Shakespeare's "Romeo & Juliet" 220 words

Vocabulary study list for Shakespeare's "Romeo & Juliet."
  1. addle
    mix up or confuse
    Thy head is as full of quarrels as an egg is full of meat; and yet thy head hath been beaten as addle as an egg for quarrelling.
  2. prolixity
    boring verbosity
    Ben. The date is out of such prolixity.
  3. arbitrate
    act between parties with a view to reconciling differences
    Therefore, out of thy long-experienc'd time, Give me some present counsel; or, behold, 'Twixt my extremes and me this bloody knife Shall play the empire, arbitrating that Which the commission of thy years and art Could to no issue of true honour br
  4. doff
    remove
    Romeo, doff thy name; And for that name, which is no part of thee, Take all myself.
  5. amble
    walk leisurely
    I am not for this ambling.
  6. dowdy
    lacking in smartness or taste
    Laura, to his lady, was but a kitchen wench (marry, she had a better love to berhyme her), Dido a dowdy, Cleopatra a gypsy, Helen and Hero hildings and harlots, This be a gray eye or so, but not to the purpose.
  7. waddle
    walk unsteadily
    And since that time it is eleven years, For then she could stand high-lone; nay, by th' rood, She could have run and waddled all about; For even the day before, she broke her brow; And then my husband (God be with his soul!
  8. drivel
    saliva spilling from the mouth
    For this drivelling love is like a great natural that runs lolling up and down to hide his bauble in a hole.
  9. bawdy
    humorously vulgar
    Mer. 'Tis no less, I tell ye; for the bawdy hand of the dial is now upon the prick of noon.
  10. sententious
    concise and full of meaning
    R is for the- No; I know it begins with some other letter; and she hath the prettiest sententious of it, of you and rosemary, that it would do you good to hear it.
  11. jocund
    full of or showing high-spirited merriment
    Night's candles are burnt out, and jocund day Stands tiptoe on the misty mountain tops.
  12. braggart
    a very boastful and talkative person
    Zounds, a dog, a rat, a mouse, a cat, to scratch a man to death! a braggart, a rogue, a villain, that fights by the book of arithmetic!
  13. trudge
    walk heavily and firmly, as when weary, or through mud
    [To Servant, giving him a paper] Go, sirrah, trudge about Through fair Verona; find those persons out Whose names are written there, and to them say, My house and welcome on their pleasure stay- Exeunt [Capulet and Paris].
  14. paramour
    a woman's lover
    Shall I believe That unsubstantial Death is amorous, And that the lean abhorred monster keeps Thee here in dark to be his paramour?
  15. rote
    memorization by repetition
    O, she knew well Thy love did read by rote, that could not spell.
  16. garish
    tastelessly showy
    Come, gentle night; come, loving, black-brow'd night; Give me my Romeo; and, when he shall die, Take him and cut him out in little stars, And he will make the face of heaven so fine That all the world will be in love with night And pay no worship to the garish sun.
  17. gossamer
    a gauze fabric with an extremely fine texture
    A lover may bestride the gossamer That idles in the wanton summer air, And yet not fall; so light is vanity.
  18. bauble
    cheap showy jewelry or ornament on clothing
    For this drivelling love is like a great natural that runs lolling up and down to hide his bauble in a hole.
  19. gory
    covered with blood
    What mean these masterless and gory swords To lie discolour'd by this place of peace?
  20. lineament
    the characteristic parts of a person's face: eyes and nose and mouth and chin
    Read o'er the volume of young Paris' face, And find delight writ there with beauty's pen; Examine every married lineament, And see how one another lends content; And what obscur'd in this fair volume lies Find written in the margent of his eyes, This precious book of love, this unbound lover, To beautify him only lacks a cover.
  21. canker
    an ulceration (especially of the lips or lining of the mouth)
    Two such opposed kings encamp them still In man as well as herbs- grace and rude will; And where the worser is predominant, Full soon the canker death eats up that plant.
  22. misadventure
    an instance of misfortune
    Your looks are pale and wild and do import Some misadventure.
  23. forswear
    formally reject or disavow a formerly held belief, usually under pressure
    She hath forsworn to love, and in that vow Do I live dead that live to tell it now.
  24. dank
    unpleasantly cool and humid
    Non, ere the sun advance his burning eye The day to cheer and night's dank dew to dry, I must up-fill this osier cage of ours With baleful weeds and precious-juiced flowers.
  25. penury
    a state of extreme poverty or destitution
    Noting this penury, to myself I said, 'An if a man did need a poison now Whose sale is present death in Mantua, Here lives a caitiff wretch would sell it him.'
  26. peruse
    examine or consider with attention and in detail
    Let me peruse this face.
  27. poultice
    a medical dressing consisting of a soft heated mass of meal or clay that is spread on a cloth and applied to the skin to treat inflamed areas or improve circulation etc.
    Is this the poultice for my aching bones?
  28. distraught
    deeply agitated especially from emotion
    Or, if I live, is it not very like The horrible conceit of death and night, Together with the terror of the place- As in a vault, an ancient receptacle Where for this many hundred years the bones Of all my buried ancestors are pack'd; Where bloody Tybalt, yet but green in earth, Lies fest'ring in his shroud; where, as they say, At some hours in the night spirits resort- Alack, alack, is it not like that I, So early waking- what with loathsome smells, And shrieks like mandrakes torn out of th...
  29. presage
    a foreboding about what is about to happen
    Rom. If I may trust the flattering truth of sleep My dreams presage some joyful news at hand.
  30. prate
    speak (about unimportant matters) rapidly and incessantly
    Lord, Lord! when 'twas a little prating thing- O, there is a nobleman in town, one Paris, that would fain lay knife aboard; but she, good soul, had as lieve see a toad, a very toad, as see him.
  31. sunder
    break apart or in two, using violence
    O, what more favour can I do to thee Than with that hand that cut thy youth in twain To sunder his that was thine enemy?
  32. carrion
    the dead and rotting body of an animal; unfit for human food
    More validity, More honourable state, more courtship lives In carrion flies than Romeo.
  33. conspire
    act in unison or agreement and in secret towards a deceitful or illegal purpose
    What further woe conspires against mine age?
  34. baleful
    threatening or foreshadowing evil or tragic developments
    Non, ere the sun advance his burning eye The day to cheer and night's dank dew to dry, I must up-fill this osier cage of ours With baleful weeds and precious-juiced flowers.
  35. mischance
    an unpredictable outcome that is unfortunate
    Meantime forbear, And let mischance be slave to patience.
  36. minion
    a servile or fawning dependant
    Mistress minion you, Thank me no thankings, nor proud me no prouds, But fettle your fine joints 'gainst Thursday next To go with Paris to Saint Peter's Church, Or I will drag thee on a hurdle thither.
  37. propagate
    multiply sexually or asexually
    Griefs of mine own lie heavy in my breast, Which thou wilt propagate, to have it prest With more of thine.
  38. dirge
    a song or hymn of mourning composed or performed as a memorial to a dead person
    Cap. All things that we ordained festival Turn from their office to black funeral- Our instruments to melancholy bells, Our wedding cheer to a sad burial feast; Our solemn hymns to sullen dirges change; Our bridal flowers serve for a buried corse; And all things change them to the contrary.
  39. headstrong
    habitually disposed to disobedience and opposition
    Cap. How now, my headstrong?
  40. conduit
    a passage (a pipe or tunnel) through which water or electric wires can pass
    How now? a conduit, girl?
  41. nuptial
    of or relating to a wedding
    'Tis since the nuptial of Lucentio, Come Pentecost as quickly as it will, Some five-and-twenty years, and then we mask'd. 2.
  42. impute
    attribute or credit to
    Therefore pardon me, And not impute this yielding to light love, Which the dark night hath so discovered.
  43. vial
    a small bottle that contains a drug (especially a sealed sterile container for injection by needle)
    Take thou this vial, being then in bed, And this distilled liquor drink thou off; When presently through all thy veins shall run A cold and drowsy humour; for no pulse Shall keep his native progress, but surcease; No warmth, no breath, shall testify thou livest; The roses in thy lips and cheeks shall fade To paly ashes, thy eyes' windows fall Like death when he shuts up the day of life; Each part, depriv'd of supple government, Shall, stiff and stark and cold, appear like death; And ...
  44. incorporate
    make into a whole or make part of a whole
    Come, come with me, and we will make short work; For, by your leaves, you shall not stay alone Till Holy Church incorporate two in one.
  45. potion
    a medicinal or magical or poisonous beverage
    Then gave I her (so tutored by my art) A sleeping potion; which so took effect As I intended, for it wrought on her The form of death.
  46. budge
    move very slightly
    I will not budge for no man's pleasure,
    Enter Romeo.
  47. bandy
    discuss lightly
    Had she affections and warm youthful blood, She would be as swift in motion as a ball; My words would bandy her to my sweet love, And his to me, But old folks, many feign as they were dead- Unwieldy, slow, heavy and pale as lead.
  48. unwieldy
    difficult to use or handle or manage because of size or weight or shape
    Had she affections and warm youthful blood, She would be as swift in motion as a ball; My words would bandy her to my sweet love, And his to me, But old folks, many feign as they were dead- Unwieldy, slow, heavy and pale as lead.
  49. effeminate
    having unsuitable feminine qualities
    O sweet Juliet, Thy beauty hath made me effeminate And in my temper soft'ned valour's steel
    Enter Benvolio.
  50. ambiguity
    unclearness by virtue of having more than one meaning
    Seal up the mouth of outrage for a while, Till we can clear these ambiguities And know their spring, their head, their true descent; And then will I be general of your woes And lead you even to death.
  51. stealth
    avoiding detection by moving carefully
    Romeo is banish'd; and all the world to nothing That he dares ne'er come back to challenge you; Or if he do, it needs must be by stealth.
  52. musty
    covered with or smelling of mold
    Meagre were his looks, Sharp misery had worn him to the bones; And in his needy shop a tortoise hung, An alligator stuff'd, and other skins Of ill-shaped fishes; and about his shelves A beggarly account of empty boxes, Green earthen pots, bladders, and musty seeds, Remnants of packthread, and old cakes of roses Were thinly scattered, to make up a show.
  53. hap
    come to pass
    Hence will I to my ghostly father's cell, His help to crave and my dear hap to tell.
  54. cull
    remove something that has been rejected
    I do remember an apothecary, And hereabouts 'a dwells, which late I noted In tatt'red weeds, with overwhelming brows, Culling of simples.
  55. scurvy
    a condition caused by deficiency of ascorbic acid (vitamin C)
    Scurvy knave!
  56. fleck
    a small contrasting part of something
    The grey-ey'd morn smiles on the frowning night, Check'ring the Eastern clouds with streaks of light; And flecked darkness like a drunkard reels From forth day's path and Titan's fiery wheels.
  57. agile
    moving quickly and lightly
    Romeo he cries aloud, 'Hold, friends! friends, part!' and swifter than his tongue, His agile arm beats down their fatal points, And 'twixt them rushes; underneath whose arm An envious thrust from Tybalt hit the life Of stout Mercutio, and then Tybalt fled; But by-and-by comes back to Romeo, Who had but newly entertain'd revenge, And to't they go like lightning; for, ere I Could draw to part them, was stout Tybalt slain; And, as he fell, did Romeo turn and fly.
  58. portly
    euphemisms for `fat'
    'A bears him like a portly gentleman, And, to say truth, Verona brags of him To be a virtuous and well-govern'd youth.
  59. loll
    be lazy or idle
    For this drivelling love is like a great natural that runs lolling up and down to hide his bauble in a hole.
  60. impeach
    bring an accusation against; level a charge against
    I am the greatest, able to do least, Yet most suspected, as the time and place Doth make against me, of this direful murther; And here I stand, both to impeach and purge Myself condemned and myself excus'd.
  61. invocation
    the act of appealing for help
    That were some spite; my invocation Is fair and honest: in his mistress' name, I conjure only but to raise up him.
  62. abate
    become less in amount or intensity
    And this shall free thee from this present shame, If no inconstant toy nor womanish fear Abate thy valour in the acting it.
  63. bode
    indicate by signs
    This is that very Mab That plats the manes of horses in the night And bakes the elflocks in foul sluttish, hairs, Which once untangled much misfortune bodes This is the hag, when maids lie on their backs, That presses them and learns them first to bear, Making them women of good carriage.
  64. wreak
    cause to happen or to occur as a consequence
    O, how my heart abhors To hear him nam'd and cannot come to him, To wreak the love I bore my cousin Tybalt Upon his body that hath slaughter'd him!
  65. troth
    a solemn pledge of fidelity
    By my troth, it is well said.
  66. doleful
    filled with or evoking sadness
    'When griping grief the heart doth wound, And doleful dumps the mind oppress, Then music with her silver sound'-
    Why 'silver sound'?
  67. contagion
    an incident in which an infectious disease is transmitted
    Lady, come from that nest Of death, contagion, and unnatural sleep.
  68. dedicate
    give entirely to a specific person, activity, or cause
    Mon. Both by myself and many other friend; But he, his own affections' counsellor, Is to himself- I will not say how true- But to himself so secret and so close, So far from sounding and discovery, As is the bud bit with an envious worm Ere he can spread his sweet leaves to the air Or dedicate his beauty to the sun.
  69. felon
    someone who has committed a crime or has been legally convicted of a crime
    Par. I do defy thy, conjuration And apprehend thee for a felon here.
  70. dote
    shower with love; show excessive affection for
    For doting, not for loving, pupil mine.
  71. clout
    (boxing) a blow with the fist
    I anger her sometimes, and tell her that Paris is the properer man; but I'll warrant you, when I say so, she looks as pale as any clout in the versal world.
  72. stifle
    impair the respiration of or obstruct the air passage of
    Shall I not then be stifled in the vault, To whose foul mouth no healthsome air breathes in, And there die strangled ere my Romeo comes?
  73. gripe
    complain
    'When griping grief the heart doth wound, And doleful dumps the mind oppress, Then music with her silver sound'-
    Why 'silver sound'?
  74. purgatory
    (theology) in Roman Catholic theology the place where those who have died in a state of grace undergo limited torment to expiate their sins
    Rom. There is no world without Verona walls, But purgatory, torture, hell itself.
  75. unruly
    of persons
    All this- uttered With gentle breath, calm look, knees humbly bow'd- Could not take truce with the unruly spleen Of Tybalt deaf to peace, but that he tilts With piercing steel at bold Mercutio's breast; Who, all as hot, turns deadly point to point, And, with a martial scorn, with one hand beats Cold death aside and with the other sends It back to Tybalt, whose dexterity Retorts it.
  76. unseemly
    not in keeping with accepted standards of what is right or proper in polite society
    Unseemly woman in a seeming man!
  77. apothecary
    a health professional trained in the art of preparing and dispensing drugs
    I do remember an apothecary, And hereabouts 'a dwells, which late I noted In tatt'red weeds, with overwhelming brows, Culling of simples.
  78. predominant
    having superior power and influence
    Two such opposed kings encamp them still In man as well as herbs- grace and rude will; And where the worser is predominant, Full soon the canker death eats up that plant.
  79. fickle
    liable to sudden unpredictable change
    Jul. O Fortune, Fortune! all men call thee fickle.
  80. sallow
    unhealthy looking
    What a deal of brine Hath wash'd thy sallow cheeks for Rosaline!
  81. perjury
    criminal offense of making false statements under oath
    At lovers' perjuries, They say Jove laughs.
  82. conjure
    summon into action or bring into existence, often as if by magic
    Mer. Nay, I'll conjure too.
  83. transgression
    the act of transgressing; the violation of a law or a duty or moral principle
    Rom. Why, such is love's transgression.
  84. descry
    catch sight of
    We see the ground whereon these woes do lie, But the true ground of all these piteous woes We cannot without circumstance descry.
  85. environ
    extend on all sides of simultaneously; encircle
    Or, if I live, is it not very like The horrible conceit of death and night, Together with the terror of the place- As in a vault, an ancient receptacle Where for this many hundred years the bones Of all my buried ancestors are pack'd; Where bloody Tybalt, yet but green in earth, Lies fest'ring in his shroud; where, as they say, At some hours in the night spirits resort- Alack, alack, is it not like that I, So early waking- what with loathsome smells, And shrieks like mandrakes torn out of th...
  86. supple
    moving and bending with ease
    Take thou this vial, being then in bed, And this distilled liquor drink thou off; When presently through all thy veins shall run A cold and drowsy humour; for no pulse Shall keep his native progress, but surcease; No warmth, no breath, shall testify thou livest; The roses in thy lips and cheeks shall fade To paly ashes, thy eyes' windows fall Like death when he shuts up the day of life; Each part, depriv'd of supple government, Shall, stiff and stark and cold, appear like death; And ...
  87. antic
    ludicrously odd
    What, dares the slave Come hither, cover'd with an antic face, To fleer and scorn at our solemnity?
  88. prologue
    an introduction to a play
    THE PROLOGUE
    Enter Chorus.
  89. disperse
    move away from each other
    Let me have A dram of poison, such soon-speeding gear As will disperse itself through all the veins That the life-weary taker mall fall dead, And that the trunk may be discharg'd of breath As violently as hasty powder fir'd Doth hurry from the fatal cannon's womb.
  90. predicament
    a situation from which extrication is difficult especially an unpleasant or trying one
    Piteous predicament!
  91. stint
    supply sparingly and with restricted quantities
    'Wilt thou not, Jule?' quoth he, And, pretty fool, it stinted, and said 'Ay.' Wife.
  92. uneven
    (of a contest or contestants) not fairly matched as opponents
    Uneven is the course; I like it not.
  93. whit
    a tiny or scarcely detectable amount
    Cap. No, not a whit.
  94. amended
    modified for the better
    Mus. Ay, by my troth, the case may be amended.
  95. validity
    the quality of being valid and rigorous
    More validity, More honourable state, more courtship lives In carrion flies than Romeo.
  96. stumble
    miss a step and fall or nearly fall
    O, mickle is the powerful grace that lies In plants, herbs, stones, and their true qualities; For naught so vile that on the earth doth live But to the earth some special good doth give; Nor aught so good but, strain'd from that fair use, Revolts from true birth, stumbling on abuse.
  97. pensive
    deeply or seriously thoughtful
    My leisure serves me, pensive daughter, now.
  98. perverse
    deviating from what is considered moral or right or proper or good
    Or if thou thinkest I am too quickly won, I'll frown, and be perverse, and say thee nay, So thou wilt woo; but else, not for the world.
  99. inexorable
    not to be placated or appeased or moved by entreaty
    The time and my intents are savage-wild, More fierce and more inexorable far Than empty tigers or the roaring sea.
  100. tithe
    a levy of one tenth of something
    Sometime she gallops o'er a courtier's nose, And then dreams he of smelling out a suit; And sometime comes she with a tithe-pig's tail Tickling a parson's nose as 'a lies asleep, Then dreams he of another benefice.
  101. purge
    rid of impurities
    I am the greatest, able to do least, Yet most suspected, as the time and place Doth make against me, of this direful murther; And here I stand, both to impeach and purge Myself condemned and myself excus'd.
  102. brawl
    to quarrel noisily, angrily or disruptively
    Three civil brawls, bred of an airy word By thee, old Capulet, and Montague, Have thrice disturb'd the quiet of our streets And made Verona's ancient citizens Cast by their grave beseeming ornaments To wield old partisans, in hands as old, Cank'red with peace, to part your cank'red hate.
  103. distill
    undergo condensation; change from a gaseous to a liquid state and fall in drops
    Take thou this vial, being then in bed, And this distilled liquor drink thou off; When presently through all thy veins shall run A cold and drowsy humour; for no pulse Shall keep his native progress, but surcease; No warmth, no breath, shall testify thou livest; The roses in thy lips and cheeks shall fade To paly ashes, thy eyes' windows fall Like death when he shuts up the day of life; Each part, depriv'd of supple government, Shall, stiff and stark and cold, appear like death; And ...
  104. meddle
    intrude in other people's affairs or business; interfere unwantedly
    It is written that the shoemaker should meddle with his yard and the tailor with his last, the fisher with his pencil and the painter with his nets; but I am sent to find those persons whose names are here writ, and can never find what names the writing person hath here writ.
  105. nimble
    moving quickly and lightly
    You have dancing shoes With nimble soles; I have a soul of lead So stakes me to the ground I cannot move.
  106. amorous
    inclined toward or displaying love
    Lovers can see to do their amorous rites By their own beauties; or, if love be blind, It best agrees with night.
  107. variable
    something that is likely to vary; something that is subject to variation
    Rom. Lady, by yonder blessed moon I swear, That tips with silver all these fruit-tree tops- Jul. O, swear not by the moon, th' inconstant moon, That monthly changes in her circled orb, Lest that thy love prove likewise variable.
  108. chide
    censure severely or angrily
    Rom. I pray thee chide not.
  109. expire
    lose validity
    Rom. I fear, too early; for my mind misgives Some consequence, yet hanging in the stars, Shall bitterly begin his fearful date With this night's revels and expire the term Of a despised life, clos'd in my breast, By some vile forfeit of untimely death.
  110. mire
    a soft wet area of low-lying land that sinks underfoot
    If thou art Dun, we'll draw thee from the mire Of this sir-reverence love, wherein thou stick'st Up to the ears.
  111. drowsy
    half asleep
    Take thou this vial, being then in bed, And this distilled liquor drink thou off; When presently through all thy veins shall run A cold and drowsy humour; for no pulse Shall keep his native progress, but surcease; No warmth, no breath, shall testify thou livest; The roses in thy lips and cheeks shall fade To paly ashes, thy eyes' windows fall Like death when he shuts up the day of life; Each part, depriv'd of supple government, Shall, stiff and stark and cold, appear like death; And ...
  112. pestilence
    any epidemic disease with a high death rate
    Going to find a barefoot brother out, One of our order, to associate me Here in this city visiting the sick, And finding him, the searchers of the town, Suspecting that we both were in a house Where the infectious pestilence did reign, Seal'd up the doors, and would not let us forth, So that my speed to Mantua there was stay'd.
  113. dexterity
    adroitness in using the hands
    All this- uttered With gentle breath, calm look, knees humbly bow'd- Could not take truce with the unruly spleen Of Tybalt deaf to peace, but that he tilts With piercing steel at bold Mercutio's breast; Who, all as hot, turns deadly point to point, And, with a martial scorn, with one hand beats Cold death aside and with the other sends It back to Tybalt, whose dexterity Retorts it.
  114. confines
    a bounded scope
    Mer. Thou art like one of these fellows that, when he enters the confines of a tavern, claps me his sword upon the table and says 'God send me no need of thee!' and by the operation of the second cup draws him on the drawer, when indeed there is no need.
  115. solace
    comfort in disappointment or misery
    But one, poor one, one poor and loving child, But one thing to rejoice and solace in, And cruel Death hath catch'd it from my sight!
  116. adversity
    a state of misfortune or affliction
    I'll give thee armour to keep off that word; Adversity's sweet milk, philosophy, To comfort thee, though thou art banished.
  117. stratagem
    an elaborate or deceitful scheme contrived to deceive or evade
    Alack, alack, that heaven should practise stratagems Upon so soft a subject as myself!
  118. smelt
    extract (metals) by heating
    Within the infant rind of this small flower Poison hath residence, and medicine power; For this, being smelt, with that part cheers each part; Being tasted, slays all senses with the heart.
  119. giddy
    lacking seriousness; given to frivolity
    Ben. Tut, man, one fire burns out another's burning; One pain is lessoned by another's anguish; Turn giddy, and be holp by backward turning; One desperate grief cures with another's languish.
  120. pernicious
    exceedingly harmful
    What, ho! you men, you beasts, That quench the fire of your pernicious rage With purple fountains issuing from your veins!
  121. idolatry
    the worship of idols; the worship of images that are not God
    Jul. Do not swear at all; Or if thou wilt, swear by thy gracious self, Which is the god of my idolatry, And I'll believe thee.
  122. ebb
    the outward flow of the tide
    In one little body Thou counterfeit'st a bark, a sea, a wind: For still thy eyes, which I may call the sea, Do ebb and flow with tears; the bark thy body is Sailing in this salt flood; the winds, thy sighs, Who, raging with thy tears and they with them, Without a sudden calm will overset Thy tempest-tossed body.
  123. cleft
    a long narrow opening
    Mer. Alas, poor Romeo, he is already dead! stabb'd with a white wench's black eye; shot through the ear with a love song; the very pin of his heart cleft with the blind bow-boy's butt-shaft; and is he a man to encounter Tybalt?
  124. tarry
    leave slowly and hesitantly
    Come, we'll in here, tarry for the mourners, and stay dinner.
  125. morsel
    a small amount of solid food; a mouthful
    Rom. Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death, Gorg'd with the dearest morsel of the earth, Thus I enforce thy rotten jaws to open, And in despite I'll cram thee with more food.
  126. scourge
    something causing misery or death
    Capulet, Montage, See what a scourge is laid upon your hate, That heaven finds means to kill your joys with love!
  127. distribute
    give to several people
    ELECTRONIC AND MACHINE READABLE COPIES MAY BE DISTRIBUTED SO LONG AS SUCH COPIES (1) ARE FOR YOUR OR OTHERS PERSONAL USE ONLY, AND (2) ARE NOT DISTRIBUTED OR USED COMMERCIALLY.
  128. abhor
    find repugnant
    O, how my heart abhors To hear him nam'd and cannot come to him, To wreak the love I bore my cousin Tybalt Upon his body that hath slaughter'd him!
  129. visage
    the human face (`kisser' and `smiler' and `mug' are informal terms for `face' and `phiz' is British)
    Give me a case to put my visage in.
  130. chaste
    abstaining from unlawful sexual intercourse
    Ben. Then she hath sworn that she will still live chaste?
  131. slander
    words falsely spoken that damage the reputation of another
    Rom. This gentleman, the Prince's near ally, My very friend, hath got this mortal hurt In my behalf- my reputation stain'd With Tybalt's slander- Tybalt, that an hour Hath been my kinsman.
  132. covert
    secret or hidden; not openly practiced or engaged in or shown or avowed
    Towards him I made; but he was ware of me And stole into the covert of the wood.
  133. semblance
    an outward or token appearance or form that is deliberately misleading
    It is my will; the which if thou respect, Show a fair presence and put off these frowns, An ill-beseeming semblance for a feast.
  134. pry
    be nosey
    But if thou, jealous, dost return to pry In what I farther shall intend to do, By heaven, I will tear thee joint by joint And strew this hungry churchyard with thy limbs.
  135. asunder
    into parts or pieces
    Jul. [aside] Villain and he be many miles asunder.-
  136. sparkle
    emit or produce sparks
    Love is a smoke rais'd with the fume of sighs; Being purg'd, a fire sparkling in lovers' eyes; Being vex'd, a sea nourish'd with lovers' tears.
  137. languish
    become feeble
    Ben. Tut, man, one fire burns out another's burning; One pain is lessoned by another's anguish; Turn giddy, and be holp by backward turning; One desperate grief cures with another's languish.
  138. devise
    a will disposing of real property
    Rom. Bid her devise Some means to come to shrift this afternoon; And there she shall at Friar Laurence' cell Be shriv'd and married.
  139. profane
    grossly irreverent toward what is held to be sacred
    Rom. If I profane with my unworthiest hand This holy shrine, the gentle fine is this: My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss.
  140. redress
    make reparations or amends for
    'Then music with her silver sound With speedy help doth lend redress.'
  141. misty
    filled or abounding with fog or mist
    Night's candles are burnt out, and jocund day Stands tiptoe on the misty mountain tops.
  142. pierce
    penetrate or cut through with a sharp instrument
    All this- uttered With gentle breath, calm look, knees humbly bow'd- Could not take truce with the unruly spleen Of Tybalt deaf to peace, but that he tilts With piercing steel at bold Mercutio's breast; Who, all as hot, turns deadly point to point, And, with a martial scorn, with one hand beats Cold death aside and with the other sends It back to Tybalt, whose dexterity Retorts it.
  143. wanton
    lewd or lascivious woman
    Let wantons light of heart Tickle the senseless rushes with their heels; For I am proverb'd with a grandsire phrase, I'll be a candle-holder and look on; The game was ne'er so fair, and I am done.
  144. sham
    something that is a counterfeit; not what it seems to be
    Though news be sad, yet tell them merrily; If good, thou shamest the music of sweet news By playing it to me with so sour a face.
  145. quench
    satisfy (thirst)
    What, ho! you men, you beasts, That quench the fire of your pernicious rage With purple fountains issuing from your veins!
  146. sojourn
    a temporary stay (e.g., as a guest)
    Sojourn in Mantua.
  147. grudge
    a resentment strong enough to justify retaliation
    Two households, both alike in dignity, In fair Verona, where we lay our scene, From ancient grudge break to new mutiny, Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean.
  148. wary
    marked by keen caution and watchful prudence
    The day is broke; be wary, look about.
  149. bate
    flap the wings wildly or frantically; used of falcons
    Hood my unmann'd blood, bating in my cheeks, With thy black mantle till strange love, grown bold, Think true love acted simple modesty.
  150. taint
    place under suspicion or cast doubt upon
    And in this state she 'gallops night by night Through lovers' brains, and then they dream of love; O'er courtiers' knees, that dream on cursies straight; O'er lawyers' fingers, who straight dream on fees; O'er ladies' lips, who straight on kisses dream, Which oft the angry Mab with blisters plagues, Because their breaths with sweetmeats tainted are.
  151. knave
    a deceitful and unreliable scoundrel
    More light, you knaves! and turn the tables up, And quench the fire, the room is grown too hot.
  152. consort
    keep company with; hang out with
    Ben. Come, he hath hid himself among these trees To be consorted with the humorous night.
  153. spade
    a sturdy hand shovel that can be pushed into the earth with the foot
    Enter Friar [Laurence], with lanthorn, crow, and spade.
  154. issuing
    the act of providing an item for general use or for official purposes (usually in quantity)
    What, ho! you men, you beasts, That quench the fire of your pernicious rage With purple fountains issuing from your veins!
  155. discreet
    marked by prudence or modesty and wise self-restraint
    A madness most discreet, A choking gall, and a preserving sweet.
  156. consume
    serve oneself to, or consume regularly
    These violent delights have violent ends And in their triumph die, like fire and powder, Which, as they kiss, consume.
  157. aloof
    remote in manner
    Hence, and stand aloof.
  158. engross
    devote (oneself) fully to
    Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips, O you The doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss A dateless bargain to engrossing death!
  159. privy
    hidden from general view or use
    All this I know, and to the marriage Her nurse is privy; and if aught in this Miscarried by my fault, let my old life Be sacrific'd, some hour before his time, Unto the rigour of severest law.
  160. riddle
    pierce with many holes
    Be plain, good son, and homely in thy drift Riddling confession finds but riddling shrift.
  161. shady
    filled with shade
    Mon. Many a morning hath he there been seen, With tears augmenting the fresh morning's dew, Adding to clouds more clouds with his deep sighs; But all so soon as the all-cheering sun Should in the farthest East bean to draw The shady curtains from Aurora's bed, Away from light steals home my heavy son And private in his chamber pens himself, Shuts up his windows, locks fair daylight And makes himself an artificial night.
  162. augment
    enlarge or increase
    Mon. Many a morning hath he there been seen, With tears augmenting the fresh morning's dew, Adding to clouds more clouds with his deep sighs; But all so soon as the all-cheering sun Should in the farthest East bean to draw The shady curtains from Aurora's bed, Away from light steals home my heavy son And private in his chamber pens himself, Shuts up his windows, locks fair daylight And makes himself an artificial night.
  163. denote
    have as a meaning
    Thy form cries out thou art; Thy tears are womanish, thy wild acts denote The unreasonable fury of a beast.
  164. gape
    look with amazement; look stupidly
    Now old desire doth in his deathbed lie, And young affection gapes to be his heir; That fair for which love groan'd for and would die, With tender Juliet match'd, is now not fair.
  165. reconcile
    come to terms
    But look thou stay not till the watch be set, For then thou canst not pass to Mantua, Where thou shalt live till we can find a time To blaze your marriage, reconcile your friends, Beg pardon of the Prince, and call thee back With twenty hundred thousand times more joy Than thou went'st forth in lamentation.
  166. bondage
    the state of being under the control of another person
    Bondage is hoarse and may not speak aloud; Else would I tear the cave where Echo lies, And make her airy tongue more hoarse than mine With repetition of my Romeo's name.
  167. prostrate
    stretched out and lying at full length along the ground
    Jul. Where I have learnt me to repent the sin Of disobedient opposition To you and your behests, and am enjoin'd By holy Laurence to fall prostrate here To beg your pardon.
  168. fume
    a cloud of fine particles suspended in a gas
    Love is a smoke rais'd with the fume of sighs; Being purg'd, a fire sparkling in lovers' eyes; Being vex'd, a sea nourish'd with lovers' tears.
  169. provoke
    provide the needed stimulus for
    Rom. Wilt thou provoke me?
  170. attire
    clothing of a distinctive style or for a particular occasion
    Jul. Ay, those attires are best; but, gentle nurse, I pray thee leave me to myself to-night; For I have need of many orisons To move the heavens to smile upon my state, Which, well thou knowest, is cross and full of sin.
  171. feign
    make believe with the intent to deceive
    Had she affections and warm youthful blood, She would be as swift in motion as a ball; My words would bandy her to my sweet love, And his to me, But old folks, many feign as they were dead- Unwieldy, slow, heavy and pale as lead.
  172. enmity
    a state of deep-seated ill-will
    Look thou but sweet, And I am proof against their enmity.
  173. prohibited
    forbidden by law
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  174. conceit
    the trait of being unduly vain and conceited; false pride
    Jul. Conceit, more rich in matter than in words, Brags of his substance, not of ornament.
  175. fray
    wear away by rubbing
    Right glad I am he was not at this fray.
  176. gall
    a digestive juice secreted by the liver and stored in the gallbladder; aids in the digestion of fats
    A madness most discreet, A choking gall, and a preserving sweet.
  177. discord
    lack of agreement or harmony
    An thou make minstrels of us, look to hear nothing but discords.
  178. mutiny
    open rebellion against constituted authority (especially by seamen or soldiers against their officers)
    Two households, both alike in dignity, In fair Verona, where we lay our scene, From ancient grudge break to new mutiny, Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean.
  179. solemnity
    a trait of dignified seriousness
    What, dares the slave Come hither, cover'd with an antic face, To fleer and scorn at our solemnity?
  180. rouse
    cause to become awake or conscious
    What, rouse thee, man!
  181. writ
    (law) a legal document issued by a court or judicial officer
    It is written that the shoemaker should meddle with his yard and the tailor with his last, the fisher with his pencil and the painter with his nets; but I am sent to find those persons whose names are here writ, and can never find what names the writing person hath here writ.
  182. forfeit
    lose (s.th.) or lose the right to (s.th.) by some error, offense, or crime
    If ever you disturb our streets again, Your lives shall pay the forfeit of the peace.
  183. excel
    distinguish oneself
    Though his face be better than any man's, yet his leg excels all men's; and for a hand and a foot, and a body, though they be not to be talk'd on, yet they are past compare.
  184. shroud
    burial garment in which a corpse is wrapped
    Jul. O, bid me leap, rather than marry Paris, From off the battlements of yonder tower, Or walk in thievish ways, or bid me lurk Where serpents are; chain me with roaring bears, Or shut me nightly in a charnel house, O'ercover'd quite with dead men's rattling bones, With reeky shanks and yellow chapless skulls; Or bid me go into a new-made grave And hide me with a dead man in his shroud- Things that, to hear them told, have made me tremble- And I will do it without fear or doubt, To l...
  185. tedious
    so lacking in interest as to cause mental weariness
    So tedious is this day As is the night before some festival To an impatient child that hath new robes And may not wear them.
  186. cleave
    separate or cut with a tool, such as a sharp instrument
  187. infection
    (medicine) the invasion of the body by pathogenic microorganisms and their multiplication which can lead to tissue damage and disease
    Take thou some new infection to thy eye, And the rank poison of the old will die.
  188. slew
    (often followed by `of') a large number or amount or extent
    There lies the man, slain by young Romeo, That slew thy kinsman, brave Mercutio.
  189. valiant
    having or showing valor
    To move is to stir, and to be valiant is to stand.
  190. sullen
    showing a brooding ill humor
    A pack of blessings light upon thy back; Happiness courts thee in her best array; But, like a misbhav'd and sullen wench, Thou pout'st upon thy fortune and thy love.
  191. grievance
    a complaint about a (real or imaginary) wrong that causes resentment and is grounds for action
    So please you step aside, I'll know his grievance, or be much denied.
  192. kindred
    group of people related by blood or marriage
    Then, as the manner of our country is, In thy best robes uncovered on the bier Thou shalt be borne to that same ancient vault Where all the kindred of the Capulets lie.
  193. strew
    spread by scattering ("straw" is archaic)
    Par. Sweet flower, with flowers thy bridal bed I strew (O woe! thy canopy is dust and stones) Which with sweet water nightly I will dew; Or, wanting that, with tears distill'd by moans.
  194. confine
    place limits on (extent or access)
  195. dismal
    causing dejection
    This torture should be roar'd in dismal hell.
  196. amend
    make amendments to
  197. bliss
    a state of extreme happiness
    She is too fair, too wise, wisely too fair, To merit bliss by making me despair.
  198. array
    an impressive display
    A pack of blessings light upon thy back; Happiness courts thee in her best array; But, like a misbhav'd and sullen wench, Thou pout'st upon thy fortune and thy love.
  199. partisan
    a fervent and even militant proponent of something
    Enter an officer, and three or four Citizens with clubs or partisans.
  200. despise
    look down on with disdain
    Rom. I fear, too early; for my mind misgives Some consequence, yet hanging in the stars, Shall bitterly begin his fearful date With this night's revels and expire the term Of a despised life, clos'd in my breast, By some vile forfeit of untimely death.
  201. commend
    present as worthy of regard, kindness, or confidence
    Rom. Nurse, commend me to thy lady and mistress.
  202. crave
    have a craving, appetite, or great desire for
    Madam, your mother craves a word with you.
  203. orchard
    garden consisting of a small cultivated wood without undergrowth
    ACT II. Scene I. A lane by the wall of Capulet's orchard.
  204. dew
    water that has condensed on a cool surface overnight from water vapor in the air
    Mon. Many a morning hath he there been seen, With tears augmenting the fresh morning's dew, Adding to clouds more clouds with his deep sighs; But all so soon as the all-cheering sun Should in the farthest East bean to draw The shady curtains from Aurora's bed, Away from light steals home my heavy son And private in his chamber pens himself, Shuts up his windows, locks fair daylight And makes himself an artificial night.
  205. beseech
    ask for or request earnestly
    I beseech you follow straight.
  206. likeness
    similarity in appearance or character or nature between persons or things
    Appear thou in the likeness of a sigh; Speak but one rhyme, and I am satisfied!
  207. apprehend
    anticipate with dread or anxiety
    I will apprehend him.
  208. outrage
    a disgraceful event
    Gentlemen, for shame! forbear this outrage!
  209. solely
    without any others being included or involved
    Follow me this jest now till thou hast worn out thy pump, that, when the single sole of it is worn, the jest may remain, after the wearing, solely singular.
  210. rejoice
    feel happiness or joy
    Rom. I'll go along, no such sight to be shown, But to rejoice in splendour of my own.
  211. prohibit
    command against
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  212. wail
    a cry of sorrow and grief
    Weeping and wailing over Tybalt's corse.
  213. entreat
    ask for or request earnestly
    Two of the fairest stars in all the heaven, Having some business, do entreat her eyes To twinkle in their spheres till they return.
  214. gear
    a toothed wheel that engages another toothed mechanism in order to change the speed or direction of transmitted motion
    Rom. Here's goodly gear!
  215. procure
    get by special effort
    If that thy bent of love be honourable, Thy purpose marriage, send me word to-morrow, By one that I'll procure to come to thee, Where and what time thou wilt perform the rite; And all my fortunes at thy foot I'll lay And follow thee my lord throughout the world.
  216. strife
    bitter conflict; heated often violent dissension
    From forth the fatal loins of these two foes A pair of star-cross'd lovers take their life; Whose misadventur'd piteous overthrows Doth with their death bury their parents' strife.
  217. soar
    rise rapidly
    Borrow Cupid's wings And soar with them above a common bound.
  218. torch
    a light usually carried in the hand; consists of some flammable substance
    Rom. Give me a torch.
  219. banish
    expel, as if by official decree
    Tybalt is gone, and Romeo banished; Romeo that kill'd him, he is banished.
  220. plague
    any large scale calamity (especially when thought to be sent by God)
    And in this state she 'gallops night by night Through lovers' brains, and then they dream of love; O'er courtiers' knees, that dream on cursies straight; O'er lawyers' fingers, who straight dream on fees; O'er ladies' lips, who straight on kisses dream, Which oft the angry Mab with blisters plagues, Because their breaths with sweetmeats tainted are.