George Orwell's "1984" Part 1 315 words

Vocabulary study list for George Orwell's "1984" (Part 1).
  1. alterable
    capable of being changed or altered in some characteristic
    And yet the past, though of its nature alterable, never had been altered.
  2. garble
    make false by mutilation or addition; as of a message or story
    And a few cubicles away a mild, ineffectual, dreamy creature named Ampleforth, with very hairy ears and a surprising talent for juggling with rhymes and metres, was engaged in producing garbled versions--definitive texts, they were called--of poems
  3. abbreviate
    shorten
    Each contained a message of only one or two lines, in the abbreviated jargon--not actually Newspeak, but consisting largely of Newspeak words--which was used in the Ministry for internal purposes.
  4. indoctrinate
    teach doctrines to; teach uncritically
    A few agents of the Thought Police moved always among them, spreading false rumours and marking down and eliminating the few individuals who were judged capable of becoming dangerous; but no attempt was made to indoctrinate them with the ideology o
  5. collate
    to assemble in proper sequence
    As soon as all the corrections which happened to be necessary in any particular number of 'The Times' had been assembled and collated, that number would be reprinted, the original copy destroyed, and the corrected copy placed on the files in its st
  6. vaporize
    turn into gas
    I'll shoot you, I'll vaporize you, I'll send you to the salt mines!'
  7. co-ordinated
    being dexterous in the use of more than one set of muscle movements
    And somewhere or other, quite anonymous, there were the directing brains who co-ordinated the whole effort and laid down the lines of policy which made it necessary that this fragment of the past should be preserved, that one falsified, and the oth
  8. palimpsest
    a manuscript (usually written on papyrus or parchment) on which more than one text has been written with the earlier writing incompletely erased and still visible
    All history was a palimpsest, scraped clean and reinscribed exactly as often as was necessary.
  9. proliferate
    grow rapidly
    It was curious how that beetle-like type proliferated in the Ministries: little dumpy men, growing stout very early in life, with short legs, swift scuttling movements, and fat inscrutable faces with very small eyes.
  10. gesticulate
    show, express or direct through movement
    In the long, windowless hall, with its double row of cubicles and its endless rustle of papers and hum of voices murmuring into speakwrites, there were quite a dozen people whom Winston did not even know by name, though he daily saw them hurrying to and f
  11. delete
    cut or eliminate
    He knew that in the cubicle next to him the little woman with sandy hair toiled day in day out, simply at tracking down and deleting from the Press the names of people who had been vaporized and were therefore considered never to have existed.
  12. fulminate
    cause to explode violently and with loud noise
    He might be denouncing Goldstein and demanding sterner measures against thought-criminals and saboteurs, he might be fulminating against the atrocities of the Eurasian army, he might be praising Big Brother or the heroes on the Malabar front--it ma
  13. incriminate
    suggest that someone is guilty
    As often happened, they had vanished for a year or more, so that one did not know whether they were alive or dead, and then had suddenly been brought forth to incriminate themselves in the usual way.
  14. mutability
    the quality of being capable of mutation
    Newspeak, doublethink, the mutability of the past.
  15. convoluted
    rolled longitudinally upon itself
    At the heart of it, magnified by the curved surface, there was a strange, pink, convoluted object that recalled a rose or a sea anemone.
  16. crumple
    to gather something into small wrinkles or folds
    He took a cigarette from a crumpled packet marked VICTORY CIGARETTES and incautiously held it upright, whereupon the tobacco fell out on to the floor.
  17. ideologically
    with respect to ideology
    And a few cubicles away a mild, ineffectual, dreamy creature named Ampleforth, with very hairy ears and a surprising talent for juggling with rhymes and metres, was engaged in producing garbled versions--definitive texts, they were called--of poems which
  18. wispy
    thin and weak
    A colourless, crushed-looking woman, with wispy hair and a lined face, was standing outside.
  19. identifiable
    capable of being identified
    With the tip of his finger he picked up an identifiable grain of whitish dust and deposited it on the corner of the cover, where it was bound to be shaken off if the book was moved.
  20. actuate
    put in motion or move to act
    Whether she was really an agent of the Thought Police, or simply an amateur spy actuated by officiousness, hardly mattered.
  21. saboteur
    someone who commits sabotage or deliberately causes wrecks
    A day never passed when spies and saboteurs acting under his directions were not unmasked by the Thought Police.
  22. anodyne
    capable of relieving pain
    It was their delight, their folly, their anodyne, their intellectual stimulant.
  23. saccharine
    overly sweet
    On to each was dumped swiftly the regulation lunch--a metal pannikin of pinkish-grey stew, a hunk of bread, a cube of cheese, a mug of milkless Victory Coffee, and one saccharine tablet.
  24. documentation
    confirmation that some fact or statement is true through the use of documentary evidence
    This process of continuous alteration was applied not only to newspapers, but to books, periodicals, pamphlets, posters, leaflets, films, sound-tracks, cartoons, photographs--to every kind of literature or documentation which might conceivably hold
  25. submerge
    put under water
    Mere debauchery did not matter very much, so long as it was furtive and joyless and only involved the women of a submerged and despised class.
  26. nib
    the writing point of a pen
    Winston fitted a nib into the penholder and sucked it to get the grease off.
  27. reverberate
    ring or echo with sound
    Somewhere far away a rocket bomb exploded with a dull, reverberating roar.
  28. aureole
    the outermost region of the sun's atmosphere; visible as a white halo during a solar eclipse
    It was a lean Jewish face, with a great fuzzy aureole of white hair and a small goatee beard--a clever face, and yet somehow inherently despicable, with a kind of senile silliness in the long thin nose, near the end of which a pair of spectacles wa
  29. implicate
    bring into intimate and incriminating connection
    Very occasionally some person whom you had believed dead long since would make a ghostly reappearance at some public trial where he would implicate hundreds of others by his testimony before vanishing, this time for ever.
  30. garbled
    lacking orderly continuity
    And a few cubicles away a mild, ineffectual, dreamy creature named Ampleforth, with very hairy ears and a surprising talent for juggling with rhymes and metres, was engaged in producing garbled versions--definitive texts, they were called--of poems
  31. debase
    corrupt, debase, or make impure by adding a foreign or inferior substance; often by replacing valuable ingredients with inferior ones
    His voice was soft, as though faded, and his accent less debased than that of the majority of proles.
  32. dabble
    bob forward and under so as to feed off the bottom of a body of water
    As Syme had done earlier Winston had taken up his spoon and was dabbling in the pale-coloured gravy that dribbled across the table, drawing a long streak of it out into a pattern.
  33. inconceivably
    to an inconceivable degree
    It would have been inconceivably dangerous even if he had known how to set about doing it.
  34. waddle
    walk unsteadily
    In and out of the dark doorways, and down narrow alley-ways that branched off on either side, people swarmed in astonishing numbers--girls in full bloom, with crudely lipsticked mouths, and youths who chased the girls, and swollen waddling women wh
  35. inscribe
    carve, cut, or etch into a material or surface
    There, too, in tiny clear lettering, the same slogans were inscribed, and on the other face of the coin the head of Big Brother.
  36. compiling
    the act of compiling (as into a single book or file or list)
    Indeed, he was one of the enormous team of experts now engaged in compiling the Eleventh Edition of the Newspeak Dictionary.
  37. jostle
    make one's way by jostling, pushing, or shoving
    The successful women, bumped and jostled by the rest, were trying to make off with their saucepans while dozens of others clamoured round the stall, accusing the stall-keeper of favouritism and of having more saucepans somewhere in reserve.
  38. compile
    get or gather together
    Indeed, he was one of the enormous team of experts now engaged in compiling the Eleventh Edition of the Newspeak Dictionary.
  39. kaleidoscope
    an optical toy in a tube; it produces symmetrical patterns as bits of colored glass are reflected by mirrors
    Here were produced rubbishy newspapers containing almost nothing except sport, crime and astrology, sensational five-cent novelettes, films oozing with sex, and sentimental songs which were composed entirely by mechanical means on a special kind of kal
  40. cringe
    draw back, as with fear or pain
    When any ordinary person spoke to a capitalist he had to cringe and bow to him, and take off his cap and address him as 'Sir'.
  41. cubicle
    small area set off by walls for special use
    It was nearly eleven hundred, and in the Records Department, where Winston worked, they were dragging the chairs out of the cubicles and grouping them in the centre of the hall opposite the big telescreen, in preparation for the Two Minutes Hate.
  42. camaraderie
    the quality of affording easy familiarity and sociability
    The sky was a warmer blue than he had seen it that year, and suddenly the long, noisy evening at the Centre, the boring, exhausting games, the lectures, the creaking camaraderie oiled by gin, had seemed intolerable.
  43. improvise
    manage in a makeshift way; do with whatever is at hand
    He had even started humming to an improvised tune

    Oranges and lemons, say the bells of St Clement's, You owe me three farthings, say the----

    Suddenly his heart seemed to turn to ice and his bowels to water.
  44. venerate
    regard with feelings of respect and reverence; consider hallowed or exalted or be in awe of
    He believed in the principles of Ingsoc, he venerated Big Brother, he rejoiced over victories, he hated heretics, not merely with sincerity but with a sort of restless zeal, an up-to-dateness of information, which the ordinary Party member did not
  45. embezzlement
    the fraudulent appropriation of funds or property entrusted to your care but actually owned by someone else
    They had confessed to intelligence with the enemy (at that date, too, the enemy was Eurasia), embezzlement of public funds, the murder of various trusted Party members, intrigues against the leadership of Big Brother which had started long before t
  46. vapid
    lacking significance or liveliness or spirit or zest
    A sort of vapid eagerness flitted across Winston's face at the mention of Big Brother.
  47. ordinate
    the value of a coordinate on the vertical axis
    And somewhere or other, quite anonymous, there were the directing brains who co- ordinated the whole effort and laid down the lines of policy which made it necessary that this fragment of the past should be preserved, that one falsified, and the oth
  48. multifarious
    having many aspects
    And the Ministry had not only to supply the multifarious needs of the party, but also to repeat the whole operation at a lower level for the benefit of the proletariat.
  49. scrutinize
    examine carefully for accuracy with the intent of verification
    You had to live--did live, from habit that became instinct--in the assumption that every sound you made was overheard, and, except in darkness, every movement scrutinized.
  50. sinecure
    an office that involves minimal duties
    After confessing to these things they had been pardoned, reinstated in the Party, and given posts which were in fact sinecures but which sounded important.
  51. celibate
    abstaining from sexual intercourse
    But even then he could have borne living with her if it had been agreed that they should remain celibate.
  52. ingrained
    (used especially of ideas or principles) deeply rooted; firmly fixed or held
    Chastity was as deep ingrained in them as Party loyalty.
  53. truism
    an obvious truth
    Truisms are true, hold on to that!
  54. edify
    make understand
    Parsons, his attention caught by the trumpet call, sat listening with a sort of gaping solemnity, a sort of edified boredom.
  55. statutory
    relating to or created by statutes
    At thirty-five he had just been unwillingly evicted from the Youth League, and before graduating into the Youth League he had managed to stay on in the Spies for a year beyond the statutory age.
  56. inherently
    in an inherent manner
    It was a lean Jewish face, with a great fuzzy aureole of white hair and a small goatee beard--a clever face, and yet somehow inherently despicable, with a kind of senile silliness in the long thin nose, near the end of which a pair of spectacles wa
  57. nebulous
    lacking definite form or limits
    It had happened that morning at the Ministry, if anything so nebulous could be said to happen.
  58. compendium
    a publication containing a variety of works
    There were also whispered stories of a terrible book, a compendium of all the heresies, of which Goldstein was the author and which circulated clandestinely here and there.
  59. deride
    treat or speak of with contempt
    Thus, at one moment Winston's hatred was not turned against Goldstein at all, but, on the contrary, against Big Brother, the Party, and the Thought Police; and at such moments his heart went out to the lonely, derided heretic on the screen, sole gu
  60. corrugated
    shaped into alternating parallel grooves and ridges
    Were there always these vistas of rotting nineteenth-century houses, their sides shored up with baulks of timber, their windows patched with cardboard and their roofs with corrugated iron, their crazy garden walls sagging in all directions?
  61. evict
    expel or eject without recourse to legal process
    At thirty-five he had just been unwillingly evicted from the Youth League, and before graduating into the Youth League he had managed to stay on in the Spies for a year beyond the statutory age.
  62. gory
    covered with blood
    And sure enough, following on a gory description of the annihilation of a Eurasian army, with stupendous figures of killed and prisoners, came the announcement that, as from next week, the chocolate ration would be reduced from thirty grammes to tw
  63. dissemble
    behave unnaturally or affectedly
    To dissemble your feelings, to control your face, to do what everyone else was doing, was an instinctive reaction.
  64. catapult
    an engine that provided medieval artillery used during sieges; a heavy war engine for hurling large stones and other missiles
    He spun round just in time to see Mrs Parsons dragging her son back into the doorway while the boy pocketed a catapult.
  65. complicate
    make more complicated
    He might turn the speech into the usual denunciation of traitors and thought-criminals, but that was a little too obvious, while to invent a victory at the front, or some triumph of over-production in the Ninth Three-Year Plan, might complicate the
  66. lassitude
    a feeling of lack of interest or energy
    A deadly lassitude had taken hold of him.
  67. aquiline
    curved down like an eagle's beak
    She had a bold, aquiline face, a face that one might have called noble until one discovered that there was as nearly as possible nothing behind it.
  68. displace
    cause to move, usually with force or pressure
    The face of Big Brother swam into his mind, displacing that of O'Brien.
  69. ramification
    a development that complicates a situation
    From where Winston stood it was just possible to read, picked out on its white face in elegant lettering, the three slogans of the Party:

    WAR IS PEACE FREEDOM IS SLAVERY IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH

    The Ministry of Truth contained, it was said, three
  70. pillory
    a wooden instrument of punishment on a post with holes for the wrists and neck; offenders were locked in and so exposed to public scorn
    There would be mention of the bishops in their lawn sleeves, the judges in their ermine robes, the pillory, the stocks, the treadmill, the cat-o'-nine tails, the Lord Mayor's Banquet, and the practice of kissing the Pope's toe.
  71. fascinate
    to render motionless, as with a fixed stare or by arousing terror or awe
    It's fascinating.'
  72. cumbersome
    difficult to handle or use especially because of size or weight
    But I dare say you'd find it a little bit cumbersome.'
  73. amulet
    a trinket or piece of jewelry usually hung about the neck and thought to be a magical protection against evil or disease
    There was a whole tribe of men who made a living simply by selling systems, forecasts, and lucky amulets.
  74. wince
    draw back, as with fear or pain
    As soon as he touched her she seemed to wince and stiffen.
  75. orifice
    an aperture or hole that opens into a bodily cavity
    In the walls of the cubicle there were three orifices.
  76. urbane
    showing a high degree of refinement and the assurance that comes from wide social experience
    He felt deeply drawn to him, and not solely because he was intrigued by the contrast between O'Brien's urbane manner and his prize-fighter's physique.
  77. pedantic
    marked by a narrow focus on or display of learning especially its trivial aspects
    Winston thought for a moment, then pulled the speakwrite towards him and began dictating in Big Brother's familiar style: a style at once military and pedantic, and, because of a trick of asking questions and then promptly answering them ('What les
  78. overpower
    overcome by superior force
    An overpowering smell of sweat, a sort of unconscious testimony to the strenuousness of his life, followed him about wherever he went, and even remained behind him after he had gone.
  79. strident
    unpleasantly loud and harsh
    The telescreen had changed over to strident military music.
  80. proletarian
    belonging to or characteristic of the proletariat
    There was a whole chain of separate departments dealing with proletarian literature, music, drama, and entertainment generally.
  81. knell
    the sound of a bell rung slowly to announce a death or a funeral or the end of something
    Like a leaden knell the words came back at him:

    WAR IS PEACE FREEDOM IS SLAVERY IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH
  82. conspire
    act in unison or agreement and in secret towards a deceitful or illegal purpose
    But the proles, if only they could somehow become conscious of their own strength. would have no need to conspire.
  83. ooze
    pass gradually or leak through or as if through small openings
    Here were produced rubbishy newspapers containing almost nothing except sport, crime and astrology, sensational five-cent novelettes, films oozing with sex, and sentimental songs which were composed entirely by mechanical means on a special kind of
  84. unalterable
    not capable of being changed or altered
    His mother's memory tore at his heart because she had died loving him, when he was too young and selfish to love her in return, and because somehow, he did not remember how, she had sacrificed herself to a conception of loyalty that was private and una
  85. pedant
    a person who pays more attention to formal rules and book learning than they merit
    He bit hungrily into his bread and swallowed a couple of mouthfuls, then continued speaking, with a sort of pedant's passion.
  86. gambol
    play boisterously
    It was somehow slightly frightening, like the gambolling of tiger cubs which will soon grow up into man-eaters.
  87. anthology
    a collection of selected literary passages
    And a few cubicles away a mild, ineffectual, dreamy creature named Ampleforth, with very hairy ears and a surprising talent for juggling with rhymes and metres, was engaged in producing garbled versions--definitive texts, they were called--of poems which
  88. formulate
    prepare according to a formula
    It seemed to him that it was only now, when he had begun to be able to formulate his thoughts, that he had taken the decisive step.
  89. repository
    a facility where things can be deposited for storage or safekeeping
    There were the vast repositories where the corrected documents were stored, and the hidden furnaces where the original copies were destroyed.
  90. allure
    the power to entice or attract through personal charm
    He seemed to breathe again the warm stuffy odour of the basement kitchen, an odour compounded of bugs and dirty clothes and villainous cheap scent, but nevertheless alluring, because no woman of the Party ever used scent, or could be imagined as do
  91. rigidity
    the physical property of being stiff and resisting bending
    The rigidity of her muscles managed to convey that impression.
  92. insecurity
    the anxiety you experience when you feel vulnerable and insecure
    It struck him that the truly characteristic thing about modern life was not its cruelty and insecurity, but simply its bareness, its dinginess, its listlessness.
  93. supersede
    take the place or move into the position of
    The largest section of the Records Department, far larger than the one on which Winston worked, consisted simply of persons whose duty it was to track down and collect all copies of books, newspapers, and other documents which had been superseded a
  94. babble
    utter meaningless sounds, like a baby, or utter in an incoherent way
    Behind Winston's back the voice from the telescreen was still babbling away about pig-iron and the overfulfilment of the Ninth Three-Year Plan.
  95. etymology
    a history of a word
    For an account of its structure and etymology see Appendix.]--was startlingly different from any other object in sight.
  96. queue
    a line of people or vehicles waiting for something
    Chapter 5

    In the low-ceilinged canteen, deep underground, the lunch queue jerked slowly forward.
  97. predominate
    be larger in number, quantity, power, status or importance
    How easy it was, thought Winston, if you did not look about you, to believe that the physical type set up by the Party as an ideal--tall muscular youths and deep-bosomed maidens, blond-haired, vital, sunburnt, carefree--existed and even predominated
  98. zealot
    a fervent and even militant proponent of something
    Some nosing zealot in the Ministry (a woman, probably: someone like the little sandy-haired woman or the dark-haired girl from the Fiction Department) might start wondering why he had been writing during the lunch interval, why he had used an old-f
  99. equivocal
    open to two or more interpretations; or of uncertain nature or significance; or (often) intended to mislead
    For a second, two seconds, they had exchanged an equivocal glance, and that was the end of the story.
  100. conceivably
    within the realm of possibility
    But there was a space of a couple of seconds during which the expression of his eyes might conceivably have betrayed him.
  101. imbecility
    retardation more severe than a moron but not as severe as an idiot
    She had not a thought in her head that was not a slogan, and there was no imbecility, absolutely none that she was not capable of swallowing if the Party handed it out to her.
  102. scuttle
    an entrance equipped with a hatch; especially a passageway between decks of a ship
    It was curious how that beetle-like type proliferated in the Ministries: little dumpy men, growing stout very early in life, with short legs, swift scuttling movements, and fat inscrutable faces with very small eyes.
  103. scuffle
    fight or struggle in a confused way at close quarters
    Why could he not have a woman of his own instead of these filthy scuffles at intervals of years?
  104. sabotage
    a deliberate act of destruction or disruption in which equipment is damaged
    All subsequent crimes against the Party, all treacheries, acts of sabotage, heresies, deviations, sprang directly out of his teaching.
  105. nostalgia
    longing for something past
    It was a wild, impossible notion, to be abandoned as soon as thought of; but the room had awakened in him a sort of nostalgia, a sort of ancestral memory.
  106. persecute
    cause to suffer
    The ideal set up by the Party was something huge, terrible, and glittering--a world of steel and concrete, of monstrous machines and terrifying weapons--a nation of warriors and fanatics, marching forward in perfect unity, all thinking the same thoughts a
  107. altercation
    noisy quarrel
    He was a few paces away from them when suddenly the group broke up and two of the men were in violent altercation.
  108. grovel
    show submission or fear
    But before death (nobody spoke of such things, yet everybody knew of them) there was the routine of confession that had to be gone through: the grovelling on the floor and screaming for mercy, the crack of broken bones, the smashed teeth and bloody
  109. alcove
    a small recess opening off a larger room
    To one side of it there was a shallow alcove in which Winston was now sitting, and which, when the flats were built, had probably been intended to hold bookshelves.
  110. individualism
    the quality of being individual
    There was a word for it in Newspeak: OWNLIFE, it was called, meaning individualism and eccentricity.
  111. imposture
    pretending to be another person
    What most afflicted him with the sense of nightmare was that he had never clearly understood why the huge imposture was undertaken.
  112. rectify
    make right or correct
    They ran:

    times 17.3.84 bb speech malreported africa rectify

    times 19.12.83 forecasts 3 yp 4th quarter 83 misprints verify current issue

    times 14.2.84 miniplenty malquoted chocolate rectify

    times 3.12.83 reporting bb dayorder doubleplusung
  113. bloat
    swelling of the rumen or intestinal tract of domestic animals caused by excessive gas
    Two bloated women, one of them with her hair coming down, had got hold of the same saucepan and were trying to tear it out of one another's hands.
  114. illuminate
    make lighter or brighter
    He was holding the lamp high up, so as to illuminate the whole room, and in the warm dim light the place looked curiously inviting.
  115. repudiate
    refuse to acknowledge, ratify, or recognize as valid
    To know and not to know, to be conscious of complete truthfulness while telling carefully constructed lies, to hold simultaneously two opinions which cancelled out, knowing them to be contradictory and believing in both of them, to use logic against logic
  116. definitive
    clearly defined or formulated
    And a few cubicles away a mild, ineffectual, dreamy creature named Ampleforth, with very hairy ears and a surprising talent for juggling with rhymes and metres, was engaged in producing garbled versions-- definitive texts, they were called--of poems
  117. rubble
    the remains of something that has been destroyed or broken up
    And the bombed sites where the plaster dust swirled in the air and the willow-herb straggled over the heaps of rubble; and the places where the bombs had cleared a larger patch and there had sprung up sordid colonies of wooden dwellings like chicke
  118. refute
    overthrow by argument, evidence, or proof
    But what was strange was that although Goldstein was hated and despised by everybody, although every day and a thousand times a day, on platforms, on the telescreen, in newspapers, in books, his theories were refuted, smashed, ridiculed, held up to
  119. liberate
    grant freedom to; free from confinement
    The Party claimed, of course, to have liberated the proles from bondage.
  120. specious
    plausible but false
    And all the while, lest one should be in any doubt as to the reality which Goldstein's specious claptrap covered, behind his head on the telescreen there marched the endless columns of the Eurasian army--row after row of solid-looking men with expr
  121. brooch
    a decorative pin worn by women
    Only on a small table in the corner was there a litter of odds and ends--lacquered snuffboxes, agate brooches, and the like--which looked as though they might include something interesting.
  122. annihilate
    kill in large numbers
    You were abolished, annihilated: VAPORIZED was the usual word.
  123. archaic
    so extremely old as seeming to belong to an earlier period
    The pen was an archaic instrument, seldom used even for signatures, and he had procured one, furtively and with some difficulty, simply because of a feeling that the beautiful creamy paper deserved to be written on with a real nib instead of being
  124. gloat
    dwell on with satisfaction
    He would talk with a disagreeable gloating satisfaction of helicopter raids on enemy villages, and trials and confessions of thought-criminals, the executions in the cellars of the Ministry of Love.
  125. communal
    for or by a group rather than individuals
    It was assumed that when he was not working, eating, or sleeping he would be taking part in some kind of communal recreation: to do anything that suggested a taste for solitude, even to go for a walk by yourself, was always slightly dangerous.
  126. bounce
    spring back; spring away from an impact
    It struck Goldstein's nose and bounced off; the voice continued inexorably.
  127. embed
    fix or set securely or deeply
    They used to kind of embed it in the glass.
  128. commemorate
    call to remembrance; keep alive the memory of someone or something, as in a ceremony
    There were occasions when Big Brother devoted his Order for the Day to commemorating some humble, rank-and-file Party member whose life and death he held up as an example worthy to be followed.
  129. clarify
    make clear by removing impurities or solids, as by heating
    But the curious thing was that while he was doing so a totally different memory had clarified itself in his mind, to the point where he almost felt equal to writing it down.
  130. despicable
    morally reprehensible
    It was a lean Jewish face, with a great fuzzy aureole of white hair and a small goatee beard--a clever face, and yet somehow inherently despicable, with a kind of senile silliness in the long thin nose, near the end of which a pair of spectacles wa
  131. flimsy
    a thin strong lightweight translucent paper used especially for making carbon copies
    They were wretched, flimsy things, but cooking-pots of any kind were always difficult to get.
  132. relevant
    having a bearing on or connection with the subject at issue
    But the really relevant date was seven or eight years earlier.
  133. cube
    a hexahedron with six equal squares as faces
    On to each was dumped swiftly the regulation lunch--a metal pannikin of pinkish-grey stew, a hunk of bread, a cube of cheese, a mug of milkless Victory Coffee, and one saccharine tablet.
  134. dedicate
    give entirely to a specific person, activity, or cause
    He was the commander of a vast shadowy army, an underground network of conspirators dedicated to the overthrow of the State.
  135. whiff
    a short light gust of air
    He would inform you with quiet pride, between whiffs of his pipe, that he had put in an appearance at the Community Centre every evening for the past four years.
  136. irrepressible
    impossible to repress or control
    All over Oceania this morning there were irrepressible spontaneous demonstrations when workers marched out of factories and offices and paraded through the streets with banners voicing their gratitude to Big Brother for the new, happy life which hi
  137. unpack
    remove from its packing
    They threaded their way across the crowded room and unpacked their trays on to the metal-topped table, on one corner of which someone had left a pool of stew, a filthy liquid mess that had the appearance of vomit.
  138. sniff
    perceive by inhaling through the nose
    There was the usual boiled-cabbage smell, common to the whole building, but it was shot through by a sharper reek of sweat, which--one knew this at the first sniff, though it was hard to say how--was the sweat of some person not present at the mome
  139. wallow
    roll around, "pigs were wallowing in the mud"
    Audience much amused by shots of a great huge fat man trying to swim away with a helicopter after him, first you saw him wallowing along in the water like a porpoise, then you saw him through the helicopters gunsights, then he was full of holes and
  140. deviation
    a variation that deviates from the standard or norm
    All subsequent crimes against the Party, all treacheries, acts of sabotage, heresies, deviations, sprang directly out of his teaching.
  141. blare
    make a loud noise
    He was conscious of nothing except the blankness of the page in front of him, the itching of the skin above his ankle, the blaring of the music, and a slight booziness caused by the gin.
  142. shirk
    avoid (one's assigned duties)
    It was perhaps not more dangerous than shirking an evening at the Centre.
  143. elimination
    the act of removing or getting rid of something
    Just once Winston caught a phrase--'complete and final elimination of Goldsteinism'--jerked out very rapidly and, as it seemed, all in one piece, like a line of type cast solid.
  144. bristle
    a stiff hair
    It was a noise that set one's teeth on edge and bristled the hair at the back of one's neck.
  145. stagnant
    not growing or changing; without force or vitality
    A trumpet call, clear and beautiful, floated into the stagnant air.
  146. caption
    brief description accompanying an illustration
    BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU, the caption beneath it ran.
  147. ideology
    an orientation that characterizes the thinking of a group or nation
    This, Winston was aware, was not meant altogether seriously, but somehow it fitted in with the general ideology of the Party.
  148. substitution
    the act of putting one thing or person in the place of another: "he sent Smith in for Jones but the substitution came too late to help"
    It was merely the substitution of one piece of nonsense for another.
  149. axiom
    (logic) a proposition that is not susceptible of proof or disproof; its truth is assumed to be self-evident
    With the feeling that he was speaking to O'Brien, and also that he was setting forth an important axiom, he wrote:

    Freedom is the freedom to say that two plus two make four.
  150. confuse
    mistake one thing for another
    For several months during his childhood there had been confused street fighting in London itself, some of which he remembered vividly.
  151. exaggerate
    to enlarge beyond bounds or the truth
    Goldstein was delivering his usual venomous attack upon the doctrines of the Party--an attack so exaggerated and perverse that a child should have been able to see through it, and yet just plausible enough to fill one with an alarmed feeling that o
  152. defection
    withdrawing support or help despite allegiance or responsibility
    All three had written long, abject articles in 'The Times', analysing the reasons for their defection and promising to make amends.
  153. jargon
    specialized technical terminology characteristic of a particular subject
    Each contained a message of only one or two lines, in the abbreviated jargon--not actually Newspeak, but consisting largely of Newspeak words--which was used in the Ministry for internal purposes.
  154. equation
    a mathematical statement that two expressions are equal
    It was like a single equation with two unknowns.
  155. furtive
    secret and sly or sordid
    But that was merely a piece of furtive knowledge which he happened to possess because his memory was not satisfactorily under control.
  156. lucid
    (of language) transparently clear; easily understandable
    In a lucid moment Winston found that he was shouting with the others and kicking his heel violently against the rung of his chair.
  157. hallucination
    illusory perception; a common symptom of severe mental disorder
    Vivid, beautiful hallucinations flashed through his mind.
  158. ideological
    of or pertaining to or characteristic of an orientation that characterizes the thinking of a group or nation
    This process of continuous alteration was applied not only to newspapers, but to books, periodicals, pamphlets, posters, leaflets, films, sound-tracks, cartoons, photographs--to every kind of literature or documentation which might conceivably hold any po
  159. renegade
    someone who rebels and becomes an outlaw
    Goldstein was the renegade and backslider who once, long ago (how long ago, nobody quite remembered), had been one of the leading figures of the Party, almost on a level with Big Brother himself, and then had engaged in counter-revolutionary activi
  160. inscrutable
    of an obscure nature
    And then the flash of intelligence was gone, and O'Brien's face was as inscrutable as everybody else's.
  161. supple
    moving and bending with ease
    He hated her because she was young and pretty and sexless, because he wanted to go to bed with her and would never do so, because round her sweet supple waist, which seemed to ask you to encircle it with your arm, there was only the odious scarlet
  162. grimace
    contort the face to indicate a certain mental or emotional state
    A hideous ecstasy of fear and vindictiveness, a desire to kill, to torture, to smash faces in with a sledge-hammer, seemed to flow through the whole group of people like an electric current, turning one even against one's will into a grimacing, scr
  163. flinch
    draw back, as with fear or pain
    Then the sheep-face melted into the figure of a Eurasian soldier who seemed to be advancing, huge and terrible, his sub-machine gun roaring, and seeming to spring out of the surface of the screen, so that some of the people in the front row actually fl
  164. astronomical
    relating or belonging to the science of astronomy
    All one knew was that every quarter astronomical numbers of boots were produced on paper, while perhaps half the population of Oceania went barefoot.
  165. impregnable
    immune to attack; incapable of being tampered with
    They were all impregnable, as the Party intended that they should be.
  166. quack
    the harsh sound of a duck
    From the table at Winston's left, a little behind his back, someone was talking rapidly and continuously, a harsh gabble almost like the quacking of a duck, which pierced the general uproar of the room.
  167. jagged
    having a sharply uneven surface or outline
    Her voice seemed to stick into his brain like jagged splinters of glass.
  168. eccentricity
    strange and unconventional behavior
    There was a word for it in Newspeak: OWNLIFE, it was called, meaning individualism and eccentricity.
  169. compounded
    combined into or constituting a chemical compound
    He seemed to breathe again the warm stuffy odour of the basement kitchen, an odour compounded of bugs and dirty clothes and villainous cheap scent, but nevertheless alluring, because no woman of the Party ever used scent, or could be imagined as do
  170. incredulous
    not disposed or willing to believe; unbelieving
    In any case, to wear an improper expression on your face (to look incredulous when a victory was announced, for example) was itself a punishable offence.
  171. parasite
    an animal or plant that lives in or on a host (another animal or plant); it obtains nourishment from the host without benefiting or killing the host
    Parasites--that was another of them.
  172. tolerant
    showing or characterized by broad-mindedness
    When he spoke it was with a tolerant philosophical air, as though the beer had mellowed him.
  173. filing
    the entering of a legal document into the public record
    Rewrite it in full and submit your draft to higher authority before filing.
  174. reconstruct
    build again
    And the Records Department, after all, was itself only a single branch of the Ministry of Truth, whose primary job was not to reconstruct the past but to supply the citizens of Oceania with newspapers, films, textbooks, telescreen programmes, plays
  175. synthetic
    a compound made artificially by chemical reactions
    In any time that he could accurately remember, there had never been quite enough to eat, one had never had socks or underclothes that were not full of holes, furniture had always been battered and rickety, rooms underheated, tube trains crowded, houses fa
  176. predicament
    a situation from which extrication is difficult especially an unpleasant or trying one
    Either the future would resemble the present, in which case it would not listen to him: or it would be different from it, and his predicament would be meaningless.
  177. amends
    something done or paid in expiation of a wrong
    All three had written long, abject articles in 'The Times', analysing the reasons for their defection and promising to make amends.
  178. consecutive
    one after the other
    Even now, in spite of the gin, the dull ache in his belly made consecutive thought impossible.
  179. credible
    capable of being believed
    She must have followed him here, because it was not credible that by pure chance she should have happened to be walking on the same evening up the same obscure backstreet, kilometres distant from any quarter where Party members lived.
  180. illiterate
    not able to read or write
    Winston found and handed over two creased and filthy notes, which Parsons entered in a small notebook, in the neat handwriting of the illiterate.
  181. eddy
    a miniature whirlpool or whirlwind resulting when the current of a fluid doubles back on itself
    Down in the street little eddies of wind were whirling dust and torn paper into spirals, and though the sun was shining and the sky a harsh blue, there seemed to be no colour in anything, except the posters that were plastered everywhere.
  182. rigidly
    in a rigid manner
    Every concept that can ever be needed, will be expressed by exactly one word, with its meaning rigidly defined and all its subsidiary meanings rubbed out and forgotten.
  183. flick
    throw or toss with a quick motion
    Last night to the flicks.
  184. validity
    the quality of being valid and rigorous
    Not merely the validity of experience, but the very existence of external reality, was tacitly denied by their philosophy.
  185. animate
    make lively
    His thin dark face had become animated, his eyes had lost their mocking expression and grown almost dreamy.
  186. labyrinth
    complex system of paths or tunnels in which it is easy to get lost
    What happened in the unseen labyrinth to which the pneumatic tubes led, he did not know in detail, but he did know in general terms.
  187. reek
    give off smoke, fumes, warm vapour, steam, etc.
    There was the usual boiled-cabbage smell, common to the whole building, but it was shot through by a sharper reek of sweat, which--one knew this at the first sniff, though it was hard to say how--was the sweat of some person not present at the mome
  188. individually
    apart from others
    It was merely a few words of encouragement, the sort of words that are uttered in the din of battle, not distinguishable individually but restoring confidence by the fact of being spoken.
  189. perverse
    deviating from what is considered moral or right or proper or good
    Goldstein was delivering his usual venomous attack upon the doctrines of the Party--an attack so exaggerated and perverse that a child should have been able to see through it, and yet just plausible enough to fill one with an alarmed feeling that o
  190. incompatible
    not compatible
    He was a total abstainer and a nonsmoker, had no recreations except a daily hour in the gymnasium, and had taken a vow of celibacy, believing marriage and the care of a family to be incompatible with a twenty-four-hour-a-day devotion to duty.
  191. purge
    rid of impurities
    The two of them must evidently have been swallowed up in one of the first great purges of the fifties.
  192. palpable
    capable of being perceived; especially capable of being handled or touched or felt
    The words kept coming back to him, statement of a mystical truth and a palpable absurdity.
  193. nip
    sever or remove by pinching or snipping
    From the grille at the counter the steam of stew came pouring forth, with a sour metallic smell which did not quite overcome the fumes of Victory Gin. On the far side of the room there was a small bar, a mere hole in the wall, where gin could be bought at
  194. interminable
    tiresomely long; seemingly without end
    All he had to do was to transfer to paper the interminable restless monologue that had been running inside his head, literally for years.
  195. smelt
    extract (metals) by heating
    The hallway smelt of boiled cabbage and old rag mats.
  196. abject
    of the most contemptible kind
    The great purges involving thousands of people, with public trials of traitors and thought-criminals who made abject confession of their crimes and were afterwards executed, were special show-pieces not occurring oftener than once in a couple of ye
  197. denounce
    speak out against
    He was abusing Big Brother, he was denouncing the dictatorship of the Party, he was demanding the immediate conclusion of peace with Eurasia, he was advocating freedom of speech, freedom of the Press, freedom of assembly, freedom of thought, he was
  198. atrocity
    an act of atrocious cruelty
    He might be denouncing Goldstein and demanding sterner measures against thought-criminals and saboteurs, he might be fulminating against the atrocities of the Eurasian army, he might be praising Big Brother or the heroes on the Malabar front--it ma
  199. conceivable
    capable of being imagined
    It was even conceivable that they watched everybody all the time.
  200. dingy
    thickly covered with ingrained dirt or soot
    The Parsons' flat was bigger than Winston's, and dingy in a different way.
  201. contradictory
    unable to be both true at the same time
    To know and not to know, to be conscious of complete truthfulness while telling carefully constructed lies, to hold simultaneously two opinions which cancelled out, knowing them to be contradictory and believing in both of them, to use logic agains
  202. sordid
    foul and run-down and repulsive
    And the bombed sites where the plaster dust swirled in the air and the willow-herb straggled over the heaps of rubble; and the places where the bombs had cleared a larger patch and there had sprung up sordid colonies of wooden dwellings like chicke
  203. entail
    have as a logical consequence
    He wrote:

    Thoughtcrime does not entail death: thoughtcrime IS death.
  204. pierce
    penetrate or cut through with a sharp instrument
    Once when they passed in the corridor she gave him a quick sidelong glance which seemed to pierce right into him and for a moment had filled him with black terror.
  205. automatically
    in a mechanical manner; by a mechanism
    The self-satisfied sheep-like face on the screen, and the terrifying power of the Eurasian army behind it, were too much to be borne: besides, the sight or even the thought of Goldstein produced fear and anger automatically.
  206. revert
    go back to a previous state
    Parsons did, indeed, invariably revert to shorts when a community hike or any other physical activity gave him an excuse for doing so.
  207. filthy
    disgustingly dirty; filled or smeared with offensive matter
    The kitchen sink was full nearly to the brim with filthy greenish water which smelt worse than ever of cabbage.
  208. forecast
    a prediction about how something (as the weather) will develop
    They ran:

    times 17.3.84 bb speech malreported africa rectify

    times 19.12.83 forecasts 3 yp 4th quarter 83 misprints verify current issue

    times 14.2.84 miniplenty malquoted chocolate rectify

    times 3.12.83 reporting bb dayorder doubleplusung
  209. periodical
    happening or recurring at regular intervals
    This process of continuous alteration was applied not only to newspapers, but to books, periodicals, pamphlets, posters, leaflets, films, sound-tracks, cartoons, photographs--to every kind of literature or documentation which might conceivably hold
  210. intricate
    having many complexly arranged elements; elaborate
    It was an intricate and responsible job and had better be dealt with last.
  211. recreation
    an activity that diverts or amuses or stimulates
    He was a total abstainer and a nonsmoker, had no recreations except a daily hour in the gymnasium, and had taken a vow of celibacy, believing marriage and the care of a family to be incompatible with a twenty-four-hour-a-day devotion to duty.
  212. revealing
    showing or making known
    It was safer; though, as he well knew, even a back can be revealing.
  213. spontaneous
    said or done without having been planned or written in advance
    At the Ministry he was employed in some subordinate post for which intelligence was not required, but on the other hand he was a leading figure on the Sports Committee and all the other committees engaged in organizing community hikes, spontaneous
  214. anonymous
    having no known name or identity or known source
    How could you make appeal to the future when not a trace of you, not even an anonymous word scribbled on a piece of paper, could physically survive?
  215. assemble
    create by putting components or members together
    As soon as all the corrections which happened to be necessary in any particular number of 'The Times' had been assembled and collated, that number would be reprinted, the original copy destroyed, and the corrected copy placed on the files in its st
  216. distort
    twist and press out of shape
    The Party was trying to kill the sex instinct, or, if it could not be killed, then to distort it and dirty it.
  217. wrench
    a sharp strain on muscles or ligaments
    Suddenly, by the sort of violent effort with which one wrenches one's head away from the pillow in a nightmare, Winston succeeded in transferring his hatred from the face on the screen to the dark-haired girl behind him.
  218. starve
    die of food deprivation
    Before the Revolution they had been hideously oppressed by the capitalists, they had been starved and flogged, women had been forced to work in the coal mines (women still did work in the coal mines, as a matter of fact), children had been sold int
  219. coincidence
    the temporal property of two things happening at the same time
    Perhaps after all she was not really following him about, perhaps it was coincidence that she had sat so close to him two days running.
  220. din
    a loud harsh or strident noise
    It was merely a few words of encouragement, the sort of words that are uttered in the din of battle, not distinguishable individually but restoring confidence by the fact of being spoken.
  221. heresy
    a belief that rejects the orthodox tenets of a religion
    All subsequent crimes against the Party, all treacheries, acts of sabotage, heresies, deviations, sprang directly out of his teaching.
  222. output
    production of a certain amount
    Or again, 'The Times' of the nineteenth of December had published the official forecasts of the output of various classes of consumption goods in the fourth quarter of 1983, which was also the sixth quarter of the Ninth Three-Year Plan.
  223. recur
    happen or occur again
    The landscape that he was looking at recurred so often in his dreams that he was never fully certain whether or not he had seen it in the real world.
  224. physically
    in accord with physical laws
    How could you make appeal to the future when not a trace of you, not even an anonymous word scribbled on a piece of paper, could physically survive?
  225. flit
    move along rapidly and lightly; skim or dart
    Mrs Parsons' eyes flitted nervously from Winston to the children, and back again.
  226. automatic
    operating with minimal human intervention; independent of external control
    He discovered that while he sat helplessly musing he had also been writing, as though by automatic action.
  227. dictate
    a guiding principle
    Apart from very short notes, it was usual to dictate everything into the speak-write which was of course impossible for his present purpose.
  228. frail
    physically weak
    He moved over to the window: a smallish, frail figure, the meagreness of his body merely emphasized by the blue overalls which were the uniform of the party.
  229. tedious
    so lacking in interest as to cause mental weariness
    The other three were routine matters, though the second one would probably mean some tedious wading through lists of figures.
  230. climax
    the highest point of anything conceived of as growing or developing or unfolding
    He would ravish her and cut her throat at the moment of climax.
  231. beget
    make children
    The only recognized purpose of marriage was to beget children for the service of the Party.
  232. imitate
    reproduce someone's behavior or looks
    Suddenly they were both leaping round him, shouting 'Traitor!' and 'Thought-criminal!' the little girl imitating her brother in every movement.
  233. emerge
    come out into view, as from concealment
    Finally they had emerged into a noisy, crowded place which he had realized to be a Tube station.
  234. flap
    move in a wavy pattern or with a rising and falling motion
    Down at street level another poster, torn at one corner, flapped fitfully in the wind, alternately covering and uncovering the single word INGSOC.
  235. rash
    imprudently incurring risk
    This was the second time in three weeks that he had missed an evening at the Community Centre: a rash act, since you could be certain that the number of your attendances at the Centre was carefully checked.
  236. execute
    put in effect
    The great purges involving thousands of people, with public trials of traitors and thought-criminals who made abject confession of their crimes and were afterwards executed, were special show-pieces not occurring oftener than once in a couple of ye
  237. clue
    evidence that helps to solve a problem
    One never had the smallest clue as to what had happened to them.
  238. survivor
    one who lives through affliction
    Among the last survivors were three men named Jones, Aaronson, and Rutherford.
  239. statistics
    a branch of applied mathematics concerned with the collection and interpretation of quantitative data and the use of probability theory to estimate population parameters
    Statistics were just as much a fantasy in their original version as in their rectified version.
  240. penetrate
    pass into or through, often by overcoming resistance
    It was a place impossible to enter except on official business, and then only by penetrating through a maze of barbed-wire entanglements, steel doors, and hidden machine-gun nests.
  241. ration
    a fixed portion that is allotted (especially in times of scarcity)
    And sure enough, following on a gory description of the annihilation of a Eurasian army, with stupendous figures of killed and prisoners, came the announcement that, as from next week, the chocolate ration would be reduced from thirty grammes to tw
  242. overall
    including everything
    He moved over to the window: a smallish, frail figure, the meagreness of his body merely emphasized by the blue overalls which were the uniform of the party.
  243. statistic
    a datum that can be represented numerically
    Statistics were just as much a fantasy in their original version as in their rectified version.
  244. impose
    impose and collect
    And if all others accepted the lie which the Party imposed--if all records told the same tale--then the lie passed into history and became truth.
  245. amend
    make amendments to
  246. detected
    perceived or discerned
    This was not illegal (nothing was illegal, since there were no longer any laws), but if detected it was reasonably certain that it would be punished by death, or at least by twenty-five years in a forced-labour camp.
  247. concept
    an abstract or general idea inferred or derived from specific instances
    Every concept that can ever be needed, will be expressed by exactly one word, with its meaning rigidly defined and all its subsidiary meanings rubbed out and forgotten.
  248. alteration
    the act of revising or altering (involving reconsideration and modification)
    This process of continuous alteration was applied not only to newspapers, but to books, periodicals, pamphlets, posters, leaflets, films, sound-tracks, cartoons, photographs--to every kind of literature or documentation which might conceivably hold
  249. lump
    a compact mass
    It was a heavy lump of glass, curved on one side, flat on the other, making almost a hemisphere.
  250. despise
    look down on with disdain
    But what was strange was that although Goldstein was hated and despised by everybody, although every day and a thousand times a day, on platforms, on the telescreen, in newspapers, in books, his theories were refuted, smashed, ridiculed, held up to
  251. illegal
    prohibited by law or by official or accepted rules
    This was not illegal (nothing was illegal, since there were no longer any laws), but if detected it was reasonably certain that it would be punished by death, or at least by twenty-five years in a forced-labour camp.
  252. devote
    dedicate
    He was a fattish but active man of paralysing stupidity, a mass of imbecile enthusiasms--one of those completely unquestioning, devoted drudges on whom, more even than on the Thought Police, the stability of the Party depended.
  253. stall
    small area set off by walls for special use
    When he had reached the spot it was to see a mob of two or three hundred women crowding round the stalls of a street market, with faces as tragic as though they had been the doomed passengers on a sinking ship.
  254. voluntary
    (military) a person who freely enlists for service
    It was even possible, at moments, to switch one's hatred this way or that by a voluntary act.
  255. monstrous
    distorted and unnatural in shape or size; abnormal and hideous
    The next moment a hideous, grinding speech, as of some monstrous machine running without oil, burst from the big telescreen at the end of the room.
  256. logic
    the branch of philosophy that analyzes inference
    To know and not to know, to be conscious of complete truthfulness while telling carefully constructed lies, to hold simultaneously two opinions which cancelled out, knowing them to be contradictory and believing in both of them, to use logic agains
  257. paragraph
    one of several distinct subdivisions of a text intended to separate ideas; the beginning is usually marked by a new indented line
    And with good reason, for hardly a week passed in which 'The Times' did not carry a paragraph describing how some eavesdropping little sneak--'child hero' was the phrase generally used--had overheard some compromising remark and denounced its paren
  258. subordinate
    an assistant subject to the authority or control of another
    At the Ministry he was employed in some subordinate post for which intelligence was not required, but on the other hand he was a leading figure on the Sports Committee and all the other committees engaged in organizing community hikes, spontaneous
  259. dreary
    lacking in liveliness or charm or surprise
    'Oh, comrade,' she began in a dreary, whining sort of voice, 'I thought I heard you come in.
  260. hover
    hang in the air; fly or be suspended above
    In the far distance a helicopter skimmed down between the roofs, hovered for an instant like a bluebottle, and darted away again with a curving flight.
  261. corresponding
    similar especially in position or purpose
    From where Winston stood it was just possible to read, picked out on its white face in elegant lettering, the three slogans of the Party:

    WAR IS PEACE FREEDOM IS SLAVERY IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH

    The Ministry of Truth contained, it was said, three
  262. intrigue
    a crafty and involved plot to achieve your (usually sinister) ends
    He felt deeply drawn to him, and not solely because he was intrigued by the contrast between O'Brien's urbane manner and his prize-fighter's physique.
  263. definitely
    without question and beyond doubt
    Winston could not definitely remember a time when his country had not been at war, but it was evident that there had been a fairly long interval of peace during his childhood, because one of his early memories was of an air raid which appeared to t
  264. continuous
    continuing in time or space without interruption
    Since about that time, war had been literally continuous, though strictly speaking it had not always been the same war.
  265. achieve
    to gain with effort
    Even to have awakened Katharine, if he could have achieved it, would have been like a seduction, although she was his wife.
  266. announce
    make known; make an announcement
    And only yesterday, he reflected, it had been announced that the ration was to be REDUCED to twenty grammes a week.
  267. betray
    deliver to an enemy by treachery
    He was abusing Big Brother, he was denouncing the dictatorship of the Party, he was demanding the immediate conclusion of peace with Eurasia, he was advocating freedom of speech, freedom of the Press, freedom of assembly, freedom of thought, he was crying
  268. parade
    a ceremonial procession including people marching
    All over Oceania this morning there were irrepressible spontaneous demonstrations when workers marched out of factories and offices and paraded through the streets with banners voicing their gratitude to Big Brother for the new, happy life which hi
  269. refrain
    resist doing something
    It was a refrain that was often heard in moments of overwhelming emotion.
  270. consumption
    the act of consuming something
    Or again, 'The Times' of the nineteenth of December had published the official forecasts of the output of various classes of consumption goods in the fourth quarter of 1983, which was also the sixth quarter of the Ninth Three-Year Plan.
  271. wither
    lose freshness, vigor, or vitality
    A certain Comrade Withers, a prominent member of the Inner Party, had been singled out for special mention and awarded a decoration, the Order of Conspicuous Merit, Second Class.
  272. abolish
    do away with
    You were abolished, annihilated: VAPORIZED was the usual word.
  273. preliminary
    denoting an action or event preceding or in preparation for something more important; designed to orient or acquaint with a situation before proceeding
    He picked up his pen again and wrote:

    She threw herself down on the bed, and at once, without any kind of preliminary in the most coarse, horrible way you can imagine, pulled up her skirt.
  274. arrange
    put into a proper or systematic order
    In the absence of any real intercommunication between one part of Oceania and another, this was not difficult to arrange.
  275. substitute
    a person or thing that takes or can take the place of another
    All that was needed was to substitute for the original promise a warning that it would probably be necessary to reduce the ration at some time in April.
  276. petty
    (informal) small and of little importance
    Heavy physical work, the care of home and children, petty quarrels with neighbours, films, football, beer, and above all, gambling, filled up the horizon of their minds.
  277. invariably
    without variation or change, in every case
    It was always at night--the arrests invariably happened at night.
  278. tragic
    very sad; especially involving grief or death or destruction
    The thing that now suddenly struck Winston was that his mother's death, nearly thirty years ago, had been tragic and sorrowful in a way that was no longer possible.
  279. whistle
    the sound made by something moving rapidly or by steam coming out of a small aperture
    The telescreen was giving forth an ear-splitting whistle which continued on the same note for thirty seconds.
  280. proprietor
    (law) someone who owns (is legal possessor of) a business
    The proprietor had just lighted a hanging oil lamp which gave off an unclean but friendly smell.
  281. switch
    control consisting of a mechanical or electrical or electronic device for making or breaking or changing the connections in a circuit
    Winston turned a switch and the voice sank somewhat, though the words were still distinguishable.
  282. conspicuous
    obvious to the eye or mind
    A certain Comrade Withers, a prominent member of the Inner Party, had been singled out for special mention and awarded a decoration, the Order of Conspicuous Merit, Second Class.
  283. survive
    continue in existence after (an adversity, etc.)
    How could you make appeal to the future when not a trace of you, not even an anonymous word scribbled on a piece of paper, could physically survive?
  284. conspiracy
    a plot to carry out some harmful or illegal act (especially a political plot)
    Somewhere or other he was still alive and hatching his conspiracies: perhaps somewhere beyond the sea, under the protection of his foreign paymasters, perhaps even--so it was occasionally rumoured--in some hiding-place in Oceania itself.
  285. involve
    contain as a part
    Even to understand the word 'doublethink' involved the use of doublethink.
  286. engage
    consume all of one's attention or time
    Goldstein was the renegade and backslider who once, long ago (how long ago, nobody quite remembered), had been one of the leading figures of the Party, almost on a level with Big Brother himself, and then had engaged in counter-revolutionary activi
  287. overthrow
    rule against
    He was the commander of a vast shadowy army, an underground network of conspirators dedicated to the overthrow of the State.
  288. swarm
    a group of many things in the air or on the ground
    Beyond, above, below, were other swarms of workers engaged in an unimaginable multitude of jobs.
  289. scratch
    cut the surface of; wear away the surface of
    The pen was an archaic instrument, seldom used even for signatures, and he had procured one, furtively and with some difficulty, simply because of a feeling that the beautiful creamy paper deserved to be written on with a real nib instead of being scra
  290. resemble
    appear like; be similar or bear a likeness to
    Either the future would resemble the present, in which case it would not listen to him: or it would be different from it, and his predicament would be meaningless.
  291. altered
    changed in form or character without becoming something else
    And yet the past, though of its nature alterable, never had been altered.
  292. banner
    long strip of cloth or paper used for decoration or advertising
    On the walls were scarlet banners of the Youth League and the Spies, and a full-sized poster of Big Brother.
  293. appropriate
    suitable for a particular person or place or condition etc
    Some nosing zealot in the Ministry (a woman, probably: someone like the little sandy-haired woman or the dark-haired girl from the Fiction Department) might start wondering why he had been writing during the lunch interval, why he had used an old-fashione
  294. fortress
    a fortified defensive structure
    Instead, a clipped military voice was reading out, with a sort of brutal relish, a description of the armaments of the new Floating Fortress which had just been anchored between Iceland and the Faroe Islands.
  295. offensive
    unpleasant or disgusting especially to the senses
    For example, it appeared from 'The Times' of the seventeenth of March that Big Brother, in his speech of the previous day, had predicted that the South Indian front would remain quiet but that a Eurasian offensive would shortly be launched in North
  296. significance
    the quality of being significant
    It was only later and by degrees that they had seemed to take on significance.
  297. demonstration
    a show or display; the act of presenting something to sight or view
    At the Ministry he was employed in some subordinate post for which intelligence was not required, but on the other hand he was a leading figure on the Sports Committee and all the other committees engaged in organizing community hikes, spontaneous demo
  298. compromise
    an accommodation in which both sides make concessions
    Even with nothing written in it, it was a compromising possession.
  299. compound
    a whole formed by a union of two or more elements or parts
  300. heroic
    having or displaying qualities appropriate for heroes
    Suddenly there sprang into his mind, ready made as it were, the image of a certain Comrade Ogilvy, who had recently died in battle, in heroic circumstances.
  301. detect
    discover or determine the existence, presence, or fact of
  302. pursue
    follow in or as if in pursuit
    Even from the coin the eyes pursued you.
  303. tube
    a hollow cylindrical shape
    Finally they had emerged into a noisy, crowded place which he had realized to be a Tube station.
  304. reduce
    make smaller
    And sure enough, following on a gory description of the annihilation of a Eurasian army, with stupendous figures of killed and prisoners, came the announcement that, as from next week, the chocolate ration would be reduced from thirty grammes to tw
  305. complex
    complicated in structure; consisting of interconnected parts
    Today there were fear, hatred, and pain, but no dignity of emotion, no deep or complex sorrows.
  306. coin
    a flat metal piece (usually a disc) used as money
    There, too, in tiny clear lettering, the same slogans were inscribed, and on the other face of the coin the head of Big Brother.
  307. external
    happening or arising or located outside or beyond some limits or especially surface
    When there were no external records that you could refer to, even the outline of your own life lost its sharpness.
  308. endure
    undergo or be subjected to
    And what way of knowing that the dominion of the Party would not endure FOR EVER?
  309. hostile
    characterized by enmity or ill will
    But in the same moment, drawing a deep sigh of relief from everybody, the hostile figure melted into the face of Big Brother, black-haired, black-moustachio'd, full of power and mysterious calm, and so vast that it almost filled up the screen.
  310. invent
    come up with (an idea, plan, explanation, theory, or principle) after a mental effort
    There was no knowing how much of this legend was true and how much invented.
  311. correspond
    take the place of or be parallel or equivalent to
  312. jest
    activity characterized by good humor
    'Ah,' said the other, 'that's jest it.
  313. patch
    a small contrasting part of something
    Were there always these vistas of rotting nineteenth-century houses, their sides shored up with baulks of timber, their windows patched with cardboard and their roofs with corrugated iron, their crazy garden walls sagging in all directions?
  314. definite
    precise; explicit and clearly defined
    Sometimes, indeed, you could put your finger on a definite lie.
  315. ministry
    the work of a minister of religion
    A kilometre away the Ministry of Truth, his place of work, towered vast and white above the grimy landscape.