Jane Austen's Emma - Chapters 1 - 6 312 words

  1. Goddard
    United States physicist who developed the first successful liquid-fueled rocket (1882-1945)
    After these came a second set; among the most come-at-able of whom were Mrs. and Miss Bates, and Mrs. Goddard, three ladies almost always at the service of an invitation from Hartfield, and who were fetched and carried home so often, that Mr. Woodh
  2. likeness
    similarity in appearance or character or nature between persons or things
    "Did you ever have your likeness taken, Harriet?" said she: "did you ever sit for your picture?"
  3. Churchill
    English general considered one of the greatest generals in history (1650-1722)
    Captain Weston was a general favourite; and when the chances of his military life had introduced him to Miss Churchill, of a great Yorkshire family, and Miss Churchill fell in love with him, nobody was surprized, except her brother and his wife, wh
  4. bate
    flap the wings wildly or frantically; used of falcons
    There was not a dissentient voice on the subject, either when Mrs. Perry drank tea with Mrs. and Miss Bates, or when Mrs. and Miss Bates returned the visit.
  5. oblige
    force somebody to do something
    Matrimony, as the origin of change, was always disagreeable; and he was by no means yet reconciled to his own daughter's marrying, nor could ever speak of her but with compassion, though it had been entirely a match of affection, when he was now oblige
  6. gentility
    elegance by virtue of fineness of manner and expression
    CHAPTER II Mr. Weston was a native of Highbury, and born of a respectable family, which for the last two or three generations had been rising into gentility and property.
  7. water-colour
    water-soluble pigment
    Miniatures, half-lengths, whole-lengths, pencil, crayon, and water-colours had been all tried in turn.
  8. unexceptionable
    completely acceptable; not open to exception or reproach
    Mr. Weston was a man of unexceptionable character, easy fortune, suitable age, and pleasant manners; and there was some satisfaction in considering with what self-denying, generous friendship she had always wished and promoted the match; but it was a black morning's work for her.
  9. half-length
    abridged to half its original length
    Miniatures, half-lengths, whole-lengths, pencil, crayon, and water-colours had been all tried in turn.
  10. martin
    any of various swallows with squarish or slightly forked tail and long pointed wings; migrate around Martinmas
    Mrs. Goddard, and the teachers, and the girls and the affairs of the school in general, formed naturally a great part of the conversation--and but for her acquaintance with the Martins of Abbey-Mill Farm, it must have been the whole.
  11. profit and loss
    an account compiled at the end of an accounting period to show gross and net profit or loss
    He will be a completely gross, vulgar farmer, totally inattentive to appearances, and thinking of nothing but profit and loss."
  12. chilblain
    inflammation of the hands and feet caused by exposure to cold and moisture
    Mrs. Goddard's school was in high repute--and very deservedly; for Highbury was reckoned a particularly healthy spot: she had an ample house and garden, gave the children plenty of wholesome food, let them run about a great deal in the summer, and in winter dressed their chilblains with her own hands.
  13. refine
    reduce to a fine, unmixed, or pure state; separate from extraneous matter or cleanse from impurities
    Mrs. Goddard was the mistress of a School--not of a seminary, or an establishment, or any thing which professed, in long sentences of refined nonsense, to combine liberal acquirements with elegant morality, upon new principles and new systems--and where young ladies for enormous pay might be screwed out of health and into vanity--but a real, honest, old-fashioned Boarding-school, where a reasonable quantity of accomplishments were sold at a reasonable price, and where girls might be s...
  14. naivete
    lack of sophistication or worldliness
    Harriet was on the point of leaving the room, and only stopt to say, with a very interesting naivete, "Oh! dear, no, never."
  15. drawing
    a representation of forms or objects on a surface by means of lines
    Real, long-standing regard brought the Westons and Mr. Knightley; and by Mr. Elton, a young man living alone without liking it, the privilege of exchanging any vacant evening of his own blank solitude for the elegancies and society of Mr. Woodhouse's drawing-room, and the smiles of his lovely daughter, was in no danger of being thrown away.
  16. inimitable
    defying imitation; matchless
    Is not this room rich in specimens of your landscapes and flowers; and has not Mrs. Weston some inimitable figure-pieces in her drawing-room, at Randalls?"
  17. dissuade
    turn away from by persuasion
    Miss Churchill, however, being of age, and with the full command of her fortune--though her fortune bore no proportion to the family-estate--was not to be dissuaded from the marriage, and it took place, to the infinite mortification of Mr. and Mrs. Churchill, who threw her off with due decorum.
  18. evening
    the latter part of the day (the period of decreasing daylight from late afternoon until nightfall)
    The wedding over, and the bride-people gone, her father and herself were left to dine together, with no prospect of a third to cheer a long evening.
  19. recommend
    express a good opinion of
    The evil of the actual disparity in their ages (and Mr. Woodhouse had not married early) was much increased by his constitution and habits; for having been a valetudinarian all his life, without activity of mind or body, he was a much older man in ways than in years; and though everywhere beloved for the friendliness of his heart and his amiable temper, his talents could not have recommended him at any time.
  20. ingratiate
    gain favor with somebody by deliberate efforts
    I do not know whether he has any design of ingratiating himself with either of us, Harriet, by additional softness, but it strikes me that his manners are softer than they used to be.
  21. scruple
    an ethical or moral principle that inhibits action
    Some scruples and some reluctance the widower-father may be supposed to have felt; but as they were overcome by other considerations, the child was given up to the care and the wealth of the Churchills, and he had only his own comfort to seek, and his own situation to improve as he could.
  22. settle
    become resolved, fixed, established, or quiet
    Her sister, though comparatively but little removed by matrimony, being settled in London, only sixteen miles off, was much beyond her daily reach; and many a long October and November evening must be struggled through at Hartfield, before Christmas brought the next visit from Isabella and her husband, and their little children, to fill the house, and give her pleasant society again.
  23. disposition
    your usual mood
    Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, and rich, with a comfortable home and happy disposition, seemed to unite some of the best blessings of existence; and had lived nearly twenty-one years in the world with very little to distress or vex her.
  24. comfort
    a state of being relaxed and feeling no pain
    I am sure she will be an excellent servant; and it will be a great comfort to poor Miss Taylor to have somebody about her that she is used to see.
  25. gratitude
    a feeling of thankfulness and appreciation
    A large debt of gratitude was owing here; but the intercourse of the last seven years, the equal footing and perfect unreserve which had soon followed Isabella's marriage, on their being left to each other, was yet a dearer, tenderer recollection.
  26. Kingston
    capital and largest city of Jamaica
    He is in Highbury every now and then, and he is sure to ride through every week in his way to Kingston.
  27. self-denying
    willing to deprive yourself
    Mr. Weston was a man of unexceptionable character, easy fortune, suitable age, and pleasant manners; and there was some satisfaction in considering with what self-denying, generous friendship she had always wished and promoted the match; but it was a black morning's work for her.
  28. clever
    mentally quick and resourceful
    Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, and rich, with a comfortable home and happy disposition, seemed to unite some of the best blessings of existence; and had lived nearly twenty-one years in the world with very little to distress or vex her.
  29. approbation
    official approval
    Such another small basin of thin gruel as his own was all that he could, with thorough self- approbation, recommend; though he might constrain himself, while the ladies were comfortably clearing the nicer things, to say: "Mrs. Bates, let me propose your venturing on one of these eggs.
  30. attachment
    the act of attaching or affixing something
    Her early attachment to herself was very amiable; and her inclination for good company, and power of appreciating what was elegant and clever, shewed that there was no want of taste, though strength of understanding must not be expected.
  31. rapture
    a state of being carried away by overwhelming emotion
    Don't pretend to be in raptures about mine.
  32. observe
    watch attentively
    Whenever I see her, she always curtseys and asks me how I do, in a very pretty manner; and when you have had her here to do needlework, I observe she always turns the lock of the door the right way and never bangs it.
  33. merit
    the quality of being deserving (e.g., deserving assistance)
    Where is your merit?
  34. fortunate
    having unexpected good fortune
    She felt herself a most fortunate woman; and she had lived long enough to know how fortunate she might well be thought, where the only regret was for a partial separation from friends whose friendship for her had never cooled, and who could ill bear to part with her.
  35. amiable
    diffusing warmth and friendliness
    The evil of the actual disparity in their ages (and Mr. Woodhouse had not married early) was much increased by his constitution and habits; for having been a valetudinarian all his life, without activity of mind or body, he was a much older man in ways than in years; and though everywhere beloved for the friendliness of his heart and his amiable temper, his talents could not have recommended him at any time.
  36. Brunswick
    a city in central Germany
    He had returned to a late dinner, after some days' absence, and now walked up to Hartfield to say that all were well in Brunswick Square.
  37. odd
    not divisible by two
    Mr. Weston is such a good-humoured, pleasant, excellent man, that he thoroughly deserves a good wife;--and you would not have had Miss Taylor live with us for ever, and bear all my odd humours, when she might have a house of her own?"
  38. unfeigned
    not pretended; sincerely felt or expressed
    He was on foot, and after looking very respectfully at her, looked with most unfeigned satisfaction at her companion.
  39. drizzle
    very light rain; stronger than mist but less than a shower
    "Ever since the day--about four years ago--that Miss Taylor and I met with him in Broadway Lane, when, because it began to drizzle, he darted away with so much gallantry, and borrowed two umbrellas for us from Farmer Mitchell's, I made up my mind on the subject.
  40. yeomanry
    class of small freeholders who cultivated their own land
    The yeomanry are precisely the order of people with whom I feel I can have nothing to do.
  41. temper
    a characteristic (habitual or relatively temporary) state of feeling
    Even before Miss Taylor had ceased to hold the nominal office of governess, the mildness of her temper had hardly allowed her to impose any restraint; and the shadow of authority being now long passed away, they had been living together as friend and friend very mutually attached, and Emma doing just what she liked; highly esteeming Miss Taylor's judgment, but directed chiefly by her own.
  42. consider
    think about carefully; weigh
    Mr. Weston was a man of unexceptionable character, easy fortune, suitable age, and pleasant manners; and there was some satisfaction in considering with what self-denying, generous friendship she had always wished and promoted the match; but it was a black morning's work for her.
  43. elegant
    refined and tasteful in appearance or behavior or style
    Mrs. Goddard was the mistress of a School--not of a seminary, or an establishment, or any thing which professed, in long sentences of refined nonsense, to combine liberal acquirements with elegant morality, upon new principles and new systems--and where young ladies for enormous pay might be screwed out of health and into vanity--but a real, honest, old-fashioned Boarding-school, where a reasonable quantity of accomplishments were sold at a reasonable price, and where girls might be s...
  44. crayon
    writing implement consisting of a colored stick of composition wax used for writing and drawing
    Miniatures, half-lengths, whole-lengths, pencil, crayon, and water-colours had been all tried in turn.
  45. quadrille
    a square dance of 5 or more figures for 4 or more couples
    Mrs. Bates, the widow of a former vicar of Highbury, was a very old lady, almost past every thing but tea and quadrille.
  46. rationally
    in a rational manner
    I am much mistaken if Emma's doctrines give any strength of mind, or tend at all to make a girl adapt herself rationally to the varieties of her situation in life.--They
  47. fanciful
    indulging in or influenced by fancy
    "Especially when _one_ of those two is such a fanciful, troublesome creature!" said Emma playfully.
  48. nestle
    move or arrange oneself in a comfortable and cozy position
    He had nestled down his head most conveniently.
  49. forswear
    formally reject or disavow a formerly held belief, usually under pressure
    It was made a great favour of; and altogether it was more than I could bear; and so I never would finish it, to have it apologised over as an unfavourable likeness, to every morning visitor in Brunswick Square;--and, as I said, I did then forswear ever drawing any body again.
  50. entreat
    ask for or request earnestly
    "Let me entreat you," cried Mr. Elton; "it would indeed be a delight!
  51. gentle
    soft and mild; not harsh or stern or severe
    Sorrow came--a gentle sorrow--but not at all in the shape of any disagreeable consciousness.--Miss
  52. companion
    a friend who is frequently in the company of another
    She had been a friend and companion such as few possessed: intelligent, well-informed, useful, gentle, knowing all the ways of the family, interested in all its concerns, and peculiarly interested in herself, in every pleasure, every scheme of hers--one to whom she could speak every thought as it arose, and who had such an affection for her as could never find fault.
  53. abbey
    a monastery ruled by an abbot
    Fortunately for him, Highbury, including Randalls in the same parish, and Donwell Abbey in the parish adjoining, the seat of Mr. Knightley, comprehended many such.
  54. diffident
    showing modest reserve
    She was always quick and assured: Isabella slow and diffident.
  55. education
    the activities of educating or instructing; activities that impart knowledge or skill
    He had received a good education, but, on succeeding early in life to a small independence, had become indisposed for any of the more homely pursuits in which his brothers were engaged, and had satisfied an active, cheerful mind and social temper by entering into the militia of his county, then embodied.
  56. gruel
    a thin porridge (usually oatmeal or cornmeal)
    Such another small basin of thin gruel as his own was all that he could, with thorough self-approbation, recommend; though he might constrain himself, while the ladies were comfortably clearing the nicer things, to say: "Mrs. Bates, let me propose your venturing on one of these eggs.
  57. grateful
    feeling or showing gratitude
    The simplicity and cheerfulness of her nature, her contented and grateful spirit, were a recommendation to every body, and a mine of felicity to herself.
  58. convince
    make (someone) agree, understand, or realize the truth or validity of something
    Altogether she was quite convinced of Harriet Smith's being exactly the young friend she wanted--exactly the something which her home required.
  59. come of age
    reach a certain age that marks a transition to maturity
    He had only himself to please in his choice: his fortune was his own; for as to Frank, it was more than being tacitly brought up as his uncle's heir, it had become so avowed an adoption as to have him assume the name of Churchill on coming of age.
  60. conceit
    the trait of being unduly vain and conceited; false pride
    Harriet certainly was not clever, but she had a sweet, docile, grateful disposition, was totally free from conceit, and only desiring to be guided by any one she looked up to.
  61. husband
    a married man; a woman's partner in marriage
    Her sister, though comparatively but little removed by matrimony, being settled in London, only sixteen miles off, was much beyond her daily reach; and many a long October and November evening must be struggled through at Hartfield, before Christmas brought the next visit from Isabella and her husband, and their little children, to fill the house, and give her pleasant society again.
  62. untoward
    not in keeping with accepted standards of what is right or proper in polite society
    She lived with her single daughter in a very small way, and was considered with all the regard and respect which a harmless old lady, under such untoward circumstances, can excite.
  63. gratify
    make happy or satisfied
    Miss Woodhouse was so great a personage in Highbury, that the prospect of the introduction had given as much panic as pleasure; but the humble, grateful little girl went off with highly gratified feelings, delighted with the affability with which Miss Woodhouse had treated her all the evening, and actually shaken hands with her at last!
  64. scallop
    edible marine bivalve having a fluted fan-shaped shell that swim by expelling water from the shell in a series of snapping motions
    With an alacrity beyond the common impulse of a spirit which yet was never indifferent to the credit of doing every thing well and attentively, with the real good-will of a mind delighted with its own ideas, did she then do all the honours of the meal, and help and recommend the minced chicken and scalloped oysters, with an urgency which she knew would be acceptable to the early hours and civil scruples of their guests.
  65. engage
    consume all of one's attention or time
    He had received a good education, but, on succeeding early in life to a small independence, had become indisposed for any of the more homely pursuits in which his brothers were engaged, and had satisfied an active, cheerful mind and social temper by entering into the militia of his county, then embodied.
  66. disparity
    inequality or difference in some respect
    The evil of the actual disparity in their ages (and Mr. Woodhouse had not married early) was much increased by his constitution and habits; for having been a valetudinarian all his life, without activity of mind or body, he was a much older man in ways than in years; and though everywhere beloved for the friendliness of his heart and his amiable temper, his talents could not have recommended him at any time.
  67. compose
    form the substance of
    Her father composed himself to sleep after dinner, as usual, and she had then only to sit and think of what she had lost.
  68. vicarage
    an official residence provided by a church for its parson or vicar or rector
    He had a comfortable home for her, and Emma imagined a very sufficient income; for though the vicarage of Highbury was not large, he was known to have some independent property; and she thought very highly of him as a good-humoured, well-meaning, respectable young man, without any deficiency of useful understanding or knowledge of the world.
  69. abrupt
    exceedingly sudden and unexpected
    I am sure you must have been struck by his awkward look and abrupt manner, and the uncouthness of a voice which I heard to be wholly unmodulated as I stood here."
  70. plain
    not elaborate or elaborated; simple
    She was a plain, motherly kind of woman, who had worked hard in her youth, and now thought herself entitled to the occasional holiday of a tea-visit; and having formerly owed much to Mr. Woodhouse's kindness, felt his particular claim on her to leave her neat parlour, hung round with fancy-work, whenever she could, and win or lose a few sixpences by his fireside.
  71. amaze
    affect with wonder
    Captain Weston, who had been considered, especially by the Churchills, as making such an amazing match, was proved to have much the worst of the bargain; for when his wife died, after a three years' marriage, he was rather a poorer man than at first, and with a child to maintain.
  72. delight
    a feeling of extreme pleasure or satisfaction
    She was delighted to see her father look comfortable, and very much pleased with herself for contriving things so well; but the quiet prosings of three such women made her feel that every evening so spent was indeed one of the long evenings she had fearfully anticipated.
  73. ennui
    the feeling of being bored by something tedious
    She knew that at times she must be missed; and could not think, without pain, of Emma's losing a single pleasure, or suffering an hour's ennui, from the want of her companionableness: but dear Emma was of no feeble character; she was more equal to her situation than most girls would have been, and had sense, and energy, and spirits that might be hoped would bear her well and happily through its little difficulties and privations.
  74. eyelash
    any of the short curved hairs that grow from the edges of the eyelids
    expression of the eye is most correct, but Miss Smith has not those eyebrows and eyelashes.
  75. stealth
    avoiding detection by moving carefully
    There is my father--another of my father--but the idea of sitting for his picture made him so nervous, that I could only take him by stealth; neither of them very like therefore.
  76. superior
    of high or superior quality or performance
    She was not struck by any thing remarkably clever in Miss Smith's conversation, but she found her altogether very engaging--not inconveniently shy, not unwilling to talk--and yet so far from pushing, shewing so proper and becoming a deference, seeming so pleasantly grateful for being admitted to Hartfield, and so artlessly impressed by the appearance of every thing in so superior a style to what she had been used to, that she must have good sense, and deserve encouragement.
  77. feature
    a prominent attribute or aspect of something
    She was short, plump, and fair, with a fine bloom, blue eyes, light hair, regular features, and a look of great sweetness, and, before the end of the evening, Emma was as much pleased with her manners as her person, and quite determined to continue the acquaintance.
  78. delighted
    greatly pleased
    She was delighted to see her father look comfortable, and very much pleased with herself for contriving things so well; but the quiet prosings of three such women made her feel that every evening so spent was indeed one of the long evenings she had fearfully anticipated.
  79. admire
    feel admiration for
    She was a very pretty girl, and her beauty happened to be of a sort which Emma particularly admired.
  80. venture
    any venturesome undertaking especially one with an uncertain outcome
    Such another small basin of thin gruel as his own was all that he could, with thorough self-approbation, recommend; though he might constrain himself, while the ladies were comfortably clearing the nicer things, to say: "Mrs. Bates, let me propose your venturing on one of these eggs.
  81. inclination
    the act of inclining; bending forward
    Mr. Perry was an intelligent, gentlemanlike man, whose frequent visits were one of the comforts of Mr. Woodhouse's life; and upon being applied to, he could not but acknowledge (though it seemed rather against the bias of inclination) that wedding-cake might certainly disagree with many--perhaps with most people, unless taken moderately.
  82. fluctuation
    an instance of change; the rate or magnitude of change
    Emma watched her through the fluctuations of this speech, and saw no alarming symptoms of love.
  83. persuade
    cause somebody to adopt a certain position, belief, or course of action; twist somebody's arm
    never could persuade her to read half so much as you wished.--You
  84. punctual
    acting or arriving or performed exactly at the time appointed
    Every body was punctual, every body in their best looks: not a tear, and hardly a long face to be seen.
  85. alloy
    a mixture containing two or more metallic elements or metallic and nonmetallic elements usually fused together or dissolving into each other when molten
    The real evils, indeed, of Emma's situation were the power of having rather too much her own way, and a disposition to think a little too well of herself; these were the disadvantages which threatened alloy to her many enjoyments.
  86. intermission
    a time interval during which there is a temporary cessation of something
    She must allow him to be still frequently coming to look; any thing less would certainly have been too little in a lover; and he was ready at the smallest intermission of the pencil, to jump up and see the progress, and be charmed.--There
  87. decease
    the event of dying or departure from life
    The boy had, with the additional softening claim of a lingering illness of his mother's, been the means of a sort of reconciliation; and Mr. and Mrs. Churchill, having no children of their own, nor any other young creature of equal kindred to care for, offered to take the whole charge of the little Frank soon after her decease.
  88. vicar
    a Roman Catholic priest who acts for another higher-ranking clergyman
    Mrs. Bates, the widow of a former vicar of Highbury, was a very old lady, almost past every thing but tea and quadrille.
  89. degrade
    reduce in worth or character, usually verbally
    There can be no doubt of your being a gentleman's daughter, and you must support your claim to that station by every thing within your own power, or there will be plenty of people who would take pleasure in degrading you."
  90. spleen
    a large dark-red oval organ on the left side of the body between the stomach and the diaphragm; produces cells involved in immune responses
    Emma shall be an angel, and I will keep my spleen to myself till Christmas brings John and Isabella.
  91. affection
    a positive feeling of liking
    Her mother had died too long ago for her to have more than an indistinct remembrance of her caresses; and her place had been supplied by an excellent woman as governess, who had fallen little short of a mother in affection.
  92. equal
    having the same quantity, value, or measure as another
    A large debt of gratitude was owing here; but the intercourse of the last seven years, the equal footing and perfect unreserve which had soon followed Isabella's marriage, on their being left to each other, was yet a dearer, tenderer recollection.
  93. employ
    put into service; make work or employ for a particular purpose or for its inherent or natural purpose
    Whatever money he might come into when his father died, whatever his share of the family property, it is, I dare say, all afloat, all employed in his stock, and so forth; and though, with diligence and good luck, he may be rich in time, it is next to impossible that he should have realised any thing yet."
  94. fancy
    not plain; decorative or ornamented
    Not unfrequently, through Emma's persuasion, he had some of the chosen and the best to dine with him: but evening parties were what he preferred; and, unless he fancied himself at any time unequal to company, there was scarcely an evening in the week in which Emma could not make up a card-table for him.
  95. receive
    get something; come into possession of
    He had received a good education, but, on succeeding early in life to a small independence, had become indisposed for any of the more homely pursuits in which his brothers were engaged, and had satisfied an active, cheerful mind and social temper by entering into the militia of his county, then embodied.
  96. require
    have need of
    His spirits required support.
  97. talent
    natural abilities or qualities
    The evil of the actual disparity in their ages (and Mr. Woodhouse had not married early) was much increased by his constitution and habits; for having been a valetudinarian all his life, without activity of mind or body, he was a much older man in ways than in years; and though everywhere beloved for the friendliness of his heart and his amiable temper, his talents could not have recommended him at any time.
  98. competence
    the quality of being adequately or well qualified physically and intellectually
    He had, by that time, realised an easy competence--enough to secure the purchase of a little estate adjoining Highbury, which he had always longed for--enough to marry a woman as portionless even as Miss Taylor, and to live according to the wishes of his own friendly and social disposition.
  99. settled
    established in a desired position or place; not moving about
    Her sister, though comparatively but little removed by matrimony, being settled in London, only sixteen miles off, was much beyond her daily reach; and many a long October and November evening must be struggled through at Hartfield, before Christmas brought the next visit from Isabella and her husband, and their little children, to fill the house, and give her pleasant society again.
  100. thrive
    make steady progress; be at the high point in one's career or reach a high point in historical significance or importance
    He was a great deal too full of the market to think of any thing else--which is just as it should be, for a thriving man.
  101. docile
    easily handled or managed
    Harriet certainly was not clever, but she had a sweet, docile, grateful disposition, was totally free from conceit, and only desiring to be guided by any one she looked up to.
  102. parish
    a local church community
    Fortunately for him, Highbury, including Randalls in the same parish, and Donwell Abbey in the parish adjoining, the seat of Mr. Knightley, comprehended many such.
  103. apothecary
    a health professional trained in the art of preparing and dispensing drugs
    He had been at the pains of consulting Mr. Perry, the apothecary, on the subject.
  104. devote
    dedicate
    She recalled her past kindness--the kindness, the affection of sixteen years--how she had taught and how she had played with her from five years old--how she had devoted all her powers to attach and amuse her in health--and how nursed her through the various illnesses of childhood.
  105. mantelpiece
    shelf that projects from wall above fireplace
    It was to be a whole-length in water-colours, like Mr. John Knightley's, and was destined, if she could please herself, to hold a very honourable station over the mantelpiece.
  106. James
    (New Testament) disciple of Jesus; brother of John; author of the Epistle of James in the New Testament
    But James will not like to put the horses to for such a little way;--and where are the poor horses to be while we are paying our visit?"
  107. militia
    civilians trained as soldiers but not part of the regular army
    He had received a good education, but, on succeeding early in life to a small independence, had become indisposed for any of the more homely pursuits in which his brothers were engaged, and had satisfied an active, cheerful mind and social temper by entering into the militia of his county, then embodied.
  108. deceive
    cause someone to believe an untruth
    She was not much deceived as to her own skill either as an artist or a musician, but she was not unwilling to have others deceived, or sorry to know her reputation for accomplishment often higher than it deserved.
  109. regret
    feel remorse for; feel sorry for; be contrite about
    Emma spared no exertions to maintain this happier flow of ideas, and hoped, by the help of backgammon, to get her father tolerably through the evening, and be attacked by no regrets but her own.
  110. refined
    (used of persons and their behavior) cultivated and genteel
    Mrs. Goddard was the mistress of a School--not of a seminary, or an establishment, or any thing which professed, in long sentences of refined nonsense, to combine liberal acquirements with elegant morality, upon new principles and new systems--and where young ladies for enormous pay might be screwed out of health and into vanity--but a real, honest, old-fashioned Boarding-school, where a reasonable quantity of accomplishments were sold at a reasonable price, and where girls might be s...
  111. intelligent
    having the capacity for thought and reason especially to a high degree
    She had been a friend and companion such as few possessed: intelligent, well-informed, useful, gentle, knowing all the ways of the family, interested in all its concerns, and peculiarly interested in herself, in every pleasure, every scheme of hers--one to whom she could speak every thought as it arose, and who had such an affection for her as could never find fault.
  112. err
    to make a mistake or be incorrect
    No, no; she has qualities which may be trusted; she will never lead any one really wrong; she will make no lasting blunder; where Emma errs once, she is in the right a hundred times."
  113. decorum
    propriety in manners and conduct
    Miss Churchill, however, being of age, and with the full command of her fortune--though her fortune bore no proportion to the family-estate--was not to be dissuaded from the marriage, and it took place, to the infinite mortification of Mr. and Mrs. Churchill, who threw her off with due decorum.
  114. partial
    being or affecting only a part; not total
    She felt herself a most fortunate woman; and she had lived long enough to know how fortunate she might well be thought, where the only regret was for a partial separation from friends whose friendship for her had never cooled, and who could ill bear to part with her.
  115. understanding
    the cognitive condition of someone who understands
    "Emma never thinks of herself, if she can do good to others," rejoined Mr. Woodhouse, understanding but in part.
  116. rational
    consistent with or based on or using reason
    He could not meet her in conversation, rational or playful.
  117. respect
    regard highly; think much of
    She lived with her single daughter in a very small way, and was considered with all the regard and respect which a harmless old lady, under such untoward circumstances, can excite.
  118. adjoin
    lie adjacent to another or share a boundary
    He had, by that time, realised an easy competence--enough to secure the purchase of a little estate adjoining Highbury, which he had always longed for--enough to marry a woman as portionless even as Miss Taylor, and to live according to the wishes of his own friendly and social disposition.
  119. London
    the capital and largest city of England; located on the Thames in southeastern England; financial and industrial and cultural center
    Her sister, though comparatively but little removed by matrimony, being settled in London, only sixteen miles off, was much beyond her daily reach; and many a long October and November evening must be struggled through at Hartfield, before Christmas brought the next visit from Isabella and her husband, and their little children, to fill the house, and give her pleasant society again.
  120. preserve
    keep in safety and protect from harm, decay, loss, or destruction
    You need not be afraid of unwholesome preserves here.
  121. present
    temporal sense; intermediate between past and future; now existing or happening or in consideration
    The danger, however, was at present so unperceived, that they did not by any means rank as misfortunes with her.
  122. misfortune
    an unfortunate state resulting from unfavorable outcomes
    The danger, however, was at present so unperceived, that they did not by any means rank as misfortunes with her.
  123. fastidious
    giving careful attention to detail; hard to please; excessively concerned with cleanliness
    And he was really a very pleasing young man, a young man whom any woman not fastidious might like.
  124. figure
    alternative names for the body of a human being
    Neither would Mr. Knightley's downright, decided, commanding sort of manner, though it suits _him_ very well; his figure, and look, and situation in life seem to allow it; but if any young man were to set about copying him, he would not be sufferable.
  125. attempt
    make an effort or attempt
    Her first attempts at usefulness were in an endeavour to find out who were the parents, but Harriet could not tell.
  126. predicament
    a situation from which extrication is difficult especially an unpleasant or trying one
    Miss Bates stood in the very worst predicament in the world for having much of the public favour; and she had no intellectual superiority to make atonement to herself, or frighten those who might hate her into outward respect.
  127. cease
    put an end to a state or an activity
    Even before Miss Taylor had ceased to hold the nominal office of governess, the mildness of her temper had hardly allowed her to impose any restraint; and the shadow of authority being now long passed away, they had been living together as friend and friend very mutually attached, and Emma doing just what she liked; highly esteeming Miss Taylor's judgment, but directed chiefly by her own.
  128. indistinct
    not clearly defined or easy to perceive or understand
    Her mother had died too long ago for her to have more than an indistinct remembrance of her caresses; and her place had been supplied by an excellent woman as governess, who had fallen little short of a mother in affection.
  129. unaffected
    undergoing no change when acted upon
    "A straightforward, open-hearted man like Weston, and a rational, unaffected woman like Miss Taylor, may be safely left to manage their own concerns.
  130. promote
    give a promotion to or assign to a higher position
    Mr. Weston was a man of unexceptionable character, easy fortune, suitable age, and pleasant manners; and there was some satisfaction in considering with what self-denying, generous friendship she had always wished and promoted the match; but it was a black morning's work for her.
  131. atonement
    the act of atoning for sin or wrongdoing (especially appeasing a deity)
    Miss Bates stood in the very worst predicament in the world for having much of the public favour; and she had no intellectual superiority to make atonement to herself, or frighten those who might hate her into outward respect.
  132. illiterate
    not able to read or write
    And I have no doubt that he _will_ thrive, and be a very rich man in time--and his being illiterate and coarse need not disturb _us_."
  133. penetration
    the act of entering into or through something
    Harriet had no penetration.
  134. awkward
    lacking grace or skill in manner or movement or performance
    I am sure you must have been struck by his awkward look and abrupt manner, and the uncouthness of a voice which I heard to be wholly unmodulated as I stood here."
  135. raise
    move upwards
    Somebody had placed her, several years back, at Mrs. Goddard's school, and somebody had lately raised her from the condition of scholar to that of parlour-boarder.
  136. plague
    any large scale calamity (especially when thought to be sent by God)
    Weston may grow cross from the wantonness of comfort, or his son may plague him."
  137. efficacy
    capacity or power to produce a desired effect
    She had already satisfied herself that he thought Harriet a beautiful girl, which she trusted, with such frequent meetings at Hartfield, was foundation enough on his side; and on Harriet's there could be little doubt that the idea of being preferred by him would have all the usual weight and efficacy.
  138. approve
    judge to be right or commendable; think well of
    But in every respect, as she saw more of her, she approved her, and was confirmed in all her kind designs.
  139. animate
    make lively
    It was a happy circumstance, and animated Mr. Woodhouse for some time.
  140. mortify
    cause to feel shame; hurt the pride of
    "To be sure," said Harriet, in a mortified voice, "he is not so genteel as real gentlemen."
  141. suspect
    regard as untrustworthy; regard with suspicion; have no faith or confidence in
    Mr. Knightley, in fact, was one of the few people who could see faults in Emma Woodhouse, and the only one who ever told her of them: and though this was not particularly agreeable to Emma herself, she knew it would be so much less so to her father, that she would not have him really suspect such a circumstance as her not being thought perfect by every body.
  142. prodigy
    an unusually gifted or intelligent (young) person; someone whose talents excite wonder and admiration
    Mrs. Goddard was the mistress of a School--not of a seminary, or an establishment, or any thing which professed, in long sentences of refined nonsense, to combine liberal acquirements with elegant morality, upon new principles and new systems--and where young ladies for enormous pay might be screwed out of health and into vanity--but a real, honest, old-fashioned Boarding-school, where a reasonable quantity of accomplishments were sold at a reasonable price, and where girls might be sent to ...
  143. surmise
    infer from incomplete evidence
    There were wishes at Randalls respecting Emma's destiny, but it was not desirable to have them suspected; and the quiet transition which Mr. Knightley soon afterwards made to "What does Weston think of the weather; shall we have rain?" convinced her that he had nothing more to say or surmise about Hartfield.
  144. genteel
    marked by refinement in taste and manners
    "To be sure," said Harriet, in a mortified voice, "he is not so genteel as real gentlemen."
  145. capricious
    determined by chance or impulse or whim rather than by necessity or reason
    The aunt was a capricious woman, and governed her husband entirely; but it was not in Mr. Weston's nature to imagine that any caprice could be strong enough to affect one so dear, and, as he believed, so deservedly dear.
  146. credit
    an estimate, based on previous dealings, of a person's or an organization's ability to fulfill their financial commitments
    With an alacrity beyond the common impulse of a spirit which yet was never indifferent to the credit of doing every thing well and attentively, with the real good-will of a mind delighted with its own ideas, did she then do all the honours of the meal, and help and recommend the minced chicken and scalloped oysters, with an urgency which she knew would be acceptable to the early hours and civil scruples of their guests.
  147. alacrity
    liveliness and eagerness
    With an alacrity beyond the common impulse of a spirit which yet was never indifferent to the credit of doing every thing well and attentively, with the real good-will of a mind delighted with its own ideas, did she then do all the honours of the meal, and help and recommend the minced chicken and scalloped oysters, with an urgency which she knew would be acceptable to the early hours and civil scruples of their guests.
  148. featured
    made a feature or highlight; given prominence
    She was so eager to have them drawn that I could not refuse; but there is no making children of three or four years old stand still you know; nor can it be very easy to take any likeness of them, beyond the air and complexion, unless they are coarser featured than any of mama's children ever were.
  149. repute
    the state of being held in high esteem and honor
    Mrs. Goddard's school was in high repute--and very deservedly; for Highbury was reckoned a particularly healthy spot: she had an ample house and garden, gave the children plenty of wholesome food, let them run about a great deal in the summer, and in winter dressed their chilblains with her own hands.
  150. depend
    be contingent upon (something that is elided)
    thought you cleverer--for, depend upon it a lucky guess is never merely luck.
  151. privilege
    a special advantage or immunity or benefit not enjoyed by all
    Real, long-standing regard brought the Westons and Mr. Knightley; and by Mr. Elton, a young man living alone without liking it, the privilege of exchanging any vacant evening of his own blank solitude for the elegancies and society of Mr. Woodhouse's drawing-room, and the smiles of his lovely daughter, was in no danger of being thrown away.
  152. hindrance
    any obstruction that impedes or is burdensome
    And then there was such comfort in the very easy distance of Randalls from Hartfield, so convenient for even solitary female walking, and in Mr. Weston's disposition and circumstances, which would make the approaching season no hindrance to their spending half the evenings in the week together.
  153. frequent
    coming at short intervals or habitually
    He lived about a mile from Highbury, was a frequent visitor, and always welcome, and at this time more welcome than usual, as coming directly from their mutual connexions in London.
  154. mutually
    in a mutual or shared manner
    Even before Miss Taylor had ceased to hold the nominal office of governess, the mildness of her temper had hardly allowed her to impose any restraint; and the shadow of authority being now long passed away, they had been living together as friend and friend very mutually attached, and Emma doing just what she liked; highly esteeming Miss Taylor's judgment, but directed chiefly by her own.
  155. hint
    an indirect suggestion
    "I know that you all love her really too well to be unjust or unkind; but excuse me, Mr. Knightley, if I take the liberty (I consider myself, you know, as having somewhat of the privilege of speech that Emma's mother might have had) the liberty of hinting that I do not think any possible good can arise from Harriet Smith's intimacy being made a matter of much discussion among you.
  156. straightforward
    pointed directly ahead
    "A straightforward, open-hearted man like Weston, and a rational, unaffected woman like Miss Taylor, may be safely left to manage their own concerns.
  157. indulgent
    characterized by or given to yielding to the wishes of someone
    She was the youngest of the two daughters of a most affectionate, indulgent father; and had, in consequence of her sister's marriage, been mistress of his house from a very early period.
  158. nominal
    relating to or constituting or bearing or giving a name
    Even before Miss Taylor had ceased to hold the nominal office of governess, the mildness of her temper had hardly allowed her to impose any restraint; and the shadow of authority being now long passed away, they had been living together as friend and friend very mutually attached, and Emma doing just what she liked; highly esteeming Miss Taylor's judgment, but directed chiefly by her own.
  159. solitude
    a state of social isolation
    was true that her friend was going only half a mile from them; but Emma was aware that great must be the difference between a Mrs. Weston, only half a mile from them, and a Miss Taylor in the house; and with all her advantages, natural and domestic, she was now in great danger of suffering from intellectual solitude.
  160. introduce
    bring something new to an environment
    Captain Weston was a general favourite; and when the chances of his military life had introduced him to Miss Churchill, of a great Yorkshire family, and Miss Churchill fell in love with him, nobody was surprized, except her brother and his wife, who had never seen him, and who were full of pride and importance, which the connexion would offend.
  161. required
    required by rule
    His spirits required support.
  162. submit
    yield to the control of another
    She will never submit to any thing requiring industry and patience, and a subjection of the fancy to the understanding.
  163. exquisite
    delicately beautiful
    No sooner was she out of sight, than Emma exclaimed, "What an exquisite possession a good picture of her would be!
  164. leisure
    time available for ease and relaxation
    He had still a small house in Highbury, where most of his leisure days were spent; and between useful occupation and the pleasures of society, the next eighteen or twenty years of his life passed cheerfully away.
  165. convinced
    having a strong belief or conviction
    Altogether she was quite convinced of Harriet Smith's being exactly the young friend she wanted--exactly the something which her home required.
  166. portfolio
    a large, flat, thin case for carrying loose papers or drawings or maps; usually leather
    Emma wished to go to work directly, and therefore produced the portfolio containing her various attempts at portraits, for not one of them had ever been finished, that they might decide together on the best size for Harriet.
  167. Yorkshire
    a former large county in northern England; in 1974 it was divided into three smaller counties
    Captain Weston was a general favourite; and when the chances of his military life had introduced him to Miss Churchill, of a great Yorkshire family, and Miss Churchill fell in love with him, nobody was surprized, except her brother and his wife, who had never seen him, and who were full of pride and importance, which the connexion would offend.
  168. contrive
    make or work out a plan for; devise
    She was delighted to see her father look comfortable, and very much pleased with herself for contriving things so well; but the quiet prosings of three such women made her feel that every evening so spent was indeed one of the long evenings she had fearfully anticipated.
  169. object
    a tangible and visible entity; an entity that can cast a shadow
    It was now some time since Miss Taylor had begun to influence his schemes; but as it was not the tyrannic influence of youth on youth, it had not shaken his determination of never settling till he could purchase Randalls, and the sale of Randalls was long looked forward to; but he had gone steadily on, with these objects in view, till they were accomplished.
  170. degree
    a specific identifiable position in a continuum or series or especially in a process
    Her daughter enjoyed a most uncommon degree of popularity for a woman neither young, handsome, rich, nor married.
  171. income
    the financial gain (earned or unearned) accruing over a given period of time
    They lived beyond their income, but still it was nothing in comparison of Enscombe: she did not cease to love her husband, but she wanted at once to be the wife of Captain Weston, and Miss Churchill of Enscombe.
  172. distress
    a state of adversity (danger or affliction or need)
    Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, and rich, with a comfortable home and happy disposition, seemed to unite some of the best blessings of existence; and had lived nearly twenty-one years in the world with very little to distress or vex her.
  173. proportion
    the relation between things (or parts of things) with respect to their comparative quantity, magnitude, or degree
    Miss Churchill, however, being of age, and with the full command of her fortune--though her fortune bore no proportion to the family-estate--was not to be dissuaded from the marriage, and it took place, to the infinite mortification of Mr. and Mrs. Churchill, who threw her off with due decorum.
  174. style
    how something is done or how it happens
    She was not struck by any thing remarkably clever in Miss Smith's conversation, but she found her altogether very engaging--not inconveniently shy, not unwilling to talk--and yet so far from pushing, shewing so proper and becoming a deference, seeming so pleasantly grateful for being admitted to Hartfield, and so artlessly impressed by the appearance of every thing in so superior a style to what she had been used to, that she must have good sense, and deserve encouragement.
  175. independent
    free from external control and constraint
    It was quite a different sort of thing, a sentiment distinct and independent.
  176. comprehend
    get the meaning of something
    I think you must know Hartfield enough to comprehend that."
  177. prospect
    the possibility of future success
    The wedding over, and the bride-people gone, her father and herself were left to dine together, with no prospect of a third to cheer a long evening.
  178. privation
    act of depriving someone of food or money or rights
    She knew that at times she must be missed; and could not think, without pain, of Emma's losing a single pleasure, or suffering an hour's ennui, from the want of her companionableness: but dear Emma was of no feeble character; she was more equal to her situation than most girls would have been, and had sense, and energy, and spirits that might be hoped would bear her well and happily through its little difficulties and privations.
  179. boil
    come to the boiling point and change from a liquid to vapor
    An egg boiled very soft is not unwholesome.
  180. languish
    become feeble
    He is an excellent young man, and will suit Harriet exactly; it will be an 'Exactly so,' as he says himself; but he does sigh and languish, and study for compliments rather more than I could endure as a principal.
  181. attach
    be attached; be in contact with
    Even before Miss Taylor had ceased to hold the nominal office of governess, the mildness of her temper had hardly allowed her to impose any restraint; and the shadow of authority being now long passed away, they had been living together as friend and friend very mutually attached, and Emma doing just what she liked; highly esteeming Miss Taylor's judgment, but directed chiefly by her own.
  182. scheme
    an elaborate and systematic plan of action
    She had been a friend and companion such as few possessed: intelligent, well-informed, useful, gentle, knowing all the ways of the family, interested in all its concerns, and peculiarly interested in herself, in every pleasure, every scheme of hers--one to whom she could speak every thought as it arose, and who had such an affection for her as could never find fault.
  183. advantage
    the quality of having a superior or more favorable position
    was true that her friend was going only half a mile from them; but Emma was aware that great must be the difference between a Mrs. Weston, only half a mile from them, and a Miss Taylor in the house; and with all her advantages, natural and domestic, she was now in great danger of suffering from intellectual solitude.
  184. animation
    quality of being active or spirited or alive and vigorous
    And it was spoken with a sort of sighing animation, which had a vast deal of the lover.
  185. resolution
    a decision to do something or to behave in a certain manner
    She had resolution enough to pursue her own will in spite of her brother, but not enough to refrain from unreasonable regrets at that brother's unreasonable anger, nor from missing the luxuries of her former home.
  186. suitable
    meant or adapted for an occasion or use
    Mr. Weston was a man of unexceptionable character, easy fortune, suitable age, and pleasant manners; and there was some satisfaction in considering with what self-denying, generous friendship she had always wished and promoted the match; but it was a black morning's work for her.
  187. illness
    impairment of normal physiological function affecting part or all of an organism
    She recalled her past kindness--the kindness, the affection of sixteen years--how she had taught and how she had played with her from five years old--how she had devoted all her powers to attach and amuse her in health--and how nursed her through the various illnesses of childhood.
  188. endure
    undergo or be subjected to
    "He was too good!--she could not endure the thought!--she would not give him such a troublesome office for the world,"--brought on the desired repetition of entreaties and assurances,--and a very few minutes settled the business.
  189. glaring
    shining intensely
    The older a person grows, Harriet, the more important it is that their manners should not be bad; the more glaring and disgusting any loudness, or coarseness, or awkwardness becomes.
  190. insensible
    barely able to be perceived
    Harriet was not insensible of manner; she had voluntarily noticed her father's gentleness with admiration as well as wonder.
  191. stimulate
    cause to do; cause to act in a specified manner
    Where Miss Taylor failed to stimulate, I may safely affirm that Harriet Smith will do nothing.--You
  192. assurance
    a binding commitment to do or give or refrain from something
    CHAPTER VI Emma could not feel a doubt of having given Harriet's fancy a proper direction and raised the gratitude of her young vanity to a very good purpose, for she found her decidedly more sensible than before of Mr. Elton's being a remarkably handsome man, with most agreeable manners; and as she had no hesitation in following up the assurance of his admiration by agreeable hints, she was soon pretty confident of creating as much liking on Harriet's side, as there could be any occa...
  193. concern
    something that interests you because it is important or affects you
    She had been a friend and companion such as few possessed: intelligent, well-informed, useful, gentle, knowing all the ways of the family, interested in all its concerns, and peculiarly interested in herself, in every pleasure, every scheme of hers--one to whom she could speak every thought as it arose, and who had such an affection for her as could never find fault.
  194. aware
    (sometimes followed by `of') having or showing knowledge or understanding or realization or perception
    was true that her friend was going only half a mile from them; but Emma was aware that great must be the difference between a Mrs. Weston, only half a mile from them, and a Miss Taylor in the house; and with all her advantages, natural and domestic, she was now in great danger of suffering from intellectual solitude.
  195. bias
    a partiality that prevents objective consideration of an issue or situation
    Mr. Perry was an intelligent, gentlemanlike man, whose frequent visits were one of the comforts of Mr. Woodhouse's life; and upon being applied to, he could not but acknowledge (though it seemed rather against the bias of inclination) that wedding-cake might certainly disagree with many--perhaps with most people, unless taken moderately.
  196. character
    a characteristic property that defines the apparent individual nature of something
    Mr. Weston was a man of unexceptionable character, easy fortune, suitable age, and pleasant manners; and there was some satisfaction in considering with what self-denying, generous friendship she had always wished and promoted the match; but it was a black morning's work for her.
  197. felicity
    pleasing and appropriate manner or style (especially manner or style of expression)
    The simplicity and cheerfulness of her nature, her contented and grateful spirit, were a recommendation to every body, and a mine of felicity to herself.
  198. confess
    admit (to a wrongdoing)
    I had imagined him, I confess, a degree or two nearer gentility."
  199. engross
    devote (oneself) fully to
    "How much his business engrosses him already is very plain from the circumstance of his forgetting to inquire for the book you recommended.
  200. advice
    a proposal for an appropriate course of action
    It has been so many years my province to give advice, that you cannot be surprized, Mr. Knightley, at this little remains of office."
  201. specimen
    a bit of tissue or blood or urine that is taken for diagnostic purposes
    At Hartfield, you have had very good specimens of well educated, well bred men.
  202. caprice
    a sudden desire
    The aunt was a capricious woman, and governed her husband entirely; but it was not in Mr. Weston's nature to imagine that any caprice could be strong enough to affect one so dear, and, as he believed, so deservedly dear.
  203. deference
    courteous regard for people's feelings
    She was not struck by any thing remarkably clever in Miss Smith's conversation, but she found her altogether very engaging--not inconveniently shy, not unwilling to talk--and yet so far from pushing, shewing so proper and becoming a deference, seeming so pleasantly grateful for being admitted to Hartfield, and so artlessly impressed by the appearance of every thing in so superior a style to what she had been used to, that she must have good sense, and deserve encouragement.
  204. reconcile
    come to terms
    Matrimony, as the origin of change, was always disagreeable; and he was by no means yet reconciled to his own daughter's marrying, nor could ever speak of her but with compassion, though it had been entirely a match of affection, when he was now obliged to part with Miss Taylor too; and from his habits of gentle selfishness, and of being never able to suppose that other people could feel differently from himself, he was very much disposed to think Miss Taylor had done as sad a thing f...
  205. anticipate
    regard something as probable or likely
    She was delighted to see her father look comfortable, and very much pleased with herself for contriving things so well; but the quiet prosings of three such women made her feel that every evening so spent was indeed one of the long evenings she had fearfully anticipated.
  206. provoke
    provide the needed stimulus for
    I could not help being provoked; for after all my pains, and when I had really made a very good likeness of it--(Mrs. Weston and I were quite agreed in thinking it _very_ like)--only too handsome--too flattering--but that was a fault on the right side"--after all this, came poor dear Isabella's cold approbation of--"Yes, it was a little like--but to be sure it did not do him justice.
  207. circle
    ellipse in which the two axes are of equal length; a plane curve generated by one point moving at a constant distance from a fixed point
    "But, my dear, pray do not make any more matches; they are silly things, and break up one's family circle grievously."
  208. additional
    further or added
    The boy had, with the additional softening claim of a lingering illness of his mother's, been the means of a sort of reconciliation; and Mr. and Mrs. Churchill, having no children of their own, nor any other young creature of equal kindred to care for, offered to take the whole charge of the little Frank soon after her decease.
  209. infinite
    having no limits or boundaries in time or space or extent or magnitude
    Miss Churchill, however, being of age, and with the full command of her fortune--though her fortune bore no proportion to the family-estate--was not to be dissuaded from the marriage, and it took place, to the infinite mortification of Mr. and Mrs. Churchill, who threw her off with due decorum.
  210. intimate
    marked by close acquaintance, association, or familiarity
    Mr. Knightley, a sensible man about seven or eight-and-thirty, was not only a very old and intimate friend of the family, but particularly connected with it, as the elder brother of Isabella's husband.
  211. associate
    bring or come into association or action
    The misfortune of your birth ought to make you particularly careful as to your associates.
  212. diligence
    conscientiousness in paying proper attention to a task; giving the degree of care required in a given situation
    Whatever money he might come into when his father died, whatever his share of the family property, it is, I dare say, all afloat, all employed in his stock, and so forth; and though, with diligence and good luck, he may be rich in time, it is next to impossible that he should have realised any thing yet."
  213. vain
    characteristic of false pride; having an exaggerated sense of self-importance
    What was unwholesome to him he regarded as unfit for any body; and he had, therefore, earnestly tried to dissuade them from having any wedding-cake at all, and when that proved vain, as earnestly tried to prevent any body's eating it.
  214. assure
    inform positively and with certainty and confidence
    I do not recommend matrimony at present to Emma, though I mean no slight to the state, I assure you."
  215. constrain
    hold back
    Such another small basin of thin gruel as his own was all that he could, with thorough self-approbation, recommend; though he might constrain himself, while the ladies were comfortably clearing the nicer things, to say: "Mrs. Bates, let me propose your venturing on one of these eggs.
  216. seminary
    a theological school for training ministers or priests or rabbis
    Mrs. Goddard was the mistress of a School--not of a seminary, or an establishment, or any thing which professed, in long sentences of refined nonsense, to combine liberal acquirements with elegant morality, upon new principles and new systems--and where young ladies for enormous pay might be screwed out of health and into vanity--but a real, honest, old-fashioned Boarding-school, where a reasonable quantity of accomplishments were sold at a reasonable price, and where girls might be s...
  217. voluntarily
    out of your own free will
    Harriet was not insensible of manner; she had voluntarily noticed her father's gentleness with admiration as well as wonder.
  218. esteem
    the condition of being honored (esteemed or respected or well regarded)
    Even before Miss Taylor had ceased to hold the nominal office of governess, the mildness of her temper had hardly allowed her to impose any restraint; and the shadow of authority being now long passed away, they had been living together as friend and friend very mutually attached, and Emma doing just what she liked; highly esteeming Miss Taylor's judgment, but directed chiefly by her own.
  219. proud
    feeling self-respect or pleasure in something by which you measure your self-worth; or being a reason for pride
    What are you proud of?
  220. invitation
    a request (spoken or written) to participate or be present or take part in something
    After these came a second set; among the most come-at-able of whom were Mrs. and Miss Bates, and Mrs. Goddard, three ladies almost always at the service of an invitation from Hartfield, and who were fetched and carried home so often, that Mr. Woodhouse thought it no hardship for either James or the horses.
  221. employment
    the state of being employed or having a job
    A worthy employment for a young lady's mind!
  222. afford
    have the financial means to do something or buy something
    Highbury, the large and populous village, almost amounting to a town, to which Hartfield, in spite of its separate lawn, and shrubberies, and name, did really belong, afforded her no equals.
  223. dependence
    the state of relying on or being controlled by someone or something else
    I have a great regard for you and Emma; but when it comes to the question of dependence or independence!--At
  224. boast
    show off
    Mr. Frank Churchill was one of the boasts of Highbury, and a lively curiosity to see him prevailed, though the compliment was so little returned that he had never been there in his life.
  225. request
    express the need or desire for; ask for
    As she sat one morning, looking forward to exactly such a close of the present day, a note was brought from Mrs. Goddard, requesting, in most respectful terms, to be allowed to bring Miss Smith with her; a most welcome request: for Miss Smith was a girl of seventeen, whom Emma knew very well by sight, and had long felt an interest in, on account of her beauty.
  226. remove
    remove something concrete, as by lifting, pushing, or taking off, or remove something abstract
    Her sister, though comparatively but little removed by matrimony, being settled in London, only sixteen miles off, was much beyond her daily reach; and many a long October and November evening must be struggled through at Hartfield, before Christmas brought the next visit from Isabella and her husband, and their little children, to fill the house, and give her pleasant society again.
  227. influence
    a power to affect persons or events especially power based on prestige etc
    It was now some time since Miss Taylor had begun to influence his schemes; but as it was not the tyrannic influence of youth on youth, it had not shaken his determination of never settling till he could purchase Randalls, and the sale of Randalls was long looked forward to; but he had gone steadily on, with these objects in view, till they were accomplished.
  228. benevolent
    showing or motivated by sympathy and understanding and generosity
    With such an opinion, in confirmation of his own, Mr. Woodhouse hoped to influence every visitor of the newly married pair; but still the cake was eaten; and there was no rest for his benevolent nerves till it was all gone.
  229. engaging
    attracting or delighting
    She was not struck by any thing remarkably clever in Miss Smith's conversation, but she found her altogether very engaging--not inconveniently shy, not unwilling to talk--and yet so far from pushing, shewing so proper and becoming a deference, seeming so pleasantly grateful for being admitted to Hartfield, and so artlessly impressed by the appearance of every thing in so superior a style to what she had been used to, that she must have good sense, and deserve encouragement.
  230. purchase
    obtain by purchase; acquire by means of a financial transaction
    He had, by that time, realised an easy competence--enough to secure the purchase of a little estate adjoining Highbury, which he had always longed for--enough to marry a woman as portionless even as Miss Taylor, and to live according to the wishes of his own friendly and social disposition.
  231. length
    the linear extent in space from one end to the other; the longest dimension of something that is fixed in place
    Miniatures, half- lengths, whole-lengths, pencil, crayon, and water-colours had been all tried in turn.
  232. chapter
    a subdivision of a written work; usually numbered and titled
    CHAPTER II Mr. Weston was a native of Highbury, and born of a respectable family, which for the last two or three generations had been rising into gentility and property.
  233. occasion
    an event that occurs at a critical time
    Now was the time for Mr. Frank Churchill to come among them; and the hope strengthened when it was understood that he had written to his new mother on the occasion.
  234. create
    bring into existence
    "There does, indeed, seem as little to tempt her to break her resolution at present," said Mrs. Weston, "as can well be; and while she is so happy at Hartfield, I cannot wish her to be forming any attachment which would be creating such difficulties on poor Mr. Woodhouse's account.
  235. civil
    of or occurring within the state or between or among citizens of the state
    She had many acquaintance in the place, for her father was universally civil, but not one among them who could be accepted in lieu of Miss Taylor for even half a day.
  236. ecstasy
    a state of elated bliss
    They were both in ecstasies.
  237. mention
    make reference to
    Nobody thought of Hannah till you mentioned her--James is so obliged to you!"
  238. increase
    a process of becoming larger or longer or more numerous or more important
    The evil of the actual disparity in their ages (and Mr. Woodhouse had not married early) was much increased by his constitution and habits; for having been a valetudinarian all his life, without activity of mind or body, he was a much older man in ways than in years; and though everywhere beloved for the friendliness of his heart and his amiable temper, his talents could not have recommended him at any time.
  239. miniature
    being on a very small scale
    Miniatures, half-lengths, whole-lengths, pencil, crayon, and water-colours had been all tried in turn.
  240. office
    place of business where professional or clerical duties are performed
    Even before Miss Taylor had ceased to hold the nominal office of governess, the mildness of her temper had hardly allowed her to impose any restraint; and the shadow of authority being now long passed away, they had been living together as friend and friend very mutually attached, and Emma doing just what she liked; highly esteeming Miss Taylor's judgment, but directed chiefly by her own.
  241. avow
    to declare or affirm solemnly and formally as true
    He had only himself to please in his choice: his fortune was his own; for as to Frank, it was more than being tacitly brought up as his uncle's heir, it had become so avowed an adoption as to have him assume the name of Churchill on coming of age.
  242. ensure
    make certain of
    Mr. Elton was to take the drawing to London, chuse the frame, and give the directions; and Emma thought she could so pack it as to ensure its safety without much incommoding him, while he seemed mostly fearful of not being incommoded enough.
  243. nervous
    of or relating to the nervous system
    He was a nervous man, easily depressed; fond of every body that he was used to, and hating to part with them; hating change of every kind.
  244. cope
    come to terms with
    In her mother she lost the only person able to cope with her.
  245. reading
    written material intended to be read
    But I have done with expecting any course of steady reading from Emma.
  246. recovering
    returning to health after illness or debility
    There was no recovering Miss Taylor--nor much likelihood of ceasing to pity her; but a few weeks brought some alleviation to Mr. Woodhouse.
  247. embody
    represent in bodily form
    He had received a good education, but, on succeeding early in life to a small independence, had become indisposed for any of the more homely pursuits in which his brothers were engaged, and had satisfied an active, cheerful mind and social temper by entering into the militia of his county, then embodied.
  248. progress
    the act of moving forward (as toward a goal)
    She had always wanted to do every thing, and had made more progress both in drawing and music than many might have done with so little labour as she would ever submit to.
  249. confirmation
    information that confirms or verifies
    With such an opinion, in confirmation of his own, Mr. Woodhouse hoped to influence every visitor of the newly married pair; but still the cake was eaten; and there was no rest for his benevolent nerves till it was all gone.
  250. consciousness
    an alert cognitive state in which you are aware of yourself and your situation
    Sorrow came--a gentle sorrow--but not at all in the shape of any disagreeable consciousness.--Miss
  251. contradict
    prove negative; show to be false
    "If it were admissible to contradict a lady," said the gallant Mr. Elton-- "I have perhaps given her a little more decision of character, have taught her to think on points which had not fallen in her way before."
  252. depressed
    filled with melancholy and despondency
    He was a nervous man, easily depressed; fond of every body that he was used to, and hating to part with them; hating change of every kind.
  253. steady
    securely in position; not shaky
    But I have done with expecting any course of steady reading from Emma.
  254. occupy
    live (in a certain place)
    Mr. Weston, who had been a widower so long, and who seemed so perfectly comfortable without a wife, so constantly occupied either in his business in town or among his friends here, always acceptable wherever he went, always cheerful--Mr. Weston need not spend a single evening in the year alone if he did not like it.
  255. complete
    perfect and complete in every respect; having all necessary qualities
    A complete change of life became desirable.
  256. transition
    the act of passing from one state or place to the next
    There were wishes at Randalls respecting Emma's destiny, but it was not desirable to have them suspected; and the quiet transition which Mr. Knightley soon afterwards made to "What does Weston think of the weather; shall we have rain?" convinced her that he had nothing more to say or surmise about Hartfield.
  257. execute
    put in effect
    "Might he be trusted with the commission, what infinite pleasure should he have in executing it! he could ride to London at any time.
  258. portrait
    any likeness of a person, in any medium
    Emma wished to go to work directly, and therefore produced the portfolio containing her various attempts at portraits, for not one of them had ever been finished, that they might decide together on the best size for Harriet.
  259. grievance
    a complaint about a (real or imaginary) wrong that causes resentment and is grounds for action
    Had it taken place only once a year, it would have been a grievance.
  260. shape
    a perceptual structure
    Sorrow came--a gentle sorrow--but not at all in the shape of any disagreeable consciousness.--Miss
  261. seldom
    not often
    "I do not know what I could imagine, but I confess that I have seldom seen a face or figure more pleasing to me than hers.
  262. circumstances
    your overall circumstances or condition in life (including everything that happens to you)
    And then there was such comfort in the very easy distance of Randalls from Hartfield, so convenient for even solitary female walking, and in Mr. Weston's disposition and circumstances, which would make the approaching season no hindrance to their spending half the evenings in the week together.
  263. kindred
    group of people related by blood or marriage
    The boy had, with the additional softening claim of a lingering illness of his mother's, been the means of a sort of reconciliation; and Mr. and Mrs. Churchill, having no children of their own, nor any other young creature of equal kindred to care for, offered to take the whole charge of the little Frank soon after her decease.
  264. confine
    place limits on (extent or access)
    Her father never went beyond the shrubbery, where two divisions of the ground sufficed him for his long walk, or his short, as the year varied; and since Mrs. Weston's marriage her exercise had been too much confined.
  265. impose
    impose and collect
    Even before Miss Taylor had ceased to hold the nominal office of governess, the mildness of her temper had hardly allowed her to impose any restraint; and the shadow of authority being now long passed away, they had been living together as friend and friend very mutually attached, and Emma doing just what she liked; highly esteeming Miss Taylor's judgment, but directed chiefly by her own.
  266. attend
    be present at (meetings, church services, university), etc.
    Her situation was altogether the subject of hours of gratitude to Mrs. Weston, and of moments only of regret; and her satisfaction--her more than satisfaction--her cheerful enjoyment, was so just and so apparent, that Emma, well as she knew her father, was sometimes taken by surprize at his being still able to pity 'poor Miss Taylor,' when they left her at Randalls in the centre of every domestic comfort, or saw her go away in the evening attended by her pleasant husband to a carriage...
  267. countenance
    the appearance conveyed by a person's face
    "Such an eye!--the true hazle eye--and so brilliant! regular features, open countenance, with a complexion! oh! what a bloom of full health, and such a pretty height and size; such a firm and upright figure!
  268. principally
    for the most part
    "Exactly so; that is what principally strikes me.
  269. devoted
    zealous in devotion or affection
    She recalled her past kindness--the kindness, the affection of sixteen years--how she had taught and how she had played with her from five years old--how she had devoted all her powers to attach and amuse her in health--and how nursed her through the various illnesses of childhood.
  270. describe
    give a description of
    But the Martins occupied her thoughts a good deal; she had spent two very happy months with them, and now loved to talk of the pleasures of her visit, and describe the many comforts and wonders of the place.
  271. property
    something owned; any tangible or intangible possession that is owned by someone
    CHAPTER II Mr. Weston was a native of Highbury, and born of a respectable family, which for the last two or three generations had been rising into gentility and property.
  272. include
    have as a part, be made up out of
    For a few days, every morning visit in Highbury included some mention of the handsome letter Mrs. Weston had received.
  273. skill
    an ability that has been acquired by training
    She was not much deceived as to her own skill either as an artist or a musician, but she was not unwilling to have others deceived, or sorry to know her reputation for accomplishment often higher than it deserved.
  274. combine
    put or add together
    Mrs. Goddard was the mistress of a School--not of a seminary, or an establishment, or any thing which professed, in long sentences of refined nonsense, to combine liberal acquirements with elegant morality, upon new principles and new systems--and where young ladies for enormous pay might be screwed out of health and into vanity--but a real, honest, old-fashioned Boarding-school, where a reasonable quantity of accomplishments were sold at a reasonable price, and where girls might be s...
  275. domestic
    a servant who is paid to perform menial tasks around the household
    was true that her friend was going only half a mile from them; but Emma was aware that great must be the difference between a Mrs. Weston, only half a mile from them, and a Miss Taylor in the house; and with all her advantages, natural and domestic, she was now in great danger of suffering from intellectual solitude.
  276. blunder
    an embarrassing mistake
    No, no; she has qualities which may be trusted; she will never lead any one really wrong; she will make no lasting blunder; where Emma errs once, she is in the right a hundred times."
  277. vacant
    without an occupant or incumbent
    Real, long-standing regard brought the Westons and Mr. Knightley; and by Mr. Elton, a young man living alone without liking it, the privilege of exchanging any vacant evening of his own blank solitude for the elegancies and society of Mr. Woodhouse's drawing-room, and the smiles of his lovely daughter, was in no danger of being thrown away.
  278. addition
    the arithmetic operation of summing; calculating the sum of two or more numbers
    Mrs. Weston had, of course, formed a very favourable idea of the young man; and such a pleasing attention was an irresistible proof of his great good sense, and a most welcome addition to every source and every expression of congratulation which her marriage had already secured.
  279. infinitely
    continuing forever without end
    She was a beautiful creature when she came to you, but, in my opinion, the attractions you have added are infinitely superior to what she received from nature."
  280. caress
    touch or stroke lightly in a loving or endearing manner
    Her mother had died too long ago for her to have more than an indistinct remembrance of her caresses; and her place had been supplied by an excellent woman as governess, who had fallen little short of a mother in affection.
  281. apprehend
    anticipate with dread or anxiety
    Pray excuse me; but supposing any little inconvenience may be apprehended from the intimacy, it cannot be expected that Emma, accountable to nobody but her father, who perfectly approves the acquaintance, should put an end to it, so long as it is a source of pleasure to herself.
  282. compassion
    a deep awareness of and sympathy for another's suffering
    Matrimony, as the origin of change, was always disagreeable; and he was by no means yet reconciled to his own daughter's marrying, nor could ever speak of her but with compassion, though it had been entirely a match of affection, when he was now obliged to part with Miss Taylor too; and from his habits of gentle selfishness, and of being never able to suppose that other people could feel differently from himself, he was very much disposed to think Miss Taylor had done as sad a thing f...
  283. detach
    cause to become detached or separated; take off
    _She_ would notice her; she would improve her; she would detach her from her bad acquaintance, and introduce her into good society; she would form her opinions and her manners.
  284. plenty
    a full supply
    Mrs. Goddard's school was in high repute--and very deservedly; for Highbury was reckoned a particularly healthy spot: she had an ample house and garden, gave the children plenty of wholesome food, let them run about a great deal in the summer, and in winter dressed their chilblains with her own hands.
  285. attitude
    a complex mental state involving beliefs and feelings and values and dispositions to act in certain ways
    The sitting began; and Harriet, smiling and blushing, and afraid of not keeping her attitude and countenance, presented a very sweet mixture of youthful expression to the steady eyes of the artist.
  286. animated
    having life or vigor or spirit
    It was a happy circumstance, and animated Mr. Woodhouse for some time.
  287. hence
    (used to introduce a logical conclusion) from that fact or reason or as a result
    Six years hence, if he could meet with a good sort of young woman in the same rank as his own, with a little money, it might be very desirable."
  288. share
    assets belonging to or due to or contributed by an individual person or group
    Harriet was very ready to speak of the share he had had in their moonlight walks and merry evening games; and dwelt a good deal upon his being so very good-humoured and obliging.
  289. supply
    circulate or distribute or equip with
    Her mother had died too long ago for her to have more than an indistinct remembrance of her caresses; and her place had been supplied by an excellent woman as governess, who had fallen little short of a mother in affection.
  290. achieve
    to gain with effort
    His coming to visit his father had been often talked of but never achieved.
  291. removed
    separate or apart in time
    Her sister, though comparatively but little removed by matrimony, being settled in London, only sixteen miles off, was much beyond her daily reach; and many a long October and November evening must be struggled through at Hartfield, before Christmas brought the next visit from Isabella and her husband, and their little children, to fill the house, and give her pleasant society again.
  292. errand
    a short trip that is taken in the performance of a necessary task or mission
    It was impossible to say how much he should be gratified by being employed on such an errand."
  293. refrain
    resist doing something
    She had resolution enough to pursue her own will in spite of her brother, but not enough to refrain from unreasonable regrets at that brother's unreasonable anger, nor from missing the luxuries of her former home.
  294. discern
    detect with the senses
    was no being displeased with such an encourager, for his admiration made him discern a likeness almost before it was possible.
  295. anticipated
    expected hopefully
    She was delighted to see her father look comfortable, and very much pleased with herself for contriving things so well; but the quiet prosings of three such women made her feel that every evening so spent was indeed one of the long evenings she had fearfully anticipated.
  296. alert
    warn or arouse to a sense of danger or call to a state of preparedness
    His gallantry was always on the alert.
  297. prefer
    like better; value more highly
    Not unfrequently, through Emma's persuasion, he had some of the chosen and the best to dine with him: but evening parties were what he preferred; and, unless he fancied himself at any time unequal to company, there was scarcely an evening in the week in which Emma could not make up a card-table for him.
  298. vex
    cause annoyance in; disturb, especially by minor irritations
    Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, and rich, with a comfortable home and happy disposition, seemed to unite some of the best blessings of existence; and had lived nearly twenty-one years in the world with very little to distress or vex her.
  299. depress
    press down
    He was a nervous man, easily depressed; fond of every body that he was used to, and hating to part with them; hating change of every kind.
  300. undertaking
    any piece of work that is undertaken or attempted
    It would be an interesting, and certainly a very kind undertaking; highly becoming her own situation in life, her leisure, and powers.
  301. arrange
    put into a proper or systematic order
    I have seen a great many lists of her drawing-up at various times of books that she meant to read regularly through--and very good lists they were--very well chosen, and very neatly arranged--sometimes alphabetically, and sometimes by some other rule.
  302. connect
    connect, fasten, or put together two or more pieces
    Mr. Knightley, a sensible man about seven or eight-and-thirty, was not only a very old and intimate friend of the family, but particularly connected with it, as the elder brother of Isabella's husband.
  303. commission
    the act of granting authority to undertake certain functions
    It must be done directly; it must be done in London; the order must go through the hands of some intelligent person whose taste could be depended on; and Isabella, the usual doer of all commissions, must not be applied to, because it was December, and Mr. Woodhouse could not bear the idea of her stirring out of her house in the fogs of December.
  304. estate
    extensive landed property (especially in the country) retained by the owner for his own use
    Miss Churchill, however, being of age, and with the full command of her fortune--though her fortune bore no proportion to the family- estate--was not to be dissuaded from the marriage, and it took place, to the infinite mortification of Mr. and Mrs. Churchill, who threw her off with due decorum.
  305. acquire
    come into the possession of something concrete or abstract
    She had no visible friends but what had been acquired at Highbury, and was now just returned from a long visit in the country to some young ladies who had been at school there with her.
  306. exercise
    the activity of exerting your muscles in various ways to keep fit
    Her father never went beyond the shrubbery, where two divisions of the ground sufficed him for his long walk, or his short, as the year varied; and since Mrs. Weston's marriage her exercise had been too much confined.
  307. affirm
    to declare or affirm solemnly and formally as true
    Where Miss Taylor failed to stimulate, I may safely affirm that Harriet Smith will do nothing.--You
  308. restraint
    the act of controlling by restraining someone or something
    Even before Miss Taylor had ceased to hold the nominal office of governess, the mildness of her temper had hardly allowed her to impose any restraint; and the shadow of authority being now long passed away, they had been living together as friend and friend very mutually attached, and Emma doing just what she liked; highly esteeming Miss Taylor's judgment, but directed chiefly by her own.
  309. desire
    the feeling that accompanies an unsatisfied state
    Harriet certainly was not clever, but she had a sweet, docile, grateful disposition, was totally free from conceit, and only desiring to be guided by any one she looked up to.
  310. perception
    the process of perceiving
    His perception of the striking improvement of Harriet's manner, since her introduction at Hartfield, was not one of the least agreeable proofs of his growing attachment.
  311. attention
    the process whereby a person concentrates on some features of the environment to the (relative) exclusion of others
    But if you want to shew him any attention, my dear, ask him to come and dine with us some day.
  312. alarm
    a device that signals the occurrence of some undesirable event
    Emma watched her through the fluctuations of this speech, and saw no alarming symptoms of love.