother to his sister, shewed Bashfull sinceritie and comely loue Hero.
  47. musty
    covered with or smelling of mold
    You had musty victuall, and he hath holpe to ease it: he's a very valiant Trencher-man, hee hath an excellent stomacke Mess.
  48. carping
    persistent petty and unjustified criticism
    Sure, sure, such carping is not commendable Hero.
  49. amble
    walk leisurely
    Ben. Sir, your wit ambles well, it goes easily Prin.
  50. daw
    common black-and-grey Eurasian bird noted for thievery
    Yea iust so much as you may take vpon a kniues point, and choake a daw withall: you haue no stomacke signior, fare you well.
  51. valiant
    having or showing valor
    You had musty victuall, and he hath holpe to ease it: he's a very valiant Trencher-man, hee hath an excellent stomacke Mess.
  52. doublet
    a man's close-fitting jacket; worn during the Renaissance
    Bor. Thou should'st rather aske if it were possible anie villanie should be so rich? for when rich villains haue neede of poore ones, poore ones may make what price they will Con. I wonder at it Bor. That shewes thou art vnconfirm'd, thou knowest that the fashion of a doublet, or a hat, or a cloake, is nothing to a man Con. Yes, it is apparell Bor. I meane the fashion Con. Yes the fashion is the fashion Bor. Tush, I may as well say the foole's the foole, but seest thou not what a defo...
  53. hart
    a male deer, especially an adult male red deer
    Mar. Nothing I, but God send euery one their harts desire Hero.
  54. semblance
    an outward or token appearance or form that is deliberately misleading
    Onely to despight them, I will endeauour any thing Bor. Goe then, finde me a meete howre, to draw on Pedro and the Count Claudio alone, tell them that you know that Hero loues me, intend a kinde of zeale both to the Prince and Claudio (as in a loue of your brothers honor who hath made this match) and his friends reputation, who is thus like to be cosen'd with the semblance of a maid, that you haue discouer'd thus: they will scarcely beleeue this without triall: offer them instances wh...
  55. woe
    misery resulting from affliction
    Thus answere I in name of Benedicke, But heare these ill newes with the eares of Claudio: 'Tis certaine so, the Prince woes for himselfe: Friendship is constant in all other things, Saue in the Office and affaires of loue: Therefore all hearts in loue vse their owne tongues.
  56. bode
    indicate by signs
    Ha, no, no faith, thou singst well enough for a shift Ben. And he had been a dog that should haue howld thus, they would haue hang'd him, and I pray God his bad voyce bode no mischiefe, I had as liefe haue heard the night-rauen, come what plague could haue come after it Prince.
  57. exceeding
    far beyond what is usual in magnitude or degree
    And she is exceeding wise Prince.
  58. garland
    flower arrangement consisting of a circular band of foliage or flowers for ornamental purposes
    Troth my Lord, I haue played the part of Lady Fame, I found him heere as melancholy as a Lodge in a Warren, I told him, and I thinke, told him true, that your grace had got the will of this young Lady, and I offered him my company to a willow tree, either to make him a garland, as being forsaken, or to binde him a rod, as being worthy to be whipt Pedro.
  59. crotchet
    a sharp curve or crook; a shape resembling a hook
    Why these are very crotchets that he speaks, Note notes forsooth, and nothing Bene.
  60. scape
    erect leafless flower stalk growing directly from the ground as in a tulip
    God keepe your Ladiship still in that minde, so some Gentleman or other shall scape a predestinate scratcht face Beat.
  61. clapper
    metal striker that hangs inside a bell and makes a sound by hitting the side
    Nay, that would be as great a soyle in the new glosse of your marriage, as to shew a childe his new coat and forbid him to weare it, I will onely bee bold with Benedicke for his companie, for from the crowne of his head, to the sole of his foot, he is all mirth, he hath twice or thrice cut Cupids bow-string, and the little hang-man dare not shoot at him, he hath a heart as sound as a bell, and his tongue is the clapper, for what his heart thinkes, his tongue speakes Bene.
  62. detraction
    a petty disparagement
    This can be no tricke, the conference was sadly borne, they haue the truth of this from Hero, they seeme to pittie the Lady: it seemes her affections haue the full bent: loue me? why it must be requited: I heare how I am censur'd, they say I will beare my selfe proudly, if I perceiue the loue come from her: they say too, that she will rather die than giue any signe of affection: I did neuer thinke to marry, I must not seeme proud, happy are they that heare their detractions, and can p...
  63. beseech
    ask for or request earnestly
    No, my Lord, vnlesse I might haue another for working-daies, your Grace is too costly to weare euerie day: but I beseech your Grace pardon mee, I was borne to speake all mirth, and no matter Prince.
  64. braggart
    a very boastful and talkative person
    Boyes, apes, braggarts, Iackes, milke-sops Leon.
  65. lute
    chordophone consisting of a plucked instrument having a pear-shaped body, a usually bent neck, and a fretted fingerboard
    When I like your fauour, for God defend the Lute should be like the case Pedro.
  66. disparage
    express a negative opinion of
    I will disparage her no farther, till you are my witnesses, beare it coldly but till night, and let the issue shew it selfe Prin.
  67. modest
    marked by simplicity; having a humble opinion of yourself
    I haue alreadie deliuered him letters, and there appeares much ioy in him, euen so much, that ioy could not shew it selfe modest enough, without a badg of bitternesse Leo. Did he breake out into teares?
  68. amorous
    inclined toward or displaying love
    The fairest graunt is the necessitie: Looke what will serue, is fit: 'tis once, thou louest, And I will fit thee with the remedie, I know we shall haue reuelling to night, I will assume thy part in some disguise, And tell faire Hero I am Claudio, And in her bosome Ile vnclaspe my heart, And take her hearing prisoner with the force And strong incounter of my amorous tale: Then after, to her father will I breake, And the conclusion is, shee shall be thine, In practise let vs put it pres...
  69. sedge
    grasslike or rushlike plant growing in wet places having solid stems, narrow grasslike leaves and spikelets of inconspicuous flowers
    Ben. Alas poore hurt fowle, now will he creepe into sedges: But that my Ladie Beatrice should know me, & not know me: the Princes foole!
  70. noisome
    causing or able to cause nausea
    Foule words is but foule wind, and foule wind is but foule breath, and foule breath is noisome, therefore I will depart vnkist Bene.
  71. capon
    castrated male chicken
    I faith I thanke him, he hath bid me to a calues head and a Capon, the which if I doe not carue most curiously, say my knife's naught, shall I not finde a woodcocke too?
  72. epitaph
    an inscription on a tombstone or monument in memory of the person buried there
    I cannot bid you bid my daughter liue, That were impossible, but I praie you both, Possesse the people in Messina here, How innocent she died, and if your loue Can labour aught in sad inuention, Hang her an epitaph vpon her toomb, And sing it to her bones, sing it to night: To morrow morning come you to my house, And since you could not be my sonne in law, Be yet my Nephew: my brother hath a daughter, Almost the copie of my childe that's dead, And she alone is heire to both of vs, Giu...
  73. rite
    any customary observance or practice
    To morrow my Lord, Time goes on crutches, till Loue haue all his rites Leonato.
  74. penthouse
    an apartment located on the top floors of a building
    Peace, stir not Bor. Conrade I say Con. Here man, I am at thy elbow Bor. Mas and my elbow itcht, I thought there would a scabbe follow Con. I will owe thee an answere for that, and now forward with thy tale Bor. Stand thee close then vnder this penthouse, for it drissels raine, and I will, like a true drunkard, vtter all to thee Watch.
  75. odorous
    having odor or a characteristic odor
    Comparisons are odorous, palabras, neighbour Verges Leon.
  76. challenge
    a call to engage in a contest or fight
    He set vp his bils here in Messina, & challeng'd Cupid at the Flight: and my Vnckles foole reading the Challenge, subscrib'd for Cupid, and challeng'd him at the Burbolt.
  77. comely
    according with custom or propriety
    I know what you would say: if I haue knowne (her, You will say, she did imbrace me as a husband, And so extenuate the forehand sinne: No Leonato, I neuer tempted her with word too large, But as a brother to his sister, shewed Bashfull sinceritie and comely loue Hero.
  78. cunning
    showing inventiveness and skill
    Grow this to what aduerse issue it can, I will put it in practise: be cunning in the working this, and thy fee is a thousand ducates Bor. Be thou constant in the accusation, and my cunning shall not shame me Iohn.
  79. allegiance
    the act of binding yourself (intellectually or emotionally) to a course of action
    I charge thee on thy allegeance Ben. You heare, Count Claudio, I can be secret as a dumbe man, I would haue you thinke so (but on my allegiance, marke you this, on my allegiance) hee is in loue, With who? now that is your Graces part: marke how short his answere is, with Hero, Leonatoes short daughter Clau.
  80. write down
    put down in writing; of texts, musical compositions, etc.
    Write down, Prince Iohn a villaine: why this is flat periurie, to call a Princes brother villaine Bora.
  81. cog
    tooth on the rim of gear wheel
    I know them, yea And what they weigh, euen to the vtmost scruple, Scambling, out-facing, fashion-monging boyes, That lye, and cog, and flout, depraue, and slander, Goe antiquely, and show outward hidiousnesse, And speake of halfe a dozen dang'rous words, How they might hurt their enemies, if they durst.
  82. dance
    taking a series of rhythmical steps (and movements) in time to music
    Old. As the euents stamps them, but they haue a good couer: they shew well outward, the Prince and Count Claudio walking in a thick pleached alley in my orchard, were thus ouer-heard by a man of mine: the Prince discouered to Claudio that hee loued my niece your daughter, and meant to acknowledge it this night in a dance, and if hee found her accordant, hee meant to take the present time by the top, and instantly breake with you of it Leo. Hath the fellow any wit that told you this?
  83. conclude
    bring to a close
    Indeed that tels a heauy tale for him: conclude, he is in loue Clau.
  84. halting
    disabled in the feet or legs
    In our last conflict, foure of his fiue wits went halting off, and now is the whole man gouern'd with one: so that if hee haue wit enough to keepe himselfe warme, let him beare it for a difference betweene himselfe and his horse: For it is all the wealth that he hath left, to be knowne a reasonable creature.
  85. bestow
    give as a gift
    A victorie is twice it selfe, when the atchieuer brings home full numbers: I finde heere, that Don Peter hath bestowed much honor on a yong Florentine, called Claudio Mess.
  86. lineament
    the characteristic parts of a person's face: eyes and nose and mouth and chin
    Bring me a father that so lou'd his childe, Whose ioy of her is ouer-whelmed like mine, And bid him speake of patience, Measure his woe the length and bredth of mine, And let it answere euery straine for straine, As thus for thus, and such a griefe for such, In euery lineament, branch, shape, and forme: If such a one will smile and stroke his beard, And sorrow, wagge, crie hem, when he should grone, Patch griefe with prouerbs, make misfortune drunke, With candle-wasters: bring him yet...
  87. melancholy
    a constitutional tendency to be gloomy and depressed
    He is of a very melancholy disposition Beatrice.
  88. canker
    an ulceration (especially of the lips or lining of the mouth)
    I had rather be a canker in a hedge, then a rose in his grace, and it better fits my bloud to be disdain'd of all, then to fashion a carriage to rob loue from any: in this (though I cannot be said to be a flattering honest man) it must not be denied but I am a plaine dealing villaine, I am trusted with a mussell, and enfranchisde with a clog, therefore I haue decreed, not to sing in my cage: if I had my mouth, I would bite: if I had my liberty, I would do my liking: in the meane time,...
  89. vouchsafe
    grant in a condescending manner
    Ile bring you thither my Lord, if you'l vouchsafe me Prin.
  90. forswear
    formally reject or disavow a formerly held belief, usually under pressure
    Ile tell thee how Beatrice prais'd thy wit the other day: I said thou hadst a fine wit: true saies she, a fine little one: no said I, a great wit: right saies shee, a great grosse one: nay said I, a good wit: iust said she, it hurts no body: nay said I, the gentleman is wise: certaine said she, a wise gentleman: nay said I, he hath the tongues: that I beleeue said shee, for hee swore a thing to me on munday night, which he forswore on tuesday morning: there's a double tongue, there's ...
  91. orthography
    a method of representing the sounds of a language by written or printed symbols
    I haue known when there was no musicke with him but the drum and the fife, and now had hee rather heare the taber and the pipe: I haue knowne when he would haue walkt ten mile afoot, to see a good armor, and now will he lie ten nights awake caruing the fashion of a new dublet: he was wont to speake plaine, & to the purpose (like an honest man & a souldier) and now is he turn'd orthography, his words are a very fantasticall banquet, iust so many strange dishes: may I be so conuerted, &...
  92. don
    teacher at a university or college (especially at Cambridge or Oxford)
    Enter don Pedro, Claudio, Benedicke, Balthasar, and Iohn the bastard.
  93. wold
    a tract of open rolling country (especially upland)
    I wish him ioy of her Ben. Why that's spoken like an honest Drouier, so they sel Bullockes: but did you thinke the Prince wold haue serued you thus?
  94. lewd
    suggestive of or tending to moral looseness
    Bring you these fellowes on, weel talke with Margaret, How her acquaintance grew with this lewd fellow.
  95. grudging
    petty or reluctant in giving or spending
    Benedictus, why benedictus? you haue some morall in this benedictus Mar. Morall? no by my troth, I haue no morall meaning, I meant plaine holy thissell, you may thinke perchance that I thinke you are in loue, nay birlady I am not such a foole to thinke what I list, nor I list not to thinke what I can, nor indeed, I cannot thinke, if I would thinke my hart out of thinking, that you are in loue, or that you will be in loue, or that you can be in loue: yet Benedicke was such another, and now is...
  96. finder
    someone who comes upon something after searching
    Or doe you play the flowting iacke, to tell vs Cupid is a good Hare- finder, and Vulcan a rare Carpenter: Come, in what key shall a man take you to goe in the song?
  97. chamber
    a natural or artificial enclosed space
    I remember Bor. I can at any vnseasonable instant of the night, appoint her to looke out at her Ladies chamber window Iohn.
  98. Vulcan
    (Roman mythology) god of fire and metal working; counterpart of Greek Hephaestus
    Or doe you play the flowting iacke, to tell vs Cupid is a good Hare-finder, and Vulcan a rare Carpenter: Come, in what key shall a man take you to goe in the song?
  99. endure
    undergo or be subjected to
    Iust, if he send me no husband, for the which blessing, I am at him vpon my knees euery morning and euening: Lord, I could not endure a husband with a beard on his face, I had rather lie in the woollen Leonato.
  100. libertine
    unrestrained by convention or morality
    Why he is the Princes ieaster, a very dull foole, onely his gift is, in deuising impossible slanders, none but Libertines delight in him, and the commendation is not in his witte, but in his villanie, for hee both pleaseth men and angers them, and then they laugh at him, and beat him: I am sure he is in the Fleet, I would he had boorded me Bene.
  101. ewe
    female sheep
    Dog. Why then depart in peace, and let the childe wake her with crying, for the ewe that will not heare her Lambe when it baes, will neuer answere a calfe when he bleates Verges.
  102. attire
    clothing of a distinctive style or for a particular occasion
    Why euerie day to morrow, come goe in, Ile shew thee some attires, and haue thy counsell, Which is the best to furnish me to morrow Vrsu.
  103. malefactor
    someone who has committed a crime or has been legally convicted of a crime
    Which be the malefactors?
  104. babble
    utter meaningless sounds, like a baby, or utter in an incoherent way
    True, and they are to meddle with none but the Princes subiects: you shall also make no noise in the streetes: for, for the Watch to babble and talke, is most tollerable, and not to be indured Watch.
  105. haste
    overly eager speed (and possible carelessness)
    Take their examination your selfe, and bring it me, I am now in great haste, as may appeare vnto you Const.
  106. exceed
    be or do something to a greater degree
    And she is exceeding wise Prince.
  107. pardon
    accept an excuse for
    And neuer could maintaine his part, but in the force of his will Ben. That a woman conceiued me, I thanke her: that she brought mee vp, I likewise giue her most humble thankes: but that I will haue a rechate winded in my forehead, or hang my bugle in an inuisible baldricke, all women shall pardon me: because I will not do them the wrong to mistrust any, I will doe my selfe the right to trust none: and the fine is, (for the which I may goe the finer) I will liue a Batchellor Pedro.
  108. incite
    provoke or stir up
    And Benedicke, loue on, I will requite thee, Taming my wilde heart to thy louing hand: If thou dost loue, my kindnesse shall incite thee To binde our loues vp in a holy band.
  109. measure
    determine the measurements of something or somebody, take measurements of
    In great measure Leo. A kinde ouerflow of kindnesse, there are no faces truer, then those that are so wash'd, how much better is it to weepe at ioy, then to ioy at weeping?
  110. Leander
    (Greek mythology) a youth beloved of Hero who drowned in a storm in the Hellespont on one of his nightly visits to see her
    I meane in singing, but in louing, Leander the good swimmer, Troilous the first imploier of pandars, and a whole booke full of these quondam carpet-mongers, whose name yet runne smoothly in the euen rode of a blanke verse, why they were neuer so truely turned ouer and ouer as my poore selfe in loue: marrie I cannot shew it rime, I haue tried, I can finde out no rime to Ladie but babie, an innocent rime: for scorne, horne, a hard rime: for schoole foole, a babling rime: verie ominous e...
  111. mettle
    the courage to carry on
    What, courage man: what though care kil'd a cat, thou hast mettle enough in thee to kill care Ben. Sir, I shall meete your wit in the careere, and you charge it against me, I pray you chuse another subiect Clau.
  112. impiety
    unrighteousness by virtue of lacking respect for a god
    But fare thee well, most foule, most faire, farewell Thou pure impiety, and impious puritie, For thee Ile locke vp all the gates of Loue, And on my eie-lids shall Coniecture hang, To turne all beauty into thoughts of harme, And neuer shall it more be gracious Leon.
  113. sonnet
    a verse form consisting of 14 lines with a fixed rhyme scheme
    Ben. Praie thee sweete Mistris Margaret, deserue well at my hands, by helping mee to the speech of Beatrice Mar. Will you then write me a Sonnet in praise of my beautie?
  114. coy
    modestly or warily rejecting approaches or overtures
    For looke where Beatrice like a Lapwing runs Close by the ground, to heare our conference Vrs. The pleasant'st angling is to see the fish Cut with her golden ores the siluer streame, And greedily deuoure the treacherous baite: So angle we for Beatrice, who euen now, Is couched in the wood-bine couerture, Feare you not my part of the Dialogue Her. Then go we neare her that her eare loose nothing, Of the false sweete baite that we lay for it: No truely Vrsula, she is too disdainfull, I know he...
  115. den
    the habitation of wild animals
    Good den brother Bast.
  116. rare
    marked by an uncommon quality; especially superlative or extreme of its kind
    Well, you are a rare Parrat teacher Beat.
  117. amaze
    affect with wonder
    How, how I pray you? you amaze me, I would haue thought her spirit had beene inuincible against all assaults of affection Leo. I would haue sworne it had, my Lord, especially against Benedicke Bene.
  118. qualm
    uneasiness about the fitness of an action
    It is not seene enough, you should weare it in your cap, by my troth I am sicke Mar. Get you some of this distill'd carduus benedictus and lay it to your heart, it is the onely thing for a qualm Hero.
  119. depart
    go away or leave
    Neuer came trouble to my house in the likenes of your Grace: for trouble being gone, comfort should remaine: but when you depart from me, sorrow abides, and happinesse takes his leaue Pedro.
  120. perturbation
    the act of causing disorder
    I would to God some scholler would coniure her, for certainely while she is heere, a man may liue as quiet in hell, as in a sanctuary, and people sinne vpon purpose, because they would goe thither, so indeed all disquiet, horror, and perturbation followes her.
  121. flee
    run away quickly
    Yea and text vnderneath, heere dwells Benedicke the married man Ben. Fare you well, Boy, you know my minde, I will leaue you now to your gossep-like humor, you breake iests as braggards do their blades, which God be thanked hurt not: my Lord, for your manie courtesies I thank you, I must discontinue your companie, your brother the Bastard is fled from Messina: you haue among you, kill'd a sweet and innocent Ladie: for my Lord Lackebeard there, he and I shall meete, and till then peace...
  122. kinsman
    a male relative
    Enter Leonato, his brother, his wife, Hero his daughter, and Beatrice his neece, and a kinsman.
  123. ditty
    a short simple song (or the words of a poem intended to be sung)
    Sing no more ditties, sing no moe, Of dumps so dull and heauy, The fraud of men were euer so, Since summer first was leauy, Then sigh not so, &c Prince.
  124. hap
    come to pass
    If it proue so, then louing goes by haps, Some Cupid kills with arrowes, some with traps.
  125. piper
    someone who plays the bagpipe
    Thinke not on him till to morrow, ile deuise thee braue punishments for him: strike vp Pipers.
  126. fife
    a small high-pitched flute similar to a piccolo; has a shrill tone and is used chiefly to accompany drums in a marching band
    I haue known when there was no musicke with him but the drum and the fife, and now had hee rather heare the taber and the pipe: I haue knowne when he would haue walkt ten mile afoot, to see a good armor, and now will he lie ten nights awake caruing the fashion of a new dublet: he was wont to speake plaine, & to the purpose (like an honest man & a souldier) and now is he turn'd orthography, his words are a very fantasticall banquet, iust so many strange dishes: may I be so conuerted, &...
  127. tedious
    so lacking in interest as to cause mental weariness
    Neighbours, you are tedious Con.Dog.
  128. blithe
    carefree and happy and lighthearted
    Sigh no more Ladies, sigh no more, Men were deceiuers euer, One foote in Sea, and one on shore, To one thing constant neuer, Then sigh not so, but let them goe, And be you blithe and bonnie, Conuerting all your sounds of woe, Into hey nony nony.
  129. carp
    any of various freshwater fish of the family Cyprinidae
    Sure, sure, such carping is not commendable Hero.
  130. desire
    the feeling that accompanies an unsatisfied state
    O my Lord, When you went onward on this ended action, I look'd vpon her with a souldiers eie, That lik'd, but had a rougher taske in hand, Than to driue liking to the name of loue: But now I am return'd, and that warre-thoughts Haue left their places vacant: in their roomes, Come thronging soft and delicate desires, All prompting mee how faire yong Hero is, Saying I lik'd her ere I went to warres Pedro.
  131. Phoebus
    (Greek mythology) Greek god of light; god of prophecy and poetry and music and healing; son of Zeus and Leto; twin brother of Artemis
    Good morrow masters, put your Torches out, The wolues haue preied, and looke, the gentle day Before the wheeles of Phoebus, round about Dapples the drowsie East with spots of grey: Thanks to you all, and leaue vs, fare you well Clau.
  132. quip
    a witty saying
    Shall quips and sentences, and these paper bullets of the braine awe a man from the careere of his humour?
  133. dedicate
    give entirely to a specific person, activity, or cause
    I doe much wonder, that one man seeing how much another man is a foole, when he dedicates his behauiours to loue, will after hee hath laught at such shallow follies in others, become the argument of his owne scorne, by falling in loue, & such a man is Claudio.
  134. dote
    shower with love; show excessive affection for
    No, nor I neither, but most wonderful, that she should so dote on Signior Benedicke, whom shee hath in all outward behauiours seemed euer to abhorre Bene.
  135. mirth
    great merriment
    No, my Lord, vnlesse I might haue another for working-daies, your Grace is too costly to weare euerie day: but I beseech your Grace pardon mee, I was borne to speake all mirth, and no matter Prince.
  136. monument
    a structure erected to commemorate persons or events
    Time hath not yet so dried this bloud of mine, Nor age so eate vp my inuention, Nor Fortune made such hauocke of my meanes, Nor my bad life reft me so much of friends, But they shall finde, awak'd in such a kinde, Both strength of limbe, and policie of minde, Ability in meanes, and choise of friends, To quit me of them throughly Fri. Pause awhile: And let my counsell sway you in this case, Your daughter heere the Princesse (left for dead) Let her awhile be secretly kept in, And publish it, t...
  137. rod
    a long thin implement made of metal or wood
    Troth my Lord, I haue played the part of Lady Fame, I found him heere as melancholy as a Lodge in a Warren, I told him, and I thinke, told him true, that your grace had got the will of this young Lady, and I offered him my company to a willow tree, either to make him a garland, as being forsaken, or to binde him a rod, as being worthy to be whipt Pedro.
  138. deny
    declare untrue; contradict
    I had rather be a canker in a hedge, then a rose in his grace, and it better fits my bloud to be disdain'd of all, then to fashion a carriage to rob loue from any: in this (though I cannot be said to be a flattering honest man) it must not be denied but I am a plaine dealing villaine, I am trusted with a mussell, and enfranchisde with a clog, therefore I haue decreed, not to sing in my cage: if I had my mouth, I would bite: if I had my liberty, I would do my liking: in the meane time,...
  139. discourse
    an extended communication (often interactive) dealing with some particular topic
    Nay mocke not, mocke not; the body of your discourse is sometime guarded with fragments, and the guardes are but slightly basted on neither, ere you flout old ends any further, examine your conscience, and so I leaue you.
  140. forbid
    command against
    Like the old tale, my Lord, it is not so, nor 'twas not so: but indeede, God forbid it should be so Clau.
  141. frugal
    avoiding waste
    Chid I, for that at frugal Natures frame?
  142. comfort
    a state of being relaxed and feeling no pain
    Neuer came trouble to my house in the likenes of your Grace: for trouble being gone, comfort should remaine: but when you depart from me, sorrow abides, and happinesse takes his leaue Pedro.
  143. illegitimate
    contrary to or forbidden by law
    Ye Light aloue with your heeles, then if your husband haue stables enough, you'll looke he shall lacke no barnes Mar. O illegitimate construction!
  144. complement
    something added to complete or embellish or make perfect
    But manhood is melted into cursies, valour into complement, and men are onelie turned into tongue, and trim ones too: he is now as valiant as Hercules, that only tells a lie, and sweares it: I cannot be a man with wishing, therfore I will die a woman with grieuing Bene.
  145. tame
    brought from wildness into a domesticated state
    And Benedicke, loue on, I will requite thee, Taming my wilde heart to thy louing hand: If thou dost loue, my kindnesse shall incite thee To binde our loues vp in a holy band.
  146. impious
    lacking piety or reverence for a god
    But fare thee well, most foule, most faire, farewell Thou pure impiety, and impious puritie, For thee Ile locke vp all the gates of Loue, And on my eie-lids shall Coniecture hang, To turne all beauty into thoughts of harme, And neuer shall it more be gracious Leon.
  147. hence
    (used to introduce a logical conclusion) from that fact or reason or as a result
    Not till monday, my deare sonne, which is hence a iust seuen night, and a time too briefe too, to haue all things answer minde Prince.
  148. subscribe
    pay (an amount of money) as a contribution to a charity or service, especially at regular intervals
    Thou hast frighted the word out of his right sence, so forcible is thy wit, but I must tell thee plainely, Claudio vndergoes my challenge, and either I must shortly heare from him, or I will subscribe him a coward, and I pray thee now tell me, for which of my bad parts didst thou first fall in loue with me?
  149. office
    place of business where professional or clerical duties are performed
    Thus answere I in name of Benedicke, But heare these ill newes with the eares of Claudio: 'Tis certaine so, the Prince woes for himselfe: Friendship is constant in all other things, Saue in the Office and affaires of loue: Therefore all hearts in loue vse their owne tongues.
  150. gentle
    soft and mild; not harsh or stern or severe
    And you to gentle Hero?
  151. hale
    exhibiting or restored to vigorous good health
    Now diuine aire, now is his soule rauisht, is it not strange that sheepes guts should hale soules out of mens bodies? well, a horne for my money when all's done.
  152. banquet
    a ceremonial dinner party for many people
    Come, let vs to the banquet.
  153. conference
    a prearranged meeting for consultation or exchange of information or discussion (especially one with a formal agenda)
    A very forward March-chicke, how came you to this: Bor. Being entertain'd for a perfumer, as I was smoaking a musty roome, comes me the Prince and Claudio, hand in hand in sad conference: I whipt behind the Arras, and there heard it agreed vpon, that the Prince should wooe Hero for himselfe, and hauing obtain'd her, giue her to Count Claudio Iohn.
  154. Archer
    the ninth sign of the zodiac; the sun is in this sign from about November 22 to December 21
    And Benedick is not the vnhopefullest husband that I know: thus farre can I praise him, hee is of a noble straine, of approued valour, and confirm'd honesty, I will teach you how to humour your cosin, that shee shall fall in loue with Benedicke, and I, with your two helpes, will so practise on Benedicke, that in despight of his quicke wit, and his queasie stomacke, hee shall fall in loue with Beatrice: if wee can doe this, Cupid is no longer an Archer, his glory shall be ours, for wee...
  155. incensed
    angered at something unjust or wrong
    Bor. Sweete Prince, let me go no farther to mine answere: do you heare me, and let this Count kill mee: I haue deceiued euen your verie eies: what your wisedomes could not discouer, these shallow fooles haue brought to light, who in the night ouerheard me confessing to this man, how Don Iohn your brother incensed me to slander the Ladie Hero, how you were brought into the Orchard, and saw me court Margaret in Heroes garments, how you disgrac'd her when you should marrie her: my villan...
  156. interim
    the time between one event, process, or period and another
    Come, you shake the head at so long a breathing, but I warrant thee Claudio, the time shall not goe dully by vs, I will in the interim, vndertake one of Hercules labors, which is, to bring Signior Benedicke and the Lady Beatrice into a mountaine of affection, th' one with th' other, I would faine haue it a match, and I doubt not but to fashion it, if you three will but minister such assistance as I shall giue you direction Leonato.
  157. Scotch
    whiskey distilled in Scotland; especially whiskey made from malted barley in a pot still
    The fault will be in the musicke cosin, if you be not woed in good time: if the Prince bee too important, tell him there is measure in euery thing, & so dance out the answere, for heare me Hero, wooing, wedding, & repenting, is as a Scotch jigge, a measure, and a cinquepace: the first suite is hot and hasty like a Scotch jigge (and full as fantasticall) the wedding manerly modest, (as a measure) full of state & aunchentry, and then comes repentance, and with his bad legs falls into th...
  158. epigram
    a witty saying
    Ile tell thee what Prince: a Colledge of witte-crackers cannot flout mee out of my humour, dost thou think I care for a Satyre or an Epigram? no, if a man will be beaten with braines, a shall weare nothing handsome about him: in briefe, since I do purpose to marry, I will thinke nothing to any purpose that the world can say against it, and therefore neuer flout at me, for I haue said against it: for man is a giddy thing, and this is my conclusion: for thy part Claudio, I did thinke to...
  159. shape
    a perceptual structure
    I know he doth deserue, As much as may be yeelded to a man: But Nature neuer fram'd a womans heart, Of prowder stuffe then that of Beatrice: Disdaine and Scorne ride sparkling in her eyes, Mis-prizing what they looke on, and her wit Values it selfe so highly, that to her All matter else seemes weake: she cannot loue, Nor take no shape nor proiect of affection, Shee is so selfe indeared Vrsula.
  160. tuition
    a fee paid for instruction (especially for higher education)
    To the tuition of God. From my house, if I had it Pedro.
  161. plague
    any large scale calamity (especially when thought to be sent by God)
    Ha, no, no faith, thou singst well enough for a shift Ben. And he had been a dog that should haue howld thus, they would haue hang'd him, and I pray God his bad voyce bode no mischiefe, I had as liefe haue heard the night-rauen, come what plague could haue come after it Prince.
  162. issue
    some situation or event that is thought about
    Bor. Proofe enough, to misuse the Prince, to vexe Claudio, to vndoe Hero, and kill Leonato, looke you for any other issue?
  163. amiable
    diffusing warmth and friendliness
    I should first tell thee how the Prince Claudio and my Master planted, and placed, and possessed by my Master Don Iohn, saw a far off in the Orchard this amiable incounter Con. And thought thy Margaret was Hero?
  164. wont
    an established custom
    I haue known when there was no musicke with him but the drum and the fife, and now had hee rather heare the taber and the pipe: I haue knowne when he would haue walkt ten mile afoot, to see a good armor, and now will he lie ten nights awake caruing the fashion of a new dublet: he was wont to speake plaine, & to the purpose (like an honest man & a souldier) and now is he turn'd orthography, his words are a very fantasticall banquet, iust so many strange dishes: may I be so conuerted, &...
  165. mortify
    cause to feel shame; hurt the pride of
    Con. If not a present remedy, yet a patient sufferance Ioh. I wonder that thou (being as thou saist thou art, borne vnder Saturne) goest about to apply a morall medicine, to a mortifying mischiefe: I cannot hide what I am: I must bee sad when I haue cause, and smile at no mans iests, eat when I haue stomacke, and wait for no mans leisure: sleepe when I am drowsie, and tend on no mans businesse, laugh when I am merry, and claw no man in his humor Con. Yea, but you must not make the ful...
  166. shallow
    lacking physical depth; having little spatial extension downward or inward from an outer surface or backward or outward from a center
    I doe much wonder, that one man seeing how much another man is a foole, when he dedicates his behauiours to loue, will after hee hath laught at such shallow follies in others, become the argument of his owne scorne, by falling in loue, & such a man is Claudio.
  167. chide
    censure severely or angrily
    Chid I, for that at frugal Natures frame?
  168. congregation
    the act of congregating
    If I see any thing to night, why I should not marry her to morrow in the congregation, where I shold wedde, there will I shame her Prin.
  169. ensue
    issue or terminate (in a specified way, state, etc.); end
    You may thinke I loue you not, let that appeare hereafter, and ayme better at me by that I now will manifest, for my brother (I thinke, he holds you well, and in dearenesse of heart) hath holpe to effect your ensuing marriage: surely sute ill spent, and labour ill bestowed Prin.
  170. proud
    feeling self-respect or pleasure in something by which you measure your self-worth; or being a reason for pride
    This can be no tricke, the conference was sadly borne, they haue the truth of this from Hero, they seeme to pittie the Lady: it seemes her affections haue the full bent: loue me? why it must be requited: I heare how I am censur'd, they say I will beare my selfe proudly, if I perceiue the loue come from her: they say too, that she will rather die than giue any signe of affection: I did neuer thinke to marry, I must not seeme proud, happy are they that heare their detractions, and can p...
  171. pestilence
    any epidemic disease with a high death rate
    O Lord, he will hang vpon him like a disease: he is sooner caught then the pestilence, and the taker runs presently mad.
  172. repute
    the state of being held in high esteem and honor
    Hah? It may be I goe vnder that title, because I am merrie: yea but so I am apt to do my selfe wrong: I am not so reputed, it is the base (though bitter) disposition of Beatrice, that putt's the world into her person, and so giues me out: well, Ile be reuenged as I may.
  173. commit
    engage in or perform
    I haue almost matter enough in me for such an Embassage, and so I commit you Clau.
  174. earnest
    characterized by a firm and humorless belief in the validity of your opinions
    What should I doe with him? dresse him in my apparell, and make him my waiting gentlewoman? he that hath a beard, is more then a youth: and he that hath no beard, is lesse then a man: and hee that is more then a youth, is not for mee: and he that is lesse then a man, I am not for him: therefore I will euen take sixepence in earnest of the Berrord, and leade his Apes into hell Leon.
  175. crafty
    marked by skill in deception
    Now Vrsula, when Beatrice doth come, As we do trace this alley vp and downe, Our talke must onely be of Benedicke, When I doe name him, let it be thy part, To praise him more then euer man did merit, My talke to thee must be how Benedicke Is sicke in loue with Beatrice; of this matter, Is little Cupids crafty arrow made, That onely wounds by heare-say: now begin, Enter Beatrice.
  176. bugle
    a brass instrument without valves; used for military calls and fanfares
    And neuer could maintaine his part, but in the force of his will Ben. That a woman conceiued me, I thanke her: that she brought mee vp, I likewise giue her most humble thankes: but that I will haue a rechate winded in my forehead, or hang my bugle in an inuisible baldricke, all women shall pardon me: because I will not do them the wrong to mistrust any, I will doe my selfe the right to trust none: and the fine is, (for the which I may goe the finer) I will liue a Batchellor Pedro.
  177. giddy
    lacking seriousness; given to frivolity
    Ile tell thee what Prince: a Colledge of witte-crackers cannot flout mee out of my humour, dost thou think I care for a Satyre or an Epigram? no, if a man will be beaten with braines, a shall weare nothing handsome about him: in briefe, since I do purpose to marry, I will thinke nothing to any purpose that the world can say against it, and therefore neuer flout at me, for I haue said against it: for man is a giddy thing, and this is my conclusion: for thy part Claudio, I did thinke to...
  178. consummate
    having or revealing supreme mastery or skill
    I doe but stay till your marriage be consummate, and then go I toward Arragon Clau.
  179. torment
    intense feelings of suffering; acute mental or physical pain
    No, and sweares she neuer will, that's her torment Claud.
  180. cleft
    a long narrow opening
    O she misusde me past the indurance of a block: an oake but with one greene leafe on it, would haue answered her: my very visor began to assume life, and scold with her: shee told mee, not thinking I had beene my selfe, that I was the Princes Iester, and that I was duller then a great thaw, hudling iest vpon iest, with such impossible conueiance vpon me, that I stood like a man at a marke, with a whole army shooting at me: shee speakes poynyards, and euery word stabbes: if her breath were as...
  181. leisure
    time available for ease and relaxation
    Con. If not a present remedy, yet a patient sufferance Ioh. I wonder that thou (being as thou saist thou art, borne vnder Saturne) goest about to apply a morall medicine, to a mortifying mischiefe: I cannot hide what I am: I must bee sad when I haue cause, and smile at no mans iests, eat when I haue stomacke, and wait for no mans leisure: sleepe when I am drowsie, and tend on no mans businesse, laugh when I am merry, and claw no man in his humor Con. Yea, but you must not make the ful...
  182. wrest
    obtain by seizing forcibly or violently, also metaphorically
    I thinke you would haue me say, sauing your reuerence a husband: and bad thinking doe not wrest true speaking, Ile offend no body, is there any harme in the heauier for a husband? none I thinke, and it be the right husband, and the right wife, otherwise 'tis light and not heauy, aske my Lady Beatrice else, here she comes.
  183. gull
    mostly white aquatic bird having long pointed wings and short legs
    I should thinke this a gull, but that the whitebearded fellow speakes it: knauery cannot sure hide himselfe in such reuerence Claud.
  184. tarry
    leave slowly and hesitantly
    Tarry good Beatrice, by this hand I loue thee Beat.
  185. subdue
    put down by force or intimidation
    Let vs to the great supper, their cheere is the greater that I am subdued, would the Cooke were of my minde: shall we goe proue whats to be done?
  186. constant
    uninterrupted in time and indefinitely long continuing
    Thus answere I in name of Benedicke, But heare these ill newes with the eares of Claudio: 'Tis certaine so, the Prince woes for himselfe: Friendship is constant in all other things, Saue in the Office and affaires of loue: Therefore all hearts in loue vse their owne tongues.
  187. minstrel
    a performer in a minstrel show
    Neuer any did so, though verie many haue been beside their wit, I will bid thee drawe, as we do the minstrels, draw to pleasure vs Prin.
  188. reading
    written material intended to be read
    He set vp his bils here in Messina, & challeng'd Cupid at the Flight: and my Vnckles foole reading the Challenge, subscrib'd for Cupid, and challeng'd him at the Burbolt.
  189. tenure
    the term during which some position is held
    Call me a foole, Trust not my reading, nor my obseruations, Which with experimental seale doth warrant The tenure of my booke: trust not my age, My reuerence, calling, nor diuinitie, If this sweet Ladie lye not guiltlesse heere, Vnder some biting error Leo. Friar, it cannot be: Thou seest that all the Grace that she hath left, Is, that she wil not adde to her damnation, A sinne of periury, she not denies it: Why seek'st thou then to couer with excuse, That which appeares in proper nak...
  190. wise man
    a wise and trusted guide and advisor
    Thou and I are too wise to wooe peaceablie Bea. It appeares not in this confession, there's not one wise man among twentie that will praise himselfe Bene.
  191. comprehend
    get the meaning of something
    You haue: I knew it would be your answere: well, for your fauour sir, why giue God thankes, & make no boast of it, and for your writing and reading, let that appeare when there is no need of such vanity, you are thought heere to be the most senslesse and fit man for the Constable of the watch: therefore beare you the lanthorne: this is your charge: You shall comprehend all vagrom men, you are to bid any man stand in the Princes name Watch 2.
  192. chaste
    abstaining from unlawful sexual intercourse
    Out on thee seeming, I will write against it, You seeme to me as Diane in her Orbe, As chaste as is the budde ere it be blowne: But you are more intemperate in your blood, Than Venus, or those pampred animalls, That rage in sauage sensualitie Hero.
  193. embrace
    squeeze (someone) tightly in your arms, usually with fondness
    You embrace your charge too willingly: I thinke this is your daughter Leonato.
  194. restore
    bring back into original existence, use, function, or position
    I will but teach them to sing, and restore them to the owner Bene.
  195. sparkle
    emit or produce sparks
    I know he doth deserue, As much as may be yeelded to a man: But Nature neuer fram'd a womans heart, Of prowder stuffe then that of Beatrice: Disdaine and Scorne ride sparkling in her eyes, Mis-prizing what they looke on, and her wit Values it selfe so highly, that to her All matter else seemes weake: she cannot loue, Nor take no shape nor proiect of affection, Shee is so selfe indeared Vrsula.
  196. bend
    form a curve
    This can be no tricke, the conference was sadly borne, they haue the truth of this from Hero, they seeme to pittie the Lady: it seemes her affections haue the full bent: loue me? why it must be requited: I heare how I am censur'd, they say I will beare my selfe proudly, if I perceiue the loue come from her: they say too, that she will rather die than giue any signe of affection: I did neuer thinke to marry, I must not seeme proud, happy are they that heare their detractions, and can p...
  197. wake
    stop sleeping
    Dog. Why then depart in peace, and let the childe wake her with crying, for the ewe that will not heare her Lambe when it baes, will neuer answere a calfe when he bleates Verges.
  198. incense
    make furious
    Bor. Sweete Prince, let me go no farther to mine answere: do you heare me, and let this Count kill mee: I haue deceiued euen your verie eies: what your wisedomes could not discouer, these shallow fooles haue brought to light, who in the night ouerheard me confessing to this man, how Don Iohn your brother incensed me to slander the Ladie Hero, how you were brought into the Orchard, and saw me court Margaret in Heroes garments, how you disgrac'd her when you should marrie her: my villan...
  199. naughty
    badly behaved
    Come, let them be opinion'd Sex. Let them be in the hands of Coxcombe Kem. Gods my life, where's the Sexton? let him write downe the Princes Officer Coxcombe: come, binde them thou naughty varlet Couley.
  200. fancy
    not plain; decorative or ornamented
    I pray you be not angry with me, Madame, Speaking my fancy: Signior Benedicke, For shape, for bearing argument and valour, Goes formost in report through Italy Hero.
  201. encounter
    come together
    Good Signior Leonato, you are come to meet your trouble: the fashion of the world is to auoid cost, and you encounter it Leon.
  202. wanton
    lewd or lascivious woman
    Not to be married, Not to knit my soule to an approued wanton Leon.
  203. quench
    satisfy (thirst)
    But if all ayme but this be leuelld false, The supposition of the Ladies death, Will quench the wonder of her infamie.
  204. grudge
    a resentment strong enough to justify retaliation
    Benedictus, why benedictus? you haue some morall in this benedictus Mar. Morall? no by my troth, I haue no morall meaning, I meant plaine holy thissell, you may thinke perchance that I thinke you are in loue, nay birlady I am not such a foole to thinke what I list, nor I list not to thinke what I can, nor indeed, I cannot thinke, if I would thinke my hart out of thinking, that you are in loue, or that you will be in loue, or that you can be in loue: yet Benedicke was such another, and now is...
  205. angle
    the space between two lines or planes that intersect; the inclination of one line to another; measured in degrees or radians
    For looke where Beatrice like a Lapwing runs Close by the ground, to heare our conference Vrs. The pleasant'st angling is to see the fish Cut with her golden ores the siluer streame, And greedily deuoure the treacherous baite: So angle we for Beatrice, who euen now, Is couched in the wood-bine couerture, Feare you not my part of the Dialogue Her. Then go we neare her that her eare loose nothing, Of the false sweete baite that we lay for it: No truely Vrsula, she is too disdainfull, I ...
  206. bate
    flap the wings wildly or frantically; used of falcons
    Hero thinkes surely she wil die, for she saies she will die, if hee loue her not, and shee will die ere shee make her loue knowne, and she will die if hee wooe her, rather than shee will bate one breath of her accustomed crossenesse Prince.
  207. taint
    place under suspicion or cast doubt upon
    Why had I not with charitable hand Tooke vp a beggars issue at my gates, Who smeered thus, and mir'd with infamie, I might haue said, no part of it is mine: This shame deriues it selfe from vnknowne loines, But mine, and mine I lou'd, and mine I prais'd, And mine that I was proud on mine so much, That I my selfe, was to my selfe not mine: Valewing of her, why she, O she is falne Into a pit of Inke, that the wide sea Hath drops too few to wash her cleane againe, And salt too little, which may...
  208. ruffian
    a cruel and brutal fellow
    Leonato, I am sorry you must heare: vpon mine honor, My selfe, my brother, and this grieued Count Did see her, heare her, at that howre last night, Talke with a ruffian at her chamber window, Who hath indeed most like a liberall villaine, Confest the vile encounters they haue had A thousand times in secret Iohn.
  209. companion
    a friend who is frequently in the company of another
    Who is his companion now?
  210. consume
    serve oneself to, or consume regularly
    No, not to be so odde, and from all fashions, As Beatrice is, cannot be commendable, But who dare tell her so? if I should speake, She would mocke me into ayre, O she would laugh me Out of my selfe, presse me to death with wit, Therefore let Benedicke like couered fire, Consume away in sighes, waste inwardly: It were a better death, to die with mockes, Which is as bad as die with tickling Vrsu.
  211. apt
    being of striking appropriateness and pertinence
    My loue is thine to teach, teach it but how, And thou shalt see how apt it is to learne Any hard Lesson that may do thee good Clau.
  212. taper
    diminish gradually
    Enter Claudio, Prince, and three or foure with Tapers.
  213. reproach
    express criticism towards
    Is it not Hero? who can blot that name With any iust reproach?
  214. reconcile
    come to terms
    If you sweare, my Lord, you shall not be forsworne, let mee bid you welcome, my Lord, being reconciled to the Prince your brother: I owe you all duetie Iohn.
  215. experimental
    of the nature of or undergoing an experiment
    Call me a foole, Trust not my reading, nor my obseruations, Which with experimental seale doth warrant The tenure of my booke: trust not my age, My reuerence, calling, nor diuinitie, If this sweet Ladie lye not guiltlesse heere, Vnder some biting error Leo. Friar, it cannot be: Thou seest that all the Grace that she hath left, Is, that she wil not adde to her damnation, A sinne of periury, she not denies it: Why seek'st thou then to couer with excuse, That which appeares in proper nak...
  216. negotiate
    discuss the terms of an arrangement
    Let euerie eye negotiate for it selfe, And trust no Agent: for beautie is a witch, Against whose charmes, faith melteth into blood: This is an accident of hourely proofe, Which I mistrusted not.
  217. apparition
    a ghostly appearing figure
    A thousand blushing apparitions, To start into her face, a thousand innocent shames, In Angel whitenesse beare away those blushes, And in her eie there hath appear'd a fire To burne the errors that these Princes hold Against her maiden truth.
  218. estimation
    an approximate calculation of quantity or degree or worth
    Bor. The poyson of that lies in you to temper, goe you to the Prince your brother, spare not to tell him, that hee hath wronged his Honor in marrying the renowned Claudio, whose estimation do you mightily hold vp, to a contaminated stale, such a one as Hero Iohn.
  219. conceit
    the trait of being unduly vain and conceited; false pride
    Ifaith Lady, I thinke your blazon to be true. though Ile be sworne, if hee be so, his conceit is false: heere Claudio, I haue wooed in thy name, and faire Hero is won, I haue broke with her father, and his good will obtained, name the day of marriage, and God giue thee ioy Leona.
  220. suspect
    regard as untrustworthy; regard with suspicion; have no faith or confidence in
    If you meet a theefe, you may suspect him, by vertue of your office, to be no true man: and for such kinde of men, the lesse you meddle or make with them, why the more is for your honesty Watch.
  221. tune
    a succession of notes forming a distinctive sequence
    Why how now? do you speake in the sick tune?
  222. assure
    inform positively and with certainty and confidence
    As Hector, I assure you, and in the managing of quarrels you may see hee is wise, for either hee auoydes them with great discretion, or vndertakes them with a Christian-like feare Leon.
  223. fray
    wear away by rubbing
    Welcome signior, you are almost come to part almost a fray Clau.
  224. fetter
    a shackle for the ankles or feet
    Bring me a father that so lou'd his childe, Whose ioy of her is ouer-whelmed like mine, And bid him speake of patience, Measure his woe the length and bredth of mine, And let it answere euery straine for straine, As thus for thus, and such a griefe for such, In euery lineament, branch, shape, and forme: If such a one will smile and stroke his beard, And sorrow, wagge, crie hem, when he should grone, Patch griefe with prouerbs, make misfortune drunke, With candle-wasters: bring him yet to me,...
  225. assume
    take to be the case or to be true; accept without verification or proof
    The fairest graunt is the necessitie: Looke what will serue, is fit: 'tis once, thou louest, And I will fit thee with the remedie, I know we shall haue reuelling to night, I will assume thy part in some disguise, And tell faire Hero I am Claudio, And in her bosome Ile vnclaspe my heart, And take her hearing prisoner with the force And strong incounter of my amorous tale: Then after, to her father will I breake, And the conclusion is, shee shall be thine, In practise let vs put it pres...
  226. melt
    reduce or cause to be reduced from a solid to a liquid state, usually by heating
    That I neither feele how shee should be loued, nor know how shee should be worthie, is the opinion that fire cannot melt out of me, I will die in it at the stake Pedr.
  227. termination
    the act of ending something
    O she misusde me past the indurance of a block: an oake but with one greene leafe on it, would haue answered her: my very visor began to assume life, and scold with her: shee told mee, not thinking I had beene my selfe, that I was the Princes Iester, and that I was duller then a great thaw, hudling iest vpon iest, with such impossible conueiance vpon me, that I stood like a man at a marke, with a whole army shooting at me: shee speakes poynyards, and euery word stabbes: if her breath were as...
  228. penance
    voluntary self-punishment in order to atone for some wrongdoing
    I know not how to pray your patience, Yet I must speake, choose your reuenge your selfe, Impose me to what penance your inuention Can lay vpon my sinne, yet sinn'd I not, But in mistaking Prin.
  229. skirmish
    a minor short-term fight
    You must not (sir) mistake my Neece, there is a kind of merry war betwixt Signior Benedick, & her: they neuer meet, but there's a skirmish of wit between them Bea. Alas, he gets nothing by that.
  230. recount
    narrate or give a detailed account of
    Come Frier Francis, be briefe, onely to the plaine forme of marriage, and you shal recount their particular duties afterwards Fran.
  231. ballet
    a theatrical representation of a story that is performed to music by trained dancers
    With anger, with sicknesse, or with hunger, my Lord, not with loue: proue that euer I loose more blood with loue, then I will get againe with drinking, picke out mine eyes with a Ballet-makers penne, and hang me vp at the doore of a brothel-house for the signe of blinde Cupid Pedro.
  232. beset
    assail or attack on all sides: "The zebra was beset by leopards"
    O God defend me how am I beset, What kinde of catechizing call you this?
  233. thwart
    hinder or prevent (the efforts, plans, or desires) of
    O mischiefe strangelie thwarting!
  234. ominous
    threatening or foreshadowing evil or tragic developments
    I meane in singing, but in louing, Leander the good swimmer, Troilous the first imploier of pandars, and a whole booke full of these quondam carpet-mongers, whose name yet runne smoothly in the euen rode of a blanke verse, why they were neuer so truely turned ouer and ouer as my poore selfe in loue: marrie I cannot shew it rime, I haue tried, I can finde out no rime to Ladie but babie, an innocent rime: for scorne, horne, a hard rime: for schoole foole, a babling rime: verie ominous e...
  235. supposition
    the cognitive process of supposing
    But if all ayme but this be leuelld false, The supposition of the Ladies death, Will quench the wonder of her infamie.
  236. infect
    contaminate with a disease or microorganism
    O she misusde me past the indurance of a block: an oake but with one greene leafe on it, would haue answered her: my very visor began to assume life, and scold with her: shee told mee, not thinking I had beene my selfe, that I was the Princes Iester, and that I was duller then a great thaw, hudling iest vpon iest, with such impossible conueiance vpon me, that I stood like a man at a marke, with a whole army shooting at me: shee speakes poynyards, and euery word stabbes: if her breath were as...
  237. solicit
    make a solicitation or entreaty for something; request urgently or persistently
    Daughter, remember what I told you, if the Prince doe solicit you in that kinde, you know your answere Beatrice.
  238. alter
    cause to change; make different; cause a transformation
    I had rather be a canker in a hedge, then a rose in his grace, and it better fits my bloud to be disdain'd of all, then to fashion a carriage to rob loue from any: in this (though I cannot be said to be a flattering honest man) it must not be denied but I am a plaine dealing villaine, I am trusted with a mussell, and enfranchisde with a clog, therefore I haue decreed, not to sing in my cage: if I had my mouth, I would bite: if I had my liberty, I would do my liking: in the meane time, let me...
  239. rotten
    having decayed or disintegrated; usually implies foulness
    Sweet Prince, you learn me noble thankfulnes: There Leonato, take her backe againe, Giue not this rotten Orenge to your friend, Shee's but the signe and semblance of her honour: Behold how like a maid she blushes heere!
  240. weigh
    have a certain weight
    I know them, yea And what they weigh, euen to the vtmost scruple, Scambling, out-facing, fashion-monging boyes, That lye, and cog, and flout, depraue, and slander, Goe antiquely, and show outward hidiousnesse, And speake of halfe a dozen dang'rous words, How they might hurt their enemies, if they durst.
  241. treacherous
    dangerously unstable and unpredictable
    For looke where Beatrice like a Lapwing runs Close by the ground, to heare our conference Vrs. The pleasant'st angling is to see the fish Cut with her golden ores the siluer streame, And greedily deuoure the treacherous baite: So angle we for Beatrice, who euen now, Is couched in the wood-bine couerture, Feare you not my part of the Dialogue Her. Then go we neare her that her eare loose nothing, Of the false sweete baite that we lay for it: No truely Vrsula, she is too disdainfull, I ...
  242. disposition
    your usual mood
    He is of a very melancholy disposition Beatrice.
  243. cleave
    separate or cut with a tool, such as a sharp instrument
    O she misusde me past the indurance of a block: an oake but with one greene leafe on it, would haue answered her: my very visor began to assume life, and scold with her: shee told mee, not thinking I had beene my selfe, that I was the Princes Iester, and that I was duller then a great thaw, hudling iest vpon iest, with such impossible conueiance vpon me, that I stood like a man at a marke, with a whole army shooting at me: shee speakes poynyards, and euery word stabbes: if her breath were as...
  244. infection
    (medicine) the invasion of the body by pathogenic microorganisms and their multiplication which can lead to tissue damage and disease
    He hath tane th' infection, hold it vp Prince.
  245. slew
    (often followed by `of') a large number or amount or extent
    Pardon goddesse of the night, Those that slew thy virgin knight, For the which with songs of woe, Round about her tombe they goe: Midnight assist our mone, helpe vs to sigh and grone.
  246. shift
    move very slightly
    Ha, no, no faith, thou singst well enough for a shift Ben. And he had been a dog that should haue howld thus, they would haue hang'd him, and I pray God his bad voyce bode no mischiefe, I had as liefe haue heard the night-rauen, come what plague could haue come after it Prince.
  247. sanctuary
    a consecrated place where sacred objects are kept
    I would to God some scholler would coniure her, for certainely while she is heere, a man may liue as quiet in hell, as in a sanctuary, and people sinne vpon purpose, because they would goe thither, so indeed all disquiet, horror, and perturbation followes her.
  248. precious
    of high worth or cost
    As freely sonne as God did giue her me Cla. And what haue I to giue you back, whose worth May counterpoise this rich and precious gift?
  249. medicine
    the learned profession that is mastered by graduate training in a medical school and that is devoted to preventing or alleviating or curing diseases and injuries
    Con. If not a present remedy, yet a patient sufferance Ioh. I wonder that thou (being as thou saist thou art, borne vnder Saturne) goest about to apply a morall medicine, to a mortifying mischiefe: I cannot hide what I am: I must bee sad when I haue cause, and smile at no mans iests, eat when I haue stomacke, and wait for no mans leisure: sleepe when I am drowsie, and tend on no mans businesse, laugh when I am merry, and claw no man in his humor Con. Yea, but you must not make the ful...
  250. remorse
    a feeling of deep regret (usually for some misdeed)
    Fri. Marry this wel carried, shall on her behalfe, Change slander to remorse, that is some good, But not for that dreame I on this strange course, But on this trauaile looke for greater birth: She dying, as it must be so maintain'd, Vpon the instant that she was accus'd, Shal be lamented, pittied, and excus'd Of euery hearer: for it so fals out, That what we haue, we prize not to the worth, Whiles we enioy it; but being lack'd and lost, Why then we racke the value, then we finde The v...
  251. obstinate
    tenaciously unwilling or marked by tenacious unwillingness to yield
    Thou wast euer an obstinate heretique in the despight of Beautie Clau.