Charles Dickens' "A Tale of Two Cities" Chapters 1-12 287 words

Vocabulary study list for Charles Dickens' "A Tale of Two Cities" (Book I, Chapters 1-6; Book II, Chapters 1-6).
  1. incommodious
    uncomfortably or inconveniently small
    It was very small, very dark, very ugly, very incommodious.
  2. cogitate
    consider carefully and deeply; reflect upon; turn over in one's mind
    Having thus given his parent God speed, young Jerry seated himself on the stool, entered on his reversionary interest in the straw his father had been chewing, and cogitated.
  3. endue
    give qualities or abilities to
    Reins and whip and coachman and guard, however, in combination, had read that article of war which forbade a purpose otherwise strongly in favour of the argument, that some brute animals are endued with Reason; and the team had capitulated and retu
  4. immolate
    offer as a sacrifice by killing or by giving up to destruction
    That, he had been the prisoner's friend, but, at once in an auspicious and an evil hour detecting his infamy, had resolved to immolate the traitor he could no longer cherish in his bosom, on the sacred altar of his country.
  5. commiserate
    to feel or express sympathy or compassion
    Change places with him, and would you have been looked at by those blue eyes as he was, and commiserated by that agitated face as he was?
  6. coherently
    in a coherent manner
    But when he did find spoken words for it, they came to him coherently, though slowly.
  7. besmirch
    smear so as to make dirty or stained
    Those who had been greedy with the staves of the cask, had acquired a tigerish smear about the mouth; and one tall joker so besmirched, his head more out of a long squalid bag of a nightcap than in it, scrawled upon a wall with his finger dipped in
  8. mutilate
    destroy or injure severely
    Others, men and women, dipped in the puddles with little mugs of mutilated earthenware, or even with handkerchiefs from women's heads, which were squeezed dry into infants' mouths; others made small mud-embankments, to stem the wine as it ran; othe
  9. adjuration
    a solemn and earnest appeal to someone to do something
    With this hurried adjuration, he cocked his blunderbuss, and stood on the offensive.
  10. bacchanalian
    used of riotously drunken merrymaking
    The learned profession of the law was certainly not behind any other learned profession in its Bacchanalian propensities; neither was Mr. Stryver, already fast shouldering his way to a large and lucrative practice, behind his compeers in this parti
  11. elate
    fill with high spirits; fill with optimism
    Don't let your sober face elate you, however; you don't know what it may come to.
  12. submerge
    put under water
    No more can I look into the depths of this unfathomable water, wherein, as momentary lights glanced into it, I have had glimpses of buried treasure and other things submerged.
  13. carouse
    engage in boisterous, drunken merrymaking
    The more business he got, the greater his power seemed to grow of getting at its pith and marrow; and however late at night he sat carousing with Sydney Carton, he always had his points at his fingers' ends in the morning.
  14. frolicsome
    given to merry frolicking
    There was a special companionship in it, an observable inclination on the part of every one to join some other one, which led, especially among the luckier or lighter-hearted, to frolicsome embraces, drinking of healths, shaking of hands, and even
  15. insensate
    devoid of feeling and consciousness and animation
    Your lighter boxes of family papers went up-stairs into a Barmecide room, that always had a great dining-table in it and never had a dinner, and where, even in the year one thousand seven hundred and eighty, the first letters written to you by your old lo
  16. decompose
    separate (substances) into constituent elements or parts
    Your bank-notes had a musty odour, as if they were fast decomposing into rags again.
  17. jostle
    make one's way by jostling, pushing, or shoving
    The rough, irregular stones of the street, pointing every way, and designed, one might have thought, expressly to lame all living creatures that approached them, had dammed it into little pools; these were surrounded, each by its own jostling group
  18. disfigure
    mar or spoil the appearance of
    How it would be a weakness in the government to break down in this attempt to practise for popularity on the lowest national antipathies and fears, and therefore Mr. Attorney-General had made the most of it; how, nevertheless, it rested upon nothing, save
  19. modicum
    a small or moderate or token amount
    Hunger was pushed out of the tall houses, in the wretched clothing that hung upon poles and lines; Hunger was patched into them with straw and rag and wood and paper; Hunger was repeated in every fragment of the small modicum of firewood that the m
  20. provender
    food for domestic livestock
    Monsieur Defarge put this provender, and the lamp he carried, on the shoemaker's bench (there was nothing else in the garret but a pallet bed), and he and Mr. Lorry roused the captive, and assisted him to his feet.
  21. roil
    make turbid by stirring up the sediments of
    On the afternoon of a certain fine Sunday when the waves of four months had roiled over the trial for treason, and carried it, as to the public interest and memory, far out to sea, Mr. Jarvis Lorry walked along the sunny streets from Clerkenwell wh
  22. cadaverous
    of or relating to a cadaver or corpse
    Pride, contempt, defiance, stubbornness, submission, lamentation, succeeded one another; so did varieties of sunken cheek, cadaverous colour, emaciated hands and figures.
  23. ogle
    look at with amorous intentions
    Your lighter boxes of family papers went up-stairs into a Barmecide room, that always had a great dining-table in it and never had a dinner, and where, even in the year one thousand seven hundred and eighty, the first letters written to you by your old lo
  24. diverge
    move or draw apart
    A narrow winding street, full of offence and stench, with other narrow winding streets diverging, all peopled by rags and nightcaps, and all smelling of rags and nightcaps, and all visible things with a brooding look upon them that looked ill.
  25. unimpeachable
    beyond doubt or reproach
    That, the lofty example of this immaculate and unimpeachable witness for the Crown, to refer to whom however unworthily was an honour, had communicated itself to the prisoner's servant, and had engendered in him a holy determination to examine his
  26. opiate
    a narcotic drug that contains opium or an opium derivative
    But, though the bank was almost always with him, and though the coach (in a confused way, like the presence of pain under an opiate) was always with him, there was another current of impression that never ceased to run, all through the night.
  27. pollute
    make impure
    The uncontrollable and hopeless mass of decomposition so engendered, would have polluted the air, even if poverty and deprivation had not loaded it with their intangible impurities; the two bad sources combined made it almost insupportable.
  28. deprecate
    express strong disapproval of; deplore
    Master Cruncher (who was in his shirt) took this very ill, and, turning to his mother, strongly deprecated any praying away of his personal board.
  29. capitulate
    surrender under agreed conditions
    Reins and whip and coachman and guard, however, in combination, had read that article of war which forbade a purpose otherwise strongly in favour of the argument, that some brute animals are endued with Reason; and the team had capitulated and retu
  30. trident
    a spear with three prongs
    France, less favoured on the whole as to matters spiritual than her sister of the shield and trident, rolled with exceeding smoothness down hill, making paper money and spending it.
  31. triumvirate
    a group of three men responsible for public administration or civil authority
    But, he feigned not to notice the two strangers, and fell into discourse with the triumvirate of customers who were drinking at the counter.
  32. gamut
    a complete extent or range: "a face that expressed a gamut of emotions"
    Accordingly, the forger was put to Death; the utterer of a bad note was put to Death; the unlawful opener of a letter was put to Death; the purloiner of forty shillings and sixpence was put to Death; the holder of a horse at Tellson's door, who made off w
  33. funereal
    suited to or suggestive of a grave or burial
    It was a large, dark room, furnished in a funereal manner with black horsehair, and loaded with heavy dark tables.
  34. secrete
    generate and separate from cells or bodily fluids
    That, the lofty example of this immaculate and unimpeachable witness for the Crown, to refer to whom however unworthily was an honour, had communicated itself to the prisoner's servant, and had engendered in him a holy determination to examine his master'
  35. dormer
    a gabled extension built out from a sloping roof to accommodate a vertical window
    The garret, built to be a depository for firewood and the like, was dim and dark: for, the window of dormer shape, was in truth a door in the roof, with a little crane over it for the hoisting up of stores from the street: unglazed, and closing up
  36. engender
    make children
    The uncontrollable and hopeless mass of decomposition so engendered, would have polluted the air, even if poverty and deprivation had not loaded it with their intangible impurities; the two bad sources combined made it almost insupportable.
  37. glib
    artfully persuasive in speech
    It had once been noted at the Bar, that while Mr. Stryver was a glib man, and an unscrupulous, and a ready, and a bold, he had not that faculty of extracting the essence from a heap of statements, which is among the most striking and necessary of t
  38. convivial
    occupied with or fond of the pleasures of good company
    Exceedingly red-eyed and grim, as if he had been up all night at a party which had taken anything but a convivial turn, Jerry Cruncher worried his breakfast rather than ate it, growling over it like any four-footed inmate of a menagerie.
  39. nestle
    move or arrange oneself in a comfortable and cozy position
    She had nestled down with him, that his head might lie upon her arm; and her hair drooping over him curtained him from the light.
  40. clammy
    unpleasantly cool and humid
    A clammy and intensely cold mist, it made its slow way through the air in ripples that visibly followed and overspread one another, as the waves of an unwholesome sea might do.
  41. displace
    cause to move, usually with force or pressure
    He was quiet and attentive; watched the opening proceedings with a grave interest; and stood with his hands resting on the slab of wood before him, so composedly, that they had not displaced a leaf of the herbs with which it was strewn.
  42. pillory
    a wooden instrument of punishment on a post with holes for the wrists and neck; offenders were locked in and so exposed to public scorn
    It was famous, too, for the pillory, a wise old institution, that inflicted a punishment of which no one could foresee the extent; also, for the whipping-post, another dear old institution, very humanising and softening to behold in action; also, f
  43. gainsay
    take exception to
    "I don't gainsay it.
  44. knotty
    tangled in knots or snarls
    Two or three times, the matter in hand became so knotty, that the jackal found it imperative on him to get up, and steep his towels anew.
  45. waylay
    wait in hiding to attack
    Daring burglaries by armed men, and highway robberies, took place in the capital itself every night; families were publicly cautioned not to go out of town without removing their furniture to upholsterers' warehouses for security; the highwayman in the da
  46. devotedly
    with devotion
    I will not say with me, though he had business relations with me many years ago, and we are now intimate; I will say with the fair daughter to whom he is so devotedly attached, and who is so devotedly attached to him?
  47. longevity
    the property of being long-lived
    Very orderly and methodical he looked, with a hand on each knee, and a loud watch ticking a sonorous sermon under his flapped waist-coat, as though it pitted its gravity and longevity against the levity and evanescence of the brisk fire.
  48. expostulation
    an exclamation of protest or remonstrance or reproof
    In his expostulation he dropped his cleaner hand (perhaps accidentally, perhaps not) upon the joker's heart.
  49. laconic
    brief and to the point; effectively cut short
    A slight frown and a laconic "Yes," were the answer.
  50. proviso
    a stipulated condition
    Jerry added, by way of proviso.
  51. overpower
    overcome by superior force
    Mr. Carton had lounged in, but he made only Two.

    The night was so very sultry, that although they sat with doors and windows open, they were overpowered by heat.
  52. slovenly
    negligent of neatness especially in dress and person; habitually dirty and unkempt
    Allowing for my learned friend's appearance being careless and slovenly if not debauched, they were sufficiently like each other to surprise, not only the witness, but everybody present, when they were thus brought into comparison.
  53. aphorism
    a short pithy instructive saying
    Altogether, the Old Bailey, at that date, was a choice illustration of the precept, that "Whatever is is right;" an aphorism that would be as final as it is lazy, did it not include the troublesome consequence, that nothing that ever was, was wrong
  54. obliterate
    remove completely from recognition or memory
    Are you a subject for the mad hospital?" said the wine-shop keeper, crossing the road, and obliterating the jest with a handful of mud, picked up for the purpose, and smeared over it.
  55. carrion
    the dead and rotting body of an animal; unfit for human food
    He had no opportunity of saying, or so much as thinking, anything else, until he was clear of the Old Bailey; for, the crowd came pouring out with a vehemence that nearly took him off his legs, and a loud buzz swept into the street as if the baffled blue-
  56. upshot
    a phenomenon that follows and is caused by some previous phenomenon
    The upshot of which, was, to smash this witness like a crockery vessel, and shiver his part of the case to useless lumber.
  57. pith
    soft spongelike central cylinder of the stems of most flowering plants
    The more business he got, the greater his power seemed to grow of getting at its pith and marrow; and however late at night he sat carousing with Sydney Carton, he always had his points at his fingers' ends in the morning.
  58. agitate
    move or cause to move back and forth
    Change places with him, and would you have been looked at by those blue eyes as he was, and commiserated by that agitated face as he was?
  59. holster
    a sheath (usually leather) for carrying a handgun
    And if you've got holsters to that saddle o' yourn, don't let me see your hand go nigh 'em.
  60. intangible
    incapable of being perceived by the senses especially the sense of touch
    The uncontrollable and hopeless mass of decomposition so engendered, would have polluted the air, even if poverty and deprivation had not loaded it with their intangible impurities; the two bad sources combined made it almost insupportable.
  61. dissipate
    to cause to separate and go in different directions
    Stryver never had a case in hand, anywhere, but Carton was there, with his hands in his pockets, staring at the ceiling of the court; they went the same Circuit, and even there they prolonged their usual orgies late into the night, and Carton was rumoured
  62. beguile
    attract; cause to be enamored
    But there was no harm in his way of saying this: it was said laughingly, and to beguile the time."
  63. timorous
    timid by nature or revealing timidity
    "Yes. Except that I remember them both to have been--like myself--timorous of highwaymen, and the prisoner has not a timorous air."
  64. detecting
    a police investigation to determine the perpetrator
    That, he had been the prisoner's friend, but, at once in an auspicious and an evil hour detecting his infamy, had resolved to immolate the traitor he could no longer cherish in his bosom, on the sacred altar of his country.
  65. attainable
    capable of being attained or accomplished
    In a building at the back, attainable by a courtyard where a plane-tree rustled its green leaves, church-organs claimed to be made, and silver to be chased, and likewise gold to be beaten by some mysterious giant who had a golden arm starting out o
  66. menagerie
    a collection of live animals for study or display
    Exceedingly red-eyed and grim, as if he had been up all night at a party which had taken anything but a convivial turn, Jerry Cruncher worried his breakfast rather than ate it, growling over it like any four-footed inmate of a menagerie.
  67. spectral
    resembling or characteristic of a phantom
    And so exactly was the expression repeated on the fair young face of her who had crept along the wall to a point where she could see him, and where she now stood looking at him, with hands which at first had been only raised in frightened compassion, if n
  68. trepidation
    a feeling of alarm or dread
    A woman of orderly and industrious appearance rose from her knees in a corner, with sufficient haste and trepidation to show that she was the person referred to.
  69. culinary
    of or relating to or used in cooking
    Miss Pross's friendship being of the thoroughly practical kind, she had ravaged Soho and the adjacent provinces, in search of impoverished French, who, tempted by shillings and half-crowns, would impart culinary mysteries to her.
  70. soliloquy
    speech you make to yourself
    "I hope there ain't, but I can't make so 'Nation sure of that," said the guard, in gruff soliloquy.
  71. mutinous
    consisting of or characterized by or inciting to mutiny
    He walked up hill in the mire by the side of the mail, as the rest of the passengers did; not because they had the least relish for walking exercise, under the circumstances, but because the hill, and the harness, and the mud, and the mail, were all so he
  72. necessitate
    require as useful, just, or proper
    After bursting open a door of idiotic obstinacy with a weak rattle in its throat, you fell into Tellson's down two steps, and came to your senses in a miserable little shop, with two little counters, where the oldest of men made your cheque shake as if th
  73. sodden
    wet through and through; thoroughly wet
    Others, men and women, dipped in the puddles with little mugs of mutilated earthenware, or even with handkerchiefs from women's heads, which were squeezed dry into infants' mouths; others made small mud-embankments, to stem the wine as it ran; others, dir
  74. evince
    give expression to
    The messenger rode back at an easy trot, stopping pretty often at ale-houses by the way to drink, but evincing a tendency to keep his own counsel, and to keep his hat cocked over his eyes.
  75. pallet
    a hand tool with a flat blade used by potters for mixing and shaping clay
    Monsieur Defarge put this provender, and the lamp he carried, on the shoemaker's bench (there was nothing else in the garret but a pallet bed), and he and Mr. Lorry roused the captive, and assisted him to his feet.
  76. nettle
    any of numerous plants having stinging hairs that cause skin irritation on contact (especially of the genus Urtica or family Urticaceae)
    "Don't be nettled, Mr. Lorry.
  77. baffle
    be a mystery or bewildering to
    He had no opportunity of saying, or so much as thinking, anything else, until he was clear of the Old Bailey; for, the crowd came pouring out with a vehemence that nearly took him off his legs, and a loud buzz swept into the street as if the baffled
  78. illuminate
    make lighter or brighter
    Under the over-swinging lamps--swinging ever brighter in the better streets, and ever dimmer in the worse--and by lighted shops, gay crowds, illuminated coffee-houses, and theatre-doors, to one of the city gates.
  79. supplementary
    functioning in a supporting capacity
    The guard soon replaced his blunderbuss in his arm-chest, and, having looked to the rest of its contents, and having looked to the supplementary pistols that he wore in his belt, looked to a smaller chest beneath his seat, in which there were a few
  80. musty
    covered with or smelling of mold
    Your bank-notes had a musty odour, as if they were fast decomposing into rags again.
  81. malign
    speak unfavorably about
    He had never been suspected of stealing a silver tea-pot; he had been maligned respecting a mustard-pot, but it turned out to be only a plated one.
  82. grisly
    shockingly repellent; inspiring horror
    He was never absent during business hours, unless upon an errand, and then he was represented by his son: a grisly urchin of twelve, who was his express image.
  83. stench
    a distinctive odor that is offensively unpleasant
    A narrow winding street, full of offence and stench, with other narrow winding streets diverging, all peopled by rags and nightcaps, and all smelling of rags and nightcaps, and all visible things with a brooding look upon them that looked ill.
  84. whet
    sharpen by rubbing, as on a whetstone
    Conspicuous among these latter, like an animated bit of the spiked wall of Newgate, Jerry stood: aiming at the prisoner the beery breath of a whet he had taken as he came along, and discharging it to mingle with the waves of other beer, and gin, an
  85. detriment
    a damage or loss
    So very great is the improvement Time has brought about in such habits, that a moderate statement of the quantity of wine and punch which one man would swallow in the course of a night, without any detriment to his reputation as a perfect gentleman
  86. compunction
    a feeling of deep regret (usually for some misdeed)
    Here again: Mr. Lorry's inquiries into Miss Pross's personal history had established the fact that her brother Solomon was a heartless scoundrel who had stripped her of everything she possessed, as a stake to speculate with, and had abandoned her in her p
  87. affidavit
    written declaration made under oath; a written statement sworn to be true before someone legally authorized to administer an oath
    "I have lived with the darling--or the darling has lived with me, and paid me for it; which she certainly should never have done, you may take your affidavit, if I could have afforded to keep either myself or her for nothing--since she was ten year
  88. precocious
    characterized by or characteristic of exceptionally early development or maturity (especially in mental aptitude)
    Mr. Stryver laughed till he shook his precocious paunch.
  89. famished
    extremely hungry
    So expressive it was, of a hopeless and lost creature, that a famished traveller, wearied out by lonely wandering in a wilderness, would have remembered home and friends in such a tone before lying down to die.
  90. skid
    one of a pair of planks used to make a track for rolling or sliding objects
    The horses stopped to breathe again, and the guard got down to skid the wheel for the descent, and open the coach-door to let the passengers in.
  91. decomposition
    the organic phenomenon of rotting
    The uncontrollable and hopeless mass of decomposition so engendered, would have polluted the air, even if poverty and deprivation had not loaded it with their intangible impurities; the two bad sources combined made it almost insupportable.
  92. interpose
    introduce
    But, there my Lord interposed (with as grave a face as if it had not been true), saying that he could not sit upon that Bench and suffer those allusions.
  93. proxy
    a person authorized to act for another
    His surname was Cruncher, and on the youthful occasion of his renouncing by proxy the works of darkness, in the easterly parish church of Hounsditch, he had received the added appellation of Jerry.
  94. rejoinder
    a quick reply to a question or remark (especially a witty or critical one)
    "I neither want any thanks, nor merit any," was the careless rejoinder.
  95. emaciated
    very thin especially from disease or hunger or cold
    Pride, contempt, defiance, stubbornness, submission, lamentation, succeeded one another; so did varieties of sunken cheek, cadaverous colour, emaciated hands and figures.
  96. nicety
    conformity with some esthetic standard of correctness or propriety
    Such a scanty portion of light was admitted through these means, that it was difficult, on first coming in, to see anything; and long habit alone could have slowly formed in any one, the ability to do any work requiring nicety in such obscurity.
  97. coercion
    using force to cause something to occur
    In the submissive way of one long accustomed to obey under coercion, he ate and drank what they gave him to eat and drink, and put on the cloak and other wrappings, that they gave him to wear.
  98. despoil
    steal goods; take as spoils
    Daring burglaries by armed men, and highway robberies, took place in the capital itself every night; families were publicly cautioned not to go out of town without removing their furniture to upholsterers' warehouses for security; the highwayman in the da
  99. throttle
    a valve that regulates the supply of fuel to the engine
    The jackal then invigorated himself with a bum for his throttle, and a fresh application to his head, and applied himself to the collection of a second meal; this was administered to the lion in the same manner, and was not disposed of until the cl
  100. methodical
    characterized by method and orderliness
    Very orderly and methodical he looked, with a hand on each knee, and a loud watch ticking a sonorous sermon under his flapped waist-coat, as though it pitted its gravity and longevity against the levity and evanescence of the brisk fire.
  101. tiller
    someone who tills land (prepares the soil for the planting of crops)
    It is likely enough that in the rough outhouses of some tillers of the heavy lands adjacent to Paris, there were sheltered from the weather that very day, rude carts, bespattered with rustic mire, snuffed about by pigs, and roosted in by poultry, w
  102. ferret
    domesticated albino variety of the European polecat bred for hunting rats and rabbits
    That Providence, however, had put it into the heart of a person who was beyond fear and beyond reproach, to ferret out the nature of the prisoner's schemes, and, struck with horror, to disclose them to his Majesty's Chief Secretary of State and mos
  103. discernible
    perceptible by the senses or intellect
    No crowd was about the door; no people were discernible at any of the many windows; not even a chance passerby was in the street.
  104. extraction
    the action of taking out something (especially using effort or force)
    How the virtuous servant, Cly, was his friend and partner, and was worthy to be; how the watchful eyes of those forgers and false swearers had rested on the prisoner as a victim, because some family affairs in France, he being of French extraction,
  105. mirage
    an optical illusion in which atmospheric refraction by a layer of hot air distorts or inverts reflections of distant objects
    Waste forces within him, and a desert all around, this man stood still on his way across a silent terrace, and saw for a moment, lying in the wilderness before him, a mirage of honourable ambition, self-denial, and perseverance.
  106. foray
    a sudden short attack
    Encamped at a quarter before nine, in good time to touch his three-cornered hat to the oldest of men as they passed in to Tellson's, Jerry took up his station on this windy March morning, with young Jerry standing by him, when not engaged in making for
  107. incredulity
    doubt about the truth of something
    It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring
  108. doleful
    filled with or evoking sadness
    Each of these stoppages was made at a doleful grating, by which any languishing good airs that were left uncorrupted, seemed to escape, and all spoilt and sickly vapours seemed to crawl in.
  109. contraband
    distributed or sold illicitly
    Daring burglaries by armed men, and highway robberies, took place in the capital itself every night; families were publicly cautioned not to go out of town without removing their furniture to upholsterers' warehouses for security; the highwayman in the da
  110. debauch
    a wild gathering involving excessive drinking and promiscuity
    Allowing for my learned friend's appearance being careless and slovenly if not debauched, they were sufficiently like each other to surprise, not only the witness, but everybody present, when they were thus brought into comparison.
  111. florid
    elaborately or excessively ornamented
    Sessions and Old Bailey had now to summon their favourite, specially, to their longing arms; and shouldering itself towards the visage of the Lord Chief Justice in the Court of King's Bench, the florid countenance of Mr. Stryver might be daily seen
  112. impurity
    the condition of being impure
    The uncontrollable and hopeless mass of decomposition so engendered, would have polluted the air, even if poverty and deprivation had not loaded it with their intangible impurities; the two bad sources combined made it almost insupportable.
  113. gruff
    brusque and surly and forbidding
    "I hope there ain't, but I can't make so 'Nation sure of that," said the guard, in gruff soliloquy.
  114. blare
    make a loud noise
    The object of all this staring and blaring, was a young man of about five-and-twenty, well-grown and well-looking, with a sunburnt cheek and a dark eye.
  115. evoke
    call forth (emotions, feelings, and responses)
    While one external cause, and that a reference to his long lingering agony, would always--as on the trial--evoke this condition from the depths of his soul, it was also in its nature to arise of itself, and to draw a gloom over him, as incomprehens
  116. bristle
    a stiff hair
    This much, Jerry, with his head becoming more and more spiky as the law terms bristled it, made out with huge satisfaction, and so arrived circuitously at the understanding that the aforesaid, and over and over again aforesaid, Charles Darnay, stoo
  117. auspicious
    auguring favorable circumstances and good luck
    That, he had been the prisoner's friend, but, at once in an auspicious and an evil hour detecting his infamy, had resolved to immolate the traitor he could no longer cherish in his bosom, on the sacred altar of his country.
  118. demur
    take exception to
    After some delay and demur, the door grudgingly turned on its hinges a very little way, and allowed Mr. Jerry Cruncher to squeeze himself into court.
  119. sonorous
    full and loud and deep
    Very orderly and methodical he looked, with a hand on each knee, and a loud watch ticking a sonorous sermon under his flapped waist-coat, as though it pitted its gravity and longevity against the levity and evanescence of the brisk fire.
  120. immaculate
    completely neat and clean
    That, the lofty example of this immaculate and unimpeachable witness for the Crown, to refer to whom however unworthily was an honour, had communicated itself to the prisoner's servant, and had engendered in him a holy determination to examine his
  121. glean
    gather, as of natural products
    His stock consisted of a wooden stool, made out of a broken-backed chair cut down, which stool, young Jerry, walking at his father's side, carried every morning to beneath the banking-house window that was nearest Temple Bar: where, with the addition of t
  122. orgy
    a wild gathering involving excessive drinking and promiscuity
    Stryver never had a case in hand, anywhere, but Carton was there, with his hands in his pockets, staring at the ceiling of the court; they went the same Circuit, and even there they prolonged their usual orgies late into the night, and Carton was r
  123. confuse
    mistake one thing for another
    But, though the bank was almost always with him, and though the coach (in a confused way, like the presence of pain under an opiate) was always with him, there was another current of impression that never ceased to run, all through the night.
  124. notoriety
    the state of being known for some unfavorable act or quality
    They hanged at Tyburn, in those days, so the street outside Newgate had not obtained one infamous notoriety that has since attached to it.
  125. sultry
    sexually exciting or gratifying
    Mr. Carton had lounged in, but he made only Two.

    The night was so very sultry, that although they sat with doors and windows open, they were overpowered by heat.
  126. exaggerate
    to enlarge beyond bounds or the truth
    It was characteristic of this lady (as of some other people before her time and since) that whenever her original proposition was questioned, she exaggerated it.
  127. releasing
    emotionally purging (of e.g. art)
    Releasing his arm, she laid her hand upon his shoulder.
  128. dutiful
    willingly obedient out of a sense of duty and respect
    You've got a dutiful mother, you have, my son.
  129. urchin
    poor and often mischievous city child
    He was never absent during business hours, unless upon an errand, and then he was represented by his son: a grisly urchin of twelve, who was his express image.
  130. stolid
    having or revealing little emotion or sensibility; not easily aroused or excited
    The gentleman from Tellson's had nothing left for it but to empty his glass with an air of stolid desperation, settle his odd little flaxen wig at the ears, and follow the waiter to Miss Manette's apartment.
  131. originate
    come into existence; take on form or shape
    Such whims are only impressive as we originate them, I think; they are not to be communicated.
  132. potentate
    a ruler who is unconstrained by law
    Daring burglaries by armed men, and highway robberies, took place in the capital itself every night; families were publicly cautioned not to go out of town without removing their furniture to upholsterers' warehouses for security; the highwayman in the da
  133. cadence
    (prosody) the accent in a metrical foot of verse
    Yet, no one could have looked at him twice, without looking again: even though the opportunity of observation had not extended to the mournful cadence of his low grave voice, and to the abstraction that overclouded him fitfully, without any apparen
  134. levity
    a manner lacking seriousness
    Very orderly and methodical he looked, with a hand on each knee, and a loud watch ticking a sonorous sermon under his flapped waist-coat, as though it pitted its gravity and longevity against the levity and evanescence of the brisk fire.
  135. environ
    extend on all sides of simultaneously; encircle
    Environed by them, while the Woodman and the Farmer worked unheeded, those two of the large jaws, and those other two of the plain and the fair faces, trod with stir enough, and carried their divine rights with a high hand.
  136. inscrutable
    of an obscure nature
    In any of the burial-places of this city through which I pass, is there a sleeper more inscrutable than its busy inhabitants are, in their innermost personality, to me, or than I am to them?
  137. revolve
    turn on or around an axis or a center
    As everything turned upon her, and revolved about her, they went out under the plane-tree, and she carried the wine down for the special benefit of Mr. Lorry.
  138. barrister
    a British or Canadian lawyer who speaks in the higher courts of law on behalf of either the defense or prosecution
    Perhaps a little angry with himself, as well as with the barrister, Mr. Lorry bustled into the chair, and was carried off to Tellson's.
  139. flinch
    draw back, as with fear or pain
    The accused, who was (and who knew he was) being mentally hanged, beheaded, and quartered, by everybody there, neither flinched from the situation, nor assumed any theatrical air in it.
  140. submissive
    inclined or willing to submit to orders or wishes of others or showing such inclination
    In the submissive way of one long accustomed to obey under coercion, he ate and drank what they gave him to eat and drink, and put on the cloak and other wrappings, that they gave him to wear.
  141. retinue
    the group following and attending to some important person
    Daring burglaries by armed men, and highway robberies, took place in the capital itself every night; families were publicly cautioned not to go out of town without removing their furniture to upholsterers' warehouses for security; the highwayman in the da
  142. contagious
    (of disease) capable of being transmitted by infection
    That, Virtue, as had been observed by the poets (in many passages which he well knew the jury would have, word for word, at the tips of their tongues; whereat the jury's countenances displayed a guilty consciousness that they knew nothing about the passag
  143. canter
    a smooth three-beat gait; between a trot and a gallop
    "I say a horse at a canter coming up, Joe."

    "_I_ say a horse at a gallop, Tom," returned the guard, leaving his hold of the door, and mounting nimbly to his place.
  144. bulky
    of large size for its weight
    As the bank passenger--with an arm drawn through the leathern strap, which did what lay in it to keep him from pounding against the next passenger, and driving him into his corner, whenever the coach got a special jolt--nodded in his place, with half-shut
  145. eccentricity
    strange and unconventional behavior
    From these pilgrimages to the jug and basin, he returned with such eccentricities of damp headgear as no words can describe; which were made the more ludicrous by his anxious gravity.
  146. antipathy
    a feeling of intense dislike
    How it would be a weakness in the government to break down in this attempt to practise for popularity on the lowest national antipathies and fears, and therefore Mr. Attorney-General had made the most of it; how, nevertheless, it rested upon nothin
  147. replenish
    fill something that had previously been emptied
    She had installed herself, some time before, as Mr. Lorry's cup-bearer; and while they sat under the plane-tree, talking, she kept his glass replenished.
  148. garnish
    decorate (food), as with parsley or other ornamental foods
    In the meantime, his son, whose head was garnished with tenderer spikes, and whose young eyes stood close by one another, as his father's did, kept the required watch upon his mother.
  149. elevate
    raise from a lower to a higher position
    The sort of interest with which this man was stared and breathed at, was not a sort that elevated humanity.
  150. consolidation
    combining into a solid mass
    My friend is dead, my neighbour is dead, my love, the darling of my soul, is dead; it is the inexorable consolidation and perpetuation of the secret that was always in that individuality, and which I shall carry in mine to my life's end.
  151. disperse
    move away from each other
    Making his way through the tainted crowd, dispersed up and down this hideous scene of action, with the skill of a man accustomed to make his way quietly, the messenger found out the door he sought, and handed in his letter through a trap in it.
  152. fictitious
    formed or conceived by the imagination
    --Halloa, father!" and, after raising this fictitious alarm, darting in again with an undutiful grin.
  153. amends
    something done or paid in expiation of a wrong
    The kennel, to make amends, ran down the middle of the street--when it ran at all: which was only after heavy rains, and then it ran, by many eccentric fits, into the houses.
  154. speculate
    reflect deeply on a subject
    Dig--dig--dig--until an impatient movement from one of the two passengers would admonish him to pull up the window, draw his arm securely through the leathern strap, and speculate upon the two slumbering forms, until his mind lost its hold of them,
  155. gender
    the properties that distinguish organisms on the basis of their reproductive roles
    The likeness passed away, like a breath along the surface of the gaunt pier-glass behind her, on the frame of which, a hospital procession of negro cupids, several headless and all cripples, were offering black baskets of Dead Sea fruit to black divinitie
  156. stint
    supply sparingly and with restricted quantities
    Both resorted to the drinking-table without stint, but each in a different way; the lion for the most part reclining with his hands in his waistband, looking at the fire, or occasionally flirting with some lighter document; the jackal, with knitted
  157. sprinkle
    scatter with liquid; wet lightly
    The court was all bestrewn with herbs and sprinkled with vinegar, as a precaution against gaol air and gaol fever.
  158. eddy
    a miniature whirlpool or whirlwind resulting when the current of a fluid doubles back on itself
    The figures of a horse and rider came slowly through the eddying mist, and came to the side of the mail, where the passenger stood.
  159. spat
    a quarrel about petty points
    The resemblance was not lessened by the accidental circumstance, that the mature Jerry bit and spat out straw, while the twinkling eyes of the youthful Jerry were as restlessly watchful of him as of everything else in Fleet-street.
  160. terrestrial
    of or relating to or characteristic of the planet Earth or its inhabitants
    "Do you feel, yet, that you belong to this terrestrial scheme again, Mr. Darnay?"
  161. stumble
    miss a step and fall or nearly fall
    With drooping heads and tremulous tails, they mashed their way through the thick mud, floundering and stumbling between whiles, as if they were falling to pieces at the larger joints.
  162. efficacy
    capacity or power to produce a desired effect
    "Don't do it!" said Mr. Crunches looking about, as if he rather expected to see the loaf disappear under the efficacy of his wife's petitions.
  163. plaintive
    expressing sorrow
    The plaintive tone of her compassion merged into the less musical voice of the Judge, as he said something fiercely: "Answer the questions put to you, and make no remark upon them."
  164. impediment
    something immaterial that interferes with or delays action or progress
    And, sir, if business imposes its restraints and its silences and impediments, Mr. Darnay as a young gentleman of generosity knows how to make allowance for that circumstance.
  165. animate
    make lively
    Conspicuous among these latter, like an animated bit of the spiked wall of Newgate, Jerry stood: aiming at the prisoner the beery breath of a whet he had taken as he came along, and discharging it to mingle with the waves of other beer, and gin, an
  166. reek
    give off smoke, fumes, warm vapour, steam, etc.
    It was dense enough to shut out everything from the light of the coach-lamps but these its own workings, and a few yards of road; and the reek of the labouring horses steamed into it, as if they had made it all.
  167. inexorable
    not to be placated or appeased or moved by entreaty
    My friend is dead, my neighbour is dead, my love, the darling of my soul, is dead; it is the inexorable consolidation and perpetuation of the secret that was always in that individuality, and which I shall carry in mine to my life's end.
  168. pauper
    a person who is very poor
    As a consequence, country airs circulated in Soho with vigorous freedom, instead of languishing into the parish like stray paupers without a settlement; and there was many a good south wall, not far off, on which the peaches ripened in their season
  169. flounder
    walk with great difficulty
    With drooping heads and tremulous tails, they mashed their way through the thick mud, floundering and stumbling between whiles, as if they were falling to pieces at the larger joints.
  170. loiter
    be about
    Consequently, another drawer, and two porters, and several maids and the landlady, were all loitering by accident at various points of the road between the Concord and the coffee-room, when a gentleman of sixty, formally dressed in a brown suit of
  171. rustle
    make a dry crackling sound
    This third interchange of the Christian name was completed at the moment when Madame Defarge put her toothpick by, kept her eyebrows up, and slightly rustled in her seat.
  172. nimble
    moving quickly and lightly
    The joker rapped it with his own, took a nimble spring upward, and came down in a fantastic dancing attitude, with one of his stained shoes jerked off his foot into his hand, and held out.
  173. labouring
    doing arduous or unpleasant work
    It was dense enough to shut out everything from the light of the coach-lamps but these its own workings, and a few yards of road; and the reek of the labouring horses steamed into it, as if they had made it all.
  174. mire
    a soft wet area of low-lying land that sinks underfoot
    It is likely enough that in the rough outhouses of some tillers of the heavy lands adjacent to Paris, there were sheltered from the weather that very day, rude carts, bespattered with rustic mire, snuffed about by pigs, and roosted in by poultry, w
  175. crevice
    a long narrow opening
    With an admonitory gesture to keep them back, he stooped, and looked in through the crevice in the wall.
  176. dogged
    stubbornly unyielding
    "Ye-es, sir," returned Jerry, in something of a dogged manner.
  177. implacable
    incapable of being placated
    Good-humoured looking on the whole, but implacable-looking, too; evidently a man of a strong resolution and a set purpose; a man not desirable to be met, rushing down a narrow pass with a gulf on either side, for nothing would turn the man.
  178. accost
    speak to someone
    Out of the midst of them, the ghostly face would rise, and he would accost it again.
  179. lucrative
    producing a sizeable profit
    The learned profession of the law was certainly not behind any other learned profession in its Bacchanalian propensities; neither was Mr. Stryver, already fast shouldering his way to a large and lucrative practice, behind his compeers in this parti
  180. timidity
    fear of the unknown or unfamiliar or fear of making decisions
    "Did you ever see a counterfeit of timidity, Mr. Lorry?"
  181. uniformity
    the quality of lacking diversity or variation (even to the point of boredom)
    He, and his old canvas frock, and his loose stockings, and all his poor tatters of clothes, had, in a long seclusion from direct light and air, faded down to such a dull uniformity of parchment-yellow, that it would have been hard to say which was
  182. repute
    the state of being held in high esteem and honor
    Like Monsieur Manette, your father, the gentleman was of repute in Paris.
  183. inconsistency
    the quality of being inconsistent and lacking a harmonious uniformity among things or parts
    "And what do you suppose, you conceited female," said Mr. Cruncher, with unconscious inconsistency, "that the worth of _your_ prayers may be?
  184. livelihood
    the financial means whereby one lives
    "Well, well," said the old clerk; "we all have our various ways of gaining a livelihood.
  185. teem
    be teeming, be abuzz
    We have seen enough of it, to know that it teems with interest; little more."
  186. admonish
    take to task
    Dig--dig--dig--until an impatient movement from one of the two passengers would admonish him to pull up the window, draw his arm securely through the leathern strap, and speculate upon the two slumbering forms, until his mind lost its hold of them,
  187. vestige
    an indication that something has been present
    Samples of a people that had undergone a terrible grinding and regrinding in the mill, and certainly not in the fabulous mill which ground old people young, shivered at every corner, passed in and out at every doorway, looked from every window, fluttered
  188. propensity
    a natural inclination
    The learned profession of the law was certainly not behind any other learned profession in its Bacchanalian propensities; neither was Mr. Stryver, already fast shouldering his way to a large and lucrative practice, behind his compeers in this parti
  189. cessation
    a stopping
    The stillness consequent on the cessation of the rumbling and labouring of the coach, added to the stillness of the night, made it very quiet indeed.
  190. appellation
    identifying word or words by which someone or something is called and classified or distinguished from others
    His surname was Cruncher, and on the youthful occasion of his renouncing by proxy the works of darkness, in the easterly parish church of Hounsditch, he had received the added appellation of Jerry.
  191. ravage
    cause extensive destruction or ruin utterly
    Miss Pross's friendship being of the thoroughly practical kind, she had ravaged Soho and the adjacent provinces, in search of impoverished French, who, tempted by shillings and half-crowns, would impart culinary mysteries to her.
  192. smelt
    extract (metals) by heating
    Carton, who smelt of port wine, and did not appear to be quite sober, laughed then, and turned to Darnay:

    "This is a strange chance that throws you and me together.
  193. impoverish
    make poor
    Miss Pross's friendship being of the thoroughly practical kind, she had ravaged Soho and the adjacent provinces, in search of impoverished French, who, tempted by shillings and half-crowns, would impart culinary mysteries to her.
  194. surveying
    the practice of measuring angles and distances on the ground so that they can be accurately plotted on a map
    Rounding his mouth and both his eyes, as he stepped backward from the table, the waiter shifted his napkin from his right arm to his left, dropped into a comfortable attitude, and stood surveying the guest while he ate and drank, as from an observa
  195. laboured
    requiring or showing effort
    By degrees, in the pauses of his quick and laboured breathing, he was heard to say:

    "What is this?"
  196. identification
    the act of designating or identifying something
    "That was a rare point, Sydney, that you brought to bear upon the identification.
  197. pernicious
    exceedingly harmful
    That, the proof would go back five years, and would show the prisoner already engaged in these pernicious missions, within a few weeks before the date of the very first action fought between the British troops and the Americans.
  198. denounce
    speak out against
    Charles Darnay had yesterday pleaded Not Guilty to an indictment denouncing him (with infinite jingle and jangle) for that he was a false traitor to our serene, illustrious, excellent, and so forth, prince, our Lord the King, by reason of his havin
  199. encompass
    include in scope; include as part of something broader; have as one's sphere or territory
    They heard him mutter, "One Hundred and Five, North Tower;" and when he looked about him, it evidently was for the strong fortress-walls which had long encompassed him.
  200. hinge
    a joint that holds two parts together so that one can swing relative to the other
    After some delay and demur, the door grudgingly turned on its hinges a very little way, and allowed Mr. Jerry Cruncher to squeeze himself into court.
  201. tremulous
    (of the voice) quivering as from weakness or fear
    With drooping heads and tremulous tails, they mashed their way through the thick mud, floundering and stumbling between whiles, as if they were falling to pieces at the larger joints.
  202. fanciful
    indulging in or influenced by fancy
    There were three rooms on a floor, and, the doors by which they communicated being put open that the air might pass freely through them all, Mr. Lorry, smilingly observant of that fanciful resemblance which he detected all around him, walked from o
  203. implore
    call upon in supplication; entreat
    As I was saying--"

    Her look so discomposed him that he stopped, wandered, and began anew:

    "As I was saying; if Monsieur Manette had not died; if he had suddenly and silently disappeared; if he had been spirited away; if it had not been difficult to gues
  204. repast
    the food served and eaten at one time
    At length the jackal had got together a compact repast for the lion, and proceeded to offer it to him.
  205. consign
    give over to another for care or safekeeping
    They were consigned to me, with him, at the--" He dropped his voice, there was a flutter among the military lanterns, and one of them being handed into the coach by an arm in uniform, the eyes connected with the arm looked, not an every day or an e
  206. wrest
    obtain by seizing forcibly or violently, also metaphorically
    How the evidence that had been warped and wrested from the young lady, whose anguish in giving it they had witnessed, came to nothing, involving the mere little innocent gallantries and politenesses likely to pass between any young gentleman and yo
  207. juncture
    the shape or manner in which things come together and a connection is made
    At which juncture, he exclaimed, in a voice of dire exasperation:

    "Bust me, if she ain't at it agin!"
  208. traverse
    travel across
    They had not traversed many steps of the long main staircase when he stopped, and stared at the roof and round at the walls.
  209. sleek
    having a smooth, gleaming surface reflecting light
    He had a good leg, and was a little vain of it, for his brown stockings fitted sleek and close, and were of a fine texture; his shoes and buckles, too, though plain, were trim.
  210. slacken
    become slow or slower
    And when she died--I believe broken-hearted--having never slackened her unavailing search for your father, she left you, at two years old, to grow to be blooming, beautiful, and happy, without the dark cloud upon you of living in uncertainty whethe
  211. emphatic
    spoken with emphasis
    As often as the driver rested them and brought them to a stand, with a wary "Wo-ho! so-ho-then!" the near leader violently shook his head and everything upon it--like an unusually emphatic horse, denying that the coach could be got up the hill.
  212. dingy
    thickly covered with ingrained dirt or soot
    After bursting open a door of idiotic obstinacy with a weak rattle in its throat, you fell into Tellson's down two steps, and came to your senses in a miserable little shop, with two little counters, where the oldest of men made your cheque shake as if th
  213. doze
    a light fitful sleep
    To whom, likewise, the shadows of the night revealed themselves, in the forms their dozing eyes and wandering thoughts suggested.
  214. haggard
    showing the wearing effects of overwork or care or suffering
    This time, a pair of haggard eyes had looked at the questioner, before the face had dropped again.
  215. languish
    become feeble
    Each of these stoppages was made at a doleful grating, by which any languishing good airs that were left uncorrupted, seemed to escape, and all spoilt and sickly vapours seemed to crawl in.
  216. mercenary
    a person hired to fight for another country than their own
    It was famous, too, for the pillory, a wise old institution, that inflicted a punishment of which no one could foresee the extent; also, for the whipping-post, another dear old institution, very humanising and softening to behold in action; also, for exte
  217. sleeper
    a rester who is sleeping
    In any of the burial-places of this city through which I pass, is there a sleeper more inscrutable than its busy inhabitants are, in their innermost personality, to me, or than I am to them?
  218. signified
    the meaning of a word or expression; the way in which a word or expression or situation can be interpreted
    Mr. Attorney-General now signified to my Lord, that he deemed it necessary, as a matter of precaution and form, to call the young lady's father, Doctor Manette.
  219. abstraction
    the process of formulating general concepts by abstracting common properties of instances
    He looked at the two, less and less attentively, and his eyes in gloomy abstraction sought the ground and looked about him in the old way.
  220. visibly
    in a visible manner
    A clammy and intensely cold mist, it made its slow way through the air in ripples that visibly followed and overspread one another, as the waves of an unwholesome sea might do.
  221. disclose
    disclose to view as by removing a cover
    That Providence, however, had put it into the heart of a person who was beyond fear and beyond reproach, to ferret out the nature of the prisoner's schemes, and, struck with horror, to disclose them to his Majesty's Chief Secretary of State and mos
  222. taint
    place under suspicion or cast doubt upon
    Making his way through the tainted crowd, dispersed up and down this hideous scene of action, with the skill of a man accustomed to make his way quietly, the messenger found out the door he sought, and handed in his letter through a trap in it.
  223. disconcert
    cause to lose one's composure
    Mr. Lorry was so exceedingly disconcerted by a question so hard to answer, that he could only look on, at a distance, with much feebler sympathy and humility, while the strong woman, having banished the inn servants under the mysterious penalty of
  224. securely
    in a secure manner; in a manner free from danger
    Dig--dig--dig--until an impatient movement from one of the two passengers would admonish him to pull up the window, draw his arm securely through the leathern strap, and speculate upon the two slumbering forms, until his mind lost its hold of them,
  225. rusty
    covered with or consisting of rust
    "Al-ways rusty!
  226. incumbent
    necessary (for someone) as a duty or responsibility; morally binding
    But, by this time she trembled under such strong emotion, and her face expressed such deep anxiety, and, above all, such dread and terror, that Mr. Lorry felt it incumbent on him to speak a word or two of reassurance.
  227. gaunt
    very thin especially from disease or hunger or cold
    The likeness passed away, like a breath along the surface of the gaunt pier-glass behind her, on the frame of which, a hospital procession of negro cupids, several headless and all cripples, were offering black baskets of Dead Sea fruit to black di
  228. congratulate
    say something to someone that expresses praise
    He did it with some flourish of ceremony, for a mail journey from London in winter was an achievement to congratulate an adventurous traveller upon.
  229. cask
    a cylindrical container that holds liquids
    V. The Wine-shop

    A large cask of wine had been dropped and broken, in the street.
  230. exclude
    prevent from entering; shut out
    To exclude the cold, one half of this door was fast closed, and the other was opened but a very little way.
  231. composure
    steadiness of mind under stress
    Madame Defarge was a stout woman of about his own age, with a watchful eye that seldom seemed to look at anything, a large hand heavily ringed, a steady face, strong features, and great composure of manner.
  232. compose
    form the substance of
    A face habitually suppressed and quieted, was still lighted up under the quaint wig by a pair of moist bright eyes that it must have cost their owner, in years gone by, some pains to drill to the composed and reserved expression of Tellson's Bank.
  233. dire
    fraught with extreme danger; nearly hopeless
    At which juncture, he exclaimed, in a voice of dire exasperation:

    "Bust me, if she ain't at it agin!"
  234. concentrate
    make denser, stronger, or purer
    As the concentrated expression returned to his forehead, he seemed to become conscious that it was in hers too.
  235. acknowledgment
    the state or quality of being recognized or acknowledged
    Jerry had just enough forehead to knuckle, and he knuckled it in acknowledgment of this communication and a shilling.
  236. coincidence
    the temporal property of two things happening at the same time
    "I did, Joe."

    "What did you make of it, Tom?"

    "Nothing at all, Joe."

    "That's a coincidence, too," the guard mused, "for I made the same of it myself."
  237. infamous
    known widely and usually unfavorably
    They hanged at Tyburn, in those days, so the street outside Newgate had not obtained one infamous notoriety that has since attached to it.
  238. abrupt
    exceedingly sudden and unexpected
    There, as it had an abrupt turn in it, they came all at once in sight of three men, whose heads were bent down close together at the side of a door, and who were intently looking into the room to which the door belonged, through some chinks or hole
  239. tranquil
    (of a body of water) free from disturbance by heavy waves
    There ought to have been a tranquil bark in such an anchorage, and there was.
  240. adjacent
    having a common boundary or edge; abutting; touching
    It is likely enough that in the rough outhouses of some tillers of the heavy lands adjacent to Paris, there were sheltered from the weather that very day, rude carts, bespattered with rustic mire, snuffed about by pigs, and roosted in by poultry, w
  241. attentive
    taking heed; giving close and thoughtful attention
    Almost at the first word, Monsieur Defarge started and became deeply attentive.
  242. scanty
    lacking in amplitude or quantity
    Hunger was the inscription on the baker's shelves, written in every small loaf of his scanty stock of bad bread; at the sausage-shop, in every dead-dog preparation that was offered for sale.
  243. muddy
    (of soil) soft and watery
    Mr. Lorry, the passenger, shaking himself out of it in chains of straw, a tangle of shaggy wrapper, flapping hat, and muddy legs, was rather like a larger sort of dog.
  244. assuredly
    without a doubt
    "Assuredly I did."
  245. scoundrel
    a wicked or evil person; someone who does evil deliberately
    He had now to attend while Mr. Stryver fitted the prisoner's case on the jury, like a compact suit of clothes; showing them how the patriot, Barsad, was a hired spy and traitor, an unblushing trafficker in blood, and one of the greatest scoundrels
  246. emerge
    come out into view, as from concealment
    The man who had left his saw sticking in the firewood he was cutting, set it in motion again; the women who had left on a door-step the little pot of hot ashes, at which she had been trying to soften the pain in her own starved fingers and toes, or in tho
  247. flap
    move in a wavy pattern or with a rising and falling motion
    Mr. Lorry, the passenger, shaking himself out of it in chains of straw, a tangle of shaggy wrapper, flapping hat, and muddy legs, was rather like a larger sort of dog.
  248. relish
    vigorous and enthusiastic enjoyment
    He walked up hill in the mire by the side of the mail, as the rest of the passengers did; not because they had the least relish for walking exercise, under the circumstances, but because the hill, and the harness, and the mud, and the mail, were al
  249. intensely
    in an intense manner
    A clammy and intensely cold mist, it made its slow way through the air in ripples that visibly followed and overspread one another, as the waves of an unwholesome sea might do.
  250. serene
    not agitated; without losing self-possession
    Charles Darnay had yesterday pleaded Not Guilty to an indictment denouncing him (with infinite jingle and jangle) for that he was a false traitor to our serene, illustrious, excellent, and so forth, prince, our Lord the King, by reason of his havin
  251. reluctant
    not eager
    Hunger rattled its dry bones among the roasting chestnuts in the turned cylinder; Hunger was shred into atomics in every farthing porringer of husky chips of potato, fried with some reluctant drops of oil.
  252. humility
    a disposition to be humble; a lack of false pride
    Mr. Lorry was so exceedingly disconcerted by a question so hard to answer, that he could only look on, at a distance, with much feebler sympathy and humility, while the strong woman, having banished the inn servants under the mysterious penalty of
  253. dismal
    causing dejection
    After bursting open a door of idiotic obstinacy with a weak rattle in its throat, you fell into Tellson's down two steps, and came to your senses in a miserable little shop, with two little counters, where the oldest of men made your cheque shake as if th
  254. amend
    make amendments to
  255. lumber
    the wood of trees cut and prepared for use as building material
    The Dover road lay, as to him, beyond the Dover mail, as it lumbered up Shooter's Hill.
  256. detected
    perceived or discerned
    There were three rooms on a floor, and, the doors by which they communicated being put open that the air might pass freely through them all, Mr. Lorry, smilingly observant of that fanciful resemblance which he detected all around him, walked from o
  257. principally
    for the most part
    Now, which of the multitude of faces that showed themselves before him was the true face of the buried person, the shadows of the night did not indicate; but they were all the faces of a man of five-and-forty by years, and they differed principally
  258. hoist
    raise or haul up with or as if with mechanical help
    Across the streets, at wide intervals, one clumsy lamp was slung by a rope and pulley; at night, when the lamplighter had let these down, and lighted, and hoisted them again, a feeble grove of dim wicks swung in a sickly manner overhead, as if they
  259. comply
    act in accordance with someone's rules, commands, or wishes
    The jackal removed the towels from his head, which had been steaming again, shook himself, yawned, shivered, and complied.
  260. denial
    renunciation of your own interests in favor of the interests of others
    Waste forces within him, and a desert all around, this man stood still on his way across a silent terrace, and saw for a moment, lying in the wilderness before him, a mirage of honourable ambition, self-denial, and perseverance.
  261. epoch
    a period marked by distinctive character or reckoned from a fixed point or event
    It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring
  262. destination
    the place designated as the end (as of a race or journey)
    By that time, there was only one adventurous traveller left be congratulated: for the two others had been set down at their respective roadside destinations.
  263. vacant
    without an occupant or incumbent
    The shoemaker stopped his work; looked with a vacant air of listening, at the floor on one side of him; then similarly, at the floor on the other side of him; then, upward at the speaker.
  264. resume
    take up or begin anew
    After this odd description of his daily routine of employment, Mr. Lorry flattened his flaxen wig upon his head with both hands (which was most unnecessary, for nothing could be flatter than its shining surface was before), and resumed his former a
  265. likeness
    similarity in appearance or character or nature between persons or things
    As his eyes rested on a short, slight, pretty figure, a quantity of golden hair, a pair of blue eyes that met his own with an inquiring look, and a forehead with a singular capacity (remembering how young and smooth it was), of rifting and knitting itself
  266. concentrated
    gathered together or made less diffuse
    As the concentrated expression returned to his forehead, he seemed to become conscious that it was in hers too.
  267. grate
    reduce to small shreds or pulverize by rubbing against a rough or sharp perforated surface
    Each of these stoppages was made at a doleful grating, by which any languishing good airs that were left uncorrupted, seemed to escape, and all spoilt and sickly vapours seemed to crawl in.
  268. compassion
    a deep awareness of and sympathy for another's suffering
    And so exactly was the expression repeated on the fair young face of her who had crept along the wall to a point where she could see him, and where she now stood looking at him, with hands which at first had been only raised in frightened compassion
  269. ponder
    reflect deeply on a subject
    The spectators saw in the two figures, a young lady of little more than twenty, and a gentleman who was evidently her father; a man of a very remarkable appearance in respect of the absolute whiteness of his hair, and a certain indescribable intensity of
  270. presume
    take to be the case or to be true; accept without verification or proof
    He wore an odd little sleek crisp flaxen wig, setting very close to his head: which wig, it is to be presumed, was made of hair, but which looked far more as though it were spun from filaments of silk or glass.
  271. breadth
    the extent of something from side to side
    So with the three passengers shut up in the narrow compass of one lumbering old mail coach; they were mysteries to one another, as complete as if each had been in his own coach and six, or his own coach and sixty, with the breadth of a county betwe
  272. orphan
    a child who has lost both parents
    "I replied to the Bank, sir, that as it was considered necessary, by those who know, and who are so kind as to advise me, that I should go to France, and that as I am an orphan and have no friend who could go with me, I should esteem it highly if I
  273. defiance
    a hostile challenge
    Pride, contempt, defiance, stubbornness, submission, lamentation, succeeded one another; so did varieties of sunken cheek, cadaverous colour, emaciated hands and figures.
  274. compact
    closely and firmly united or packed together
    He had now to attend while Mr. Stryver fitted the prisoner's case on the jury, like a compact suit of clothes; showing them how the patriot, Barsad, was a hired spy and traitor, an unblushing trafficker in blood, and one of the greatest scoundrels
  275. entreat
    ask for or request earnestly
    "I entreat you to tell me more, sir."
  276. initial
    occurring at the beginning
    At first, they were read as D. I. C.; but, on being more carefully examined, the last letter was found to be G. There was no record or legend of any prisoner with those initials, and many fruitless guesses were made what the name could have been.
  277. announce
    make known; make an announcement
    Mrs. Southcott had recently attained her five-and-twentieth blessed birthday, of whom a prophetic private in the Life Guards had heralded the sublime appearance by announcing that arrangements were made for the swallowing up of London and Westminst
  278. patriot
    one who loves and defends his or her country
    That, this patriot would be produced before them.
  279. communicate
    transfer to another
    The panting of the horses communicated a tremulous motion to the coach, as if it were in a state of agitation.
  280. positively
    so as to be positive; in a positive manner
    That, for these reasons, the jury, being a loyal jury (as he knew they were), and being a responsible jury (as _they_ knew they were), must positively find the prisoner Guilty, and make an end of him, whether they liked it or not.
  281. sublime
    of high moral or intellectual value; elevated in nature or style
    Mrs. Southcott had recently attained her five-and-twentieth blessed birthday, of whom a prophetic private in the Life Guards had heralded the sublime appearance by announcing that arrangements were made for the swallowing up of London and Westminst
  282. arrange
    put into a proper or systematic order
    "If, without disturbing him," she said, raising her hand to Mr. Lorry as he stooped over them, after repeated blowings of his nose, "all could be arranged for our leaving Paris at once, so that, from the very door, he could be taken away--"

    "But,
  283. acquire
    come into the possession of something concrete or abstract
    Those who had been greedy with the staves of the cask, had acquired a tigerish smear about the mouth; and one tall joker so besmirched, his head more out of a long squalid bag of a nightcap than in it, scrawled upon a wall with his finger dipped in
  284. gravity
    (physics) the force of attraction between all masses in the universe; especially the attraction of the earth's mass for bodies near its surface
    Very orderly and methodical he looked, with a hand on each knee, and a loud watch ticking a sonorous sermon under his flapped waist-coat, as though it pitted its gravity and longevity against the levity and evanescence of the brisk fire.
  285. knit
    make (textiles) by knitting
    As his eyes rested on a short, slight, pretty figure, a quantity of golden hair, a pair of blue eyes that met his own with an inquiring look, and a forehead with a singular capacity (remembering how young and smooth it was), of rifting and knitting
  286. incapable
    (followed by `of') lacking capacity or ability
    Sadly, sadly, the sun rose; it rose upon no sadder sight than the man of good abilities and good emotions, incapable of their directed exercise, incapable of his own help and his own happiness, sensible of the blight on him, and resigning himself t
  287. illustrious
    widely known and esteemed
    Daring burglaries by armed men, and highway robberies, took place in the capital itself every night; families were publicly cautioned not to go out of town without removing their furniture to upholsterers' warehouses for security; the highwayman in the da