Charlotte Bronte's "Jane Eyre" Chapters 1-10 412 words

Vocabulary study list for Charlotte Bronte's "Jane Eyre" (Chapters 1-10).
  1. habituate
    make psychologically or physically used (to something)
    The action was more frank and fearless than any I was habituated to indulge in: somehow it pleased her.
  2. neutralised
    made neutral in some respect; deprived of distinctive characteristics
    Should any little accidental disappointment of the appetite occur, such as the spoiling of a meal, the under or the over dressing of a dish, the incident ought not to be neutralised by replacing with something more delicate the comfort lost, thus p
  3. coherently
    in a coherent manner
    I resolved, in the depth of my heart, that I would be most moderate--most correct; and, having reflected a few minutes in order to arrange coherently what I had to say, I told her all the story of my sad childhood.
  4. corrode
    cause to deteriorate due to the action of water, air, or an acid
    Something of vengeance I had tasted for the first time; as aromatic wine it seemed, on swallowing, warm and racy: its after-flavour, metallic and corroding, gave me a sensation as if I had been poisoned.
  5. predispose
    make susceptible
    Semi-starvation and neglected colds had predisposed most of the pupils to receive infection: forty-five out of the eighty girls lay ill at one time.
  6. instigate
    provoke or stir up
    "Unjust!--unjust!" said my reason, forced by the agonising stimulus into precocious though transitory power: and Resolve, equally wrought up, instigated some strange expedient to achieve escape from insupportable oppression--as running away, or, if
  7. stagnate
    stand still
    I beg of you not to allow the waters to stagnate round her.
  8. soporific
    sleep inducing
    Even when we finally retired for the night, the inevitable Miss Gryce was still my companion: we had only a short end of candle in our candlestick, and I dreaded lest she should talk till it was all burnt out; fortunately, however, the heavy supper she ha
  9. contaminate
    make impure
    "This I learned from her benefactress; from the pious and charitable lady who adopted her in her orphan state, reared her as her own daughter, and whose kindness, whose generosity the unhappy girl repaid by an ingratitude so bad, so dreadful, that at last
  10. penurious
    excessively unwilling to spend
    It was too far to return to dinner, and an allowance of cold meat and bread, in the same penurious proportion observed in our ordinary meals, was served round between the services.
  11. ameliorate
    to make better
    Spring drew on: she was indeed already come; the frosts of winter had ceased; its snows were melted, its cutting winds ameliorated.
  12. elate
    fill with high spirits; fill with optimism
    First, I smiled to myself and felt elate; but this fierce pleasure subsided in me as fast as did the accelerated throb of my pulses.
  13. ambrosia
    (classical mythology) the food and drink of the gods; mortals who ate it became immortal
    We feasted that evening as on nectar and ambrosia; and not the least delight of the entertainment was the smile of gratification with which our hostess regarded us, as we satisfied our famished appetites on the delicate fare she liberally supplied.
  14. flay
    strip the skin off
    At the close of the afternoon service we returned by an exposed and hilly road, where the bitter winter wind, blowing over a range of snowy summits to the north, almost flayed the skin from our faces.
  15. effluvium
    a foul-smelling outflow or vapor (especially a gaseous waste)
    While disease had thus become an inhabitant of Lowood, and death its frequent visitor; while there was gloom and fear within its walls; while its rooms and passages steamed with hospital smells, the drug and the pastille striving vainly to overcome the
  16. suffocate
    deprive of oxygen and prevent from breathing
    My heart beat thick, my head grew hot; a sound filled my ears, which I deemed the rushing of wings; something seemed near me; I was oppressed, suffocated: endurance broke down; I rushed to the door and shook the lock in desperate effort.
  17. rummage
    search haphazardly
    Now, I'll teach you to rummage my bookshelves: for they _are_ mine; all the house belongs to me, or will do in a few years.
  18. animadversion
    harsh criticism or disapproval
    At that hour most of the others were sewing likewise; but one class still stood round Miss Scatcherd's chair reading, and as all was quiet, the subject of their lessons could be heard, together with the manner in which each girl acquitted herself, and the
  19. debase
    corrupt, debase, or make impure by adding a foreign or inferior substance; often by replacing valuable ingredients with inferior ones
    Poverty looks grim to grown people; still more so to children: they have not much idea of industrious, working, respectable poverty; they think of the word only as connected with ragged clothes, scanty food, fireless grates, rude manners, and debasing<
  20. rancid
    (used of decomposing oils or fats) having a rank smell or taste usually due to a chemical change or decomposition
    The odour which now filled the refectory was scarcely more appetising than that which had regaled our nostrils at breakfast: the dinner was served in two huge tin-plated vessels, whence rose a strong steam redolent of rancid fat.
  21. reciprocate
    act, feel, or give mutually or in return
    Surely the Mary Ann Wilson I have mentioned was inferior to my first acquaintance: she could only tell me amusing stories, and reciprocate any racy and pungent gossip I chose to indulge in; while, if I have spoken truth of Helen, she was qualified
  22. opprobrium
    a state of extreme dishonor
    My head still ached and bled with the blow and fall I had received: no one had reproved John for wantonly striking me; and because I had turned against him to avert farther irrational violence, I was loaded with general opprobrium.
  23. recommence
    cause to start anew
    After dinner, we immediately adjourned to the schoolroom: lessons recommenced, and were continued till five o'clock.
  24. inscribe
    carve, cut, or etch into a material or surface
    I cannot tell what sentiment haunted the quite solitary churchyard, with its inscribed headstone; its gate, its two trees, its low horizon, girdled by a broken wall, and its newly-risen crescent, attesting the hour of eventide.
  25. browbeat
    discourage or frighten with threats or a domineering manner; intimidate
    Why was I always suffering, always browbeaten, always accused, for ever condemned?
  26. captious
    tending to find and call attention to faults
    Georgiana, who had a spoiled temper, a very acrid spite, a captious and insolent carriage, was universally indulged.
  27. imbibe
    take in liquids
    I had imbibed from her something of her nature and much of her habits: more harmonious thoughts: what seemed better regulated feelings had become the inmates of my mind.
  28. circlet
    a small circle
    This precious vessel was now placed on my knee, and I was cordially invited to eat the circlet of delicate pastry upon it.
  29. inclement
    (of weather or climate) severe
    I shuddered as I stood and looked round me: it was an inclement day for outdoor exercise; not positively rainy, but darkened by a drizzling yellow fog; all under foot was still soaking wet with the floods of yesterday.
  30. hiatus
    an interruption in the intensity or amount of something
    Bessie supplied the hiatus by a homily of an hour's length, in which she proved beyond a doubt that I was the most wicked and abandoned child ever reared under a roof.
  31. obtrusive
    sticking out; protruding
    To this end, I had sat well back on the form, and while seeming to be busy with my sum, had held my slate in such a manner as to conceal my face: I might have escaped notice, had not my treacherous slate somehow happened to slip from my hand, and falling
  32. captivate
    attract; cause to be enamored
    Not that my fancy was much captivated by the idea of long chimneys and clouds of smoke--"but," I argued, "Thornfield will, probably, be a good way from the town."
  33. obese
    excessively fat
    Mrs. Reed might be at that time some six or seven and thirty; she was a woman of robust frame, square-shouldered and strong-limbed, not tall, and, though stout, not obese: she had a somewhat large face, the under jaw being much developed and very s
  34. revile
    spread negative information about
    John no one thwarted, much less punished; though he twisted the necks of the pigeons, killed the little pea-chicks, set the dogs at the sheep, stripped the hothouse vines of their fruit, and broke the buds off the choicest plants in the conservatory: he c
  35. apprise
    inform (somebody) of something
    I had my own reasons for being dismayed at this apparition; too well I remembered the perfidious hints given by Mrs. Reed about my disposition, &c.; the promise pledged by Mr. Brocklehurst to apprise Miss Temple and the teachers of my vicious natur
  36. fetid
    offensively malodorous
    The unhealthy nature of the site; the quantity and quality of the children's food; the brackish, fetid water used in its preparation; the pupils' wretched clothing and accommodations--all these things were discovered, and the discovery produced a r
  37. construe
    make sense of; assign a meaning to
    Then they seemed so familiar with French names and French authors: but my amazement reached its climax when Miss Temple asked Helen if she sometimes snatched a moment to recall the Latin her father had taught her, and taking a book from a shelf, bade her
  38. interloper
    someone who intrudes on the privacy or property of another without permission
    Mrs. Reed probably considered she had kept this promise; and so she had, I dare say, as well as her nature would permit her; but how could she really like an interloper not of her race, and unconnected with her, after her husband's death, by any ti
  39. venturesome
    disposed to venture or take risks
    What makes you so venturesome and hardy?"
  40. refectory
    a communal dining-hall (usually in a monastery)
    The refectory was a great, low-ceiled, gloomy room; on two long tables smoked basins of something hot, which, however, to my dismay, sent forth an odour far from inviting.
  41. impalpable
    not perceptible to the touch
    We are, and must be, one and all, burdened with faults in this world: but the time will soon come when, I trust, we shall put them off in putting off our corruptible bodies; when debasement and sin will fall from us with this cumbrous frame of flesh, and
  42. fumble
    feel about uncertainly or blindly
    She peered at me over her spectacles, and then she opened a drawer and fumbled among its contents for a long time, so long that my hopes began to falter.
  43. preternatural
    existing outside of or not in accordance with nature
    I wiped my tears and hushed my sobs, fearful lest any sign of violent grief might waken a preternatural voice to comfort me, or elicit from the gloom some haloed face, bending over me with strange pity.
  44. tantrum
    a display of bad temper
    "Besides," said Miss Abbot, "God will punish her: He might strike her dead in the midst of her tantrums, and then where would she go?
  45. brackish
    slightly salty (especially from containing a mixture of seawater and fresh water)
    The unhealthy nature of the site; the quantity and quality of the children's food; the brackish, fetid water used in its preparation; the pupils' wretched clothing and accommodations--all these things were discovered, and the discovery produced a r
  46. vignette
    a brief literary description
    The words in these introductory pages connected themselves with the succeeding vignettes, and gave significance to the rock standing up alone in a sea of billow and spray; to the broken boat stranded on a desolate coast; to the cold and ghastly moo
  47. bilious
    relating to or containing bile
    He gorged himself habitually at table, which made him bilious, and gave him a dim and bleared eye and flabby cheeks.
  48. corroborate
    give evidence for
    About a week subsequently to the incidents above narrated, Miss Temple, who had written to Mr. Lloyd, received his answer: it appeared that what he said went to corroborate my account.
  49. redolent
    having a strong pleasant odor
    The odour which now filled the refectory was scarcely more appetising than that which had regaled our nostrils at breakfast: the dinner was served in two huge tin-plated vessels, whence rose a strong steam redolent of rancid fat.
  50. congeal
    become gelatinous
    I covered my head and arms with the skirt of my frock, and went out to walk in a part of the plantation which was quite sequestrated; but I found no pleasure in the silent trees, the falling fir-cones, the congealed relics of autumn, russet leaves,
  51. engender
    make children
    What a miserable little poltroon had fear, engendered of unjust punishment, made of me in those days!
  52. lineament
    the characteristic parts of a person's face: eyes and nose and mouth and chin
    John Reed was a schoolboy of fourteen years old; four years older than I, for I was but ten: large and stout for his age, with a dingy and unwholesome skin; thick lineaments in a spacious visage, heavy limbs and large extremities.
  53. nestle
    move or arrange oneself in a comfortable and cozy position
    Bessie had been down into the kitchen, and she brought up with her a tart on a certain brightly painted china plate, whose bird of paradise, nestling in a wreath of convolvuli and rosebuds, had been wont to stir in me a most enthusiastic sense of a
  54. turbid
    (of liquids) clouded as with sediment
    All John Reed's violent tyrannies, all his sisters' proud indifference, all his mother's aversion, all the servants' partiality, turned up in my disturbed mind like a dark deposit in a turbid well.
  55. absolve
    grant remission of a sin to
    "Well, Helen?" said I, putting my hand into hers: she chafed my fingers gently to warm them, and went on--
    "If all the world hated you, and believed you wicked, while your own conscience approved you, and absolved you from guilt, you would not be
  56. deriving
    (historical linguistics) an explanation of the historical origins of a word or phrase
    She had a turn for narrative, I for analysis; she liked to inform, I to question; so we got on swimmingly together, deriving much entertainment, if not much improvement, from our mutual intercourse.
  57. obviate
    do away with
    Should any little accidental disappointment of the appetite occur, such as the spoiling of a meal, the under or the over dressing of a dish, the incident ought not to be neutralised by replacing with something more delicate the comfort lost, thus pamperin
  58. scapegoat
    someone who is punished for the errors of others
    I know that had I been a sanguine, brilliant, careless, exacting, handsome, romping child--though equally dependent and friendless--Mrs. Reed would have endured my presence more complacently; her children would have entertained for me more of the cordiali
  59. buxom
    (of a female body) healthily plump and vigorous
    "Silence!" ejaculated a voice; not that of Miss Miller, but one of the upper teachers, a little and dark personage, smartly dressed, but of somewhat morose aspect, who installed herself at the top of one table, while a more buxom lady presided at t
  60. fascinate
    to render motionless, as with a fixed stare or by arousing terror or awe
    Returning, I had to cross before the looking- glass; my fascinated glance involuntarily explored the depth it revealed.
  61. refine
    reduce to a fine, unmixed, or pure state; separate from extraneous matter or cleanse from impurities
    Mr. Miles, the master, affirmed that he would do very well if he had fewer cakes and sweetmeats sent him from home; but the mother's heart turned from an opinion so harsh, and inclined rather to the more refined idea that John's sallowness was owin
  62. peruse
    examine or consider with attention and in detail
    This book I had again and again perused with delight.
  63. mope
    be apathetic, gloomy, or dazed
    "Boh! Madam Mope!" cried the voice of John Reed; then he paused: he found the room apparently empty.
  64. expostulation
    an exclamation of protest or remonstrance or reproof
    One strong proof of my wretchedly defective nature is, that even her expostulations, so mild, so rational, have not influence to cure me of my faults; and even her praise, though I value it most highly, cannot stimulate me to continued care and for
  65. reprove
    take to task
    My head still ached and bled with the blow and fall I had received: no one had reproved John for wantonly striking me; and because I had turned against him to avert farther irrational violence, I was loaded with general opprobrium.
  66. remonstrate
    argue in protest or opposition
    Miss Temple seemed to remonstrate.
  67. ostensible
    appearing as such but not necessarily so
    My ostensible errand on this occasion was to get measured for a pair of shoes; so I discharged that business first, and when it was done, I stepped across the clean and quiet little street from the shoemaker's to the post-office: it was kept by an
  68. overpower
    overcome by superior force
    Overpowered by this time with weariness, I scarcely noticed what sort of a place the bedroom was, except that, like the schoolroom, I saw it was very long.
  69. intimidate
    to compel or deter by or as if by threats
    I now stood in the empty hall; before me was the breakfast-room door, and I stopped, intimidated and trembling.
  70. obliterate
    remove completely from recognition or memory
    Now, uttered before a stranger, the accusation cut me to the heart; I dimly perceived that she was already obliterating hope from the new phase of existence which she destined me to enter; I felt, though I could not have expressed the feeling, that
  71. acrid
    strong and sharp;"the pungent taste of radishes"
    Georgiana, who had a spoiled temper, a very acrid spite, a captious and insolent carriage, was universally indulged.
  72. knell
    the sound of a bell rung slowly to announce a death or a funeral or the end of something
    These words fell like the knell of doom--
    "All those top-knots must be cut off."
  73. malevolent
    wishing or appearing to wish evil to others; arising from intense ill will or hatred
    Yet, when this cherished volume was now placed in my hand--when I turned over its leaves, and sought in its marvellous pictures the charm I had, till now, never failed to find--all was eerie and dreary; the giants were gaunt goblins, the pigmies malevo
  74. insuperable
    incapable of being surmounted or excelled
    Not a hint, however, did she drop about sending me to school: still I felt an instinctive certainty that she would not long endure me under the same roof with her; for her glance, now more than ever, when turned on me, expressed an insuperable and
  75. undefined
    not precisely limited, determined, or distinguished
    My reflections were too undefined and fragmentary to merit record: I hardly yet knew where I was; Gateshead and my past life seemed floated away to an immeasurable distance; the present was vague and strange, and of the future I could form no conje
  76. advert
    give heed (to)
    All this I enjoyed often and fully, free, unwatched, and almost alone: for this unwonted liberty and pleasure there was a cause, to which it now becomes my task to advert.
  77. agitate
    move or cause to move back and forth
    I feared to return to the nursery, and feared to go forward to the parlour; ten minutes I stood in agitated hesitation; the vehement ringing of the breakfast-room bell decided me; I _must_ enter.
  78. headstrong
    habitually disposed to disobedience and opposition
    Eliza, who was headstrong and selfish, was respected.
  79. frieze
    an architectural ornament consisting of a horizontal sculptured band between the architrave and the cornice
    Each put on a coarse straw bonnet, with strings of coloured calico, and a cloak of grey frieze.
  80. titter
    laugh nervously
    Eliza and Georgiana, evidently acting according to orders, spoke to me as little as possible: John thrust his tongue in his cheek whenever he saw me, and once attempted chastisement; but as I instantly turned against him, roused by the same sentiment of d
  81. dissipate
    to cause to separate and go in different directions
    She stirred herself, put back the curtain, and I saw her face, pale, wasted, but quite composed: she looked so little changed that my fear was instantly dissipated.
  82. fervid
    characterized by intense emotion
    Has a girl of fourteen a heart large enough, vigorous enough, to hold the swelling spring of pure, full, fervid eloquence?
  83. efface
    remove by or as if by rubbing or erasing
    Miss Gryce snored at last; she was a heavy Welshwoman, and till now her habitual nasal strains had never been regarded by me in any other light than as a nuisance; to-night I hailed the first deep notes with satisfaction; I was debarrassed of interruption
  84. beguile
    attract; cause to be enamored
    Ev'n should I fall o'er the broken bridge passing, Or stray in the marshes, by false lights beguiled, Still will my Father, with promise and blessing, Take to His bosom the poor orphan child.
  85. dearth
    an insufficient quantity or number
    To this crib I always took my doll; human beings must love something, and, in the dearth of worthier objects of affection, I contrived to find a pleasure in loving and cherishing a faded graven image, shabby as a miniature scarecrow.
  86. nectar
    a sweet liquid secretion that is attractive to pollinators
    We feasted that evening as on nectar and ambrosia; and not the least delight of the entertainment was the smile of gratification with which our hostess regarded us, as we satisfied our famished appetites on the delicate fare she liberally supplied.
  87. heterogeneous
    consisting of elements that are not of the same kind or nature
    They were not bound to regard with affection a thing that could not sympathise with one amongst them; a heterogeneous thing, opposed to them in temperament, in capacity, in propensities; a useless thing, incapable of serving their interest, or addi
  88. accelerate
    move faster
    First, I smiled to myself and felt elate; but this fierce pleasure subsided in me as fast as did the accelerated throb of my pulses.
  89. predominate
    be larger in number, quantity, power, status or importance
    I felt a drop or two of blood from my head trickle down my neck, and was sensible of somewhat pungent suffering: these sensations for the time predominated over fear, and I received him in frantic sort.
  90. homily
    a sermon on a moral or religious topic
    Bessie supplied the hiatus by a homily of an hour's length, in which she proved beyond a doubt that I was the most wicked and abandoned child ever reared under a roof.
  91. throes
    violent pangs of suffering
    Indisposed to hesitate, and full of impatient impulses--soul and senses quivering with keen throes--I put it back and looked in.
  92. ravenous
    extremely hungry
    Ravenous, and now very faint, I devoured a spoonful or two of my portion without thinking of its taste; but the first edge of hunger blunted, I perceived I had got in hand a nauseous mess; burnt porridge is almost as bad as rotten potatoes; famine
  93. ignominy
    a state of dishonor
    This preparation for bonds, and the additional ignominy it inferred, took a little of the excitement out of me.
  94. multiplicity
    the property of being multiple
    Miss Miller was more ordinary; ruddy in complexion, though of a careworn countenance; hurried in gait and action, like one who had always a multiplicity of tasks on hand: she looked, indeed, what I afterwards found she really was, an under-teacher.
  95. virulent
    extremely poisonous or injurious; producing venom
    I was a precocious actress in her eyes; she sincerely looked on me as a compound of virulent passions, mean spirit, and dangerous duplicity.
  96. perfidious
    tending to betray; especially having a treacherous character as attributed to the Carthaginians by the Romans
    I had my own reasons for being dismayed at this apparition; too well I remembered the perfidious hints given by Mrs. Reed about my disposition, &c.; the promise pledged by Mr. Brocklehurst to apprise Miss Temple and the teachers of my vicious natur
  97. diffidence
    lack of self-confidence
    I asked, with awkward diffidence.
  98. duplicity
    acting in bad faith; deception by pretending to entertain one set of intentions while acting under the influence of another
    I was a precocious actress in her eyes; she sincerely looked on me as a compound of virulent passions, mean spirit, and dangerous duplicity.
  99. retrospective
    concerned with or related to the past
    Superstition was with me at that moment; but it was not yet her hour for complete victory: my blood was still warm; the mood of the revolted slave was still bracing me with its bitter vigour; I had to stem a rapid rush of retrospective thought befo
  100. foment
    try to stir up public opinion
    What had just passed; what Mrs. Reed had said concerning me to Mr. Brocklehurst; the whole tenor of their conversation, was recent, raw, and stinging in my mind; I had felt every word as acutely as I had heard it plainly, and a passion of resentment fo
  101. consenting
    having given consent
    I say scarcely voluntary, for it seemed as if my tongue pronounced words without my will consenting to their utterance: something spoke out of me over which I had no control.
  102. sodden
    wet through and through; thoroughly wet
    The moon was set, and it was very dark; Bessie carried a lantern, whose light glanced on wet steps and gravel road sodden by a recent thaw.
  103. preclude
    make impossible, especially beforehand
    Miss Temple had always something of serenity in her air, of state in her mien, of refined propriety in her language, which precluded deviation into the ardent, the excited, the eager: something which chastened the pleasure of those who looked on he
  104. elapse
    pass by
    I recalled the time when I had travelled that very road in a coach; I remembered descending that hill at twilight; an age seemed to have elapsed since the day which brought me first to Lowood, and I had never quitted it since.
  105. evince
    give expression to
    Should any little accidental disappointment of the appetite occur, such as the spoiling of a meal, the under or the over dressing of a dish, the incident ought not to be neutralised by replacing with something more delicate the comfort lost, thus pamperin
  106. alleviate
    provide physical relief, as from pain
    She was not, I was told, in the hospital portion of the house with the fever patients; for her complaint was consumption, not typhus: and by consumption I, in my ignorance, understood something mild, which time and care would be sure to alleviate.
  107. scheming
    concealing crafty designs for advancing your own interest
    In the interview which followed between him and Mrs. Reed, I presume, from after-occurrences, that the apothecary ventured to recommend my being sent to school; and the recommendation was no doubt readily enough adopted; for as Abbot said, in discussing t
  108. baffle
    be a mystery or bewildering to
    And then my mind made its first earnest effort to comprehend what had been infused into it concerning heaven and hell; and for the first time it recoiled, baffled; and for the first time glancing behind, on each side, and before it, it saw all roun
  109. noxious
    injurious to physical or mental health
    They were not bound to regard with affection a thing that could not sympathise with one amongst them; a heterogeneous thing, opposed to them in temperament, in capacity, in propensities; a useless thing, incapable of serving their interest, or adding to t
  110. opaque
    not transmitting or reflecting light or radiant energy; impenetrable to sight
    Mrs. Reed might be at that time some six or seven and thirty; she was a woman of robust frame, square-shouldered and strong-limbed, not tall, and, though stout, not obese: she had a somewhat large face, the under jaw being much developed and very solid; h
  111. aromatic
    having a strong pleasant odor
    Something of vengeance I had tasted for the first time; as aromatic wine it seemed, on swallowing, warm and racy: its after-flavour, metallic and corroding, gave me a sensation as if I had been poisoned.
  112. environs
    the area in which something exists or lives
    We parted finally at the door of the Brocklehurst Arms there: each went her separate way; she set off for the brow of Lowood Fell to meet the conveyance which was to take her back to Gateshead, I mounted the vehicle which was to bear me to new duties and
  113. morose
    showing a brooding ill humor
    "Silence!" ejaculated a voice; not that of Miss Miller, but one of the upper teachers, a little and dark personage, smartly dressed, but of somewhat morose aspect, who installed herself at the top of one table, while a more buxom lady presided at t
  114. proportionate
    being in due proportion
    Thus relieved of a grievous load, I from that hour set to work afresh, resolved to pioneer my way through every difficulty: I toiled hard, and my success was proportionate to my efforts; my memory, not naturally tenacious, improved with practice; e
  115. synonymous
    (of words) meaning the same or nearly the same
    Poverty looks grim to grown people; still more so to children: they have not much idea of industrious, working, respectable poverty; they think of the word only as connected with ragged clothes, scanty food, fireless grates, rude manners, and debasing vic
  116. liberate
    grant freedom to; free from confinement
    I abhor artifice, particularly in children; it is my duty to show you that tricks will not answer: you will now stay here an hour longer, and it is only on condition of perfect submission and stillness that I shall liberate you then."
  117. precocious
    characterized by or characteristic of exceptionally early development or maturity (especially in mental aptitude)
    "Unjust!--unjust!" said my reason, forced by the agonising stimulus into precocious though transitory power: and Resolve, equally wrought up, instigated some strange expedient to achieve escape from insupportable oppression--as running away, or, if
  118. famished
    extremely hungry
    From this deficiency of nourishment resulted an abuse, which pressed hardly on the younger pupils: whenever the famished great girls had an opportunity, they would coax or menace the little ones out of their portion.
  119. allege
    report or maintain
    Miss Temple, having assembled the whole school, announced that inquiry had been made into the charges alleged against Jane Eyre, and that she was most happy to be able to pronounce her completely cleared from every imputation.
  120. eerie
    suggestive of the supernatural; mysterious
    Yet, when this cherished volume was now placed in my hand--when I turned over its leaves, and sought in its marvellous pictures the charm I had, till now, never failed to find--all was eerie and dreary; the giants were gaunt goblins, the pigmies ma
  121. alloy
    a mixture containing two or more metallic elements or metallic and nonmetallic elements usually fused together or dissolving into each other when molten
    I was silent; Helen had calmed me; but in the tranquillity she imparted there was an alloy of inexpressible sadness.
  122. disconsolate
    sad beyond comforting; incapable of being consoled
    On the evening of the day on which I had seen Miss Scatcherd flog her pupil, Burns, I wandered as usual among the forms and tables and laughing groups without a companion, yet not feeling lonely: when I passed the windows, I now and then lifted a blind, a
  123. transitory
    lasting a very short time
    "Unjust!--unjust!" said my reason, forced by the agonising stimulus into precocious though transitory power: and Resolve, equally wrought up, instigated some strange expedient to achieve escape from insupportable oppression--as running away, or, if
  124. subside
    sink to a lower level or form a depression
    "Mind you don't," said Bessie; and when she had ascertained that I was really subsiding, she loosened her hold of me; then she and Miss Abbot stood with folded arms, looking darkly and doubtfully on my face, as incredulous of my sanity.
  125. interpose
    introduce
    "Oh! I daresay she is crying because she could not go out with Missis in the carriage," interposed Bessie.
  126. chasten
    censure severely
    Miss Temple had always something of serenity in her air, of state in her mien, of refined propriety in her language, which precluded deviation into the ardent, the excited, the eager: something which chastened the pleasure of those who looked on he
  127. ignominious
    (used of conduct or character) deserving or bringing disgrace or shame
    The punishment seemed to me in a high degree ignominious, especially for so great a girl--she looked thirteen or upwards.
  128. frigid
    extremely cold
    I saw her in a black gown and widow's cap; frigid, perhaps, but not uncivil: a model of elderly English respectability.
  129. sobriety
    the state of being sober and not intoxicated by alcohol
    "Madam," he pursued, "I have a Master to serve whose kingdom is not of this world: my mission is to mortify in these girls the lusts of the flesh; to teach them to clothe themselves with shame-facedness and sobriety, not with braided hair and costl
  130. despoil
    steal goods; take as spoils
    There is a thought that for strength should avail me, Though both of shelter and kindred despoiled; Heaven is a home, and a rest will not fail me; God is a friend to the poor orphan child."
  131. ferret
    domesticated albino variety of the European polecat bred for hunting rats and rabbits
    Yes--yes--the end is not so difficult; if I had only a brain active enough to ferret out the means of attaining it."
  132. abate
    become less in amount or intensity
    Helen regarded me, probably with surprise: I could not now abate my agitation, though I tried hard; I continued to weep aloud.
  133. despicable
    morally reprehensible
    "Well, you know Missis always said they were poor and quite despicable: and they may be poor; but I believe they are as much gentry as the Reeds are; for one day, nearly seven years ago, a Mr. Eyre came to Gateshead and wanted to see you; Missis sa
  134. petrify
    change into stone
    Having spread the quilt and folded my night-dress, I went to the window-seat to put in order some picture-books and doll's house furniture scattered there; an abrupt command from Georgiana to let her playthings alone (for the tiny chairs and mirrors, the
  135. leaven
    a substance used to produce fermentation in dough or a liquid
    "Yes; nearly five years since to Robert Leaven, the coachman; and I've a little girl besides Bobby there, that I've christened Jane."
  136. doleful
    filled with or evoking sadness
    She passed into another ballad, this time a really doleful one.
  137. irksome
    so lacking in interest as to cause mental weariness
    It must have been most irksome to find herself bound by a hard-wrung pledge to stand in the stead of a parent to a strange child she could not love, and to see an uncongenial alien permanently intruded on her own family group.
  138. prim
    affectedly dainty or refined
    In uttering these words I looked up: he seemed to me a tall gentleman; but then I was very little; his features were large, and they and all the lines of his frame were equally harsh and prim.
  139. contagion
    an incident in which an infectious disease is transmitted
    The teachers were fully occupied with packing up and making other necessary preparations for the departure of those girls who were fortunate enough to have friends and relations able and willing to remove them from the seat of contagion.
  140. regeneration
    forming again (especially with improvements or removal of defects); renewing and reconstituting
    I remained an inmate of its walls, after its regeneration, for eight years: six as pupil, and two as teacher; and in both capacities I bear my testimony to its value and importance.
  141. irrepressible
    impossible to repress or control
    The Sunday evening was spent in repeating, by heart, the Church Catechism, and the fifth, sixth, and seventh chapters of St. Matthew; and in listening to a long sermon, read by Miss Miller, whose irrepressible yawns attested her weariness.
  142. elude
    escape, either physically or mentally
    Hitherto, while gathering up the discourse of Mr. Brocklehurst and Miss Temple, I had not, at the same time, neglected precautions to secure my personal safety; which I thought would be effected, if I could only elude observation.
  143. stifle
    impair the respiration of or obstruct the air passage of
    This idea, consolatory in theory, I felt would be terrible if realised: with all my might I endeavoured to stifle it--I endeavoured to be firm.
  144. tenacious
    stubbornly unyielding
    Thus relieved of a grievous load, I from that hour set to work afresh, resolved to pioneer my way through every difficulty: I toiled hard, and my success was proportionate to my efforts; my memory, not naturally tenacious, improved with practice; e
  145. inestimable
    beyond calculation or measure
    "Madam, you may: she shall be placed in that nursery of chosen plants, and I trust she will show herself grateful for the inestimable privilege of her election."
  146. deviation
    a variation that deviates from the standard or norm
    Miss Temple had always something of serenity in her air, of state in her mien, of refined propriety in her language, which precluded deviation into the ardent, the excited, the eager: something which chastened the pleasure of those who looked on he
  147. pungent
    strong and sharp;"the pungent taste of radishes"
    I felt a drop or two of blood from my head trickle down my neck, and was sensible of somewhat pungent suffering: these sensations for the time predominated over fear, and I received him in frantic sort.
  148. feasible
    capable of being done with means at hand and circumstances as they are
    Is not the thing feasible?
  149. shirk
    avoid (one's assigned duties)
    A pause--in which I began to steady the palsy of my nerves, and to feel that the Rubicon was passed; and that the trial, no longer to be shirked, must be firmly sustained.
  150. influx
    the process of flowing in
    The red-room was a square chamber, very seldom slept in, I might say never, indeed, unless when a chance influx of visitors at Gateshead Hall rendered it necessary to turn to account all the accommodation it contained: yet it was one of the largest
  151. repugnance
    intense aversion
    He stood at Miss Temple's side; he was speaking low in her ear: I did not doubt he was making disclosures of my villainy; and I watched her eye with painful anxiety, expecting every moment to see its dark orb turn on me a glance of repugnance and c
  152. festive
    offering fun and gaiety
    Christmas and the New Year had been celebrated at Gateshead with the usual festive cheer; presents had been interchanged, dinners and evening parties given.
  153. apothecary
    a health professional trained in the art of preparing and dispensing drugs
    Turning from Bessie (though her presence was far less obnoxious to me than that of Abbot, for instance, would have been), I scrutinised the face of the gentleman: I knew him; it was Mr. Lloyd, an apothecary, sometimes called in by Mrs. Reed when th
  154. glean
    gather, as of natural products
    I doubted not--never doubted--that if Mr. Reed had been alive he would have treated me kindly; and now, as I sat looking at the white bed and overshadowed walls--occasionally also turning a fascinated eye towards the dimly gleaning mirror--I began
  155. effusion
    an unrestrained expression of emotion
    I was not free to resume the interrupted chain of my reflections till bedtime: even then a teacher who occupied the same room with me kept me from the subject to which I longed to recur, by a prolonged effusion of small talk.
  156. matured
    fully ripe; at the height of bloom
    And now vegetation matured with vigour; Lowood shook loose its tresses; it became all green, all flowery; its great elm, ash, and oak skeletons were restored to majestic life; woodland plants sprang up profusely in its recesses; unnumbered varietie
  157. licensed
    given official approval to act
    The play-hour in the evening I thought the pleasantest fraction of the day at Lowood: the bit of bread, the draught of coffee swallowed at five o'clock had revived vitality, if it had not satisfied hunger: the long restraint of the day was slackened; the
  158. confuse
    mistake one thing for another
    I heard voices, too, speaking with a hollow sound, and as if muffled by a rush of wind or water: agitation, uncertainty, and an all-predominating sense of terror confused my faculties.
  159. intrude
    enter uninvited
    It must have been most irksome to find herself bound by a hard-wrung pledge to stand in the stead of a parent to a strange child she could not love, and to see an uncongenial alien permanently intruded on her own family group.
  160. propound
    put forward, as of an idea
    I was about to propound a question, touching the manner in which that operation of changing my heart was to be performed, when Mrs. Reed interposed, telling me to sit down; she then proceeded to carry on the conversation herself.
  161. exaggerate
    to enlarge beyond bounds or the truth
    Say whatever your memory suggests is true; but add nothing and exaggerate nothing."
  162. belated
    after the expected or usual time; delayed
    All looked colder and darker in that visionary hollow than in reality: and the strange little figure there gazing at me, with a white face and arms specking the gloom, and glittering eyes of fear moving where all else was still, had the effect of a real s
  163. mediation
    the act of intervening for the purpose of bringing about a settlement
    It was a landscape in water colours, of which I had made a present to the superintendent, in acknowledgment of her obliging mediation with the committee on my behalf, and which she had framed and glazed.
  164. persevere
    be persistent, refuse to stop
    Teachers and pupils may look coldly on you for a day or two, but friendly feelings are concealed in their hearts; and if you persevere in doing well, these feelings will ere long appear so much the more evidently for their temporary suppression.
  165. pervade
    spread or diffuse through
    Led by her, I passed from compartment to compartment, from passage to passage, of a large and irregular building; till, emerging from the total and somewhat dreary silence pervading that portion of the house we had traversed, we came upon the hum o
  166. reprimand
    an act or expression of criticism and censure
    This state of things should have been to me a paradise of peace, accustomed as I was to a life of ceaseless reprimand and thankless fagging; but, in fact, my racked nerves were now in such a state that no calm could soothe, and no pleasure excite t
  167. repulse
    force or drive back
    Well might I dread, well might I dislike Mrs. Reed; for it was her nature to wound me cruelly; never was I happy in her presence; however carefully I obeyed, however strenuously I strove to please her, my efforts were still repulsed and repaid by s
  168. implicitly
    without ever expressing so clearly
    I rely implicitly on His power, and confide wholly in His goodness: I count the hours till that eventful one arrives which shall restore me to Him, reveal Him to me."
  169. catechism
    an elementary book summarizing the principles of a Christian religion; written as questions and answers
    The Sunday evening was spent in repeating, by heart, the Church Catechism, and the fifth, sixth, and seventh chapters of St. Matthew; and in listening to a long sermon, read by Miss Miller, whose irrepressible yawns attested her weariness.
  170. hoary
    showing characteristics of age, especially having grey or white hair
    It was a very grey day; a most opaque sky, "onding on snaw," canopied all; thence flakes felt it intervals, which settled on the hard path and on the hoary lea without melting.
  171. dejected
    affected or marked by low spirits
    The other teachers, poor things, were generally themselves too much dejected to attempt the task of cheering others.
  172. bask
    be exposed
    The fact is, after my conflict with and victory over Mrs. Reed, I was not disposed to care much for the nursemaid's transitory anger; and I _was_ disposed to bask in her youthful lightness of heart.
  173. cadence
    (prosody) the accent in a metrical foot of verse
    Sometimes, preoccupied with her work, she sang the refrain very low, very lingeringly; "A long time ago" came out like the saddest cadence of a funeral hymn.
  174. parley
    a negotiation between enemies
    Bessie and Abbot having retreated, Mrs. Reed, impatient of my now frantic anguish and wild sobs, abruptly thrust me back and locked me in, without farther parley.
  175. blanch
    turn pale, as if in fear
    I leaned against a gate, and looked into an empty field where no sheep were feeding, where the short grass was nipped and blanched.
  176. irrational
    not consistent with or using reason
    My head still ached and bled with the blow and fall I had received: no one had reproved John for wantonly striking me; and because I had turned against him to avert farther irrational violence, I was loaded with general opprobrium.
  177. plumage
    the light horny waterproof structure forming the external covering of birds
    I could not eat the tart; and the plumage of the bird, the tints of the flowers, seemed strangely faded: I put both plate and tart away.
  178. conservatory
    a schoolhouse with special facilities for fine arts
    John no one thwarted, much less punished; though he twisted the necks of the pigeons, killed the little pea-chicks, set the dogs at the sheep, stripped the hothouse vines of their fruit, and broke the buds off the choicest plants in the conservatory
  179. environ
    extend on all sides of simultaneously; encircle
    We parted finally at the door of the Brocklehurst Arms there: each went her separate way; she set off for the brow of Lowood Fell to meet the conveyance which was to take her back to Gateshead, I mounted the vehicle which was to bear me to new duties and
  180. knack
    a special way of doing something
    Bessie Lee must, I think, have been a girl of good natural capacity, for she was smart in all she did, and had a remarkable knack of narrative; so, at least, I judge from the impression made on me by her nursery tales.
  181. grimace
    contort the face to indicate a certain mental or emotional state
    Leaning a little back on my bench, I could see the looks and grimaces with which they commented on this manoeuvre: it was a pity Mr. Brocklehurst could not see them too; he would perhaps have felt that, whatever he might do with the outside of the
  182. invoke
    request earnestly (something from somebody); ask for aid or protection
    I am only bound to invoke Memory where I know her responses will possess some degree of interest; therefore I now pass a space of eight years almost in silence: a few lines only are necessary to keep up the links of connection.
  183. barrister
    a British or Canadian lawyer who speaks in the higher courts of law on behalf of either the defense or prosecution
    He went to college, and he got--plucked, I think they call it: and then his uncles wanted him to be a barrister, and study the law: but he is such a dissipated young man, they will never make much of him, I think."
  184. partiality
    an inclination to favor one group or view or opinion over alternatives
    All John Reed's violent tyrannies, all his sisters' proud indifference, all his mother's aversion, all the servants' partiality, turned up in my disturbed mind like a dark deposit in a turbid well.
  185. benign
    kindness of disposition or manner
    Next morning, Miss Scatcherd wrote in conspicuous characters on a piece of pasteboard the word "Slattern," and bound it like a phylactery round Helen's large, mild, intelligent, and benign-looking forehead.
  186. scald
    burn with a hot liquid or steam
    The moment Miss Scatcherd withdrew after afternoon school, I ran to Helen, tore it off, and thrust it into the fire: the fury of which she was incapable had been burning in my soul all day, and tears, hot and large, had continually been scalding my
  187. incredulous
    not disposed or willing to believe; unbelieving
    "Mind you don't," said Bessie; and when she had ascertained that I was really subsiding, she loosened her hold of me; then she and Miss Abbot stood with folded arms, looking darkly and doubtfully on my face, as incredulous of my sanity.
  188. antipathy
    a feeling of intense dislike
    John had not much affection for his mother and sisters, and an antipathy to me.
  189. plait
    a hairdo formed by braiding or twisting the hair
    "Madam," he pursued, "I have a Master to serve whose kingdom is not of this world: my mission is to mortify in these girls the lusts of the flesh; to teach them to clothe themselves with shame-facedness and sobriety, not with braided hair and costly appar
  190. impassable
    incapable of being passed
    During January, February, and part of March, the deep snows, and, after their melting, the almost impassable roads, prevented our stirring beyond the garden walls, except to go to church; but within these limits we had to pass an hour every day in
  191. diminutive
    a word that is formed with a suffix (such as -let or -kin) to indicate smallness
    I considered it a narrative of facts, and discovered in it a vein of interest deeper than what I found in fairy tales: for as to the elves, having sought them in vain among foxglove leaves and bells, under mushrooms and beneath the ground-ivy mantling old
  192. functionary
    a worker who holds or is invested with an office
    She had a turn for traffic, and a marked propensity for saving; shown not only in the vending of eggs and chickens, but also in driving hard bargains with the gardener about flower-roots, seeds, and slips of plants; that functionary having orders f
  193. ramble
    move about aimlessly or without any destination, often in search of food or employment
    But I, and the rest who continued well, enjoyed fully the beauties of the scene and season; they let us ramble in the wood, like gipsies, from morning till night; we did what we liked, went where we liked: we lived better too.
  194. obnoxious
    causing disapproval or protest
    Turning from Bessie (though her presence was far less obnoxious to me than that of Abbot, for instance, would have been), I scrutinised the face of the gentleman: I knew him; it was Mr. Lloyd, an apothecary, sometimes called in by Mrs. Reed when th
  195. credible
    capable of being believed
    Thus restrained and simplified, it sounded more credible: I felt as I went on that Miss Temple fully believed me.
  196. unwonted
    out of the ordinary
    Abbot, too, was sewing in another room, and Bessie, as she moved hither and thither, putting away toys and arranging drawers, addressed to me every now and then a word of unwonted kindness.
  197. forbearance
    a delay in enforcing rights or claims or privileges; refraining from acting
    I heard her with wonder: I could not comprehend this doctrine of endurance; and still less could I understand or sympathise with the forbearance she expressed for her chastiser.
  198. eddy
    a miniature whirlpool or whirlwind resulting when the current of a fluid doubles back on itself
    I discovered, too, that a great pleasure, an enjoyment which the horizon only bounded, lay all outside the high and spike-guarded walls of our garden: this pleasure consisted in prospect of noble summits girdling a great hill-hollow, rich in verdure and s
  199. rigidly
    in a rigid manner
    Bessie would rather have stayed, but she was obliged to go, because punctuality at meals was rigidly enforced at Gateshead Hall.
  200. exigency
    a pressing or urgent situation
    Many a time I have shared between two claimants the precious morsel of brown bread distributed at tea-time; and after relinquishing to a third half the contents of my mug of coffee, I have swallowed the remainder with an accompaniment of secret tears, for
  201. promontory
    a natural elevation (especially a rocky one that juts out into the sea)
    They were those which treat of the haunts of sea-fowl; of "the solitary rocks and promontories" by them only inhabited; of the coast of Norway, studded with isles from its southern extremity, the Lindeness, or Naze, to the North Cape--
    "Where
  202. aperture
    a natural opening in something
    Was it, I asked myself, a ray from the moon penetrating some aperture in the blind?
  203. daunt
    cause to lose courage
    I had indeed levelled at that prominent feature as hard a blow as my knuckles could inflict; and when I saw that either that or my look daunted him, I had the greatest inclination to follow up my advantage to purpose; but he was already with his ma
  204. divest
    take away possessions from someone
    Miss Abbot turned to divest a stout leg of the necessary ligature.
  205. pensive
    deeply or seriously thoughtful
    Not a tear rose to Burns' eye; and, while I paused from my sewing, because my fingers quivered at this spectacle with a sentiment of unavailing and impotent anger, not a feature of her pensive face altered its ordinary expression.
  206. animate
    make lively
    True, reader; and I knew and felt this: and though I am a defective being, with many faults and few redeeming points, yet I never tired of Helen Burns; nor ever ceased to cherish for her a sentiment of attachment, as strong, tender, and respectful as any
  207. spurn
    reject with contempt
    In the course of the tale I had mentioned Mr. Lloyd as having come to see me after the fit: for I never forgot the, to me, frightful episode of the red-room: in detailing which, my excitement was sure, in some degree, to break bounds; for nothing could so
  208. nip
    sever or remove by pinching or snipping
    I was glad of it: I never liked long walks, especially on chilly afternoons: dreadful to me was the coming home in the raw twilight, with nipped fingers and toes, and a heart saddened by the chidings of Bessie, the nurse, and humbled by the conscio
  209. comprise
    be composed of
    The lesson had comprised part of the reign of Charles I., and there were sundry questions about tonnage and poundage and ship- money, which most of them appeared unable to answer; still, every little difficulty was solved instantly when it reached
  210. mortify
    cause to feel shame; hurt the pride of
    "I was knocked down," was the blunt explanation, jerked out of me by another pang of mortified pride; "but that did not make me ill," I added; while Mr. Lloyd helped himself to a pinch of snuff.
  211. liberally
    in a generous manner
    "Miss Temple is full of goodness; it pains her to be severe to any one, even the worst in the school: she sees my errors, and tells me of them gently; and, if I do anything worthy of praise, she gives me my meed liberally.
  212. rustle
    make a dry crackling sound
    "What is all this?" demanded another voice peremptorily; and Mrs. Reed came along the corridor, her cap flying wide, her gown rustling stormily.
  213. quell
    suppress or crush completely
    Discipline prevailed: in five minutes the confused throng was resolved into order, and comparative silence quelled the Babel clamour of tongues.
  214. nimble
    moving quickly and lightly
    Mrs. Reed looked up from her work; her eye settled on mine, her fingers at the same time suspended their nimble movements.
  215. kindle
    catch fire
    There was a light in the porter's lodge: when we reached it, we found the porter's wife just kindling her fire: my trunk, which had been carried down the evening before, stood corded at the door.
  216. indefatigable
    showing sustained enthusiastic action with unflagging vitality
    The indefatigable bell now sounded for the fourth time: the classes were marshalled and marched into another room to breakfast: how glad I was to behold a prospect of getting something to eat!
  217. chide
    censure severely or angrily
    Helen Burns asked some slight question about her work of Miss Smith, was chidden for the triviality of the inquiry, returned to her place, and smiled at me as she again went by.
  218. impotent
    (of a male) unable to copulate
    "Nothing, indeed," thought I, as I struggled to repress a sob, and hastily wiped away some tears, the impotent evidences of my anguish.
  219. crevice
    a long narrow opening
    A change had taken place in the weather the preceding evening, and a keen north-east wind, whistling through the crevices of our bedroom windows all night long, had made us shiver in our beds, and turned the contents of the ewers to ice.
  220. genteel
    marked by refinement in taste and manners
    Again I reflected: I scarcely knew what school was: Bessie sometimes spoke of it as a place where young ladies sat in the stocks, wore backboards, and were expected to be exceedingly genteel and precise: John Reed hated his school, and abused his m
  221. uniformly
    in a uniform manner
    Seen by the dim light of the dips, their number to me appeared countless, though not in reality exceeding eighty; they were uniformly dressed in brown stuff frocks of quaint fashion, and long holland pinafores.
  222. transient
    lasting a very short time
    Bessie asked if I would have a book: the word _book_ acted as a transient stimulus, and I begged her to fetch Gulliver's Travels from the library.
  223. capricious
    determined by chance or impulse or whim rather than by necessity or reason
    I remember her as a slim young woman, with black hair, dark eyes, very nice features, and good, clear complexion; but she had a capricious and hasty temper, and indifferent ideas of principle or justice: still, such as she was, I preferred her to a
  224. elicit
    call forth (emotions, feelings, and responses)
    I wiped my tears and hushed my sobs, fearful lest any sign of violent grief might waken a preternatural voice to comfort me, or elicit from the gloom some haloed face, bending over me with strange pity.
  225. recompense
    make payment to; compensate
    I have a little boy, younger than you, who knows six Psalms by heart: and when you ask him which he would rather have, a gingerbread-nut to eat or a verse of a Psalm to learn, he says: 'Oh! the verse of a Psalm! angels sing Psalms;' says he, 'I wish to be
  226. glaze
    a coating for ceramics, metal, etc.
    Nor could I pass unnoticed the suggestion of the bleak shores of Lapland, Siberia, Spitzbergen, Nova Zembla, Iceland, Greenland, with "the vast sweep of the Arctic Zone, and those forlorn regions of dreary space,--that reservoir of frost and snow, where f
  227. solace
    comfort in disappointment or misery
    A little solace came at tea-time, in the shape of a double ration of bread--a whole, instead of a half, slice--with the delicious addition of a thin scrape of butter: it was the hebdomadal treat to which we all looked forward from Sabbath to Sabbat
  228. propensity
    a natural inclination
    They were not bound to regard with affection a thing that could not sympathise with one amongst them; a heterogeneous thing, opposed to them in temperament, in capacity, in propensities; a useless thing, incapable of serving their interest, or addi
  229. ceaseless
    uninterrupted in time and indefinitely long continuing
    Afar, it offered a pale blank of mist and cloud; near a scene of wet lawn and storm-beat shrub, with ceaseless rain sweeping away wildly before a long and lamentable blast.
  230. cessation
    a stopping
    Lulled by the sound, I at last dropped asleep; I had not long slumbered when the sudden cessation of motion awoke me; the coach-door was open, and a person like a servant was standing at it: I saw her face and dress by the light of the lamps.
  231. visionary
    a person with unusual powers of foresight
    All looked colder and darker in that visionary hollow than in reality: and the strange little figure there gazing at me, with a white face and arms specking the gloom, and glittering eyes of fear moving where all else was still, had the effect of a
  232. consistency
    a harmonious uniformity or agreement among things or parts
    Consistency, my dear Mr. Brocklehurst; I advocate consistency in all things."
  233. repast
    the food served and eaten at one time
    I saw a universal manifestation of discontent when the fumes of the repast met the nostrils of those destined to swallow it; from the van of the procession, the tall girls of the first class, rose the whispered words--
    "Disgusting!
  234. contrive
    make or work out a plan for; devise
    Fearful, however, of losing this first and only opportunity of relieving my grief by imparting it, I, after a disturbed pause, contrived to frame a meagre, though, as far as it went, true response.
  235. traverse
    travel across
    Led by her, I passed from compartment to compartment, from passage to passage, of a large and irregular building; till, emerging from the total and somewhat dreary silence pervading that portion of the house we had traversed, we came upon the hum o
  236. subdue
    put down by force or intimidation
    My seat, to which Bessie and the bitter Miss Abbot had left me riveted, was a low ottoman near the marble chimney-piece; the bed rose before me; to my right hand there was the high, dark wardrobe, with subdued, broken reflections varying the gloss
  237. morsel
    a small amount of solid food; a mouthful
    He bullied and punished me; not two or three times in the week, nor once or twice in the day, but continually: every nerve I had feared him, and every morsel of flesh in my bones shrank when he came near.
  238. distribute
    give to several people
    The bread and cheese was presently brought in and distributed, to the high delight and refreshment of the whole school.
  239. protract
    lengthen in time; cause to be or last longer
    Business now began, the day's Collect was repeated, then certain texts of Scripture were said, and to these succeeded a protracted reading of chapters in the Bible, which lasted an hour.
  240. abhor
    find repugnant
    I abhor artifice, particularly in children; it is my duty to show you that tricks will not answer: you will now stay here an hour longer, and it is only on condition of perfect submission and stillness that I shall liberate you then."
  241. chilly
    appreciably or disagreeably cold
    I was glad of it: I never liked long walks, especially on chilly afternoons: dreadful to me was the coming home in the raw twilight, with nipped fingers and toes, and a heart saddened by the chidings of Bessie, the nurse, and humbled by the conscio
  242. vehement
    marked by extreme intensity of emotions or convictions; inclined to react violently; fervid
    I feared to return to the nursery, and feared to go forward to the parlour; ten minutes I stood in agitated hesitation; the vehement ringing of the breakfast-room bell decided me; I _must_ enter.
  243. privation
    act of depriving someone of food or money or rights
    Should any little accidental disappointment of the appetite occur, such as the spoiling of a meal, the under or the over dressing of a dish, the incident ought not to be neutralised by replacing with something more delicate the comfort lost, thus pamperin
  244. hoard
    a secret store of valuables or money
    It was the fifteenth of January, about nine o'clock in the morning: Bessie was gone down to breakfast; my cousins had not yet been summoned to their mama; Eliza was putting on her bonnet and warm garden-coat to go and feed her poultry, an occupation of wh
  245. naughty
    badly behaved
    I dared commit no fault: I strove to fulfil every duty; and I was termed naughty and tiresome, sullen and sneaking, from morning to noon, and from noon to night.
  246. servitude
    state of subjection to an owner or master or forced labor imposed as punishment
    I abandoned it and framed a humbler supplication; for change, stimulus: that petition, too, seemed swept off into vague space: "Then," I cried, half desperate, "grant me at least a new servitude!"
  247. totter
    move without being stable, as if threatening to fall
    I tottered, and on regaining my equilibrium retired back a step or two from his chair.
  248. attest
    provide evidence for; stand as proof of; show by one's behavior, attitude, or external attributes
    I cannot tell what sentiment haunted the quite solitary churchyard, with its inscribed headstone; its gate, its two trees, its low horizon, girdled by a broken wall, and its newly-risen crescent, attesting the hour of eventide.
  249. bate
    flap the wings wildly or frantically; used of falcons
    Mary Ann remarked that she supposed some one must be very ill, as Mr. Bates had been sent for at that time of the evening.
  250. dissolve
    pass into a solution
    In five minutes more the cloud of bewilderment dissolved: I knew quite well that I was in my own bed, and that the red glare was the nursery fire.
  251. rave
    talk in a noisy, excited, or declamatory manner
    I was too tired even to dream; I only once awoke to hear the wind rave in furious gusts, and the rain fall in torrents, and to be sensible that Miss Miller had taken her place by my side.
  252. judicious
    marked by the exercise of good judgment or common sense in practical matters
    "Your decisions are perfectly judicious, madam," returned Mr. Brocklehurst.
  253. degradation
    changing to a lower state (a less respected state)
    Poverty looks grim to grown people; still more so to children: they have not much idea of industrious, working, respectable poverty; they think of the word only as connected with ragged clothes, scanty food, fireless grates, rude manners, and debasing vic
  254. sundry
    consisting of a haphazard assortment of different kinds
    The stronger among the girls ran about and engaged in active games, but sundry pale and thin ones herded together for shelter and warmth in the verandah; and amongst these, as the dense mist penetrated to their shivering frames, I heard frequently
  255. ruddy
    inclined to a healthy reddish color often associated with outdoor life
    Miss Miller was more ordinary; ruddy in complexion, though of a careworn countenance; hurried in gait and action, like one who had always a multiplicity of tasks on hand: she looked, indeed, what I afterwards found she really was, an under-teacher.
  256. recreation
    an activity that diverts or amuses or stimulates
    Half-an-hour's recreation succeeded, then study; then the glass of water and the piece of oat-cake, prayers, and bed.
  257. gaunt
    very thin especially from disease or hunger or cold
    Yet, when this cherished volume was now placed in my hand--when I turned over its leaves, and sought in its marvellous pictures the charm I had, till now, never failed to find--all was eerie and dreary; the giants were gaunt goblins, the pigmies ma
  258. translate
    restate (words) from one language into another language
    She boasted of beautiful paintings of landscapes and flowers by them executed; of songs they could sing and pieces they could play, of purses they could net, of French books they could translate; till my spirit was moved to emulation as I listened.
  259. provoke
    provide the needed stimulus for
    Don't start when I chance to speak rather sharply; it's so provoking."
  260. attire
    clothing of a distinctive style or for a particular occasion
    John no one thwarted, much less punished; though he twisted the necks of the pigeons, killed the little pea-chicks, set the dogs at the sheep, stripped the hothouse vines of their fruit, and broke the buds off the choicest plants in the conservatory: he c
  261. aversion
    a feeling of intense dislike
    All John Reed's violent tyrannies, all his sisters' proud indifference, all his mother's aversion, all the servants' partiality, turned up in my disturbed mind like a dark deposit in a turbid well.
  262. exclude
    prevent from entering; shut out
    Me, she had dispensed from joining the group; saying, "She regretted to be under the necessity of keeping me at a distance; but that until she heard from Bessie, and could discover by her own observation, that I was endeavouring in good earnest to acquire
  263. monitor
    someone who gives a warning so that a mistake can be avoided
    Miss Miller signed to me to sit on a bench near the door, then walking up to the top of the long room she cried out--
    "Monitors, collect the lesson-books and put them away!"
  264. relinquish
    turn away from; give up
    The spoons were moved slowly: I saw each girl taste her food and try to swallow it; but in most cases the effort was soon relinquished.
  265. assemble
    create by putting components or members together
    Miss Miller assumed the fourth vacant chair, which was that nearest the door, and around which the smallest of the children were assembled: to this inferior class I was called, and placed at the bottom of it.
  266. apparel
    clothing in general
    From every enjoyment I was, of course, excluded: my share of the gaiety consisted in witnessing the daily apparelling of Eliza and Georgiana, and seeing them descend to the drawing-room, dressed out in thin muslin frocks and scarlet sashes, with ha
  267. seminary
    a theological school for training ministers or priests or rabbis
    That forest-dell, where Lowood lay, was the cradle of fog and fog-bred pestilence; which, quickening with the quickening spring, crept into the Orphan Asylum, breathed typhus through its crowded schoolroom and dormitory, and, ere May arrived, transformed
  268. revive
    cause to regain consciousness
    The play-hour in the evening I thought the pleasantest fraction of the day at Lowood: the bit of bread, the draught of coffee swallowed at five o'clock had revived vitality, if it had not satisfied hunger: the long restraint of the day was slackene
  269. compose
    form the substance of
    "What?" said Mrs. Reed under her breath: her usually cold composed grey eye became troubled with a look like fear; she took her hand from my arm, and gazed at me as if she really did not know whether I were child or fiend.
  270. starve
    die of food deprivation
    All said I was wicked, and perhaps I might be so; what thought had I been but just conceiving of starving myself to death?
  271. conform
    be similar, be in line with
    Why, in defiance of every precept and principle of this house, does she conform to the world so openly--here in an evangelical, charitable establishment--as to wear her hair one mass of curls?"
  272. digest
    convert food into absorbable substances
    I hardly know where I found the hardihood thus to open a conversation with a stranger; the step was contrary to my nature and habits: but I think her occupation touched a chord of sympathy somewhere; for I too liked reading, though of a frivolous and chil
  273. fragrant
    pleasant-smelling
    How fragrant was the steam of the beverage, and the scent of the toast! of which, however, I, to my dismay (for I was beginning to be hungry) discerned only a very small portion: Miss Temple discerned it too.
  274. forlorn
    marked by or showing hopelessness
    Nor could I pass unnoticed the suggestion of the bleak shores of Lapland, Siberia, Spitzbergen, Nova Zembla, Iceland, Greenland, with "the vast sweep of the Arctic Zone, and those forlorn regions of dreary space,--that reservoir of frost and snow,
  275. benevolent
    showing or motivated by sympathy and understanding and generosity
    "Different benevolent-minded ladies and gentlemen in this neighbourhood and in London."
  276. gorge
    a deep ravine (usually with a river running through it)
    He gorged himself habitually at table, which made him bilious, and gave him a dim and bleared eye and flabby cheeks.
  277. scanty
    lacking in amplitude or quantity
    Poverty looks grim to grown people; still more so to children: they have not much idea of industrious, working, respectable poverty; they think of the word only as connected with ragged clothes, scanty food, fireless grates, rude manners, and debas
  278. oblige
    force somebody to do something
    Bessie would rather have stayed, but she was obliged to go, because punctuality at meals was rigidly enforced at Gateshead Hall.
  279. envelop
    enclose or enfold completely with or as if with a covering
    The first was a tall lady with dark hair, dark eyes, and a pale and large forehead; her figure was partly enveloped in a shawl, her countenance was grave, her bearing erect.
  280. tranquillity
    an untroubled state; free from disturbances
    I was silent; Helen had calmed me; but in the tranquillity she imparted there was an alloy of inexpressible sadness.
  281. spacious
    (of buildings and rooms) having ample space
    John Reed was a schoolboy of fourteen years old; four years older than I, for I was but ten: large and stout for his age, with a dingy and unwholesome skin; thick lineaments in a spacious visage, heavy limbs and large extremities.
  282. miniature
    being on a very small scale
    The house-maid alone came here on Saturdays, to wipe from the mirrors and the furniture a week's quiet dust: and Mrs. Reed herself, at far intervals, visited it to review the contents of a certain secret drawer in the wardrobe, where were stored divers pa
  283. mature
    having reached full natural growth or development
  284. shroud
    burial garment in which a corpse is wrapped
    A bed supported on massive pillars of mahogany, hung with curtains of deep red damask, stood out like a tabernacle in the centre; the two large windows, with their blinds always drawn down, were half shrouded in festoons and falls of similar draper
  285. infection
    (medicine) the invasion of the body by pathogenic microorganisms and their multiplication which can lead to tissue damage and disease
    On that same occasion I learned, for the first time, from Miss Abbot's communications to Bessie, that my father had been a poor clergyman; that my mother had married him against the wishes of her friends, who considered the match beneath her; that my gran
  286. harass
    annoy continually or chronically
    I doubted not--never doubted--that if Mr. Reed had been alive he would have treated me kindly; and now, as I sat looking at the white bed and overshadowed walls--occasionally also turning a fascinated eye towards the dimly gleaning mirror--I began to reca
  287. frantic
    marked by uncontrolled excitement or emotion
    I felt a drop or two of blood from my head trickle down my neck, and was sensible of somewhat pungent suffering: these sensations for the time predominated over fear, and I received him in frantic sort.
  288. climax
    the highest point of anything conceived of as growing or developing or unfolding
    The cut bled, the pain was sharp: my terror had passed its climax; other feelings succeeded.
  289. hardy
    having rugged physical strength; inured to fatigue or hardships
    "Consistency, madam, is the first of Christian duties; and it has been observed in every arrangement connected with the establishment of Lowood: plain fare, simple attire, unsophisticated accommodations, hardy and active habits; such is the order o
  290. ghastly
    shockingly repellent; inspiring horror
    The words in these introductory pages connected themselves with the succeeding vignettes, and gave significance to the rock standing up alone in a sea of billow and spray; to the broken boat stranded on a desolate coast; to the cold and ghastly moo
  291. infer
    conclude by reasoning; in logic
    This preparation for bonds, and the additional ignominy it inferred, took a little of the excitement out of me.
  292. converse
    carry on a conversation
    The only marked event of the afternoon was, that I saw the girl with whom I had conversed in the verandah dismissed in disgrace by Miss Scatcherd from a history class, and sent to stand in the middle of the large schoolroom.
  293. emerge
    come out into view, as from concealment
    Led by her, I passed from compartment to compartment, from passage to passage, of a large and irregular building; till, emerging from the total and somewhat dreary silence pervading that portion of the house we had traversed, we came upon the hum o
  294. reluctantly
    with reluctance
    I too rose reluctantly; it was bitter cold, and I dressed as well as I could for shivering, and washed when there was a basin at liberty, which did not occur soon, as there was but one basin to six girls, on the stands down the middle of the room.
  295. derive
    come from
    Probably, if I had lately left a good home and kind parents, this would have been the hour when I should most keenly have regretted the separation; that wind would then have saddened my heart; this obscure chaos would have disturbed my peace! as it was, I
  296. pang
    a sudden sharp feeling
    Yes, Mrs. Reed, to you I owe some fearful pangs of mental suffering, but I ought to forgive you, for you knew not what you did: while rending my heart-strings, you thought you were only uprooting my bad propensities.
  297. duration
    the period of time during which something continues
    The duration of each lesson was measured by the clock, which at last struck twelve.
  298. nursery
    a child's room for a baby
    Each picture told a story; mysterious often to my undeveloped understanding and imperfect feelings, yet ever profoundly interesting: as interesting as the tales Bessie sometimes narrated on winter evenings, when she chanced to be in good humour; and when,
  299. execute
    put in effect
    She boasted of beautiful paintings of landscapes and flowers by them executed; of songs they could sing and pieces they could play, of purses they could net, of French books they could translate; till my spirit was moved to emulation as I listened.
  300. sullen
    showing a brooding ill humor
    I dared commit no fault: I strove to fulfil every duty; and I was termed naughty and tiresome, sullen and sneaking, from morning to noon, and from noon to night.
  301. penetrate
    pass into or through, often by overcoming resistance
    We had been wandering, indeed, in the leafless shrubbery an hour in the morning; but since dinner (Mrs. Reed, when there was no company, dined early) the cold winter wind had brought with it clouds so sombre, and a rain so penetrating, that further
  302. serene
    not agitated; without losing self-possession
    April advanced to May: a bright serene May it was; days of blue sky, placid sunshine, and soft western or southern gales filled up its duration.
  303. obedient
    dutifully complying with the commands or instructions of those in authority
    Habitually obedient to John, I came up to his chair: he spent some three minutes in thrusting out his tongue at me as far as he could without damaging the roots: I knew he would soon strike, and while dreading the blow, I mused on the disgusting an
  304. spray
    water in small drops in the atmosphere; blown from waves or thrown up by a waterfall
    The words in these introductory pages connected themselves with the succeeding vignettes, and gave significance to the rock standing up alone in a sea of billow and spray; to the broken boat stranded on a desolate coast; to the cold and ghastly moo
  305. precept
    rule of personal conduct
    I can remember Miss Temple walking lightly and rapidly along our drooping line, her plaid cloak, which the frosty wind fluttered, gathered close about her, and encouraging us, by precept and example, to keep up our spirits, and march forward, as sh
  306. menace
    something that is a source of danger
    There were moments when I was bewildered by the terror he inspired, because I had no appeal whatever against either his menaces or his inflictions; the servants did not like to offend their young master by taking my part against him, and Mrs. Reed
  307. assuming
    excessively forward
    Miss Temple had looked down when he first began to speak to her; but she now gazed straight before her, and her face, naturally pale as marble, appeared to be assuming also the coldness and fixity of that material; especially her mouth, closed as i
  308. impose
    impose and collect
    I mention this in your hearing, Jane, that you may not attempt to impose on Mr. Brocklehurst."
  309. skeleton
    the hard structure (bones and cartilages) that provides a frame for the body of an animal
    That beck itself was then a torrent, turbid and curbless: it tore asunder the wood, and sent a raving sound through the air, often thickened with wild rain or whirling sleet; and for the forest on its banks, _that_ showed only ranks of skeletons.
  310. accommodation
    making or becoming suitable; adjusting to circumstances
    The red-room was a square chamber, very seldom slept in, I might say never, indeed, unless when a chance influx of visitors at Gateshead Hall rendered it necessary to turn to account all the accommodation it contained: yet it was one of the largest
  311. commence
    set in motion, cause to start
    I heard him in a blubbering tone commence the tale of how "that nasty Jane Eyre" had flown at him like a mad cat: he was stopped rather harshly--
    "Don't talk to me about her, John: I told you not to go near her; she is not worthy of notice; I do
  312. expose
    to show, make visible or apparent
    At the close of the afternoon service we returned by an exposed and hilly road, where the bitter winter wind, blowing over a range of snowy summits to the north, almost flayed the skin from our faces.
  313. hoist
    raise or haul up with or as if with mechanical help
    The coach drew up; there it was at the gates with its four horses and its top laden with passengers: the guard and coachman loudly urged haste; my trunk was hoisted up; I was taken from Bessie's neck, to which I clung with kisses.
  314. conjecture
    to believe especially on uncertain or tentative grounds
    I can now conjecture readily that this streak of light was, in all likelihood, a gleam from a lantern carried by some one across the lawn: but then, prepared as my mind was for horror, shaken as my nerves were by agitation, I thought the swift dart
  315. despise
    look down on with disdain
    "Another minute, and she will despise me for a hypocrite," thought I; and an impulse of fury against Reed, Brocklehurst, and Co. bounded in my pulses at the conviction.
  316. tumult
    a state of commotion and noise and confusion
    How all my brain was in tumult, and all my heart in insurrection!
  317. combine
    put or add together
    It was the hour of study; they were engaged in conning over their to-morrow's task, and the hum I had heard was the combined result of their whispered repetitions.
  318. quaint
    attractively old-fashioned (but not necessarily authentic)
    Seen by the dim light of the dips, their number to me appeared countless, though not in reality exceeding eighty; they were uniformly dressed in brown stuff frocks of quaint fashion, and long holland pinafores.
  319. qualified
    meeting the proper standards and requirements and training for an office or position or task
    Surely the Mary Ann Wilson I have mentioned was inferior to my first acquaintance: she could only tell me amusing stories, and reciprocate any racy and pungent gossip I chose to indulge in; while, if I have spoken truth of Helen, she was qualified
  320. transformed
    given a completely different form or appearance
    Now, uttered before a stranger, the accusation cut me to the heart; I dimly perceived that she was already obliterating hope from the new phase of existence which she destined me to enter; I felt, though I could not have expressed the feeling, that she wa
  321. inspire
    serve as the inciting cause of
    There were moments when I was bewildered by the terror he inspired, because I had no appeal whatever against either his menaces or his inflictions; the servants did not like to offend their young master by taking my part against him, and Mrs. Reed
  322. dusk
    the time of day immediately following sunset
    The afternoon came on wet and somewhat misty: as it waned into dusk, I began to feel that we were getting very far indeed from Gateshead: we ceased to pass through towns; the country changed; great grey hills heaved up round the horizon: as twiligh
  323. falter
    move hesitatingly, as if about to give way
    Teachers, you must watch her: keep your eyes on her movements, weigh well her words, scrutinise her actions, punish her body to save her soul: if, indeed, such salvation be possible, for (my tongue falters while I tell it) this girl, this child, th
  324. voluntary
    (military) a person who freely enlists for service
    "What would Uncle Reed say to you, if he were alive?" was my scarcely voluntary demand.
  325. dismay
    the feeling of despair in the face of obstacles
    For nearly three months, I had never been called to Mrs. Reed's presence; restricted so long to the nursery, the breakfast, dining, and drawing-rooms were become for me awful regions, on which it dismayed me to intrude.
  326. vacant
    without an occupant or incumbent
    My seat, to which Bessie and the bitter Miss Abbot had left me riveted, was a low ottoman near the marble chimney-piece; the bed rose before me; to my right hand there was the high, dark wardrobe, with subdued, broken reflections varying the gloss of its
  327. refined
    (used of persons and their behavior) cultivated and genteel
    Mr. Miles, the master, affirmed that he would do very well if he had fewer cakes and sweetmeats sent him from home; but the mother's heart turned from an opinion so harsh, and inclined rather to the more refined idea that John's sallowness was owin
  328. desolate
    providing no shelter or sustenance
    The words in these introductory pages connected themselves with the succeeding vignettes, and gave significance to the rock standing up alone in a sea of billow and spray; to the broken boat stranded on a desolate coast; to the cold and ghastly moo
  329. severity
    excessive sternness
    Would you not be happier if you tried to forget her severity, together with the passionate emotions it excited?
  330. deliberate
    carefully thought out in advance
    Here, leaning over the banister, I cried out suddenly, and without at all deliberating on my words--
    "They are not fit to associate with me."
  331. resume
    take up or begin anew
    The upper teachers now punctually resumed their posts: but still, all seemed to wait.
  332. dew
    water that has condensed on a cool surface overnight from water vapor in the air
    This done, I lingered yet a little longer: the flowers smelt so sweet as the dew fell; it was such a pleasant evening, so serene, so warm; the still glowing west promised so fairly another fine day on the morrow; the moon rose with such majesty in
  333. chronicle
    a record or narrative description of past events
    "I like Revelations, and the book of Daniel, and Genesis and Samuel, and a little bit of Exodus, and some parts of Kings and Chronicles, and Job and Jonah."
  334. install
    set up for use
    "Sorry indeed to hear it! she and I must have some talk;" and bending from the perpendicular, he installed his person in the arm-chair opposite Mrs. Reed's.
  335. dreary
    lacking in liveliness or charm or surprise
    Nor could I pass unnoticed the suggestion of the bleak shores of Lapland, Siberia, Spitzbergen, Nova Zembla, Iceland, Greenland, with "the vast sweep of the Arctic Zone, and those forlorn regions of dreary space,--that reservoir of frost and snow,
  336. ponder
    reflect deeply on a subject
    I was still pondering the signification of "Institution," and endeavouring to make out a connection between the first words and the verse of Scripture, when the sound of a cough close behind me made me turn my head.
  337. contrived
    showing effects of planning or manipulation
    Fearful, however, of losing this first and only opportunity of relieving my grief by imparting it, I, after a disturbed pause, contrived to frame a meagre, though, as far as it went, true response.
  338. decay
    the organic phenomenon of rotting
    My habitual mood of humiliation, self-doubt, forlorn depression, fell damp on the embers of my decaying ire.
  339. vicinity
    a surrounding or nearby region
    A light shone through the keyhole and from under the door; a profound stillness pervaded the vicinity.
  340. orphan
    a child who has lost both parents
    "My feet they are sore, and my limbs they are weary; Long is the way, and the mountains are wild; Soon will the twilight close moonless and dreary Over the path of the poor orphan child.
  341. license
    a legal document giving official permission to do something
    The play-hour in the evening I thought the pleasantest fraction of the day at Lowood: the bit of bread, the draught of coffee swallowed at five o'clock had revived vitality, if it had not satisfied hunger: the long restraint of the day was slackened; the
  342. torrent
    an overwhelming number or amount
    I was too tired even to dream; I only once awoke to hear the wind rave in furious gusts, and the rain fall in torrents, and to be sensible that Miss Miller had taken her place by my side.
  343. impart
    bestow a quality on
    Fearful, however, of losing this first and only opportunity of relieving my grief by imparting it, I, after a disturbed pause, contrived to frame a meagre, though, as far as it went, true response.
  344. achieve
    to gain with effort
    "Unjust!--unjust!" said my reason, forced by the agonising stimulus into precocious though transitory power: and Resolve, equally wrought up, instigated some strange expedient to achieve escape from insupportable oppression--as running away, or, if
  345. announce
    make known; make an announcement
    It wanted but a few minutes of six, and shortly after that hour had struck, the distant roll of wheels announced the coming coach; I went to the door and watched its lamps approach rapidly through the gloom.
  346. communicate
    transfer to another
    "No, certainly, not often; because Miss Temple has generally something to say which is newer than my own reflections; her language is singularly agreeable to me, and the information she communicates is often just what I wished to gain."
  347. consumption
    the act of consuming something
    She was not, I was told, in the hospital portion of the house with the fever patients; for her complaint was consumption, not typhus: and by consumption I, in my ignorance, understood something mild, which time and care would be sure to alleviate.
  348. discern
    detect with the senses
    Rain, wind, and darkness filled the air; nevertheless, I dimly discerned a wall before me and a door open in it; through this door I passed with my new guide: she shut and locked it behind her.
  349. shrewd
    marked by practical hardheaded intelligence
    I was standing before him; he fixed his eyes on me very steadily: his eyes were small and grey; not very bright, but I dare say I should think them shrewd now: he had a hard-featured yet good-natured looking face.
  350. dense
    hard to pass through because of dense growth
    Yet in what darkness, what dense ignorance, was the mental battle fought!
  351. approve
    judge to be right or commendable; think well of
    "This is the state of things I quite approve," returned Mrs. Reed; "had I sought all England over, I could scarcely have found a system more exactly fitting a child like Jane Eyre.
  352. arrange
    put into a proper or systematic order
    Abbot, too, was sewing in another room, and Bessie, as she moved hither and thither, putting away toys and arranging drawers, addressed to me every now and then a word of unwonted kindness.
  353. devour
    eat immoderately
    A ridge of lighted heath, alive, glancing, devouring, would have been a meet emblem of my mind when I accused and menaced Mrs. Reed: the same ridge, black and blasted after the flames are dead, would have represented as meetly my subsequent conditi
  354. ardent
    characterized by intense emotion
    Besides this earth, and besides the race of men, there is an invisible world and a kingdom of spirits: that world is round us, for it is everywhere; and those spirits watch us, for they are commissioned to guard us; and if we were dying in pain and shame,
  355. awe
    an overwhelming feeling of wonder or admiration
    I suppose I have a considerable organ of veneration, for I retain yet the sense of admiring awe with which my eyes traced her steps.
  356. oppress
    come down on or keep down by unjust use of one's authority
    I doubted not--never doubted--that if Mr. Reed had been alive he would have treated me kindly; and now, as I sat looking at the white bed and overshadowed walls--occasionally also turning a fascinated eye towards the dimly gleaning mirror--I began to reca
  357. inspector
    an investigator who observes carefully
    Mr. Brocklehurst, who, from his wealth and family connections, could not be overlooked, still retained the post of treasurer; but he was aided in the discharge of his duties by gentlemen of rather more enlarged and sympathising minds: his office of ins
  358. acquire
    come into the possession of something concrete or abstract
    Me, she had dispensed from joining the group; saying, "She regretted to be under the necessity of keeping me at a distance; but that until she heard from Bessie, and could discover by her own observation, that I was endeavouring in good earnest to acqu
  359. wont
    an established custom
    Bessie had been down into the kitchen, and she brought up with her a tart on a certain brightly painted china plate, whose bird of paradise, nestling in a wreath of convolvuli and rosebuds, had been wont to stir in me a most enthusiastic sense of a
  360. martyr
    one who voluntarily suffers death as the penalty for refusing to renounce their religion
    A brief address on those occasions would not be mistimed, wherein a judicious instructor would take the opportunity of referring to the sufferings of the primitive Christians; to the torments of martyrs; to the exhortations of our blessed Lord Hims
  361. rally
    gather
    Mrs. Reed soon rallied her spirits: she shook me most soundly, she boxed both my ears, and then left me without a word.
  362. affirm
    to declare or affirm solemnly and formally as true
    Mr. Miles, the master, affirmed that he would do very well if he had fewer cakes and sweetmeats sent him from home; but the mother's heart turned from an opinion so harsh, and inclined rather to the more refined idea that John's sallowness was owin
  363. incapable
    (followed by `of') lacking capacity or ability
    They were not bound to regard with affection a thing that could not sympathise with one amongst them; a heterogeneous thing, opposed to them in temperament, in capacity, in propensities; a useless thing, incapable of serving their interest, or addi
  364. resentment
    a feeling of deep and bitter anger and ill-will
    What had just passed; what Mrs. Reed had said concerning me to Mr. Brocklehurst; the whole tenor of their conversation, was recent, raw, and stinging in my mind; I had felt every word as acutely as I had heard it plainly, and a passion of resentment
  365. picturesque
    suggesting or suitable for a picture; pretty as a picture
    That night, on going to bed, I forgot to prepare in imagination the Barmecide supper of hot roast potatoes, or white bread and new milk, with which I was wont to amuse my inward cravings: I feasted instead on the spectacle of ideal drawings, which I saw i
  366. cluster
    a grouping of a number of similar things
    The said Eliza, John, and Georgiana were now clustered round their mama in the drawing-room: she lay reclined on a sofa by the fireside, and with her darlings about her (for the time neither quarrelling nor crying) looked perfectly happy.
  367. engage
    consume all of one's attention or time
    It was the hour of study; they were engaged in conning over their to-morrow's task, and the hum I had heard was the combined result of their whispered repetitions.
  368. qualify
    describe or portray the character or the qualities or peculiarities of
    Surely the Mary Ann Wilson I have mentioned was inferior to my first acquaintance: she could only tell me amusing stories, and reciprocate any racy and pungent gossip I chose to indulge in; while, if I have spoken truth of Helen, she was qualified
  369. resolve
    find the solution
    The fact is, I was a trifle beside myself; or rather _out_ of myself, as the French would say: I was conscious that a moment's mutiny had already rendered me liable to strange penalties, and, like any other rebel slave, I felt resolved, in my despe
  370. regain
    get or find back; recover the use of
    I tottered, and on regaining my equilibrium retired back a step or two from his chair.
  371. relieve
    free from a burden, evil, or distress
    Fearful, however, of losing this first and only opportunity of relieving my grief by imparting it, I, after a disturbed pause, contrived to frame a meagre, though, as far as it went, true response.
  372. abode
    any address at which you dwell more than temporarily
    I doubted not--never doubted--that if Mr. Reed had been alive he would have treated me kindly; and now, as I sat looking at the white bed and overshadowed walls--occasionally also turning a fascinated eye towards the dimly gleaning mirror--I began to reca
  373. repose
    freedom from activity (work or strain or responsibility)
    Resting my head on Helen's shoulder, I put my arms round her waist; she drew me to her, and we reposed in silence.
  374. chimney
    a vertical flue that provides a path through which smoke from a fire is carried away through the wall or roof of a building
    Say your prayers, Miss Eyre, when you are by yourself; for if you don't repent, something bad might be permitted to come down the chimney and fetch you away."
  375. prolong
    lengthen in time; cause to be or last longer
    No severe or prolonged bodily illness followed this incident of the red- room; it only gave my nerves a shock of which I feel the reverberation to this day.
  376. transform
    change or alter in form, appearance, or nature
    Now, uttered before a stranger, the accusation cut me to the heart; I dimly perceived that she was already obliterating hope from the new phase of existence which she destined me to enter; I felt, though I could not have expressed the feeling, that she wa
  377. whirl
    the shape of something rotating rapidly
    They were those which treat of the haunts of sea-fowl; of "the solitary rocks and promontories" by them only inhabited; of the coast of Norway, studded with isles from its southern extremity, the Lindeness, or Naze, to the North Cape--
    "Where the Nor
  378. invisible
    impossible or nearly impossible to see; imperceptible by the eye
    It seemed as if an invisible bond had burst, and that I had struggled out into unhoped- for liberty.
  379. harsh
    disagreeable to the senses
    Mr. Miles, the master, affirmed that he would do very well if he had fewer cakes and sweetmeats sent him from home; but the mother's heart turned from an opinion so harsh, and inclined rather to the more refined idea that John's sallowness was owin
  380. introduce
    bring something new to an environment
    Mrs. Reed occupied her usual seat by the fireside; she made a signal to me to approach; I did so, and she introduced me to the stony stranger with the words: "This is the little girl respecting whom I applied to you."
  381. admire
    feel admiration for
    I suppose I have a considerable organ of veneration, for I retain yet the sense of admiring awe with which my eyes traced her steps.
  382. cherish
    be fond of; be attached to
    They were not bound to regard with affection a thing that could not sympathise with one amongst them; a heterogeneous thing, opposed to them in temperament, in capacity, in propensities; a useless thing, incapable of serving their interest, or adding to t
  383. creed
    any system of principles or beliefs
    I considered it a narrative of facts, and discovered in it a vein of interest deeper than what I found in fairy tales: for as to the elves, having sought them in vain among foxglove leaves and bells, under mushrooms and beneath the ground-ivy mantling old
  384. inflict
    impose something unpleasant
    I had indeed levelled at that prominent feature as hard a blow as my knuckles could inflict; and when I saw that either that or my look daunted him, I had the greatest inclination to follow up my advantage to purpose; but he was already with his ma
  385. indifferent
    marked by a lack of interest
    I remember her as a slim young woman, with black hair, dark eyes, very nice features, and good, clear complexion; but she had a capricious and hasty temper, and indifferent ideas of principle or justice: still, such as she was, I preferred her to a
  386. retire
    withdraw from active participation
    I tottered, and on regaining my equilibrium retired back a step or two from his chair.
  387. comprehend
    get the meaning of something
    Of these death-white realms I formed an idea of my own: shadowy, like all the half-comprehended notions that float dim through children's brains, but strangely impressive.
  388. pursue
    follow in or as if in pursuit
    "The fall did not make you ill; what did, then?" pursued Mr. Lloyd when Bessie was gone.
  389. solitary
    of plants and animals; not growing or living in groups or colonies
    They were those which treat of the haunts of sea-fowl; of "the solitary rocks and promontories" by them only inhabited; of the coast of Norway, studded with isles from its southern extremity, the Lindeness, or Naze, to the North Cape--
    "Where
  390. quiver
    shake with fast, tremulous movements
    No; moonlight was still, and this stirred; while I gazed, it glided up to the ceiling and quivered over my head.
  391. embrace
    squeeze (someone) tightly in your arms, usually with fondness
    Bessie stooped; we mutually embraced, and I followed her into the house quite comforted.
  392. glare
    be sharply reflected
    Out of these deep surrounding shades rose high, and glared white, the piled- up mattresses and pillows of the bed, spread with a snowy Marseilles counterpane.
  393. survey
    consider in a comprehensive way
    So was the black horned thing seated aloof on a rock, surveying a distant crowd surrounding a gallows.
  394. indignation
    a feeling of righteous anger
    They were not bound to regard with affection a thing that could not sympathise with one amongst them; a heterogeneous thing, opposed to them in temperament, in capacity, in propensities; a useless thing, incapable of serving their interest, or adding to t
  395. prominent
    conspicuous in position or importance
    Scarcely less prominent was an ample cushioned easy-chair near the head of the bed, also white, with a footstool before it; and looking, as I thought, like a pale throne.
  396. stout
    having rugged physical strength; inured to fatigue or hardships
    John Reed was a schoolboy of fourteen years old; four years older than I, for I was but ten: large and stout for his age, with a dingy and unwholesome skin; thick lineaments in a spacious visage, heavy limbs and large extremities.
  397. endure
    undergo or be subjected to
    Accustomed to John Reed's abuse, I never had an idea of replying to it; my care was how to endure the blow which would certainly follow the insult.
  398. fare
    the sum charged for riding in a public conveyance
    "Consistency, madam, is the first of Christian duties; and it has been observed in every arrangement connected with the establishment of Lowood: plain fare, simple attire, unsophisticated accommodations, hardy and active habits; such is the order o
  399. relieved
    (of pain or sorrow) made easier to bear
    "I will send her, then, as soon as possible, Mr. Brocklehurst; for, I assure you, I feel anxious to be relieved of a responsibility that was becoming too irksome."
  400. horizon
    the line at which the sky and Earth appear to meet
    I cannot tell what sentiment haunted the quite solitary churchyard, with its inscribed headstone; its gate, its two trees, its low horizon, girdled by a broken wall, and its newly-risen crescent, attesting the hour of eventide.
  401. discourse
    an extended communication (often interactive) dealing with some particular topic
    CHAPTER IV
    From my discourse with Mr. Lloyd, and from the above reported conference between Bessie and Abbot, I gathered enough of hope to suffice as a motive for wishing to get well: a change seemed near,--I desired and waited it in silence.
  402. lively
    full of life and energy
    I had often heard the song before, and always with lively delight; for Bessie had a sweet voice,--at least, I thought so.
  403. examine
    observe, check out, and look over carefully or inspect
    Bessie had been down into the kitchen, and she brought up with her a tart on a certain brightly painted china plate, whose bird of paradise, nestling in a wreath of convolvuli and rosebuds, had been wont to stir in me a most enthusiastic sense of admirati
  404. sob
    weep convulsively
    I wiped my tears and hushed my sobs, fearful lest any sign of violent grief might waken a preternatural voice to comfort me, or elicit from the gloom some haloed face, bending over me with strange pity.
  405. ascertain
    learn or discover with certainty
    "Mind you don't," said Bessie; and when she had ascertained that I was really subsiding, she loosened her hold of me; then she and Miss Abbot stood with folded arms, looking darkly and doubtfully on my face, as incredulous of my sanity.
  406. perceive
    to become aware of through the senses
    Now, uttered before a stranger, the accusation cut me to the heart; I dimly perceived that she was already obliterating hope from the new phase of existence which she destined me to enter; I felt, though I could not have expressed the feeling, that
  407. narrative
    a message that tells the particulars of an act or occurrence or course of events; presented in writing or drama or cinema or as a radio or television program
    I considered it a narrative of facts, and discovered in it a vein of interest deeper than what I found in fairy tales: for as to the elves, having sought them in vain among foxglove leaves and bells, under mushrooms and beneath the ground-ivy mantl
  408. intimate
    marked by close acquaintance, association, or familiarity
    "I want you to come here;" and seating himself in an arm-chair, he intimated by a gesture that I was to approach and stand before him.
  409. lecture
    a speech that is open to the public
    "That's for you, nurse," said he; "you can go down; I'll give Miss Jane a lecture till you come back."
  410. haunt
    follow stealthily or recur constantly and spontaneously to
    They were those which treat of the haunts of sea-fowl; of "the solitary rocks and promontories" by them only inhabited; of the coast of Norway, studded with isles from its southern extremity, the Lindeness, or Naze, to the North Cape--
    "Where
  411. dismiss
    stop associating with
    She inquired how long they had been dead: then how old I was, what was my name, whether I could read, write, and sew a little: then she touched my cheek gently with her forefinger, and saying, "She hoped I should be a good child," dismissed me alon
  412. remote
    located far away spatially
    This room was chill, because it seldom had a fire; it was silent, because remote from the nursery and kitchen; solemn, because it was known to be so seldom entered.