Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice" Chapters 1-20 344 words

Vocabulary study list for Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice" (Chapters 1-20).
  1. importune
    beg persistently and urgently
    But I will no longer importune my young cousin."
  2. dawdle
    hang (back) or fall (behind) in movement, progress, development, etc.
    Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pa
  3. elate
    fill with high spirits; fill with optimism
    For, though elated by his rank, it did not render him supercilious; on the contrary, he was all attention to everybody.
  4. barefaced
    with no effort to conceal
    They attacked him in various ways--with barefaced questions, ingenious suppositions, and distant surmises; but he eluded the skill of them all, and they were at last obliged to accept the second-hand intelligence of their neighbour, Lady Lucas.
  5. consequential
    having important issues or results
    The subjection in which his father had brought him up had given him originally great humility of manner; but it was now a good deal counteracted by the self-conceit of a weak head, living in retirement, and the consequential feelings of early and u
  6. recommence
    cause to start anew
    When the dancing recommenced, however, and Darcy approached to claim her hand, Charlotte could not help cautioning her in a whisper, not to be a simpleton, and allow her fancy for Wickham to make her appear unpleasant in the eyes of a man ten times
  7. complaisant
    showing a cheerful willingness to do favors for others
    The next morning, however, made an alteration; for in a quarter of an hour's tete-a-tete with Mrs. Bennet before breakfast, a conversation beginning with his parsonage-house, and leading naturally to the avowal of his hopes, that a mistress might be found
  8. miserly
    (used of persons or behavior) characterized by or indicative of lack of generosity
    CHAPTER 15
    Mr. Collins was not a sensible man, and the deficiency of nature had been but little assisted by education or society; the greatest part of his life having been spent under the guidance of an illiterate and miserly father; and though he
  9. demean
    reduce in worth or character, usually verbally
    My mind, however, is now made up on the subject, for having received ordination at Easter, I have been so fortunate as to be distinguished by the patronage of the Right Honourable Lady Catherine de Bourgh, widow of Sir Lewis de Bourgh, whose bounty and be
  10. corroborate
    give evidence for
    Mr. Darcy corroborated it with a bow, and was beginning to determine not to fix his eyes on Elizabeth, when they were suddenly arrested by the sight of the stranger, and Elizabeth happening to see the countenance of both as they looked at each othe
  11. disinclination
    a certain degree of unwillingness
    And even Mary could assure her family that she had no disinclination for it.
  12. witticism
    a message whose ingenuity or verbal skill or incongruity has the power to evoke laughter
    Mrs. Bennet and her daughters then departed, and Elizabeth returned instantly to Jane, leaving her own and her relations' behaviour to the remarks of the two ladies and Mr. Darcy; the latter of whom, however, could not be prevailed on to join in their cen
  13. disengage
    release from something that holds fast, connects, or entangles
    Then taking the disengaged arm of Mr. Darcy, she left Elizabeth to walk by herself.
  14. dissemble
    behave unnaturally or affectedly
    You can hardly doubt the purport of my discourse, however your natural delicacy may lead you to dissemble; my attentions have been too marked to be mistaken.
  15. iniquitous
    characterized by iniquity; wicked because it is believed to be a sin
    "It certainly is a most iniquitous affair," said Mr. Bennet, "and nothing can clear Mr. Collins from the guilt of inheriting Longbourn.
  16. premeditated
    characterized by deliberate purpose and some degree of planning
    You wanted me, I know, to say 'Yes,' that you might have the pleasure of despising my taste; but I always delight in overthrowing those kind of schemes, and cheating a person of their premeditated contempt.
  17. vouchsafe
    grant in a condescending manner
    She had even condescended to advise him to marry as soon as he could, provided he chose with discretion; and had once paid him a visit in his humble parsonage, where she had perfectly approved all the alterations he had been making, and had even vouchs
  18. asperity
    harshness of manner
    But he was set right there by Mrs. Bennet, who assured him with some asperity that they were very well able to keep a good cook, and that her daughters had nothing to do in the kitchen.
  19. reprehensible
    bringing or deserving severe rebuke or censure
    She could only imagine, however, at last that she drew his notice because there was something more wrong and reprehensible, according to his ideas of right, than in any other person present.
  20. supercilious
    having or showing arrogant superiority to and disdain of those one views as unworthy
    For, though elated by his rank, it did not render him supercilious; on the contrary, he was all attention to everybody.
  21. ceremonious
    characterized by pomp and ceremony and stately display
    Mrs. Bennet chose to consider it as given in compliment to her eldest daughter, and was particularly flattered by receiving the invitation from Mr. Bingley himself, instead of a ceremonious card.
  22. expostulation
    an exclamation of protest or remonstrance or reproof
    Miss Bingley warmly resented the indignity he had received, in an expostulation with her brother for talking such nonsense.
  23. laconic
    brief and to the point; effectively cut short
    But their father, though very laconic in his expressions of pleasure, was really glad to see them; he had felt their importance in the family circle.
  24. pedantic
    marked by a narrow focus on or display of learning especially its trivial aspects
    Mary had neither genius nor taste; and though vanity had given her application, it had given her likewise a pedantic air and conceited manner, which would have injured a higher degree of excellence than she had reached.
  25. stricture
    severe criticism
    What would I give to hear your strictures on them!"
  26. unassuming
    not arrogant or presuming
    The introduction was followed up on his side by a happy readiness of conversation--a readiness at the same time perfectly correct and unassuming; and the whole party were still standing and talking together very agreeably, when the sound of horses
  27. celerity
    a rate that is rapid
    "I dare say you believed it; but I am by no means convinced that you would be gone with such celerity.
  28. headstrong
    habitually disposed to disobedience and opposition
    She is a very headstrong, foolish girl, and does not know her own interest but I will make her know it."
  29. impute
    attribute or credit to
    Breakfast was scarcely over when a servant from Netherfield brought the following note for Elizabeth:
    "MY DEAREST LIZZY,--
    "I find myself very unwell this morning, which, I suppose, is to be imputed to my getting wet through yesterday.
  30. probity
    complete and confirmed integrity; having strong moral principles
    Mr. Bingley does not know the whole of his history, and is quite ignorant of the circumstances which have principally offended Mr. Darcy; but he will vouch for the good conduct, the probity, and honour of his friend, and is perfectly convinced that
  31. panegyric
    formally expressing praise
    When you told Mrs. Bennet this morning that if you ever resolved upon quitting Netherfield you should be gone in five minutes, you meant it to be a sort of panegyric, of compliment to yourself--and yet what is there so very laudable in a precipitan
  32. threadbare
    having the nap worn away so that the threads show through
    They found Mary, as usual, deep in the study of thorough-bass and human nature; and had some extracts to admire, and some new observations of threadbare morality to listen to.
  33. diffidence
    lack of self-confidence
    Having resolved to do it without loss of time, as his leave of absence extended only to the following Saturday, and having no feelings of diffidence to make it distressing to himself even at the moment, he set about it in a very orderly manner, wit
  34. amaze
    affect with wonder
    "It is amazing to me," said Bingley, "how young ladies can have patience to be so very accomplished as they all are."
  35. laity
    in Christianity, members of a religious community that do not have the priestly responsibilities of ordained clergy
    Mr. Collins listened to her with the determined air of following his own inclination, and, when she ceased speaking, replied thus:
    "My dear Miss Elizabeth, I have the highest opinion in the world in your excellent judgement in all matters within the scope
  36. pique
    a sudden outburst of anger
    "Pride," observed Mary, who piqued herself upon the solidity of her reflections, "is a very common failing, I believe.
  37. taciturn
    habitually reserved and uncommunicative
    We are each of an unsocial, taciturn disposition, unwilling to speak, unless we expect to say something that will amaze the whole room, and be handed down to posterity with all the eclat of a proverb."
  38. confirming
    serving to support or corroborate
    He wisely resolved to be particularly careful that no sign of admiration should now escape him, nothing that could elevate her with the hope of influencing his felicity; sensible that if such an idea had been suggested, his behaviour during the last day m
  39. dissuade
    turn away from by persuasion
    Elizabeth tried hard to dissuade him from such a scheme, assuring him that Mr. Darcy would consider his addressing him without introduction as an impertinent freedom, rather than a compliment to his aunt; that it was not in the least necessary ther
  40. digression
    a turning aside (of your course or attention or concern)
    In describing to her all the grandeur of Lady Catherine and her mansion, with occasional digressions in praise of his own humble abode, and the improvements it was receiving, he was happily employed until the gentlemen joined them; and he found in
  41. bashful
    self-consciously timid
    Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had ste
  42. unrestrained
    not subject to restraint
    Mr. Darcy was eyeing him with unrestrained wonder, and when at last Mr. Collins allowed him time to speak, replied with an air of distant civility.
  43. interpose
    introduce
    You will not, I hope, consider me as showing any disrespect to your family, my dear madam, by thus withdrawing my pretensions to your daughter's favour, without having paid yourself and Mr. Bennet the compliment of requesting you to interpose your
  44. proxy
    a person authorized to act for another
    No aunt, no officers, no news could be sought after--the very shoe-roses for Netherfield were got by proxy.
  45. ordination
    the act of ordaining; the act of conferring (or receiving) holy orders
    Mrs. Bennet.'--My mind, however, is now made up on the subject, for having received ordination at Easter, I have been so fortunate as to be distinguished by the patronage of the Right Honourable Lady Catherine de Bourgh, widow of Sir Lewis de Bourg
  46. hypocritical
    professing feelings or virtues one does not have
    She is a selfish, hypocritical woman, and I have no opinion of her."
  47. despicable
    morally reprehensible
    Whatever bears affinity to cunning is despicable."
  48. doleful
    filled with or evoking sadness
    In a doleful voice Mrs. Bennet began the projected conversation: "Oh! Mr. Collins!"
  49. propitious
    presenting favorable circumstances; likely to result in or show signs of success
    Her answer, therefore, was not propitious, at least not to Elizabeth's wishes, for she was impatient to get home.
  50. compatible
    able to exist and perform in harmonious or agreeable combination
    "If I," said Mr. Collins, "were so fortunate as to be able to sing, I should have great pleasure, I am sure, in obliging the company with an air; for I consider music as a very innocent diversion, and perfectly compatible with the profession of a c
  51. enumerate
    determine the number or amount of
    Lydia talked incessantly of lottery tickets, of the fish she had lost and the fish she had won; and Mr. Collins in describing the civility of Mr. and Mrs. Phillips, protesting that he did not in the least regard his losses at whist, enumerating all
  52. elude
    escape, either physically or mentally
    They attacked him in various ways--with barefaced questions, ingenious suppositions, and distant surmises; but he eluded the skill of them all, and they were at last obliged to accept the second-hand intelligence of their neighbour, Lady Lucas.
  53. languor
    inactivity; showing an unusual lack of energy
    They repulsed every attempt of Mrs. Bennet at conversation, and by so doing threw a languor over the whole party, which was very little relieved by the long speeches of Mr. Collins, who was complimenting Mr. Bingley and his sisters on the elegance
  54. resolving
    analysis into clear-cut components
    In describing to her all the grandeur of Lady Catherine and her mansion, with occasional digressions in praise of his own humble abode, and the improvements it was receiving, he was happily employed until the gentlemen joined them; and he found in Mrs. Ph
  55. veracity
    unwillingness to tell lies
    Jane listened with astonishment and concern; she knew not how to believe that Mr. Darcy could be so unworthy of Mr. Bingley's regard; and yet, it was not in her nature to question the veracity of a young man of such amiable appearance as Wickham.
  56. upbraid
    express criticism towards
    You will not thank me for detaining you from the bewitching converse of that young lady, whose bright eyes are also upbraiding me."
  57. laudable
    worthy of high praise
    When you told Mrs. Bennet this morning that if you ever resolved upon quitting Netherfield you should be gone in five minutes, you meant it to be a sort of panegyric, of compliment to yourself--and yet what is there so very laudable in a precipitan
  58. apothecary
    a health professional trained in the art of preparing and dispensing drugs
    The apothecary came, and having examined his patient, said, as might be supposed, that she had caught a violent cold, and that they must endeavour to get the better of it; advised her to return to bed, and promised her some draughts.
  59. effusion
    an unrestrained expression of emotion
    After listening one morning to their effusions on this subject, Mr. Bennet coolly observed:
    "From all that I can collect by your manner of talking, you must be two of the silliest girls in the country.
  60. intrude
    enter uninvited
    Against staying longer, however, Elizabeth was positively resolved--nor did she much expect it would be asked; and fearful, on the contrary, as being considered as intruding themselves needlessly long, she urged Jane to borrow Mr. Bingley's carriag
  61. conciliatory
    making or willing to make concessions
    And I do not think it of light importance that he should have attentive and conciliatory manner towards everybody, especially towards those to whom he owes his preferment.
  62. persevere
    be persistent, refuse to stop
    On Miss Lucas's persevering, however, she added, "Very well, if it must be so, it must."
  63. repulse
    force or drive back
    They repulsed every attempt of Mrs. Bennet at conversation, and by so doing threw a languor over the whole party, which was very little relieved by the long speeches of Mr. Collins, who was complimenting Mr. Bingley and his sisters on the elegance
  64. filial
    designating the generation or the sequence of generations following the parental generation
    "Why, indeed; he does seem to have had some filial scruples on that head, as you will hear."
  65. symmetry
    balance among the parts of something
    Though he had detected with a critical eye more than one failure of perfect symmetry in her form, he was forced to acknowledge her figure to be light and pleasing; and in spite of his asserting that her manners were not those of the fashionable wor
  66. coincide
    happen simultaneously
    I had hoped that our sentiments coincided in every particular, but I must so far differ from you as to think our two youngest daughters uncommonly foolish."
  67. decorum
    propriety in manners and conduct
    It seems to me to show an abominable sort of conceited independence, a most country-town indifference to decorum."
  68. scamper
    to move about or proceed hurriedly
    Why must she be scampering about the country, because her sister had a cold?
  69. partiality
    an inclination to favor one group or view or opinion over alternatives
    I do not trust my own partiality.
  70. imprudent
    not prudent or wise
    I am afraid he has been very imprudent, and has deserved to lose Mr. Darcy's regard."
  71. elated
    exultantly proud and joyful; in high spirits
    For, though elated by his rank, it did not render him supercilious; on the contrary, he was all attention to everybody.
  72. satirical
    exposing human folly to ridicule
    He has a very satirical eye, and if I do not begin by being impertinent myself, I shall soon grow afraid of him."
  73. implicit
    implied though not directly expressed; inherent in the nature of something
    Let me recommend you, however, as a friend, not to give implicit confidence to all his assertions; for as to Mr. Darcy's using him ill, it is perfectly false; for, on the contrary, he has always been remarkably kind to him, though George Wickham ha
  74. elevate
    raise from a lower to a higher position
    He wisely resolved to be particularly careful that no sign of admiration should now escape him, nothing that could elevate her with the hope of influencing his felicity; sensible that if such an idea had been suggested, his behaviour during the las
  75. fastidious
    giving careful attention to detail; hard to please; excessively concerned with cleanliness
    "I would not be so fastidious as you are," cried Mr. Bingley, "for a kingdom!
  76. unaffected
    undergoing no change when acted upon
    Mr. Bingley was good-looking and gentlemanlike; he had a pleasant countenance, and easy, unaffected manners.
  77. amends
    something done or paid in expiation of a wrong
    "I do not know how you will ever make him amends for his kindness; or me, either, for that matter.
  78. ramble
    move about aimlessly or without any destination, often in search of food or employment
    She then ran gaily off, rejoicing as she rambled about, in the hope of being at home again in a day or two.
  79. variance
    the quality of being subject to variation
    "Dear Sir,--
    "The disagreement subsisting between yourself and my late honoured father always gave me much uneasiness, and since I have had the misfortune to lose him, I have frequently wished to heal the breach; but for some time I was kept back by my ow
  80. indolent
    disinclined to work or exertion
    Miss Bingley was engrossed by Mr. Darcy, her sister scarcely less so; and as for Mr. Hurst, by whom Elizabeth sat, he was an indolent man, who lived only to eat, drink, and play at cards; who, when he found her to prefer a plain dish to a ragout, h
  81. adept
    having or showing knowledge and skill and aptitude
    "Your friend performs delightfully," he continued after a pause, on seeing Bingley join the group; "and I doubt not that you are an adept in the science yourself, Mr. Darcy."
  82. forbearance
    a delay in enforcing rights or claims or privileges; refraining from acting
    Attendance, forbearance, patience with Darcy, was injury to Wickham.
  83. complacency
    the feeling you have when you are satisfied with yourself
    By all that I have ever read, I am convinced that it is very common indeed; that human nature is particularly prone to it, and that there are very few of us who do not cherish a feeling of self-complacency on the score of some quality or other, rea
  84. illiterate
    not able to read or write
    CHAPTER 15
    Mr. Collins was not a sensible man, and the deficiency of nature had been but little assisted by education or society; the greatest part of his life having been spent under the guidance of an illiterate and miserly father; and though he
  85. derision
    the act of deriding or treating with contempt
    She looked at his two sisters, and saw them making signs of derision at each other, and at Darcy, who continued, however, imperturbably grave.
  86. efficacy
    capacity or power to produce a desired effect
    I wonder who first discovered the efficacy of poetry in driving away love!"
  87. indignity
    an affront to one's dignity or self-esteem
    Miss Bingley warmly resented the indignity he had received, in an expostulation with her brother for talking such nonsense.
  88. animate
    make lively
    It was an animating subject, and Mrs. Bennet seemed incapable of fatigue while enumerating the advantages of the match.
  89. paltry
    contemptibly small in amount
    But, in my opinion, it is a paltry device, a very mean art."
  90. tithe
    a levy of one tenth of something
    In the first place, he must make such an agreement for tithes as may be beneficial to himself and not offensive to his patron.
  91. mortify
    cause to feel shame; hurt the pride of
    "That is very true," replied Elizabeth, "and I could easily forgive his pride, if he had not mortified mine."
  92. surmise
    infer from incomplete evidence
    They attacked him in various ways--with barefaced questions, ingenious suppositions, and distant surmises; but he eluded the skill of them all, and they were at last obliged to accept the second-hand intelligence of their neighbour, Lady Lucas.
  93. genteel
    marked by refinement in taste and manners
    So genteel and easy!
  94. implacable
    incapable of being placated
    "Implacable resentment is a shade in a character.
  95. uniformly
    in a uniform manner
    On that head, therefore, I shall be uniformly silent; and you may assure yourself that no ungenerous reproach shall ever pass my lips when we are married."
  96. accost
    speak to someone
    Her resistance had not injured her with the gentleman, and he was thinking of her with some complacency, when thus accosted by Miss Bingley:
    "I can guess the subject of your reverie."
  97. ensue
    issue or terminate (in a specified way, state, etc.); end
    Darcy only smiled; and the general pause which ensued made Elizabeth tremble lest her mother should be exposing herself again.
  98. alacrity
    liveliness and eagerness
    Miss Bingley moved with some alacrity to the pianoforte; and, after a polite request that Elizabeth would lead the way which the other as politely and more earnestly negatived, she seated herself.
  99. inconsistency
    the quality of being inconsistent and lacking a harmonious uniformity among things or parts
    Follies and nonsense, whims and inconsistencies, do divert me, I own, and I laugh at them whenever I can.
  100. authoritative
    of recognized authority or excellence
    She has the reputation of being remarkably sensible and clever; but I rather believe she derives part of her abilities from her rank and fortune, part from her authoritative manner, and the rest from the pride for her nephew, who chooses that every
  101. default
    an option that is selected automatically unless an alternative is specified
    CHAPTER 7
    Mr. Bennet's property consisted almost entirely in an estate of two thousand a year, which, unfortunately for his daughters, was entailed, in default of heirs male, on a distant relation; and their mother's fortune, though ample for her s
  102. mien
    dignified manner or conduct
    His brother-in-law, Mr. Hurst, merely looked the gentleman; but his friend Mr. Darcy soon drew the attention of the room by his fine, tall person, handsome features, noble mien, and the report which was in general circulation within five minutes af
  103. extort
    obtain by coercion or intimidation
    She did at last extort from her father an acknowledgment that the horses were engaged.
  104. scrupulous
    characterized by extreme care and great effort
    "You are over-scrupulous, surely.
  105. solace
    comfort in disappointment or misery
    The business of her life was to get her daughters married; its solace was visiting and news.
  106. cessation
    a stopping
    Lydia's intention of walking to Meryton was not forgotten; every sister except Mary agreed to go with her; and Mr. Collins was to attend them, at the request of Mr. Bennet, who was most anxious to get rid of him, and have his library to himself; for thith
  107. precipitate
    bring about abruptly
    "I am very sensible, madam, of the hardship to my fair cousins, and could say much on the subject, but that I am cautious of appearing forward and precipitate.
  108. adhere
    stick to firmly
    "Would Mr. Darcy then consider the rashness of your original intentions as atoned for by your obstinacy in adhering to it?"
  109. degenerate
    a person whose behavior deviates from what is acceptable especially in sexual behavior
    Not to appear to disgrace his family, to degenerate from the popular qualities, or lose the influence of the Pemberley House, is a powerful motive.
  110. impertinent
    improperly forward or bold
    It was generally evident whenever they met, that he did admire her and to her it was equally evident that Jane was yielding to the preference which she had begun to entertain for him from the first, and was in a way to be very much in love; but she consid
  111. discourage
    try to prevent; show opposition to
    "There is some sense in what he says about the girls, however, and if he is disposed to make them any amends, I shall not be the person to discourage him."
  112. indulgent
    characterized by or given to yielding to the wishes of someone
    "He seems to be a most conscientious and polite young man, upon my word, and I doubt not will prove a valuable acquaintance, especially if Lady Catherine should be so indulgent as to let him come to us again."
  113. invaluable
    having incalculable monetary, intellectual, or spiritual worth
    If my vanity had taken a musical turn, you would have been invaluable; but as it is, I would really rather not sit down before those who must be in the habit of hearing the very best performers."
  114. disinterested
    unaffected by self-interest
    This was his plan of amends--of atonement--for inheriting their father's estate; and he thought it an excellent one, full of eligibility and suitableness, and excessively generous and disinterested on his own part.
  115. deign
    do something that one considers to be below one's dignity
    Mrs. Bennet deigned not to make any reply, but, unable to contain herself, began scolding one of her daughters.
  116. consign
    give over to another for care or safekeeping
    It was, moreover, such a promising thing for her younger daughters, as Jane's marrying so greatly must throw them in the way of other rich men; and lastly, it was so pleasant at her time of life to be able to consign her single daughters to the car
  117. vogue
    a current state of general acceptance and use
    "Certainly, sir; and it has the advantage also of being in vogue amongst the less polished societies of the world.
  118. contrive
    make or work out a plan for; devise
    The two youngest of the family, Catherine and Lydia, were particularly frequent in these attentions; their minds were more vacant than their sisters', and when nothing better offered, a walk to Meryton was necessary to amuse their morning hours and furnis
  119. calculate
    make a mathematical calculation or computation
    Elizabeth listened in silence, but was not convinced; their behaviour at the assembly had not been calculated to please in general; and with more quickness of observation and less pliancy of temper than her sister, and with a judgement too unassail
  120. manifold
    many and varied; having many features or forms
    My situation in life, my connections with the family of de Bourgh, and my relationship to your own, are circumstances highly in my favour; and you should take it into further consideration, that in spite of your manifold attractions, it is by no me
  121. precede
    be earlier in time; go back further
    Much had been done and much had been said in the regiment since the preceding Wednesday; several of the officers had dined lately with their uncle, a private had been flogged, and it had actually been hinted that Colonel Forster was going to be mar
  122. emphatic
    spoken with emphasis
    "What can be the meaning of that emphatic exclamation?" cried he.
  123. arrogant
    having or showing feelings of unwarranted importance out of overbearing pride
    "Mr. Collins," said she, "speaks highly both of Lady Catherine and her daughter; but from some particulars that he has related of her ladyship, I suspect his gratitude misleads him, and that in spite of her being his patroness, she is an arrogant,
  124. eclipse
    one celestial body obscures another
    Elizabeth was the least dear to her of all her children; and though the man and the match were quite good enough for her, the worth of each was eclipsed by Mr. Bingley and Netherfield.
  125. bequeath
    leave or give by will after one's death
    "Yes--the late Mr. Darcy bequeathed me the next presentation of the best living in his gift.
  126. affront
    a deliberately offensive act or something producing the effect of deliberate disrespect
    Elizabeth, having rather expected to affront him, was amazed at his gallantry; but there was a mixture of sweetness and archness in her manner which made it difficult for her to affront anybody; and Darcy had never been so bewitched by any woman as
  127. sparkle
    emit or produce sparks
    Mrs. Bennet's eyes sparkled with pleasure, and she was eagerly calling out, while her daughter read,
    "Well, Jane, who is it from?
  128. entail
    have as a logical consequence
    CHAPTER 7
    Mr. Bennet's property consisted almost entirely in an estate of two thousand a year, which, unfortunately for his daughters, was entailed, in default of heirs male, on a distant relation; and their mother's fortune, though ample for her s
  129. deficient
    inadequate in amount or degree
    They were in fact very fine ladies; not deficient in good humour when they were pleased, nor in the power of making themselves agreeable when they chose it, but proud and conceited.
  130. assuring
    giving confidence
    He had always intended to visit him, though to the last always assuring his wife that he should not go; and till the evening after the visit was paid she had no knowledge of it.
  131. disconcert
    cause to lose one's composure
    Mrs. Bennet was quite disconcerted.
  132. abominable
    unequivocally detestable
    It seems to me to show an abominable sort of conceited independence, a most country-town indifference to decorum."
  133. felicity
    pleasing and appropriate manner or style (especially manner or style of expression)
    If the dispositions of the parties are ever so well known to each other or ever so similar beforehand, it does not advance their felicity in the least.
  134. incline
    lower or bend (the head or upper body), as in a nod or bow
    "You observed it, Mr. Darcy, I am sure," said Miss Bingley; "and I am inclined to think that you would not wish to see your sister make such an exhibition."
  135. engross
    devote (oneself) fully to
    Mr. Darcy stood near them in silent indignation at such a mode of passing the evening, to the exclusion of all conversation, and was too much engrossed by his thoughts to perceive that Sir William Lucas was his neighbour, till Sir William thus bega
  136. intricate
    having many complexly arranged elements; elaborate
    It does not follow that a deep, intricate character is more or less estimable than such a one as yours."
  137. deference
    courteous regard for people's feelings
    I assure you, that if Darcy were not such a great tall fellow, in comparison with myself, I should not pay him half so much deference.
  138. incumbent
    necessary (for someone) as a duty or responsibility; morally binding
    "As to her younger daughters, she could not take upon her to say--she could not positively answer--but she did not know of any prepossession; her eldest daughter, she must just mention--she felt it incumbent on her to hint, was likely to be very so
  139. provoke
    provide the needed stimulus for
    On his approaching them soon afterwards, though without seeming to have any intention of speaking, Miss Lucas defied her friend to mention such a subject to him; which immediately provoking Elizabeth to do it, she turned to him and said:
    "Did you n
  140. estimation
    an approximate calculation of quantity or degree or worth
    But I am very far from agreeing with you in your estimation of ladies in general.
  141. conceit
    the trait of being unduly vain and conceited; false pride
    And, if I may mention so delicate a subject, endeavour to check that little something, bordering on conceit and impertinence, which your lady possesses."
  142. composure
    steadiness of mind under stress
    It was generally evident whenever they met, that he did admire her and to her it was equally evident that Jane was yielding to the preference which she had begun to entertain for him from the first, and was in a way to be very much in love; but she consid
  143. assemble
    create by putting components or members together
    It was at Sir William Lucas's, where a large party were assembled.
  144. acknowledgment
    the state or quality of being recognized or acknowledged
    She did at last extort from her father an acknowledgment that the horses were engaged.
  145. odious
    unequivocally detestable
    How odious I should think them!"
  146. detest
    dislike intensely; feel antipathy or aversion towards
    You know how I detest it, unless I am particularly acquainted with my partner.
  147. solemnity
    a trait of dignified seriousness
    The subject elevated him to more than usual solemnity of manner, and with a most important aspect he protested that "he had never in his life witnessed such behaviour in a person of rank--such affability and condescension, as he had himself experie
  148. condescend
    behave in a patronizing and condescending manner
    "Undoubtedly," replied Darcy, to whom this remark was chiefly addressed, "there is a meanness in all the arts which ladies sometimes condescend to employ for captivation.
  149. injure
    cause injuries or bodily harm to
    Mary had neither genius nor taste; and though vanity had given her application, it had given her likewise a pedantic air and conceited manner, which would have injured a higher degree of excellence than she had reached.
  150. attentive
    taking heed; giving close and thoughtful attention
    Bingley had never met with more pleasant people or prettier girls in his life; everybody had been most kind and attentive to him; there had been no formality, no stiffness; he had soon felt acquainted with all the room; and, as to Miss Bennet, he c
  151. supposition
    the cognitive process of supposing
    They attacked him in various ways--with barefaced questions, ingenious suppositions, and distant surmises; but he eluded the skill of them all, and they were at last obliged to accept the second-hand intelligence of their neighbour, Lady Lucas.
  152. defer
    yield to another's wish or opinion
    An invitation to dinner was soon afterwards dispatched; and already had Mrs. Bennet planned the courses that were to do credit to her housekeeping, when an answer arrived which deferred it all.
  153. solicit
    make a solicitation or entreaty for something; request urgently or persistently
    "I am by no means of the opinion, I assure you," said he, "that a ball of this kind, given by a young man of character, to respectable people, can have any evil tendency; and I am so far from objecting to dancing myself, that I shall hope to be honoured w
  154. rapture
    a state of being carried away by overwhelming emotion
    "Now, Kitty, you may cough as much as you choose," said Mr. Bennet; and, as he spoke, he left the room, fatigued with the raptures of his wife.
  155. discouraged
    lacking in resolution
    Mr. Collins, however, was not discouraged from speaking again, and Mr. Darcy's contempt seemed abundantly increasing with the length of his second speech, and at the end of it he only made him a slight bow, and moved another way.
  156. oblige
    force somebody to do something
    They attacked him in various ways--with barefaced questions, ingenious suppositions, and distant surmises; but he eluded the skill of them all, and they were at last obliged to accept the second-hand intelligence of their neighbour, Lady Lucas.
  157. diversion
    a turning aside (of your course or attention or concern)
    "If I," said Mr. Collins, "were so fortunate as to be able to sing, I should have great pleasure, I am sure, in obliging the company with an air; for I consider music as a very innocent diversion, and perfectly compatible with the profession of a c
  158. tranquillity
    an untroubled state; free from disturbances
    In his library he had been always sure of leisure and tranquillity; and though prepared, as he told Elizabeth, to meet with folly and conceit in every other room of the house, he was used to be free from them there; his civility, therefore, was mos
  159. recovering
    returning to health after illness or debility
    Had she found Jane in any apparent danger, Mrs. Bennet would have been very miserable; but being satisfied on seeing her that her illness was not alarming, she had no wish of her recovering immediately, as her restoration to health would probably r
  160. ridicule
    language or behavior intended to mock or humiliate
    I hope I never ridicule what is wise and good.
  161. converse
    carry on a conversation
    But they are very pleasing women when you converse with them.
  162. censure
    harsh criticism or disapproval
    "I would not wish to be hasty in censuring anyone; but I always speak what I think."
  163. scruple
    an ethical or moral principle that inhibits action
    "Why, indeed; he does seem to have had some filial scruples on that head, as you will hear."
  164. humility
    a disposition to be humble; a lack of false pride
    "Your humility, Mr. Bingley," said Elizabeth, "must disarm reproof."
  165. impose
    impose and collect
    "It may perhaps be pleasant," replied Charlotte, "to be able to impose on the public in such a case; but it is sometimes a disadvantage to be so very guarded.
  166. amend
    make amendments to
    "I do not know how you will ever make him amends for his kindness; or me, either, for that matter.
  167. alteration
    the act of revising or altering (involving reconsideration and modification)
    She had even condescended to advise him to marry as soon as he could, provided he chose with discretion; and had once paid him a visit in his humble parsonage, where she had perfectly approved all the alterations he had been making, and had even vo
  168. principally
    for the most part
    Darcy took up a book; Miss Bingley did the same; and Mrs. Hurst, principally occupied in playing with her bracelets and rings, joined now and then in her brother's conversation with Miss Bennet.
  169. expose
    to show, make visible or apparent
    Darcy only smiled; and the general pause which ensued made Elizabeth tremble lest her mother should be exposing herself again.
  170. consistent
    the same throughout in structure or composition
    But we are none of us consistent, and in his behaviour to me there were stronger impulses even than pride."
  171. conjecture
    to believe especially on uncertain or tentative grounds
    The rest of the evening was spent in conjecturing how soon he would return Mr. Bennet's visit, and determining when they should ask him to dinner.
  172. despise
    look down on with disdain
    "Miss Eliza Bennet," said Miss Bingley, "despises cards.
  173. comply
    act in accordance with someone's rules, commands, or wishes
    This she would not hear of; but she was not so unwilling to comply with their brother's proposal; and it was settled that Mr. Jones should be sent for early in the morning, if Miss Bennet were not decidedly better.
  174. devote
    dedicate
    My father began life in the profession which your uncle, Mr. Phillips, appears to do so much credit to--but he gave up everything to be of use to the late Mr. Darcy and devoted all his time to the care of the Pemberley property.
  175. qualified
    meeting the proper standards and requirements and training for an office or position or task
    I am not qualified to form one.
  176. trifling
    not worth considering
    People do not die of little trifling colds.
  177. propriety
    correct or appropriate behavior
    Mr. Darcy, with grave propriety, requested to be allowed the honour of her hand, but in vain.
  178. deceive
    cause someone to believe an untruth
    "They have both," said she, "been deceived, I dare say, in some way or other, of which we can form no idea.
  179. voluntary
    (military) a person who freely enlists for service
    Mr. Darcy often acknowledged himself to be under the greatest obligations to my father's active superintendence, and when, immediately before my father's death, Mr. Darcy gave him a voluntary promise of providing for me, I am convinced that he felt
  180. vacant
    without an occupant or incumbent
    The two youngest of the family, Catherine and Lydia, were particularly frequent in these attentions; their minds were more vacant than their sisters', and when nothing better offered, a walk to Meryton was necessary to amuse their morning hours and
  181. amazed
    filled with the emotional impact of overwhelming surprise or shock
    Elizabeth, having rather expected to affront him, was amazed at his gallantry; but there was a mixture of sweetness and archness in her manner which made it difficult for her to affront anybody; and Darcy had never been so bewitched by any woman as
  182. infinitely
    continuing forever without end
    "Tell your sister I am delighted to hear of her improvement on the harp; and pray let her know that I am quite in raptures with her beautiful little design for a table, and I think it infinitely superior to Miss Grantley's."
  183. discretion
    the power of making free choices unconstrained by external agencies
    "Kitty has no discretion in her coughs," said her father; "she times them ill."
  184. compassion
    a deep awareness of and sympathy for another's suffering
    You have no compassion for my poor nerves."
  185. rational
    consistent with or based on or using reason
    It would surely be much more rational if conversation instead of dancing were made the order of the day."
  186. presume
    take to be the case or to be true; accept without verification or proof
    "Your examination of Mr. Darcy is over, I presume," said Miss Bingley; "and pray what is the result?"
  187. solely
    without any others being included or involved
    It had given him a disgust to his business, and to his residence in a small market town; and, in quitting them both, he had removed with his family to a house about a mile from Meryton, denominated from that period Lucas Lodge, where he could think with p
  188. cautious
    showing careful forethought
    CHAPTER 4
    When Jane and Elizabeth were alone, the former, who had been cautious in her praise of Mr. Bingley before, expressed to her sister just how very much she admired him.
  189. rejoice
    feel happiness or joy
    She then ran gaily off, rejoicing as she rambled about, in the hope of being at home again in a day or two.
  190. quest
    the act of searching for something
    She then yawned again, threw aside her book, and cast her eyes round the room in quest for some amusement; when hearing her brother mentioning a ball to Miss Bennet, she turned suddenly towards him and said:
    "By the bye, Charles, are you really ser
  191. entreat
    ask for or request earnestly
    I entreat you not to suppose that I moved this way in order to beg for a partner."
  192. positively
    so as to be positive; in a positive manner
    Against staying longer, however, Elizabeth was positively resolved--nor did she much expect it would be asked; and fearful, on the contrary, as being considered as intruding themselves needlessly long, she urged Jane to borrow Mr. Bingley's carriag
  193. delicacy
    the quality of being beautiful and delicate in appearance
    After amusing himself some time with their curiosity, he thus explained:
    "About a month ago I received this letter; and about a fortnight ago I answered it, for I thought it a case of some delicacy, and requiring early attention.
  194. procure
    get by special effort
    I knew it to be a most respectable, agreeable corps, and my friend Denny tempted me further by his account of their present quarters, and the very great attentions and excellent acquaintances Meryton had procured them.
  195. attachment
    the act of attaching or affixing something
    There is so much of gratitude or vanity in almost every attachment, that it is not safe to leave any to itself.
  196. awkward
    lacking grace or skill in manner or movement or performance
    Mr. Collins, awkward and solemn, apologising instead of attending, and often moving wrong without being aware of it, gave her all the shame and misery which a disagreeable partner for a couple of dances can give.
  197. vex
    cause annoyance in; disturb, especially by minor irritations
    You take delight in vexing me.
  198. surpass
    be or do something to a greater degree
    The astonishment of the ladies was just what he wished; that of Mrs. Bennet perhaps surpassing the rest; though, when the first tumult of joy was over, she began to declare that it was what she had expected all the while.
  199. plague
    any large scale calamity (especially when thought to be sent by God)
    "We can all plague and punish one another.
  200. convince
    make (someone) agree, understand, or realize the truth or validity of something
    Elizabeth listened in silence, but was not convinced; their behaviour at the assembly had not been calculated to please in general; and with more quickness of observation and less pliancy of temper than her sister, and with a judgement too unassail
  201. approve
    judge to be right or commendable; think well of
    Elizabeth listened in silence, but was not convinced; their behaviour at the assembly had not been calculated to please in general; and with more quickness of observation and less pliancy of temper than her sister, and with a judgement too unassailed by a
  202. arrange
    put into a proper or systematic order
    "Will it not be advisable, before we proceed on this subject, to arrange with rather more precision the degree of importance which is to appertain to this request, as well as the degree of intimacy subsisting between the parties?"
  203. amiable
    diffusing warmth and friendliness
    Such amiable qualities must speak for themselves.
  204. gravity
    (physics) the force of attraction between all masses in the universe; especially the attraction of the earth's mass for bodies near its surface
    It had not been very great; he had lost every point; but when Mrs. Phillips began to express her concern thereupon, he assured her with much earnest gravity that it was not of the least importance, that he considered the money as a mere trifle, and
  205. resignation
    the act of giving up (a claim or office or possession etc.)
    Resignation to inevitable evils is the evil duty of us all; the peculiar duty of a young man who has been so fortunate as I have been in early preferment; and I trust I am resigned.
  206. negative
    characterized by or displaying negation or denial or opposition or resistance; having no positive features
    Miss Bingley moved with some alacrity to the pianoforte; and, after a polite request that Elizabeth would lead the way which the other as politely and more earnestly negatived, she seated herself.
  207. incapable
    (followed by `of') lacking capacity or ability
    Miss Bingley, however, was incapable of disappointing Mr. Darcy in anything, and persevered therefore in requiring an explanation of his two motives.
  208. resentment
    a feeling of deep and bitter anger and ill-will
    Amongst the most violent against him was Mrs. Bennet, whose dislike of his general behaviour was sharpened into particular resentment by his having slighted one of her daughters.
  209. hearty
    showing warm and heartfelt friendliness
    I dare say Mr. Bingley will be very glad to see you; and I will send a few lines by you to assure him of my hearty consent to his marrying whichever he chooses of the girls; though I must throw in a good word for my little Lizzy."
  210. gratify
    make happy or satisfied
    Jane was as much gratified by this as her mother could be, though in a quieter way.
  211. polite
    showing regard for others in manners, speech, behavior, etc.
    Miss Bingley moved with some alacrity to the pianoforte; and, after a polite request that Elizabeth would lead the way which the other as politely and more earnestly negatived, she seated herself.
  212. uneasy
    causing or fraught with or showing anxiety
    Her sisters were uneasy for her, but her mother was delighted.
  213. engage
    consume all of one's attention or time
    "It is more than I engage for, I assure you."
  214. detain
    cause to be slowed down or delayed
    You will not thank me for detaining you from the bewitching converse of that young lady, whose bright eyes are also upbraiding me."
  215. qualify
    describe or portray the character or the qualities or peculiarities of
    I am not qualified to form one.
  216. resolve
    find the solution
    "Whatever I do is done in a hurry," replied he; "and therefore if I should resolve to quit Netherfield, I should probably be off in five minutes.
  217. relieve
    free from a burden, evil, or distress
    Her curiosity, however, was unexpectedly relieved.
  218. urge
    force or impel in an indicated direction
    Bingley urged Mr. Jones being sent for immediately; while his sisters, convinced that no country advice could be of any service, recommended an express to town for one of the most eminent physicians.
  219. abode
    any address at which you dwell more than temporarily
    "The garden in which stands my humble abode is separated only by a lane from Rosings Park, her ladyship's residence."
  220. convey
    transmit or serve as the medium for transmission
    "My ideas flow so rapidly that I have not time to express them--by which means my letters sometimes convey no ideas at all to my correspondents."
  221. oppose
    be against; express opposition to
    They could talk of nothing but officers; and Mr. Bingley's large fortune, the mention of which gave animation to their mother, was worthless in their eyes when opposed to the regimentals of an ensign.
  222. purse
    a container used for carrying money and small personal items or accessories (especially by women)
    They all paint tables, cover screens, and net purses.
  223. divide
    a serious disagreement between two groups of people (typically producing tension or hostility)
    The former was divided between admiration of the brilliancy which exercise had given to her complexion, and doubt as to the occasion's justifying her coming so far alone.
  224. fancied
    formed or conceived by the imagination
    When she was discontented, she fancied herself nervous.
  225. inherit
    receive from a predecessor
    Mr. Bingley inherited property to the amount of nearly a hundred thousand pounds from his father, who had intended to purchase an estate, but did not live to do it.
  226. fatigue
    temporary loss of strength and energy resulting from hard physical or mental work
    "Now, Kitty, you may cough as much as you choose," said Mr. Bennet; and, as he spoke, he left the room, fatigued with the raptures of his wife.
  227. solitude
    a state of social isolation
    I have been a disappointed man, and my spirits will not bear solitude.
  228. elegant
    refined and tasteful in appearance or behavior or style
    I never in my life saw anything more elegant than their dresses.
  229. alternative
    one of a number of things from which only one can be chosen
    Elizabeth, feeling really anxious, was determined to go to her, though the carriage was not to be had; and as she was no horsewoman, walking was her only alternative.
  230. attribute
    an abstraction belonging to or characteristic of an entity
    Something, he supposed, might be attributed to his connection with them, but yet he had never met with so much attention in the whole course of his life.
  231. justified
    having words so spaced that lines have straight even margins
    She received him with her very best politeness, which he returned with as much more, apologising for his intrusion, without any previous acquaintance with her, which he could not help flattering himself, however, might be justified by his relations
  232. conceive
    have the idea for
    Bingley had never met with more pleasant people or prettier girls in his life; everybody had been most kind and attentive to him; there had been no formality, no stiffness; he had soon felt acquainted with all the room; and, as to Miss Bennet, he could no
  233. introduce
    bring something new to an environment
    "But you forget, mamma," said Elizabeth, "that we shall meet him at the assemblies, and that Mrs. Long promised to introduce him."
  234. calculated
    carefully thought out in advance
    Elizabeth listened in silence, but was not convinced; their behaviour at the assembly had not been calculated to please in general; and with more quickness of observation and less pliancy of temper than her sister, and with a judgement too unassail
  235. admire
    feel admiration for
    Mrs. Bennet had seen her eldest daughter much admired by the Netherfield party.
  236. topic
    the subject matter of a conversation or discussion
    Mr. Wickham was the happy man towards whom almost every female eye was turned, and Elizabeth was the happy woman by whom he finally seated himself; and the agreeable manner in which he immediately fell into conversation, though it was only on its being a
  237. leisure
    time available for ease and relaxation
    When she is secure of him, there will be more leisure for falling in love as much as she chooses."
  238. dispatch
    the act of sending off something
    An invitation to dinner was soon afterwards dispatched; and already had Mrs. Bennet planned the courses that were to do credit to her housekeeping, when an answer arrived which deferred it all.
  239. inclination
    the act of inclining; bending forward
    But if it be only a slight, thin sort of inclination, I am convinced that one good sonnet will starve it entirely away."
  240. varied
    characterized by variety
    After playing some Italian songs, Miss Bingley varied the charm by a lively Scotch air; and soon afterwards Mr. Darcy, drawing near Elizabeth, said to her:
    "Do not you feel a great inclination, Miss Bennet, to seize such an opportunity of dancing a
  241. conclude
    bring to a close
    "You have a house in town, I conclude?"
  242. exhibition
    the act of exhibiting
    "You observed it, Mr. Darcy, I am sure," said Miss Bingley; "and I am inclined to think that you would not wish to see your sister make such an exhibition."
  243. imposed
    set forth authoritatively as obligatory
    "I can much more easily believe Mr. Bingley's being imposed on, than that Mr. Wickham should invent such a history of himself as he gave me last night; names, facts, everything mentioned without ceremony.
  244. persuade
    cause somebody to adopt a certain position, belief, or course of action; twist somebody's arm
    But I knew I should persuade you at last.
  245. assent
    to agree or express agreement
    To this speech Bingley made no answer; but his sisters gave it their hearty assent, and indulged their mirth for some time at the expense of their dear friend's vulgar relations.
  246. recover
    regain or make up for
    Had she found Jane in any apparent danger, Mrs. Bennet would have been very miserable; but being satisfied on seeing her that her illness was not alarming, she had no wish of her recovering immediately, as her restoration to health would probably r
  247. indifferent
    marked by a lack of interest
    "Her indifferent state of health unhappily prevents her being in town; and by that means, as I told Lady Catherine one day, has deprived the British court of its brightest ornaments.
  248. persist
    be persistent, refuse to stop
    To such perseverance in wilful self-deception Elizabeth would make no reply, and immediately and in silence withdrew; determined, if he persisted in considering her repeated refusals as flattering encouragement, to apply to her father, whose negati
  249. caution
    judiciousness in avoiding harm or danger
    The next morning, however, made an alteration; for in a quarter of an hour's tete-a-tete with Mrs. Bennet before breakfast, a conversation beginning with his parsonage-house, and leading naturally to the avowal of his hopes, that a mistress might be found
  250. comprehend
    get the meaning of something
    "I cannot comprehend the neglect of a family library in such days as these."
  251. acknowledge
    declare to be true or admit the existence or reality or truth of
    It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.
  252. acknowledged
    recognized or made known or admitted
    It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.
  253. decline
    grow worse
    But if we do not venture somebody else will; and after all, Mrs. Long and her daughters must stand their chance; and, therefore, as she will think it an act of kindness, if you decline the office, I will take it on myself."
  254. employ
    put into service; make work or employ for a particular purpose or for its inherent or natural purpose
    Observing his second daughter employed in trimming a hat, he suddenly addressed her with:
    "I hope Mr. Bingley will like it, Lizzy."
  255. fortunate
    having unexpected good fortune
    The ladies were somewhat more fortunate, for they had the advantage of ascertaining from an upper window that he wore a blue coat, and rode a black horse.
  256. formal
    being in accord with established forms and conventions and requirements (as e.g. of formal dress)
    His air was grave and stately, and his manners were very formal.
  257. discourse
    an extended communication (often interactive) dealing with some particular topic
    She had been graciously pleased to approve of both of the discourses which he had already had the honour of preaching before her.
  258. lively
    full of life and energy
    To be fond of dancing was a certain step towards falling in love; and very lively hopes of Mr. Bingley's heart were entertained.
  259. examine
    observe, check out, and look over carefully or inspect
    The apothecary came, and having examined his patient, said, as might be supposed, that she had caught a violent cold, and that they must endeavour to get the better of it; advised her to return to bed, and promised her some draughts.
  260. reproach
    express criticism towards
    On that head, therefore, I shall be uniformly silent; and you may assure yourself that no ungenerous reproach shall ever pass my lips when we are married."
  261. perceive
    to become aware of through the senses
    If I can perceive her regard for him, he must be a simpleton, indeed, not to discover it too."
  262. gratitude
    a feeling of thankfulness and appreciation
    There is so much of gratitude or vanity in almost every attachment, that it is not safe to leave any to itself.
  263. intimate
    imply as a possibility
    CHAPTER 5
    Within a short walk of Longbourn lived a family with whom the Bennets were particularly intimate.
  264. haste
    overly eager speed (and possible carelessness)
    Well, Jane, make haste and tell us; make haste, my love."
  265. assure
    inform positively and with certainty and confidence
    "It is more than I engage for, I assure you."
  266. contempt
    lack of respect accompanied by a feeling of intense dislike
    That she should have walked three miles so early in the day, in such dirty weather, and by herself, was almost incredible to Mrs. Hurst and Miss Bingley; and Elizabeth was convinced that they held her in contempt for it.
  267. esteem
    the condition of being honored (esteemed or respected or well regarded)
    "Oh! certainly," cried his faithful assistant, "no one can be really esteemed accomplished who does not greatly surpass what is usually met with.
  268. prepare
    make ready or suitable or equip in advance for a particular purpose or for some use, event, etc
    As for their mother, Mr. Collins's letter had done away much of her ill-will, and she was preparing to see him with a degree of composure which astonished her husband and daughters.
  269. invitation
    a request (spoken or written) to participate or be present or take part in something
    This was invitation enough.
  270. display
    something intended to communicate a particular impression
    After a song or two, and before she could reply to the entreaties of several that she would sing again, she was eagerly succeeded at the instrument by her sister Mary, who having, in consequence of being the only plain one in the family, worked hard for k
  271. bestow
    give as a gift
    I have been meditating on the very great pleasure which a pair of fine eyes in the face of a pretty woman can bestow."
  272. boast
    show off
    I cannot boast of knowing more than half-a-dozen, in the whole range of my acquaintance, that are really accomplished."
  273. clever
    mentally quick and resourceful
    Bingley was by no means deficient, but Darcy was clever.
  274. misfortune
    an unfortunate state resulting from unfavorable outcomes
    "I beg you would not put it into Lizzy's head to be vexed by his ill-treatment, for he is such a disagreeable man, that it would be quite a misfortune to be liked by him.
  275. remove
    remove something concrete, as by lifting, pushing, or taking off, or remove something abstract
    It had given him a disgust to his business, and to his residence in a small market town; and, in quitting them both, he had removed with his family to a house about a mile from Meryton, denominated from that period Lucas Lodge, where he could think
  276. arrive
    reach a destination; arrive by movement or progress
    An invitation to dinner was soon afterwards dispatched; and already had Mrs. Bennet planned the courses that were to do credit to her housekeeping, when an answer arrived which deferred it all.
  277. purchase
    obtain by purchase; acquire by means of a financial transaction
    Mr. Bingley inherited property to the amount of nearly a hundred thousand pounds from his father, who had intended to purchase an estate, but did not live to do it.
  278. vary
    become different in some particular way, without permanently losing one's or its former characteristics or essence
    After playing some Italian songs, Miss Bingley varied the charm by a lively Scotch air; and soon afterwards Mr. Darcy, drawing near Elizabeth, said to her:
    "Do not you feel a great inclination, Miss Bennet, to seize such an opportunity of dancing a
  279. application
    the action of putting something into operation
    Mary had neither genius nor taste; and though vanity had given her application, it had given her likewise a pedantic air and conceited manner, which would have injured a higher degree of excellence than she had reached.
  280. eagerly
    with eagerness; in an eager manner
    After a song or two, and before she could reply to the entreaties of several that she would sing again, she was eagerly succeeded at the instrument by her sister Mary, who having, in consequence of being the only plain one in the family, worked har
  281. settle
    become resolved, fixed, established, or quiet
    "Is that his design in settling here?"
  282. delighted
    greatly pleased
    "Why, my dear, you must know, Mrs. Long says that Netherfield is taken by a young man of large fortune from the north of England; that he came down on Monday in a chaise and four to see the place, and was so much delighted with it, that he agreed w
  283. venture
    any venturesome undertaking especially one with an uncertain outcome
    But if we do not venture somebody else will; and after all, Mrs. Long and her daughters must stand their chance; and, therefore, as she will think it an act of kindness, if you decline the office, I will take it on myself."
  284. create
    bring into existence
    She was shown into the breakfast-parlour, where all but Jane were assembled, and where her appearance created a great deal of surprise.
  285. miserable
    very unhappy; full of misery
    Bingley was quite uncomfortable; his sisters declared that they were miserable.
  286. disposition
    your usual mood
    She told the story, however, with great spirit among her friends; for she had a lively, playful disposition, which delighted in anything ridiculous.
  287. confirm
    strengthen or make more firm
  288. justify
    show to be right by providing justification or proof
    The former was divided between admiration of the brilliancy which exercise had given to her complexion, and doubt as to the occasion's justifying her coming so far alone.
  289. humble
    marked by meekness or modesty; not arrogant or prideful
    She had even condescended to advise him to marry as soon as he could, provided he chose with discretion; and had once paid him a visit in his humble parsonage, where she had perfectly approved all the alterations he had been making, and had even vo
  290. affected
    acted upon; influenced
    "I am afraid, Mr. Darcy," observed Miss Bingley in a half whisper, "that this adventure has rather affected your admiration of her fine eyes."
  291. pause
    cease an action temporarily
    "Your friend performs delightfully," he continued after a pause, on seeing Bingley join the group; "and I doubt not that you are an adept in the science yourself, Mr. Darcy."
  292. recommend
    express a good opinion of
    "They have none of them much to recommend them," replied he; "they are all silly and ignorant like other girls; but Lizzy has something more of quickness than her sisters."
  293. interval
    the distance between things
    To the girls, who could not listen to their cousin, and who had nothing to do but to wish for an instrument, and examine their own indifferent imitations of china on the mantelpiece, the interval of waiting appeared very long.
  294. steady
    securely in position; not shaky
    Between him and Darcy there was a very steady friendship, in spite of great opposition of character.
  295. reject
    refuse to accept or acknowledge
    She had obtained private intelligence that Mr. Darcy did not wish for cards; and Mr. Hurst soon found even his open petition rejected.
  296. likewise
    in like or similar manner
    "He is also handsome," replied Elizabeth, "which a young man ought likewise to be, if he possibly can.
  297. assert
    to declare or affirm solemnly and formally as true
    Though he had detected with a critical eye more than one failure of perfect symmetry in her form, he was forced to acknowledge her figure to be light and pleasing; and in spite of his asserting that her manners were not those of the fashionable wor
  298. declare
    state emphatically and authoritatively
    The astonishment of the ladies was just what he wished; that of Mrs. Bennet perhaps surpassing the rest; though, when the first tumult of joy was over, she began to declare that it was what she had expected all the while.
  299. hint
    an indirect suggestion
    "Is this a hint to me, Lizzy," said her father, "to send for the horses?"
  300. astonish
    affect with wonder
    "I am astonished, my dear," said Mrs. Bennet, "that you should be so ready to think your own children silly.
  301. ease
    freedom from difficulty or hardship or effort
    "He is just what a young man ought to be," said she, "sensible, good-humoured, lively; and I never saw such happy manners!--so much ease, with such perfect good breeding!"
  302. delicate
    developed with extreme delicacy and subtlety
    His sister was less delicate, and directed her eyes towards Mr. Darcy with a very expressive smile.
  303. convinced
    having a strong belief or conviction
    Elizabeth listened in silence, but was not convinced; their behaviour at the assembly had not been calculated to please in general; and with more quickness of observation and less pliancy of temper than her sister, and with a judgement too unassail
  304. entertain
    provide entertainment for
    To be fond of dancing was a certain step towards falling in love; and very lively hopes of Mr. Bingley's heart were entertained.
  305. ceremony
    a formal event performed on a special occasion
    Mrs. Bennet.'--My mind, however, is now made up on the subject, for having received ordination at Easter, I have been so fortunate as to be distinguished by the patronage of the Right Honourable Lady Catherine de Bourgh, widow of Sir Lewis de Bourgh, whos
  306. prevail
    be larger in number, quantity, power, status or importance
    Mrs. Bennet and her daughters then departed, and Elizabeth returned instantly to Jane, leaving her own and her relations' behaviour to the remarks of the two ladies and Mr. Darcy; the latter of whom, however, could not be prevailed on to join in th
  307. countenance
    the appearance conveyed by a person's face
    Mr. Bingley was good-looking and gentlemanlike; he had a pleasant countenance, and easy, unaffected manners.
  308. pardon
    accept an excuse for
    He begged pardon for having displeased her.
  309. describe
    give a description of
    I never saw such capacity, and taste, and application, and elegance, as you describe united."
  310. distress
    a state of adversity (danger or affliction or need)
    "It is difficult indeed--it is distressing.
  311. forbid
    command against
    The gentlemen pronounced him to be a fine figure of a man, the ladies declared he was much handsomer than Mr. Bingley, and he was looked at with great admiration for about half the evening, till his manners gave a disgust which turned the tide of his popu
  312. severe
    unsparing and uncompromising in discipline or judgment
    "You are severe on us."
  313. evident
    clearly revealed to the mind or the senses or judgment
    It was generally evident whenever they met, that he did admire her and to her it was equally evident that Jane was yielding to the preference which she had begun to entertain for him from the first, and was in a way to be very much in love; but she
  314. summon
    gather or bring together
    CHAPTER 8
    At five o'clock the two ladies retired to dress, and at half-past six Elizabeth was summoned to dinner.
  315. communication
    the activity of communicating; the activity of conveying information
    The communication excited many professions of concern; and enough was said of wishing them to stay at least till the following day to work on Jane; and till the morrow their going was deferred.
  316. skill
    an ability that has been acquired by training
    They attacked him in various ways--with barefaced questions, ingenious suppositions, and distant surmises; but he eluded the skill of them all, and they were at last obliged to accept the second-hand intelligence of their neighbour, Lady Lucas.
  317. observe
    watch attentively
    Observing his second daughter employed in trimming a hat, he suddenly addressed her with:
    "I hope Mr. Bingley will like it, Lizzy."
  318. assist
    give help or assistance; be of service
    CHAPTER 15
    Mr. Collins was not a sensible man, and the deficiency of nature had been but little assisted by education or society; the greatest part of his life having been spent under the guidance of an illiterate and miserly father; and though he
  319. capable
    (usually followed by `of') having capacity or ability
    You could not have met with a person more capable of giving you certain information on that head than myself, for I have been connected with his family in a particular manner from my infancy."
  320. prospect
    the possibility of future success
    You have a sweet room here, Mr. Bingley, and a charming prospect over the gravel walk.
  321. entrance
    something that provides access (to get in or get out)
    His brother-in-law, Mr. Hurst, merely looked the gentleman; but his friend Mr. Darcy soon drew the attention of the room by his fine, tall person, handsome features, noble mien, and the report which was in general circulation within five minutes after his
  322. instrument
    the means whereby some act is accomplished
    "I am going to open the instrument, Eliza, and you know what follows."
  323. temper
    a characteristic (habitual or relatively temporary) state of feeling
    She was a woman of mean understanding, little information, and uncertain temper.
  324. superior
    of high or superior quality or performance
    In understanding, Darcy was the superior.
  325. extraordinary
    beyond what is ordinary or usual; highly unusual or exceptional or remarkable
    I certainly have had my share of beauty, but I do not pretend to be anything extraordinary now.
  326. provide
    give something useful or necessary to
    Mr. Bingley intended it likewise, and sometimes made choice of his county; but as he was now provided with a good house and the liberty of a manor, it was doubtful to many of those who best knew the easiness of his temper, whether he might not spen
  327. removed
    separate or apart in time
    It had given him a disgust to his business, and to his residence in a small market town; and, in quitting them both, he had removed with his family to a house about a mile from Meryton, denominated from that period Lucas Lodge, where he could think
  328. assembly
    a group of persons who are gathered together for a common purpose
    "But you forget, mamma," said Elizabeth, "that we shall meet him at the assemblies, and that Mrs. Long promised to introduce him."
  329. aware
    (sometimes followed by `of') having or showing knowledge or understanding or realization or perception
    Till the next morning, however, she was not aware of all the felicity of her contrivance.
  330. accomplish
    to gain with effort
    Mary had heard herself mentioned to Miss Bingley as the most accomplished girl in the neighbourhood; and Catherine and Lydia had been fortunate enough never to be without partners, which was all that they had yet learnt to care for at a ball.
  331. advice
    a proposal for an appropriate course of action
    Mr. Bingley followed his advice.
  332. marked
    strongly marked; easily noticeable
    Jane met her with a smile of such sweet complacency, a glow of such happy expression, as sufficiently marked how well she was satisfied with the occurrences of the evening.
  333. intelligence
    the ability to comprehend; to understand and profit from experience
    They attacked him in various ways--with barefaced questions, ingenious suppositions, and distant surmises; but he eluded the skill of them all, and they were at last obliged to accept the second-hand intelligence of their neighbour, Lady Lucas.
  334. principal
    most important element
    Mr. Bingley had soon made himself acquainted with all the principal people in the room; he was lively and unreserved, danced every dance, was angry that the ball closed so early, and talked of giving one himself at Netherfield.
  335. connect
    connect, fasten, or put together two or more pieces
    You could not have met with a person more capable of giving you certain information on that head than myself, for I have been connected with his family in a particular manner from my infancy."
  336. estate
    extensive landed property (especially in the country) retained by the owner for his own use
    The gentlemen pronounced him to be a fine figure of a man, the ladies declared he was much handsomer than Mr. Bingley, and he was looked at with great admiration for about half the evening, till his manners gave a disgust which turned the tide of his popu
  337. contrary
    exact opposition
    Darcy, on the contrary, had seen a collection of people in whom there was little beauty and no fashion, for none of whom he had felt the smallest interest, and from none received either attention or pleasure.
  338. affection
    a positive feeling of liking
    If a woman conceals her affection with the same skill from the object of it, she may lose the opportunity of fixing him; and it will then be but poor consolation to believe the world equally in the dark.
  339. yield
    give or supply
    It was generally evident whenever they met, that he did admire her and to her it was equally evident that Jane was yielding to the preference which she had begun to entertain for him from the first, and was in a way to be very much in love; but she
  340. suspect
    regard as untrustworthy; regard with suspicion; have no faith or confidence in
    Occupied in observing Mr. Bingley's attentions to her sister, Elizabeth was far from suspecting that she was herself becoming an object of some interest in the eyes of his friend.
  341. vain
    characteristic of false pride; having an exaggerated sense of self-importance
    A person may be proud without being vain.
  342. alarm
    a device that signals the occurrence of some undesirable event
    They insist also on my seeing Mr. Jones--therefore do not be alarmed if you should hear of his having been to me--and, excepting a sore throat and headache, there is not much the matter with me.--Yours, etc."
  343. require
    have need of
    "I admire the activity of your benevolence," observed Mary, "but every impulse of feeling should be guided by reason; and, in my opinion, exertion should always be in proportion to what is required."
  344. credit
    an estimate, based on previous dealings, of a person's or an organization's ability to fulfill their financial commitments
    An invitation to dinner was soon afterwards dispatched; and already had Mrs. Bennet planned the courses that were to do credit to her housekeeping, when an answer arrived which deferred it all.