George Orwell's "1984" Part 3 (comprehensive) 2202 words

Comprehensive vocabulary list for George Orwell's "1984" (Part 3).
  1. newspeak
    deliberately ambiguous and contradictory language use to mislead and manipulate the public
    CRIMESTOP, they called it in Newspeak.
  2. labour camp
    a penal institution for political prisoners who are used as forced labor
    There was much talk about the forced-labour camps to which
    most of the prisoners expected to be sent.
  3. chinless
    having a receding chin
    Opposite Winston there sat
    a man with a chinless, toothy face exactly like that of some large,
    harmless rodent.
  4. zip fastener
    a fastener for locking together two toothed edges by means of a sliding tab
    The zip
    fastener
    had long since been wrenched out of them.
  5. undercharge
    charge (someone) too little money
    At irregular
    intervals they presented him with a dirty slip of paper which they said
    was the bill, but he had the impression that they always undercharged him.
  6. snakes and ladders
    a board game for children who use dice to move counters up ladders and down snakes
    A lovely
    toy--you'll love it'; and then she had gone out in the rain, to a little
    general shop which was still sporadically open nearby, and came back with
    a cardboard box containing an outfit of Snakes and Ladders.
  7. Big Brother
    an authoritarian leader and invader of privacy
    '"Down with Big Brother!"
  8. Oceania
    a large group of islands in the south Pacific including Melanesia and Micronesia and Polynesia (and sometimes Australasia and the Malay Archipelago)
    At this moment, which power is
    Oceania at war with?'
  9. doublethink
    believing two contradictory ideas at the same time
    That was doublethink.
  10. Eurasia
    the land mass formed by the continents of Europe and Asia
    The war was
    against Eurasia.
  11. fencing mask
    a face mask made of fine mesh that is worn over a fencer's face
    Fixed to the front of it was something that looked
    like a fencing mask, with the concave side outwards.
  12. vocabulary
    a language user's knowledge of words
    Its vocabulary was so constructed as to give exact and
    often very subtle expression to every meaning that a Party member could
    properly wish to express, while excluding all other meanings and also the
    possibility of arriving at them by indirect met
  13. solipsism
    (philosophy) the philosophical theory that the self is all that you know to exist
    The word you are trying to think of is solipsism.
  14. pronounceable
    capable of being uttered or pronounced
    They consisted of two or more words, or portions of words, welded together
    in an easily pronounceable form.
  15. preterite
    a term formerly used to refer to the simple past tense
    Thus, in all verbs the preterite and the past
    participle were the same and ended in -ED. The preterite of STEAL was
    STEALED, the preterite of THINK was THINKED, and so on throughout the
    language, all such forms as SWAM, GAVE, BROUGHT, SPOKE, TAKEN,
  16. spyhole
    a hole (in a door or an oven etc) through which you can peep
    On the other hand some of them seemed to be on
    good terms with the guards, called them by nicknames, and tried to wheedle
    cigarettes through the spyhole in the door.
  17. dial
    the circular graduated indicator on various measuring instruments
    He was strapped into a chair surrounded by dials, under dazzling lights.
  18. white knight
    a company that is a friendly acquirer in a takeover
    He picked up the white knight and moved it across the board.
  19. five-finger
    any of a numerous plants grown for their five-petaled flowers; abundant in temperate regions; alleged to have medicinal properties
    You saw five fingers.
  20. inflect
    vary the pitch of one's speech
    The only classes of words that were still allowed to inflect irregularly
    were the pronouns, the relatives, the demonstrative adjectives, and the
    auxiliary verbs.
  21. drug peddler
    an unlicensed dealer in illegal drugs
    There was a constant come-and-go of prisoners of every description:
    drug-peddlers, thieves, bandits, black-marketeers, drunks, prostitutes.
  22. cheekbone
    the arch of bone beneath the eye that forms the prominence of the cheek
    A scrubby beard covered his face to the cheekbones, giving
    him an air of ruffianism that went oddly with his large weak frame and
    nervous movements.
  23. subtilize
    make more subtle or refined
    Some of the B words had highly subtilized meanings, barely intelligible to
    anyone who had not mastered the language as a whole.
  24. lavatory
    a room or building equipped with one or more toilets
    A bench, or
    shelf, just wide enough to sit on ran round the wall, broken only by the
    door and, at the end opposite the door, a lavatory pan with no wooden
    seat.
  25. predestine
    decree or determine beforehand
    Nothing had changed except
    your own attitude: the predestined thing happened in any case.
  26. kilometre
    a metric unit of length equal to 1000 meters (or 0.621371 miles)
    He was rolling down a mighty corridor, a kilometre wide, full of glorious,
    golden light, roaring with laughter and shouting out confessions at the
    top of his voice.
  27. euphony
    any agreeable (pleasing and harmonious) sounds
    A word which was difficult to utter, or was liable
    to be incorrectly heard, was held to be ipso facto a bad word; occasionally
    therefore, for the sake of euphony, extra letters were inserted into a word
    or an archaic formation was retained.
  28. chessboard
    a checkerboard used to play chess
    A waiter, again
    unbidden, brought the chessboard and the current issue of 'The Times',
    with the page turned down at the chess problem.
  29. abbreviate
    shorten
    It was perceived that in thus
    abbreviating a name one narrowed and subtly altered its meaning, by
    cutting out most of the associations that would otherwise cling to it.
  30. interchangeability
    the quality of being capable of exchange or interchange
    The first of
    these was an almost complete interchangeability between different parts of
    speech.
  31. 101
    being one more than one hundred
    'Room 101,' he said.
  32. pain
    a somatic sensation of acute discomfort
    He had sat silent against the wall, jostled by dirty
    bodies, too preoccupied by fear and the pain in his belly to take much
    interest in his surroundings, but still noticing the astonishing difference
    in demeanour between the Party prisoners and the
  33. dental plate
    a dental appliance that artificially replaces missing teeth
    Amid a stream of blood and saliva, the two
    halves of a dental plate fell out of his mouth.
  34. tiddly
    slightly intoxicated
    Soon he was wildly excited and shouting with
    laughter as the tiddly-winks climbed hopefully up the ladders and then
    came slithering down the snakes again, almost to the starting-point.
  35. heretical
    characterized by departure from accepted beliefs or standards
    In the old days he had
    hidden a heretical mind beneath an appearance of conformity.
  36. truncheon
    a short stout club used primarily by policemen
    He felt the smash of
    truncheons on his elbows and iron-shod boots on his shins; he saw himself
    grovelling on the floor, screaming for mercy through broken teeth.
  37. inflected
    (of the voice) altered in tone or pitch
    The resulting amalgam was always a
    noun-verb, and inflected according to the ordinary rules.
  38. centimetre
    a metric unit of length equal to one hundredth of a meter
    It was impossible to move so much as
    a centimetre in any direction.
  39. gracelessness
    an unpleasant lack of grace in carriage or form or movement or expression
    He was aware of his ugliness, his gracelessness, a bundle of
    bones in filthy underclothes sitting weeping in the harsh white light: but
    he could not stop himself.
  40. emaciation
    extreme leanness (usually caused by starvation or disease)
    But what was
    startling was the emaciation of his face.
  41. underclothes
    undergarment worn next to the skin and under the outer garments
    Beneath the overalls his body was looped with filthy yellowish
    rags, just recognizable as the remnants of underclothes.
  42. electric drill
    a rotating power drill powered by an electric motor
    A sort of
    electric drill ran through the cafe.
  43. resettle
    settle in a new place
    He resettled his spectacles
    thoughtfully, and took a pace or two up and down.
  44. mottle
    mark with spots or blotches of different color or shades of color as if stained
    His fat, mottled cheeks were so pouched at the bottom
    that it was difficult not to believe that he had little stores of food
    tucked away there.
  45. cell
    (biology) the basic structural and functional unit of all organisms; they may exist as independent units of life (as in monads) or may form colonies or tissues as in higher plants and animals
    He was in a high-ceilinged
    windowless cell with walls of glittering white porcelain.
  46. ampoule
    a small bottle that contains a drug (especially a sealed sterile container for injection by needle)
    Over to his left Winston saw the
    man in the white coat break an ampoule and draw back the plunger of a
    syringe.
  47. metre
    the basic unit of length adopted under the Systeme International d'Unites (approximately 1.094 yards)
    His troubled eyes were gazing at the wall about a metre above
    the level of Winston's head.
  48. filthily
    in a filthy unclean manner
    They had put him into a cell similar to the one he was now in,
    but filthily dirty and at all times crowded by ten or fifteen people.
  49. fair hearing
    a hearing that is granted in extraordinary situations where the normal judicial process would be inadequate to secure due process because the person would be harmed or denied their rights before a judicial remedy became available (as in deportation or loss of welfare benefits)
    I know they give you a fair
    hearing
    .
  50. Eurasian
    relating to, or coming from, Europe and Asia
    A Eurasian army (Oceania was at war with Eurasia:
    Oceania had always been at war with Eurasia) was moving southward at
    terrifying speed.
  51. chestnut tree
    any of several attractive deciduous trees yellow-brown in autumn; yield a hard wood and edible nuts in a prickly bur
    Chapter 6



    The Chestnut Tree was almost empty.
  52. past participle
    a participle that expresses completed action
    Thus, in all verbs the preterite and the past
    participle
    were the same and ended in -ED. The preterite of STEAL was
    STEALED, the preterite of THINK was THINKED, and so on throughout the
    language, all such forms as SWAM, GAVE, BROUGHT, SPOKE, TAKEN,
  53. grammatical rule
    a linguistic rule for the syntax of grammatical utterances
    They followed the same grammatical rules as the
    words in the other two vocabularies.
  54. Parsons
    United States sociologist (1902-1979)
    Parsons
    walked into the cell.
  55. resettled
    settled in a new location
    He resettled his spectacles
    thoughtfully, and took a pace or two up and down.
  56. hunch forward
    round one's back by bending forward and drawing the shoulders forward
    The thin shoulders were
    hunched forward so as to make a cavity of the chest, the scraggy neck
    seemed to be bending double under the weight of the skull.
  57. alterable
    capable of being changed or altered in some characteristic
    The past was alterable.
  58. sexual immorality
    the evil ascribed to sexual acts that violate social conventions
    His sexual life, for example, was entirely regulated by
    the two Newspeak words SEXCRIME (sexual immorality) and GOODSEX (chastity).
  59. soap bubble
    a bubble formed by a thin soap film
    I could float off this floor like a soap bubble if
    I wish to.
  60. prepositional
    of or relating to or formed with a preposition
    It was also possible, as in present-day English, to modify the meaning of
    almost any word by prepositional affixes such as ANTE-, POST-, UP-, DOWN-,
    etc.
  61. gin
    strong liquor flavored with juniper berries
    Unbidden, a waiter came and
    filled his glass up with Victory Gin, shaking into it a few drops from
    another bottle with a quill through the cork.
  62. uncured
    not seasoned
    Will you understand,
    Winston, that no one whom we bring to this place ever leaves our hands
    uncured?
  63. spinal fluid
    clear liquid produced in the ventricles of the brain; fills and protects cavities in the brain and spinal cord
    You have a vivid mental picture of the vertebrae snapping apart
    and the spinal fluid dripping out of them.
  64. didactically
    in a didactic manner
    'It was a common punishment in Imperial China,' said O'Brien as
    didactically as ever.
  65. meaning
    the message that is intended or expressed or signified
    But at this moment the meaning of the mask-like attachment in front of it
    suddenly sank into him.
  66. rat
    any of various long-tailed rodents similar to but larger than a mouse
    They were rats.
  67. remember
    recall knowledge from memory; have a recollection
    He put a hand to his forehead and pressed his temples for a moment, as
    though trying to remember something.
  68. face
    the front of the human head from the forehead to the chin and ear to ear
    She put a vast arm round his shoulder and drew him
    towards her, breathing beer and vomit into his face.
  69. varicose
    abnormally swollen or knotty
    Here and there under the dirt there
    were the red scars of wounds, and near the ankle the varicose ulcer was an
    inflamed mass with flakes of skin peeling off it.
  70. verb
    a content word that denotes an action, occurrence, or state of existence
    Any word in the language (in principle this applied even to very
    abstract words such as IF or WHEN) could be used either as verb, noun,
    adjective, or adverb.
  71. cauterize
    burn, sear, or freeze (tissue) using a hot iron or electric current or a caustic agent
    Something was killed in your breast: burnt out, cauterized out.
  72. illegitimately
    in a manner disapproved or not allowed by custom
    One could, in fact, only use Newspeak for unorthodox purposes by
    illegitimately translating some of the words back into Oldspeak.
  73. exist
    have an existence, be extant
    It was more natural to exist
    from moment to moment, accepting another ten minutes' life even with the
    certainty that there was torture at the end of it.
  74. noun
    a content word that can be used to refer to a person, place, thing, quality, or action
    Any word in the language (in principle this applied even to very
    abstract words such as IF or WHEN) could be used either as verb, noun,
    adjective, or adverb.
  75. party
    an occasion on which people can assemble for social interaction and entertainment
    He had sat silent against the wall, jostled by dirty
    bodies, too preoccupied by fear and the pain in his belly to take much
    interest in his surroundings, but still noticing the astonishing difference
    in demeanour between the Party prisoners and the
  76. grammatical construction
    a group of words that form a constituent of a sentence and are considered as a single unit
    Meanwhile it gained ground steadily, all
    Party members tending to use Newspeak words and grammatical constructions
    more and more in their everyday speech.
  77. impalement
    the act of piercing with a sharpened stake as a form of punishment or torture
    It may be burial alive, or death by fire, or by drowning, or
    by impalement, or fifty other deaths.
  78. totalitarian
    characterized by a government in which the political authority exercises absolute and centralized control
    Later, in the twentieth century, there
    were the totalitarians, as they were called.
  79. uncontrollably
    in an uncontrolled manner
    His large pouchy cheeks were quivering
    uncontrollably.
  80. lever
    a simple machine that gives a mechanical advantage when given a fulcrum
    Under
    his hand there was a dial with a lever on top and figures running round
    the face.
  81. cage
    an enclosure made or wire or metal bars in which birds or animals can be kept
    It was an oblong wire cage with a handle on top
    for carrying it by.
  82. agitprop
    political propaganda (especially communist propaganda) communicated via art and literature and cinema
    Examples were such
    words as NAZI, GESTAPO, COMINTERN, INPRECORR, AGITPROP.
  83. side view
    a view from the side of something
    You shall
    see the side view as well.'
  84. razor
    edge tool used in shaving
    But there was the razor blade;
    they would send the razor blade if they could.
  85. gum up
    stick together as if with gum
    When he woke, seldom before eleven hundred, with gummed-up eyelids and
    fiery mouth and a back that seemed to be broken, it would have been
    impossible even to rise from the horizontal if it had not been for the
    bottle and teacup placed beside the be
  86. mutilate
    destroy or injure severely
    It was a question of degrading himself, mutilating himself.
  87. inscrutability
    the quality of being impossible to investigate
    It was not easy to preserve
    inscrutability when you did not know what your face looked like.
  88. present participle
    a participle expressing present action; in English is formed by adding -ing
    This
    inflected as follows: noun-verb, GOODTHINK; past tense and past participle,
    GOODTHINKED; present participle, GOOD-THINKING; adjective, GOODTHINKFUL;
    adverb, GOODTHINKWISE; verbal noun, GOODTHINKER.
  89. ideologically
    with respect to ideology
    No word in the B vocabulary was ideologically neutral.
  90. hypodermic syringe
    a piston syringe that is fitted with a hypodermic needle for giving injections
    At
    the other side of him stood a man in a white coat, holding a hypodermic
    syringe
    .
  91. grizzle
    a grey wig
    Winston whined
    and grizzled, made futile demands for food, fretted about the room pulling
    everything out of place and kicking the wainscoting until the neighbours
    banged on the wall, while the younger child wailed intermittently.
  92. etymological
    based on or belonging to etymology
    No etymological principle was followed
    here: in some cases it was the original noun that was chosen for retention,
    in other cases the verb.
  93. finger
    any of the terminal members of the hand (sometimes excepting the thumb)
    The blade would bite
    into him with a sort of burning coldness, and even the fingers that held
    it would be cut to the bone.
  94. ministry
    the work of a minister of religion
    Presumably he was in the Ministry of Love,
    but there was no way of making certain.
  95. ambivalent
    uncertain or unable to decide about what course to follow
    Other words, again, were ambivalent, having the connotation 'good' when
    applied to the Party and 'bad' when applied to its enemies.
  96. verbal noun
    a noun that is derived from a verb
    This
    inflected as follows: noun-verb, GOODTHINK; past tense and past participle,
    GOODTHINKED; present participle, GOOD-THINKING; adjective, GOODTHINKFUL;
    adverb, GOODTHINKWISE; verbal noun, GOODTHINKER.
  97. bugger
    practice anal sex upon
    'I wouldn't 'a sat on you, only the buggers
    put me there.
  98. ruffianism
    violent lawless behavior
    A scrubby beard covered his face to the cheekbones, giving
    him an air of ruffianism that went oddly with his large weak frame and
    nervous movements.
  99. auxiliary verb
    a verb that combines with another verb in a verb phrase to help form tense, mood, voice, or condition of the verb it combines with
    The only classes of words that were still allowed to inflect irregularly
    were the pronouns, the relatives, the demonstrative adjectives, and the
    auxiliary verbs.
  100. rubbishy
    cheap and inferior; of no value
    An example was PROLEFEED, meaning the rubbishy
    entertainment and spurious news which the Party handed out to the masses.
  101. grammatical
    of or pertaining to grammar
    Meanwhile it gained ground steadily, all
    Party members tending to use Newspeak words and grammatical constructions
    more and more in their everyday speech.
  102. ideological
    of or pertaining to or characteristic of an orientation that characterizes the thinking of a group or nation
    The Principles of Newspeak



    Newspeak was the official language of Oceania and had been devised to meet
    the ideological needs of Ingsoc, or English Socialism.
  103. humiliate
    cause to feel shame; hurt the pride of
    They slapped his face, wrung
    his ears, pulled his hair, made him stand on one leg, refused him leave to
    urinate, shone glaring lights in his face until his eyes ran with water;
    but the aim of this was simply to humiliate him and destroy his power o
  104. questioner
    someone who asks a question
    His questioners now were not ruffians in black uniforms
    but Party intellectuals, little rotund men with quick movements and
    flashing spectacles, who worked on him in relays over periods which
    lasted--he thought, he could not be sure--ten or twelve
  105. saccharine
    overly sweet
    It was saccharine flavoured
    with cloves, the speciality of the cafe.
  106. relearn
    learn something again, as after having forgotten or neglected it
    That is the fact that you have got
    to relearn, Winston.
  107. Brother
    (Roman Catholic Church) a title given to a monk and used as form of address
    '"Down with Big Brother!"
  108. interrogation
    an instance of questioning
    Later he was
    to realize that all that then happened was merely a preliminary, a routine
    interrogation to which nearly all prisoners were subjected.
  109. camp bed
    a small bed that folds up for storage or transport
    Chapter 2



    He was lying on something that felt like a camp bed, except that it was
    higher off the ground and that he was fixed down in some way so that he
    could not move.
  110. adjectival
    of or relating to or functioning as an adjective
    There was little
    need for them, since almost any adjectival meaning could be arrived at by
    adding -FUL to a noun-verb.
  111. athleticism
    intense energy
    It needed also a sort of
    athleticism of mind, an ability at one moment to make the most delicate
    use of logic and at the next to be unconscious of the crudest logical
    errors.
  112. bootlace
    a long lace for fastening boots
    In the preceding quarter,
    it appeared, the Tenth Three-Year Plan's quota for bootlaces had been
    overfulfilled by 98 per cent.
  113. unorthodox
    breaking with convention or tradition
    This was done partly
    by the invention of new words, but chiefly by eliminating undesirable
    words and by stripping such words as remained of unorthodox meanings, and
    so far as possible of all secondary meanings whatever.
  114. hedonistic
    devoted to pleasure
    It is the exact opposite of the stupid hedonistic Utopias that
    the old reformers imagined.
  115. ration card
    a card certifying the bearer's right to purchase rationed goods
    Procreation will be an annual
    formality like the renewal of a ration card.
  116. unrepentant
    not penitent or remorseful
    Because
    the Inquisition killed its enemies in the open, and killed them while
    they were still unrepentant: in fact, it killed them because they were
    unrepentant.
  117. three-sided
    having three sides
    As he slid
    them to the ground he saw that there was a three-sided mirror at the far
    end of the room.
  118. happen
    come to pass
    There were moments
    when he foresaw the things that would happen to him with such actuality
    that his heart galloped and his breath stopped.
  119. gabble
    speak (about unimportant matters) rapidly and incessantly
    Already an
    excited voice was gabbling from the telescreen, but even as it started
    it was almost drowned by a roar of cheering from outside.
  120. unsteadily
    in an unsteady manner
    Then he rolled over and raised himself
    unsteadily on hands and knees.
  121. skull
    the bony skeleton of the head of vertebrates
    It was like a skull.
  122. abbreviation
    shortening something by omitting parts of it
    [Compound words such as
    SPEAKWRITE, were of course to be found in the A vocabulary, but these were
    merely convenient abbreviations and had no special ideological colour.]
  123. implicate
    bring into intimate and incriminating connection
    It was easier to
    confess everything and implicate everybody.
  124. nip off
    sever or remove by pinching or snipping
    Heard what I was saying, and nipped off to
    the patrols the very next day.
  125. pouched
    having a pouch
    His fat, mottled cheeks were so pouched at the bottom
    that it was difficult not to believe that he had little stores of food
    tucked away there.
  126. startle
    to stimulate to action
    Ampleforth paused, mildly startled.
  127. wrench
    a sharp strain on muscles or ligaments
    They wrenched off the boots with
    which she had been trying to kick them, and dumped her down across
    Winston's lap, almost breaking his thigh-bones.
  128. again
    anew
    He sat still again, his hands crossed on his knee.
  129. telescoped
    shortened by or as if by means of parts that slide one within another or are crushed one into another
    Even in the early decades of
    the twentieth century, telescoped words and phrases had been one of the
    characteristic features of political language; and it had been noticed
    that the tendency to use abbreviations of this kind was most marked in
    total
  130. in principle
    with regard to fundamentals although not concerning details
    Any word in the language (in principle this applied even to very
    abstract words such as IF or WHEN) could be used either as verb, noun,
    adjective, or adverb.
  131. moment
    an indefinitely short time
    There were moments
    when he foresaw the things that would happen to him with such actuality
    that his heart galloped and his breath stopped.
  132. enormous
    extraordinarily large in size or extent or amount or power or degree
    An enormous wreck of a woman, aged about sixty, with
    great tumbling breasts and thick coils of white hair which had come down
    in her struggles, was carried in, kicking and shouting, by four guards,
    who had hold of her one at each corner.
  133. light year
    the distance that light travels in a vacuum in 1 year; 5.88 trillion miles or 9.46 trillion kilometers
    Some of them are
    a million light-years away.
  134. confess
    admit (to a wrongdoing)
    There's nothing I wouldn't confess, nothing!
  135. rebelliousness
    intentionally contemptuous behavior or attitude
    All her rebelliousness, her deceit, her
    folly, her dirty-mindedness--everything has been burned out of her.
  136. bulletin
    a brief report (especially an official statement issued for immediate publication or broadcast)
    At present only music was coming
    out of it, but there was a possibility that at any moment there might be
    a special bulletin from the Ministry of Peace.
  137. belly
    the region of the body of a vertebrate between the thorax and the pelvis
    There was a dull aching in his belly.
  138. torture
    the deliberate, systematic, or wanton infliction of physical or mental suffering by one or more persons in an attempt to force another person to yield information or to make a confession or for any other reason
    It was more natural to exist
    from moment to moment, accepting another ten minutes' life even with the
    certainty that there was torture at the end of it.
  139. light-year
    the distance that light travels in a vacuum in 1 year; 5.88 trillion miles or 9.46 trillion kilometers
    Some of them are
    a million light-years away.
  140. adverb
    a word that modifies something other than a noun
    Any word in the language (in principle this applied even to very
    abstract words such as IF or WHEN) could be used either as verb, noun,
    adjective, or adverb.
  141. denture
    a dental appliance that artificially replaces missing teeth
    They had pulled out the remnants
    of his teeth and given him a new set of dentures.
  142. clang
    a loud resonant repeating noise
    The steel door opened with
    a clang.
  143. levitation
    the act of raising (a body) from the ground by presumably spiritualistic means
    Invisibility,
    levitation--anything.
  144. proletarian
    belonging to or characteristic of the proletariat
    The secret
    accumulation of knowledge--a gradual spread of enlightenment--ultimately
    a proletarian rebellion--the overthrow of the Party.
  145. speciality
    a distinguishing trait
    It was saccharine flavoured
    with cloves, the speciality of the cafe.
  146. guard
    watch over or shield from danger or harm; protect
    They yelled insults at the guards,
    fought back fiercely when their belongings were impounded, wrote obscene
    words on the floor, ate smuggled food which they produced from mysterious
    hiding-places in their clothes, and even shouted down the telescre
  147. seaborne
    conveyed by sea
    He could hear just enough of what was
    issuing from the telescreen to realize that it had all happened, as he had
    foreseen; a vast seaborne armada had secretly assembled a sudden blow in
    the enemy's rear, the white arrow tearing across the tail of t
  148. betray
    deliver to an enemy by treachery
    He loved her
    and would not betray her; but that was only a fact, known as he knew the
    rules of arithmetic.
  149. wordless
    expressed without speech
    He had set up a wordless
    howling, like an animal.
  150. blurry
    indistinct or hazy in outline
    The fingers stood up
    before his eyes like pillars, enormous, blurry, and seeming to vibrate,
    but unmistakably four.
  151. die down
    suffer from a disease that kills shoots
    The pain died down again.
  152. prevaricate
    be deliberately ambiguous or unclear in order to mislead or withhold information
    If you tell me any lies, or attempt to
    prevaricate in any way, or even fall below your usual level of
    intelligence, you will cry out with pain, instantly.
  153. lengthways
    in the direction of the length
    Although it was three
    or four metres away from him, he could see that the cage was divided
    lengthways into two compartments, and that there was some kind of creature
    in each.
  154. purposive
    having a purpose
    It was intended
    only to express simple, purposive thoughts, usually involving concrete
    objects or physical actions.
  155. black marketeer
    someone who engages illegally in trade in scarce or controlled commodities
    There was a constant come-and-go of prisoners of every description:
    drug-peddlers, thieves, bandits, black-marketeers, drunks, prostitutes.
  156. adjective
    the word class that qualifies nouns
    Any word in the language (in principle this applied even to very
    abstract words such as IF or WHEN) could be used either as verb, noun,
    adjective, or adverb.
  157. high-ceilinged
    having a higher than normal ceiling
    He was in a high-ceilinged
    windowless cell with walls of glittering white porcelain.
  158. tiredness
    temporary loss of strength and energy resulting from hard physical or mental work
    Winston was struck, as he had been struck before, by the tiredness of
    O'Brien's face.
  159. thinkable
    capable of being conceived or imagined or considered
    It was thinkable that the razor blade might
    arrive concealed in his food, if he were ever fed.
  160. sizeable
    fairly large
    It was even possible--he thought this because from time to time
    something seemed to tickle his leg--that there might be a sizeable bit of
    crust there.
  161. lunatic
    an insane person
    Perhaps
    that lunatic dislocation in the mind could really happen: that was the
    thought that defeated him.
  162. syringe
    a medical instrument used to inject or withdraw fluids
    At
    the other side of him stood a man in a white coat, holding a hypodermic
    syringe.
  163. interrogate
    pose a series of questions to
    'You are thinking,' he said, 'that since we intend to destroy you utterly,
    so that nothing that you say or do can make the smallest difference--in
    that case, why do we go to the trouble of interrogating you first?
  164. big brother
    an older brother
    BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU, the caption said.
  165. in its own right
    by reason of one's own ability or ownership etc.
    You believe that reality is
    something objective, external, existing in its own right.
  166. whimper
    cry weakly or softly
    A very faint whimpering or squeaking, which seemed
    unconscious, came out of him.
  167. grovelling
    totally submissive
    He felt the smash of
    truncheons on his elbows and iron-shod boots on his shins; he saw himself
    grovelling on the floor, screaming for mercy through broken teeth.
  168. self-evident
    evident without proof or argument
    You also believe
    that the nature of reality is self-evident.
  169. chess
    a board game for two players who move their 16 pieces according to specific rules; the object is to checkmate the opponent's king
    A waiter, again
    unbidden, brought the chessboard and the current issue of 'The Times',
    with the page turned down at the chess problem.
  170. ooze out
    release (a liquid) in drops or small quantities
    Winston had stopped weeping, though the tears were still oozing out of his
    eyes.
  171. guiltily
    in the manner of someone who has committed an offense
    The
    eyes of the chinless man kept flitting towards the skull-faced man, then
    turning guiltily away, then being dragged back by an irresistible
    attraction.
  172. sabotage
    a deliberate act of destruction or disruption in which equipment is damaged
    There was a
    long range of crimes--espionage, sabotage, and the like--to which everyone
    had to confess as a matter of course.
  173. overall
    including everything
    He had an idea that there were a few breadcrumbs in the pocket of his
    overalls.
  174. Brazzaville
    the capital and largest city of the Republic of the Congo
    Brazzaville and Leopoldville were in danger.
  175. control
    power to direct or determine
    Whenever his physical sensations were a little under
    control the terror returned.
  176. self-contradiction
    contradicting yourself
    Their real weapon was the merciless questioning
    that went on and on, hour after hour, tripping him up, laying traps for
    him, twisting everything that he said, convicting him at every step of
    lies and self-contradiction until he began weeping as muc
  177. baize
    a bright green fabric napped to resemble felt; used to cover gaming tables
    All he noticed was that there were two small tables
    straight in front of him, each covered with green baize.
  178. inflexion
    a change in the form of a word (usually by adding a suffix) to indicate a change in its grammatical function
    Subject to a few exceptions which are mentioned below all inflexions
    followed the same rules.
  179. heresy
    a belief that rejects the orthodox tenets of a religion
    It set out
    to eradicate heresy, and ended by perpetuating it.
  180. heretic
    a person who holds religious beliefs in conflict with the dogma of the Roman Catholic Church
    For every heretic it
    burned at the stake, thousands of others rose up.
  181. controllable
    capable of being controlled
    In the same way,
    the associations called up by a word like MINITRUE are fewer and more
    controllable than those called up by MINISTRY OF TRUTH.
  182. urinate
    eliminate urine
    They slapped his face, wrung
    his ears, pulled his hair, made him stand on one leg, refused him leave to
    urinate, shone glaring lights in his face until his eyes ran with water;
    but the aim of this was simply to humiliate him and destroy his power o
  183. everyday
    commonplace and ordinary
    Meanwhile it gained ground steadily, all
    Party members tending to use Newspeak words and grammatical constructions
    more and more in their everyday speech.
  184. helplessness
    the state of needing help from something
    He had a feeling of deadly
    helplessness.
  185. blind spot
    the point where the optic nerve enters the retina; not sensitive to light
    The mind should develop a blind spot whenever a
    dangerous thought presented itself.
  186. nonexistence
    the state of not existing
    He knew, or he could
    imagine, the arguments which proved his own nonexistence; but they were
    nonsense, they were only a play on words.
  187. destroy
    do away with, cause the destruction or undoing of
    They slapped his face, wrung
    his ears, pulled his hair, made him stand on one leg, refused him leave to
    urinate, shone glaring lights in his face until his eyes ran with water;
    but the aim of this was simply to humiliate him and destroy his power o
  188. crocus
    any of numerous low-growing plants of the genus Crocus having slender grasslike leaves and white or yellow or purple flowers; native chiefly to the Mediterranean region but widely cultivated
    It was in the
    Park, on a vile, biting day in March, when the earth was like iron and
    all the grass seemed dead and there was not a bud anywhere except a few
    crocuses which had pushed themselves up to be dismembered by the wind.
  189. present-day
    belonging to the present time
    It was composed almost entirely of words
    that we already possess words like HIT, RUN, DOG, TREE, SUGAR, HOUSE,
    FIELD--but in comparison with the present-day English vocabulary their
    number was extremely small, while their meanings were far more rig
  190. happening
    an event that happens
    He felt no love for her, and he hardly even wondered
    what was happening to her.
  191. tinny
    thin and metallic in sound; lacking resonance
    A
    tinny music trickled from the telescreens.
  192. seamed
    having or joined by a seam or seams
    The cheeks were seamed, the mouth had a drawn-in look.
  193. unappeasable
    not to be placated or appeased or moved by entreaty
    Because of
    its thinness the mouth and eyes looked disproportionately large, and the
    eyes seemed filled with a murderous, unappeasable hatred of somebody or
    something.
  194. for example
    as an example
    The word THOUGHT, for
    example
    , did not exist in Newspeak.
  195. purge
    rid of impurities
    Even the victim of the Russian purges could
    carry rebellion locked up in his skull as he walked down the passage
    waiting for the bullet.
  196. merely
    and nothing more
    But that
    was merely an intellectual decision, taken because he knew that he ought
    to take it.
  197. untranslatable
    not capable of being put into another form or style or language
    In the future such fragments, even
    if they chanced to survive, would be unintelligible and untranslatable.
  198. split second
    a very short time (as the time it takes the eye to blink or the heart to beat)
    To think, to think, even with a
    split second left--to think was the only hope.
  199. capitulate
    surrender under agreed conditions
    He had capitulated, that was agreed.
  200. power
    possession of the qualities (especially mental qualities) required to do something or get something done
    They slapped his face, wrung
    his ears, pulled his hair, made him stand on one leg, refused him leave to
    urinate, shone glaring lights in his face until his eyes ran with water;
    but the aim of this was simply to humiliate him and destroy his power o
  201. favouritism
    an inclination to favor some person or group
    There was bribery, favouritism, and racketeering of every kind, there was
    homosexuality and prostitution, there was even illicit alcohol distilled
    from potatoes.
  202. bed
    a piece of furniture that provides a place to sleep
    Chapter 2



    He was lying on something that felt like a camp bed, except that it was
    higher off the ground and that he was fixed down in some way so that he
    could not move.
  203. bench
    a long seat for more than one person
    A bench, or
    shelf, just wide enough to sit on ran round the wall, broken only by the
    door and, at the end opposite the door, a lavatory pan with no wooden
    seat.
  204. body
    an individual 3-dimensional object that has mass and that is distinguishable from other objects
    He had sat silent against the wall, jostled by dirty
    bodies, too preoccupied by fear and the pain in his belly to take much
    interest in his surroundings, but still noticing the astonishing difference
    in demeanour between the Party prisoners and the
  205. chance upon
    find unexpectedly
    It was another copy of the photograph of Jones, Aaronson, and
    Rutherford at the party function in New York, which he had chanced upon
    eleven years ago and promptly destroyed.
  206. rodent
    relatively small placental mammals having a single pair of constantly growing incisor teeth specialized for gnawing
    Opposite Winston there sat
    a man with a chinless, toothy face exactly like that of some large,
    harmless rodent.
  207. human being
    any living or extinct member of the family Hominidae characterized by superior intelligence, articulate speech, and erect carriage
    He confessed that for years he had been in personal touch
    with Goldstein and had been a member of an underground organization which
    had included almost every human being he had ever known.
  208. archaic
    so extremely old as seeming to belong to an earlier period
    The version in use in 1984, and
    embodied in the Ninth and Tenth Editions of the Newspeak Dictionary, was
    a provisional one, and contained many superfluous words and archaic
    formations which were due to be suppressed later.
  209. intermittently
    in an intermittent manner
    Winston could not intermittently
    remember why the pain was happening.
  210. slithering
    moving as on a slippery surface
    Soon he was wildly excited and shouting with
    laughter as the tiddly-winks climbed hopefully up the ladders and then
    came slithering down the snakes again, almost to the starting-point.
  211. photograph
    a representation of a person or scene in the form of a print or transparent slide; recorded by a camera on light-sensitive material
    There was a certain photograph about which you had a hallucination.
  212. trickle
    run or flow slowly, as in drops or in an unsteady stream
    A
    tinny music trickled from the telescreens.
  213. sometimes
    on certain occasions or in certain cases but not always
    The
    dull pain in his belly never went away, but sometimes it grew better and
    sometimes worse, and his thoughts expanded or contracted accordingly.
  214. inextricably
    in an inextricable manner
    The cloves and saccharine, themselves disgusting
    enough in their sickly way, could not disguise the flat oily smell; and
    what was worst of all was that the smell of gin, which dwelt with him
    night and day, was inextricably mixed up in his mind with
  215. in the end
    as the end result of a succession or process
    In the end the temptation to find out overcame his fear; he
    slipped a hand into his pocket.
  216. Oceanic
    an eastern subfamily of Malayo-Polynesian languages
    Some words, on the other hand,
    displayed a frank and contemptuous understanding of the real nature of
    Oceanic society.
  217. jailbird
    a criminal who has been jailed repeatedly
    A forlorn, jailbird's face with a nobby
    forehead running back into a bald scalp, a crooked nose, and
    battered-looking cheekbones above which his eyes were fierce and watchful.
  218. retch
    make an unsuccessful effort to vomit; strain to vomit
    As always, the gin made him shudder and even retch slightly.
  219. fastener
    restraint that attaches to something or holds something in place
    The zip
    fastener had long since been wrenched out of them.
  220. two iron
    long iron with a nearly vertical face
    They sat down on two iron chairs, side by side
    but not too close together.
  221. concretely
    in concrete terms
    Does the past exist concretely, in space?
  222. sport shirt
    a shirt with short sleeves designed for comfort and casual wear
    He was wearing khaki shorts and a sports-shirt.
  223. the boot
    an instrument of torture that is used to heat or crush the foot and leg
    They wrenched off the boots with
    which she had been trying to kick them, and dumped her down across
    Winston's lap, almost breaking his thigh-bones.
  224. sit
    take a seat
    A bench, or
    shelf, just wide enough to sit on ran round the wall, broken only by the
    door and, at the end opposite the door, a lavatory pan with no wooden
    seat.
  225. blade
    the flat part of a tool or weapon that (usually) has a cutting edge
    But there was the razor blade;
    they would send the razor blade if they could.
  226. prisoner
    a person who is confined; especially a prisoner of war
    The
    majority of them were common criminals, but there were a few political
    prisoners among them.
  227. oozing
    the process of seeping
    For a moment he lay as though stunned, with dark blood oozing from
    his mouth and nose.
  228. part of speech
    one of the traditional categories of words intended to reflect their functions in a grammatical context
    The first of
    these was an almost complete interchangeability between different parts of
    speech
    .
  229. dismember
    separate the limbs from the body
    It was in the
    Park, on a vile, biting day in March, when the earth was like iron and
    all the grass seemed dead and there was not a bud anywhere except a few
    crocuses which had pushed themselves up to be dismembered by the wind.
  230. undifferentiated
    not differentiated
    A violent emotion, not fear exactly but a sort of undifferentiated
    excitement, flared up in him, then faded again.
  231. needle
    a sharp pointed implement (usually steel)
    He
    remembered a surly barber arriving to scrape his chin and crop his hair,
    and businesslike, unsympathetic men in white coats feeling his pulse,
    tapping his reflexes, turning up his eyelids, running harsh fingers over
    him in search for broken bones, and
  232. unvarying
    unvarying in nature
    The humming sound and the unvarying white light induced a
    sort of faintness, an empty feeling inside his head.
  233. floor
    the inside lower horizontal surface (as of a room, hallway, tent, or other structure)
    They yelled insults at the guards,
    fought back fiercely when their belongings were impounded, wrote obscene
    words on the floor, ate smuggled food which they produced from mysterious
    hiding-places in their clothes, and even shouted down the telescre
  234. possible
    capable of happening or existing
    It was even possible--he thought this because from time to time
    something seemed to tickle his leg--that there might be a sizeable bit of
    crust there.
  235. mealtime
    the hour at which a meal is habitually or customarily eaten
    But after a few more days--a few more mealtimes--even that feat was
    accomplished.
  236. scrubby
    sparsely covered with stunted trees or vegetation and underbrush
    A scrubby beard covered his face to the cheekbones, giving
    him an air of ruffianism that went oddly with his large weak frame and
    nervous movements.
  237. yell
    a loud utterance; often in protest or opposition
    If you made unexpected
    movements they yelled at you from the telescreen.
  238. face off
    start a game by a face-off
    Tear her face off, strip her to the bones.
  239. kilogram
    one thousand grams; the basic unit of mass adopted under the Systeme International d'Unites
    Do you know that you have lost twenty-five
    kilograms since you have been in our hands?
  240. corridor
    an enclosed passageway; rooms usually open onto it
    He was rolling down a mighty corridor, a kilometre wide, full of glorious,
    golden light, roaring with laughter and shouting out confessions at the
    top of his voice.
  241. paralyse
    cause to be paralyzed and immobile
    He had slumped to his knees, almost paralysed, clasping the
    stricken elbow with his other hand.
  242. understand
    know and comprehend the nature or meaning of
    Only
    once, when two Party members, both women, were pressed close together on
    the bench, he overheard amid the din of voices a few hurriedly-whispered
    words; and in particular a reference to something called 'room one-oh-one',
    which he did not understa
  243. pause
    cease an action temporarily
    She paused, patted
    her breast, and belched.
  244. staccato
    separating the notes; in music
    So far as it could be achieved, a Newspeak word of this class was
    simply a staccato sound expressing ONE clearly understood concept.
  245. timorously
    in a timorous and trepid manner
    His pale-grey eyes flitted timorously from face to face
    and turned quickly away again when he caught anyone's eye.
  246. trample
    tread or stomp heavily or roughly
    A world of fear and treachery and torment, a
    world of trampling and being trampled upon, a world which will grow not
    less but MORE merciless as it refines itself.
  247. blissful
    completely happy and contented
    Almost in the same instant a blissful,
    healing warmth spread all through his body.
  248. past
    earlier than the present time; no longer current
    'There is a Party slogan dealing with the control of the past,' he said.
  249. toothy
    having or showing prominent teeth
    Opposite Winston there sat
    a man with a chinless, toothy face exactly like that of some large,
    harmless rodent.
  250. parson
    a person authorized to conduct religious worship
    Parsons
    walked into the cell.
  251. sticking out
    extending out above or beyond a surface or boundary
    He was shoeless; large, dirty toes were
    sticking out of the holes in his socks.
  252. ipso facto
    by the fact itself
    A word which was difficult to utter, or was liable
    to be incorrectly heard, was held to be ipso facto a bad word; occasionally
    therefore, for the sake of euphony, extra letters were inserted into a word
    or an archaic formation was retained.
  253. yelled
    in a vehement outcry
    If you made unexpected
    movements they yelled at you from the telescreen.
  254. lunacy
    foolish or senseless behavior
    O'Brien
    had tortured him to the edge of lunacy, and in a little while, it was
    certain, he would send him to his death.
  255. foolproof
    not liable to failure
    His training fitted him to do this, the language gave him an almost
    foolproof instrument, and the texture of the words, with their harsh sound
    and a certain wilful ugliness which was in accord with the spirit of
    Ingsoc, assisted the process still f
  256. reversible
    capable of reversing or being reversed
    Has it ever occurred to you that it is reversible?
  257. writhe
    to move in a twisting or contorted motion, (especially when struggling)
    In the face of pain
    there are no heroes, no heroes, he thought over and over as he writhed
    on the floor, clutching uselessly at his disabled left arm.
  258. screaming
    resembling a scream in effect
    He felt the smash of
    truncheons on his elbows and iron-shod boots on his shins; he saw himself
    grovelling on the floor, screaming for mercy through broken teeth.
  259. flit
    move along rapidly and lightly; skim or dart
    His eyes flitted
    round the walls, as though he half expected to find a window somewhere.
  260. involve
    contain as a part
    Courage and cowardice are not involved.
  261. gummed
    covered with adhesive gum
    When he woke, seldom before eleven hundred, with gummed-up eyelids and
    fiery mouth and a back that seemed to be broken, it would have been
    impossible even to rise from the horizontal if it had not been for the
    bottle and teacup placed beside the be
  262. visualized
    seen in the mind as a mental image
    The cloves and saccharine, themselves disgusting
    enough in their sickly way, could not disguise the flat oily smell; and
    what was worst of all was that the smell of gin, which dwelt with him
    night and day, was inextricably mixed up in his mind with the sm
  263. shoeless
    without shoes
    He was shoeless; large, dirty toes were
    sticking out of the holes in his socks.
  264. example
    an item of information that is typical of a class or group
    Now we will take an example.
  265. any longer
    at the present or from now on; usually used with a negative
    No one dares trust a wife or a child or a friend
    any longer.
  266. nagging
    continually complaining or faultfinding
    In the
    end the nagging voices broke him down more completely than the boots and
    fists of the guards.
  267. knee
    hinge joint in the human leg connecting the tibia and fibula with the femur and protected in front by the patella
    He sat as still as he could on the narrow bench, with his hands crossed
    on his knee.
  268. choice of words
    the manner in which something is expressed in words
    Newspeak was designed not to extend
    but to DIMINISH the range of thought, and this purpose was indirectly
    assisted by cutting the choice of words down to a minimum.
  269. sanity
    normal or sound powers of mind
    You would not make the act of submission which is the
    price of sanity.
  270. self-abasement
    voluntary self-punishment in order to atone for some wrongdoing
    In our world
    there will be no emotions except fear, rage, triumph, and self-abasement.
  271. still
    not in physical motion
    He still did not know,
    probably never would know, whether it had been morning or evening when
    they arrested him.
  272. elbow
    hinge joint between the forearm and upper arm and the corresponding joint in the forelimb of a quadruped
    He felt the smash of
    truncheons on his elbows and iron-shod boots on his shins; he saw himself
    grovelling on the floor, screaming for mercy through broken teeth.
  273. unpunished
    not punished
    They could not
    let such an outburst go unpunished.
  274. black-market
    distributed or sold illicitly
    He had told them everything he knew about her, her habits, her
    character, her past life; he had confessed in the most trivial detail
    everything that had happened at their meetings, all that he had said to
    her and she to him, their black-market meal
  275. undesirable
    not wanted
    This was done partly
    by the invention of new words, but chiefly by eliminating undesirable
    words and by stripping such words as remained of unorthodox meanings, and
    so far as possible of all secondary meanings whatever.
  276. grow
    increase in size by natural process
    But the craving for food
    was growing upon him.
  277. hallucination
    illusory perception; a common symptom of severe mental disorder
    There was a certain photograph about which you had a hallucination.
  278. skip over
    bypass
    Some dreadful thing which had lain embedded in the future had
    somehow been skipped over and had not happened.
  279. jerkily
    with jerking motions
    He began walking jerkily up and down, evidently
    unable to keep still.
  280. ugliness
    qualities of appearance that do not give pleasure to the senses
    There will be
    no distinction between beauty and ugliness.
  281. baldly
    in a bald manner
    'I betrayed you,' she said baldly.
  282. inside
    relating to or being on the side closer to the center or within a defined space
    The humming sound and the unvarying white light induced a
    sort of faintness, an empty feeling inside his head.
  283. backbone
    the series of vertebrae forming the axis of the skeleton and protecting the spinal cord
    Although
    the pain had brought the sweat out on his forehead, the worst of all was
    the fear that his backbone was about to snap.
  284. blackness
    total absence of light
    They stood out in his mind
    disconnectedly, like pictures with blackness all round them.
  285. played out
    drained of energy or effectiveness; extremely tired; completely exhausted
    This drama that I have played out with you
    during seven years will be played out over and over again generation after
    generation, always in subtler forms.
  286. opposite
    being directly across from each other; facing
    A bench, or
    shelf, just wide enough to sit on ran round the wall, broken only by the
    door and, at the end opposite the door, a lavatory pan with no wooden
    seat.
  287. participle
    a non-finite form of the verb; in English it is used adjectivally and to form compound tenses
    Thus, in all verbs the preterite and the past
    participle were the same and ended in -ED. The preterite of STEAL was
    STEALED, the preterite of THINK was THINKED, and so on throughout the
    language, all such forms as SWAM, GAVE, BROUGHT, SPOKE, TAKEN,
  288. over again
    anew
    Said it over and over again,
    it seems.
  289. ground level
    the height of the ground on which something stands
    The cells where the guards had beaten him
    were below ground level.
  290. unbearable
    incapable of being put up with
    I must hold out till the
    pain becomes unbearable.
  291. stand up
    rise to one's feet
    At last he stood up,
    waddled clumsily across the cell, dug down into the pocket of his overalls,
    and, with an abashed air, held out a grimy piece of bread to the
    skull-faced man.
  292. reshape
    shape anew or differently
    We convert him, we capture his inner mind, we reshape him.
  293. fallacy
    a misconception resulting from incorrect reasoning
    Had it not been
    exposed long ago as a fallacy?
  294. uncomprehending
    lacking understanding
    Ampleforth marched clumsily out between the guards, his face vaguely
    perturbed, but uncomprehending.
  295. frightening
    causing fear or dread or terror
    It was a frightening pain, because he could not see
    what was happening, and he had the feeling that some mortal injury was
    being done to him.
  296. derange
    derange mentally, throw out of mental balance; make insane
    You are
    mentally deranged.
  297. memory
    the cognitive processes whereby past experience is remembered
    Besides, his memories were not
    continuous.
  298. distinguishing characteristic
    an odd or unusual characteristic
    And it was to be
    foreseen that with the passage of time the distinguishing characteristics
    of Newspeak would become more and more pronounced--its words growing
    fewer and fewer, their meanings more and more rigid, and the chance of
    putting them to i
  299. filthy
    disgustingly dirty; filled or smeared with offensive matter
    Beneath the overalls his body was looped with filthy yellowish
    rags, just recognizable as the remnants of underclothes.
  300. voice
    the sound made by the vibration of vocal folds modified by the resonance of the vocal tract
    'Smith!' yelled a voice from the telescreen. '6079 Smith W.! Hands out of
    pockets in the cells!'
  301. human
    any living or extinct member of the family Hominidae characterized by superior intelligence, articulate speech, and erect carriage
    He confessed that for years he had been in personal touch
    with Goldstein and had been a member of an underground organization which
    had included almost every human being he had ever known.
  302. define
    show the form or outline of
    It struck him at once that she had changed in
    some ill-defined way.
  303. confession
    an admission of misdeeds or faults
    The confession was a formality,
    though the torture was real.
  304. air pressure
    the pressure exerted by the atmosphere
    Possibly there were slight
    differences in the air pressure.
  305. law of nature
    a generalization that describes recurring facts or events in nature
    You must
    get rid of those nineteenth-century ideas about the laws of Nature.
  306. breadcrumb
    crumb of bread; used especially for coating or thickening
    He had an idea that there were a few breadcrumbs in the pocket of his
    overalls.
  307. hand
    the (prehensile) extremity of the superior limb
    He sat as still as he could on the narrow bench, with his hands crossed
    on his knee.
  308. wainscoting
    wooden panels that can be used to line the walls of a room
    Winston whined
    and grizzled, made futile demands for food, fretted about the room pulling
    everything out of place and kicking the wainscoting until the neighbours
    banged on the wall, while the younger child wailed intermittently.
  309. roll down
    gather into a huge mass and roll down a mountain, of snow
    He was rolling down a mighty corridor, a kilometre wide, full of glorious,
    golden light, roaring with laughter and shouting out confessions at the
    top of his voice.
  310. time of day
    clock time
    More often he wondered where he was, and what time
    of day
    it was.
  311. utopia
    ideally perfect state; especially in its social and political and moral aspects
    It is the exact opposite of the stupid hedonistic Utopias that
    the old reformers imagined.
  312. spasm
    a painful and involuntary muscular contraction
    There was another spasm in his
    entrails, the heavy boots were approaching.
  313. reason out
    decide by reasoning; draw or come to a conclusion
    When he did recall it,
    it was only by consciously reasoning out what it must be: it did not come
    of its own accord.
  314. middle distance
    the part of a scene between the foreground and the background
    His eyes had a wide-open, staring look,
    as though he could not prevent himself from gazing at something in the
    middle distance.
  315. over
    beyond the top or upper surface or edge; forward from an upright position
    A young officer, a trim black-uniformed figure who seemed to
    glitter all over with polished leather, and whose pale, straight-featured
    face was like a wax mask, stepped smartly through the doorway.
  316. ooze
    pass gradually or leak through or as if through small openings
    For a moment he lay as though stunned, with dark blood oozing from
    his mouth and nose.
  317. brick in
    wall up with brick
    Sometimes he tried to calculate the number of porcelain bricks in the
    walls of the cell.
  318. round
    having a circular shape
    A bench, or
    shelf, just wide enough to sit on ran round the wall, broken only by the
    door and, at the end opposite the door, a lavatory pan with no wooden
    seat.
  319. thing
    a separate and self-contained entity
    There were moments
    when he foresaw the things that would happen to him with such actuality
    that his heart galloped and his breath stopped.
  320. five
    the cardinal number that is the sum of four and one
    There would be perhaps five
    seconds before the guard could rush into the cell.
  321. ceilinged
    provided with a ceiling especially the overhead interior surface
    He was in a high-ceilinged
    windowless cell with walls of glittering white porcelain.
  322. once and for all
    in a conclusive way
    It was intended that
    when Newspeak had been adopted once and for all and Oldspeak forgotten,
    a heretical thought--that is, a thought diverging from the principles of
    Ingsoc--should be literally unthinkable, at least so far as thought is
    dependent o
  323. draw back
    pull back or move away or backward
    There were times when his nerve
    so forsook him that he began shouting for mercy even before the beating
    began, when the mere sight of a fist drawn back for a blow was enough
    to make him pour forth a confession of real and imaginary crimes.
  324. uncover
    make visible
    'Smith!' yelled the voice from the telescreen. '6079 Smith W.! Uncover your
    face.
  325. Inquisition
    a former tribunal of the Roman Catholic Church (1232-1820) created to discover and suppress heresy
    In
    the Middle Ages there was the Inquisition.
  326. belch
    expel gas from the stomach
    She paused, patted
    her breast, and belched.
  327. unforgivable
    not excusable
    There were times
    when it went on and on until the cruel, wicked, unforgivable thing seemed
    to him not that the guards continued to beat him but that he could not
    force himself into losing consciousness.
  328. kick
    drive or propel with the foot
    An enormous wreck of a woman, aged about sixty, with
    great tumbling breasts and thick coils of white hair which had come down
    in her struggles, was carried in, kicking and shouting, by four guards,
    who had hold of her one at each corner.
  329. dearie
    a special loved one
    'Beg pardon, dearie,' she said.
  330. keep abreast
    keep informed
    She did not actually try to shake him off, but
    walked at just such a speed as to prevent his keeping abreast of her.
  331. imagine
    expect, believe, or suppose
    'And why do you imagine that we bring people to this place?'
  332. hatred
    the emotion of intense dislike; a feeling of dislike so strong that it demands action
    Because of
    its thinness the mouth and eyes looked disproportionately large, and the
    eyes seemed filled with a murderous, unappeasable hatred of somebody or
    something.
  333. translate
    restate (words) from one language into another language
    In some cases they could be translated into
    Oldspeak, or even into words taken from the A vocabulary, but this usually
    demanded a long paraphrase and always involved the loss of certain
    overtones.
  334. entrails
    internal organs collectively (especially those in the abdominal cavity)
    Winston's entrails contracted.
  335. speculatively
    with speculation; in a speculative manner
    O'Brien was looking down at him speculatively.
  336. unendurable
    incapable of being put up with
    But for everyone there is something unendurable--something that cannot be
    contemplated.
  337. affix
    attach to
    In addition, any word--this again applied in principle to every word in
    the language--could be negatived by adding the affix UN-, or could be
    strengthened by the affix PLUS-, or, for still greater emphasis,
    DOUBLEPLUS-.
  338. helpless
    unable to function; without help
    It was strong and fleshy and brutal, it was full of
    intelligence and a sort of controlled passion before which he felt himself
    helpless; but it was tired.
  339. supersede
    take the place or move into the position of
    It was expected that Newspeak would
    have finally superseded Oldspeak (or Standard English, as we should
    call it) by about the year 2050.
  340. slip of paper
    a small sheet of paper
    Unseen, the frail slip of paper was whirling
    away on the current of warm air; it was vanishing in a flash of flame.
  341. utter
    without qualification; used informally as (often pejorative) intensifiers
    He sank his voice, like someone who is obliged for medical reasons to
    utter an obscenity.
  342. forgotten
    not noticed inadvertently
    For the moment he had even forgotten the
    dial.
  343. concept
    an abstract or general idea inferred or derived from specific instances
    It could not be used in its old sense of 'politically
    free' or 'intellectually free' since political and intellectual freedom no
    longer existed even as concepts, and were therefore of necessity nameless.
  344. curable
    curing or healing is possible
    Fortunately it is curable.
  345. stop
    have an end, in a temporal, spatial, or quantitative sense; either spatial or metaphorical
    There were moments
    when he foresaw the things that would happen to him with such actuality
    that his heart galloped and his breath stopped.
  346. vilely
    in a vile manner
    It was vilely
    cold.
  347. clumsily
    in a clumsy manner
    Ampleforth marched clumsily out between the guards, his face vaguely
    perturbed, but uncomprehending.
  348. scalp
    the skin that covers the top of the head
    A forlorn, jailbird's face with a nobby
    forehead running back into a bald scalp, a crooked nose, and
    battered-looking cheekbones above which his eyes were fierce and watchful.
  349. syllable
    a unit of spoken language larger than a phoneme
    The B words were a sort of verbal shorthand, often packing
    whole ranges of ideas into a few syllables, and at the same time more
    accurate and forcible than ordinary language.
  350. survive
    continue in existence after (an adversity, etc.)
    Already we are breaking down
    the habits of thought which have survived from before the Revolution.
  351. force out
    force or drive out
    There
    were other times when he started out with the resolve of confessing
    nothing, when every word had to be forced out of him between gasps of
    pain, and there were times when he feebly tried to compromise, when he
    said to himself: 'I will confess,
  352. revive
    cause to regain consciousness
    She revived, turned to have another look at Winston and seemed immediately
    to take a fancy to him.
  353. eyelid
    either of two folds of skin that can be moved to cover or open the eye
    He
    remembered a surly barber arriving to scrape his chin and crop his hair,
    and businesslike, unsympathetic men in white coats feeling his pulse,
    tapping his reflexes, turning up his eyelids, running harsh fingers over
    him in search for broken bone
  354. consciousness
    an alert cognitive state in which you are aware of yourself and your situation
    There had been times when consciousness, even the sort of
    consciousness that one has in sleep, had stopped dead and started again
    after a blank interval.
  355. sporadically
    in a sporadic manner
    A lovely
    toy--you'll love it'; and then she had gone out in the rain, to a little
    general shop which was still sporadically open nearby, and came back with
    a cardboard box containing an outfit of Snakes and Ladders.
  356. white
    being of the achromatic color of maximum lightness; having little or no hue owing to reflection of almost all incident light
    He was in a high-ceilinged
    windowless cell with walls of glittering white porcelain.
  357. stratosphere
    the atmospheric layer between the troposphere and the mesosphere
    We shall turn you into gas and pour you into the
    stratosphere.
  358. pouch
    a small or medium size container for holding or carrying things
    His fat, mottled cheeks were so pouched at the bottom
    that it was difficult not to believe that he had little stores of food
    tucked away there.
  359. identifiable
    capable of being identified
    'Not even identifiable ashes.
  360. up and down
    moving backward and forward along a given course
    Ampleforth made one or two uncertain movements from side to side, as
    though having some idea that there was another door to go out of, and then
    began to wander up and down the cell.
  361. Leopoldville
    the capital of the Democratic Republic of the Congo on the Congo river opposite Brazzaville
    Brazzaville and Leopoldville were in danger.
  362. collective
    done by or characteristic of individuals acting together
    Not in the individual
    mind, which can make mistakes, and in any case soon perishes: only in the
    mind of the Party, which is collective and immortal.
  363. vomit
    the reflex act of ejecting the contents of the stomach through the mouth
    She leant forward and vomited copiously on the floor.
  364. victory
    a successful ending of a struggle or contest
    Always, at every moment, there will be the thrill of victory,
    the sensation of trampling on an enemy who is helpless.
  365. mastodon
    extinct elephant-like mammal that flourished worldwide from Miocene through Pleistocene times; differ from mammoths in the form of the molar teeth
    'But the rocks are full of the bones of extinct animals--mammoths and
    mastodons and enormous reptiles which lived here long before man was ever
    heard of.'
  366. orthodox
    adhering to what is commonly accepted
    To take a single
    example: the word GOODTHINK, meaning, very roughly, 'orthodoxy', or, if
    one chose to regard it as a verb, 'to think in an orthodox manner'.
  367. then
    at that time
    Then,
    noticing that she was sitting on something uneven, she slid off Winston's
    knees on to the bench.
  368. premonitory
    warning of future misfortune
    A sort of premonitory tremor, a fear of he was not certain what, had
    passed through Winston as soon as he caught his first glimpse of the cage.
  369. past tense
    a verb tense that expresses actions or states in the past
    This
    inflected as follows: noun-verb, GOODTHINK; past tense and past participle,
    GOODTHINKED; present participle, GOOD-THINKING; adjective, GOODTHINKFUL;
    adverb, GOODTHINKWISE; verbal noun, GOODTHINKER.
  370. across the board
    including all
    He picked up the white knight and moved it across the board.
  371. notice
    the act of noticing or paying attention
    He had sat silent against the wall, jostled by dirty
    bodies, too preoccupied by fear and the pain in his belly to take much
    interest in his surroundings, but still noticing the astonishing difference
    in demeanour between the Party prisoners and the
  372. uniformed
    dressed in a uniform
    A young officer, a trim black-uniformed figure who seemed to
    glitter all over with polished leather, and whose pale, straight-featured
    face was like a wax mask, stepped smartly through the doorway.
  373. scream
    utter a sudden loud cry
    He felt the smash of
    truncheons on his elbows and iron-shod boots on his shins; he saw himself
    grovelling on the floor, screaming for mercy through broken teeth.
  374. recuperate
    restore to good health or strength
    Sometimes he was beaten till he could hardly
    stand, then flung like a sack of potatoes on to the stone floor of a cell,
    left to recuperate for a few hours, and then taken out and beaten again.
  375. generalize
    draw from specific cases for more general cases
    In somewhat
    the same way, the party member knew what constituted right conduct, and in
    exceedingly vague, generalized terms he knew what kinds of departure from
    it were possible.
  376. arrest
    take into custody
    He still did not know,
    probably never would know, whether it had been morning or evening when
    they arrested him.
  377. grovel
    show submission or fear
    He felt the smash of
    truncheons on his elbows and iron-shod boots on his shins; he saw himself
    grovelling on the floor, screaming for mercy through broken teeth.
  378. feeling
    a physical sensation that you experience
    He moved himself
    mentally from place to place, and tried to determine by the feeling of his
    body whether he was perched high in the air or buried deep underground.
  379. sunlit
    lighted by sunlight
    He
    was in the Golden Country, or he was sitting among enormous glorious,
    sunlit ruins, with his mother, with Julia, with O'Brien--not doing
    anything, merely sitting in the sun, talking of peaceful things.
  380. defeat
    an unsuccessful ending to a struggle or contest
    Perhaps
    that lunatic dislocation in the mind could really happen: that was the
    thought that defeated him.
  381. recognizable
    easily perceived; easy to become aware of
    Beneath the overalls his body was looped with filthy yellowish
    rags, just recognizable as the remnants of underclothes.
  382. brotherhood
    the kinship relation between a male offspring and the siblings
    The Brotherhood, he
    had said, never tried to save its members.
  383. shorts
    trousers that end at or above the knee
    He was wearing khaki shorts and a sports-shirt.
  384. thigh
    the part of the leg between the hip and the knee
    They wrenched off the boots with
    which she had been trying to kick them, and dumped her down across
    Winston's lap, almost breaking his thigh-bones.
  385. other
    not the same one or ones already mentioned or implied
    On the other hand some of them seemed to be on
    good terms with the guards, called them by nicknames, and tried to wheedle
    cigarettes through the spyhole in the door.
  386. waiter
    a person whose occupation is to serve at table (as in a restaurant)
    Unbidden, a waiter came and
    filled his glass up with Victory Gin, shaking into it a few drops from
    another bottle with a quill through the cork.
  387. self-discipline
    the trait of practicing self discipline
    You are here because you have failed in humility, in
    self-discipline.
  388. somewhere
    in or at or to some place
    His eyes flitted
    round the walls, as though he half expected to find a window somewhere.
  389. ill-defined
    poorly stated or described
    It struck him at once that she had changed in
    some ill-defined way.
  390. homosexuality
    a sexual attraction to (or sexual relations with) persons of the same sex
    There was bribery, favouritism, and racketeering of every kind, there was
    homosexuality and prostitution, there was even illicit alcohol distilled
    from potatoes.
  391. hoped-for
    expected hopefully
    The long-hoped-for
    bullet was entering his brain.
  392. thickened
    made or having become thick
    His features had thickened, the skin on nose and cheekbones was
    coarsely red, even the bald scalp was too deep a pink.
  393. changed
    made or become different in nature or form
    She was about the right age and
    physique, and it was probable that people changed somewhat after twenty
    years in a forced-labour camp.
  394. devastate
    cause extensive destruction or ruin utterly
    At this moment there was a devastating explosion, or what seemed like an
    explosion, though it was not certain whether there was any noise.
  395. give a damn
    show no concern or interest; always used in the negative
    You don't give a damn what they suffer.
  396. chestnut
    any of several attractive deciduous trees yellow-brown in autumn; yield a hard wood and edible nuts in a prickly bur
    Chapter 6



    The Chestnut Tree was almost empty.
  397. need
    have need of
    At the beginning it needed a hard effort not to look at it,
    but presently hunger gave way to thirst.
  398. cling to
    hold firmly, usually with one's hands
    Even now, I am well
    aware, you are clinging to your disease under the impression that it is
    a virtue.
  399. dirty
    soiled or likely to soil with dirt or grime
    They had put him into a cell similar to the one he was now in,
    but filthily dirty and at all times crowded by ten or fifteen people.
  400. internationalism
    quality of being international in scope
    Countless other words such as HONOUR, JUSTICE, MORALITY, INTERNATIONALISM,
    DEMOCRACY, SCIENCE, and RELIGION had simply ceased to exist.
  401. sanctimonious
    excessively or hypocritically pious
    His frog-like face grew calmer, and even took on a slightly
    sanctimonious expression.
  402. bones
    a percussion instrument consisting of a pair of hollow pieces of wood or bone (usually held between the thumb and fingers) that are made to click together (as by Spanish dancers) in rhythm with the dance
    They wrenched off the boots with
    which she had been trying to kick them, and dumped her down across
    Winston's lap, almost breaking his thigh-bones.
  403. familiarize
    make familiar or conversant with
    He ran a hand
    over his face, trying to familiarize himself with the new shape.
  404. disseminate
    cause to become widely known
    He heard himself promising to lie, to steal,
    to forge, to murder, to encourage drug-taking and prostitution, to
    disseminate venereal diseases, to throw vitriol in a child's face.
  405. translation
    a written communication in a second language having the same meaning as the written communication in a first language
    But this is not an adequate translation.
  406. derivation
    the source or origin from which something derives (i.e. comes or issues)
    The words of
    which they were made up could be any parts of speech, and could be placed
    in any order and mutilated in any way which made them easy to pronounce
    while indicating their derivation.
  407. shout down
    silence or overwhelm by shouting
    They yelled insults at the guards,
    fought back fiercely when their belongings were impounded, wrote obscene
    words on the floor, ate smuggled food which they produced from mysterious
    hiding-places in their clothes, and even shouted down the telescre
  408. suddenly
    happening unexpectedly
    Then he suddenly ripped down his
    shorts.
  409. blubber
    an insulating layer of fat under the skin of whales and other large marine mammals; used as a source of oil
    'Thoughtcrime!' said Parsons, almost blubbering.
  410. pronounce
    speak, pronounce, or utter in a certain way
    The words of
    which they were made up could be any parts of speech, and could be placed
    in any order and mutilated in any way which made them easy to pronounce
    while indicating their derivation.
  411. submerge
    put under water
    Suddenly, like a lump of submerged wreckage
    breaking the surface of water, the thought burst into his mind: 'It doesn't
    really happen.
  412. tear apart
    express a totally negative opinion of
    He did not know whether the thing was really happening,
    or whether the effect was electrically produced; but his body was being
    wrenched out of shape, the joints were being slowly torn apart.
  413. eradicate
    destroy completely, as if down to the roots
    It set out
    to eradicate heresy, and ended by perpetuating it.
  414. movement
    a change of position that does not entail a change of location
    If you made unexpected
    movements they yelled at you from the telescreen.
  415. digression
    a turning aside (of your course or attention or concern)
    All this is a
    digression,' he added in a different tone.
  416. certain
    established beyond doubt or question; definitely known
    Presumably he was in the Ministry of Love,
    but there was no way of making certain.
  417. cyst
    a small anatomically normal sac or bladderlike structure (especially one containing fluid)
    And all the while he must keep his hatred
    locked up inside him like a ball of matter which was part of himself and
    yet unconnected with the rest of him, a kind of cyst.
  418. try
    make an effort or attempt
    They yelled insults at the guards,
    fought back fiercely when their belongings were impounded, wrote obscene
    words on the floor, ate smuggled food which they produced from mysterious
    hiding-places in their clothes, and even shouted down the telescreen when
  419. straight off
    without delay or hesitation; with no time intervening
    Just tell me what it is and
    I'll confess straight off.
  420. language
    a systematic means of communicating by the use of sounds or conventional symbols
    Do you realize that there are only
    twelve rhymes to "rod" in the entire language?
  421. immovably
    so as to be incapable of moving
    It was hopeless; every part of him, even his head,
    was held immovably.
  422. dictionary
    a reference book containing an alphabetical list of words with information about them
    He had been appointed to a
    sub-committee of a sub-committee which had sprouted from one of the
    innumerable committees dealing with minor difficulties that arose in the
    compilation of the Eleventh Edition of the Newspeak Dictionary.
  423. same
    same in identity
    His mind sagged round and round on the same trick, like a ball
    falling again and again into the same series of slots.
  424. sentimentally
    in a sentimental manner
    Why,' she
    added sentimentally, 'I might be your mother!'
  425. already
    prior to a specified or implied time
    He had already learned to sit still.
  426. brainy
    having or marked by unusual and impressive intelligence
    Not brainy, of
    course, but keen.
  427. tour de force
    a masterly or brilliant feat
    The leading articles in
    'The Times' were written in it, but this was a TOUR DE FORCE which could
    only be carried out by a specialist.
  428. Moloch
    god of the Canaanites and Phoenicians to whom parents sacrificed their children
    He did not need to
    know that these gods were called Baal, Osiris, Moloch, Ashtaroth, and the
    like: probably the less he knew about them the better for his orthodoxy.
  429. malleable
    capable of being shaped or bent or drawn out
    Men are infinitely
    malleable.
  430. wheedle
    influence or urge by gentle urging, caressing, or flattering
    On the other hand some of them seemed to be on
    good terms with the guards, called them by nicknames, and tried to wheedle
    cigarettes through the spyhole in the door.
  431. irresolutely
    lacking determination or decisiveness
    He followed irresolutely for a little distance, half a pace behind her.
  432. neurologist
    a medical specialist in the nervous system and the disorders affecting it
    Our neurologists are at work upon it now.
  433. texture
    the feel of a surface or a fabric
    It was as though she
    had got into the texture of his skin.
  434. mask
    a covering to disguise or conceal the face
    A young officer, a trim black-uniformed figure who seemed to
    glitter all over with polished leather, and whose pale, straight-featured
    face was like a wax mask, stepped smartly through the doorway.
  435. haggle
    an instance of intense argument (as in bargaining)
    But there were other days when
    they settled down to their work almost eagerly, making a tremendous show
    of entering up their minutes and drafting long memoranda which were never
    finished--when the argument as to what they were supposedly arguing about
    gre
  436. in some manner
    in some unspecified way or manner; or by some unspecified means
    Even the back of his head
    was gripped in some manner.
  437. medley
    a musical composition consisting of a series of songs or other musical pieces from various sources
    An extraordinary medley
    of feeling--but it was not a medley, exactly; rather it was successive
    layers of feeling, in which one could not say which layer was
    undermost--struggled inside him.
  438. grouping
    any number of entities (members) considered as a unit
    All words
    grouping themselves round the concepts of liberty and equality, for
    instance, were contained in the single word CRIMETHINK, while all words
    grouping themselves round the concepts of objectivity and rationalism
    were contained in the single
  439. West African
    of or relating to the countries or cultures or people of West Africa
    The outline of the West African coast stood out vividly in his
    mind.
  440. bring
    take something or somebody with oneself somewhere
    Before being brought
    here he had been taken to another place which must have been an ordinary
    prison or a temporary lock-up used by the patrols.
  441. mental picture
    a clear and telling mental image
    You have a vivid mental picture of the vertebrae snapping apart
    and the spinal fluid dripping out of them.
  442. stop dead
    stop moving or become immobilized
    There had been times when consciousness, even the sort of
    consciousness that one has in sleep, had stopped dead and started again
    after a blank interval.
  443. coat
    a thin layer covering something
    At
    the other side of him stood a man in a white coat, holding a hypodermic
    syringe.
  444. bone
    rigid connective tissue that makes up the skeleton of vertebrates
    They wrenched off the boots with
    which she had been trying to kick them, and dumped her down across
    Winston's lap, almost breaking his thigh-bones.
  445. cardboard
    a stiff moderately thick paper
    A lovely
    toy--you'll love it'; and then she had gone out in the rain, to a little
    general shop which was still sporadically open nearby, and came back with
    a cardboard box containing an outfit of Snakes and Ladders.
  446. spectacles
    optical instrument consisting of a frame that holds a pair of lenses for correcting defective vision
    His questioners now were not ruffians in black uniforms
    but Party intellectuals, little rotund men with quick movements and
    flashing spectacles, who worked on him in relays over periods which
    lasted--he thought, he could not be sure--ten or twelve
  447. disproportionately
    to a disproportionate degree
    Because of
    its thinness the mouth and eyes looked disproportionately large, and the
    eyes seemed filled with a murderous, unappeasable hatred of somebody or
    something.
  448. impound
    place or shut up in a pound
    They yelled insults at the guards,
    fought back fiercely when their belongings were impounded, wrote obscene
    words on the floor, ate smuggled food which they produced from mysterious
    hiding-places in their clothes, and even shouted down the telescre
  449. agonizing
    extremely painful
    He made a desperate, agonizing effort to
    wrench the top half of his body free.
  450. hypodermic
    a piston syringe that is fitted with a hypodermic needle for giving injections
    At
    the other side of him stood a man in a white coat, holding a hypodermic
    syringe.
  451. tooth
    hard bonelike structures in the jaws of vertebrates; used for biting and chewing or for attack and defense
    He felt the smash of
    truncheons on his elbows and iron-shod boots on his shins; he saw himself
    grovelling on the floor, screaming for mercy through broken teeth.
  452. foresee
    realize beforehand
    There were moments
    when he foresaw the things that would happen to him with such actuality
    that his heart galloped and his breath stopped.
  453. self-deception
    a misconception that is favorable to the person who holds it
    He remembered
    remembering contrary things, but those were false memories, products of
    self-deception.
  454. stopped
    (of a nose) blocked
    There were moments
    when he foresaw the things that would happen to him with such actuality
    that his heart galloped and his breath stopped.
  455. invisibility
    the quality of not being perceivable by the eye
    Invisibility,
    levitation--anything.
  456. shallowness
    the quality of lacking physical depth
    From the
    moment when he was inside the Ministry of Love--and yes, even during those
    minutes when he and Julia had stood helpless while the iron voice from the
    telescreen told them what to do--he had grasped the frivolity, the
    shallowness of his att
  457. protrude
    extend out or project in space
    The creature's face seemed to be protruded,
    because of its bent carriage.
  458. plunger
    mechanical device that has a plunging or thrusting motion
    Over to his left Winston saw the
    man in the white coat break an ampoule and draw back the plunger of a
    syringe.
  459. mouth
    the opening through which food is taken in and vocalizations emerge
    Because of
    its thinness the mouth and eyes looked disproportionately large, and the
    eyes seemed filled with a murderous, unappeasable hatred of somebody or
    something.
  460. collaborate
    work together on a common enterprise of project
    That is to say, I collaborated in writing it.
  461. shrink back
    pull away from a source of disgust or fear
    Winston shrank back upon the bed.
  462. equivocation
    intentionally vague or ambiguous
    He
    thought how ten minutes ago--yes, only ten minutes--there had still been
    equivocation in his heart as he wondered whether the news from the front
    would be of victory or defeat.
  463. feebly
    in a faint and feeble manner
    There
    were other times when he started out with the resolve of confessing
    nothing, when every word had to be forced out of him between gasps of
    pain, and there were times when he feebly tried to compromise, when he
    said to himself: 'I will confess,
  464. in any case
    making an additional point; anyway
    Not in the individual
    mind, which can make mistakes, and in any case soon perishes: only in the
    mind of the Party, which is collective and immortal.
  465. switch off
    cause to stop operating by disengaging a switch
    'It is switched
    off
    .
  466. cling
    hold on tightly or tenaciously
    The guards took hold of him to wrench him loose,
    but he clung on with astonishing strength.
  467. bald
    lacking hair on all or most of the scalp
    A forlorn, jailbird's face with a nobby
    forehead running back into a bald scalp, a crooked nose, and
    battered-looking cheekbones above which his eyes were fierce and watchful.
  468. teeth
    the kind and number and arrangement of teeth (collectively) in a person or animal
    He felt the smash of
    truncheons on his elbows and iron-shod boots on his shins; he saw himself
    grovelling on the floor, screaming for mercy through broken teeth.
  469. fidget
    move restlessly
    Ampleforth, too large to sit in comfort on the narrow
    bench, fidgeted from side to side, clasping his lank hands first round one
    knee, then round the other.
  470. censored
    suppressed or subject to censorship
    History had already been rewritten,
    but fragments of the literature of the past survived here and there,
    imperfectly censored, and so long as one retained one's knowledge of
    Oldspeak it was possible to read them.
  471. impossible
    not capable of occurring or being accomplished or dealt with
    'It was impossible
    to change the line.
  472. wall
    an architectural partition with a height and length greater than its thickness; used to divide or enclose an area or to support another structure
    He was in a high-ceilinged
    windowless cell with walls of glittering white porcelain.
  473. self-destruction
    the act of destroying yourself
    It needs an act of self-destruction, an effort of the
    will.
  474. arm guard
    a pad worn by football players and hockey goalkeepers
    He was walking down the white-tiled corridor, with the feeling
    of walking in sunlight, and an armed guard at his back.
  475. humming
    the act of singing with closed lips
    Concealed lamps
    flooded it with cold light, and there was a low, steady humming sound
    which he supposed had something to do with the air supply.
  476. sitting
    the act of assuming or maintaining a seated position
    Then,
    noticing that she was sitting on something uneven, she slid off Winston's
    knees on to the bench.
  477. end
    either extremity of something that has length
    A bench, or
    shelf, just wide enough to sit on ran round the wall, broken only by the
    door and, at the end opposite the door, a lavatory pan with no wooden
    seat.
  478. over and over
    repeatedly
    Said it over and over again,
    it seems.
  479. racketeering
    engaging in a racket
    There was bribery, favouritism, and racketeering of every kind, there was
    homosexuality and prostitution, there was even illicit alcohol distilled
    from potatoes.
  480. take hold of
    take hold of so as to seize or restrain or stop the motion of
    When it grew better, panic took hold of him.
  481. more
    (comparative of `much' used with mass nouns) a quantifier meaning greater in size or amount or extent or degree
    It was more natural to exist
    from moment to moment, accepting another ten minutes' life even with the
    certainty that there was torture at the end of it.
  482. intellectual
    of or associated with or requiring the use of the mind
    A sort of intellectual warmth, the joy
    of the pedant who has found out some useless fact, shone through the dirt
    and scrubby hair.
  483. rhyme
    correspondence in the sounds of two or more lines (especially final sounds)
    The rhyme was "rod".
  484. after hours
    not during regular hours
    When his nerves were in rags after hours of
    questioning, even this appeal could reduce him to snivelling tears.
  485. rounder
    a tool for rounding corners or edges
    He would finger himself here and there,
    trying to make sure that it was not an illusion that his muscles were
    growing rounder and his skin tauter.
  486. world
    the 3rd planet from the sun; the planet we live on
    The skull-faced man had quickly thrust his hands
    behind his back, as though demonstrating to all the world that he refused
    the gift.
  487. waddle
    walk unsteadily
    At last he stood up,
    waddled clumsily across the cell, dug down into the pocket of his overalls,
    and, with an abashed air, held out a grimy piece of bread to the
    skull-faced man.
  488. piece
    a separate part of a whole
    What he longed for above all was a piece of bread.
  489. shoot
    fire a shot
    He paused opposite
    Winston and began eagerly appealing to him: 'You don't think they'll shoot
    me, do you, old chap?
  490. shy away from
    avoid having to deal with some unpleasant task
    His mind, as though shying away from
    something, seemed unable to concentrate.
  491. simultaneously
    at the same instant
    The same thought seemed to occur almost simultaneously to everyone in the
    cell.
  492. sniff
    perceive by inhaling through the nose
    One of them was leaping up and down, the
    other, an old scaly grandfather of the sewers, stood up, with his pink
    hands against the bars, and fiercely sniffed the air.
  493. hold
    have or hold in one's hands or grip
    An enormous wreck of a woman, aged about sixty, with
    great tumbling breasts and thick coils of white hair which had come down
    in her struggles, was carried in, kicking and shouting, by four guards,
    who had hold of her one at each corner.
  494. reality
    the state of being actual or real
    Only the
    disciplined mind can see reality, Winston.
  495. faced
    having a face or facing especially of a specified kind or number; often used in combination
    The cold-faced young officer stepped into the cell.
  496. nazi
    derogatory term for a person who is fanatically dedicated to, or seeks to control, some activity, practice, etc.
    There were the German Nazis
    and the Russian Communists.
  497. twentieth century
    the century from 1901 to 2000
    Later, in the twentieth century, there
    were the totalitarians, as they were called.
  498. fetch up
    finally be or do something
    His body
    was flung across the cell and fetched up against the base of the lavatory
    seat.
  499. generalized
    not biologically differentiated or adapted to a specific function or environment
    In somewhat
    the same way, the party member knew what constituted right conduct, and in
    exceedingly vague, generalized terms he knew what kinds of departure from
    it were possible.
  500. foreknowledge
    knowledge of an event before it occurs
    In this place you could not feel anything,
    except pain and foreknowledge of pain.
  501. though
    (postpositive) however
    Ampleforth made one or two uncertain movements from side to side, as
    though having some idea that there was another door to go out of, and then
    began to wander up and down the cell.
  502. invent
    come up with (an idea, plan, explanation, theory, or principle) after a mental effort
    You invented it, and later you grew to believe in it.
  503. scraggy
    having a sharply uneven surface or outline
    The thin shoulders were
    hunched forward so as to make a cavity of the chest, the scraggy neck
    seemed to be bending double under the weight of the skull.
  504. objectivity
    judgment based on observable phenomena and uninfluenced by emotions or personal prejudices
    All words
    grouping themselves round the concepts of liberty and equality, for
    instance, were contained in the single word CRIMETHINK, while all words
    grouping themselves round the concepts of objectivity and rationalism
    were contained in the single
  505. magnifying glass
    light microscope consisting of a single convex lens that is used to produce an enlarged image
    He knew now that for seven years the Thought Police had watched him
    like a beetle under a magnifying glass.
  506. procreation
    the sexual activity of conceiving and bearing offspring
    Procreation will be an annual
    formality like the renewal of a ration card.
  507. sane
    mentally healthy; free from mental disorder
    You must humble yourself before you can become sane.'
  508. deliberately
    in a deliberate unhurried manner
    Before they exposed their victims to public trial, they
    deliberately set themselves to destroy their dignity.
  509. secondary
    being of second rank or importance or value; not direct or immediate
    This was done partly
    by the invention of new words, but chiefly by eliminating undesirable
    words and by stripping such words as remained of unorthodox meanings, and
    so far as possible of all secondary meanings whatever.
  510. fretted
    having frets
    The wind whistled through the twigs and fretted the occasional,
    dirty-looking crocuses.
  511. convulsive
    affected by involuntary jerky muscular contractions; resembling a spasm
    Winston made another convulsive movement.
  512. mindless
    devoid of intelligence
    He was blind, helpless, mindless.
  513. degradation
    changing to a lower state (a less respected state)
    The dead men had become martyrs and their degradation was forgotten.
  514. walk
    use one's feet to advance; advance by steps
    Parsons
    walked into the cell.
  515. speak
    use language
    No one else had spoken to him.
  516. create
    bring into existence
    As the door opened, the wave
    of air that it created brought in a powerful smell of cold sweat.
  517. pluck at
    pluck or pull at with the fingers
    He plucked at Winston's head and brought away a tuft
    of hair.
  518. question
    a sentence of inquiry that asks for a reply
    But that question was not answerable yet.
  519. come
    move toward, travel toward something or somebody or approach something or somebody
    There was a constant come-and-go of prisoners of every description:
    drug-peddlers, thieves, bandits, black-marketeers, drunks, prostitutes.
  520. must
    a necessary or essential thing
    Before being brought
    here he had been taken to another place which must have been an ordinary
    prison or a temporary lock-up used by the patrols.
  521. uninterested
    not having or showing interest
    'The polITS,' they called them,
    with a sort of uninterested contempt.
  522. stand out
    be highly noticeable
    They stood out in his mind
    disconnectedly, like pictures with blackness all round them.
  523. jostle
    make one's way by jostling, pushing, or shoving
    He had sat silent against the wall, jostled by dirty
    bodies, too preoccupied by fear and the pain in his belly to take much
    interest in his surroundings, but still noticing the astonishing difference
    in demeanour between the Party prisoners and the
  524. stupor
    marginal consciousness
    He remembered them dimly,
    because they were spent chiefly in sleep or stupor.
  525. flooded
    covered with water
    Concealed lamps
    flooded it with cold light, and there was a low, steady humming sound
    which he supposed had something to do with the air supply.
  526. elm tree
    any of various trees of the genus Ulmus: important timber or shade trees
    At the edge of the field were the elm trees, faintly stirring,
    and somewhere beyond that was the stream where the dace lay in the green
    pools under the willows.
  527. another
    any of various alternatives; some other
    Before being brought
    here he had been taken to another place which must have been an ordinary
    prison or a temporary lock-up used by the patrols.
  528. EST
    standard time in the 5th time zone west of Greenwich, reckoned at the 75th meridian; used in the eastern United States
    Comparison of
    adjectives was invariably made by adding -ER, -EST (GOOD, GOODER, GOODEST),
    irregular forms and the MORE, MOST formation being suppressed.
  529. extinct
    no longer in existence; lost or especially having died out leaving no living representatives
    'But the rocks are full of the bones of extinct animals--mammoths and
    mastodons and enormous reptiles which lived here long before man was ever
    heard of.'
  530. amalgam
    a combination or blend of diverse things
    The resulting amalgam was always a
    noun-verb, and inflected according to the ordinary rules.
  531. might
    physical strength
    It might be twenty-four
    hours since he had eaten, it might be thirty-six.
  532. forget
    dismiss from the mind; stop remembering
    For the first time in many years he forgot the
    presence of the telescreen.
  533. unmistakably
    without possibility of mistake
    It was definitely, unmistakably, a shade of green.
  534. perhaps
    by chance
    There would be perhaps five
    seconds before the guard could rush into the cell.
  535. revived
    restored to consciousness or life or vigor
    She revived, turned to have another look at Winston and seemed immediately
    to take a fancy to him.
  536. emptiness
    the state of containing nothing
    As his eyes regained their focus he
    remembered who he was, and where he was, and recognized the face that was
    gazing into his own; but somewhere or other there was a large patch of
    emptiness, as though a piece had been taken out of his brain.
  537. connotation
    an idea that is implied or suggested
    Other words, again, were ambivalent, having the connotation 'good' when
    applied to the Party and 'bad' when applied to its enemies.
  538. retained
    continued in your keeping or use or memory
    Certain
    of our present-day adjectives, such as GOOD, STRONG, BIG, BLACK, SOFT,
    were retained, but their total number was very small.
  539. raise
    move upwards
    I could not help it!' he added
    almost indignantly, raising his face to look at Winston.
  540. disable
    injure permanently
    In the face of pain
    there are no heroes, no heroes, he thought over and over as he writhed
    on the floor, clutching uselessly at his disabled left arm.
  541. nipper
    a grasping structure on the limb of a crustacean or other arthropods
    Pretty smart for a nipper of seven, eh?
  542. disintegrate
    break into parts or components or lose cohesion or unity
    It would disintegrate.
  543. few
    a quantifier that can be used with count nouns and is often preceded by `a'; a small but indefinite number
    He had an idea that there were a few breadcrumbs in the pocket of his
    overalls.
  544. trampling
    the sound of heavy treading or stomping
    A world of fear and treachery and torment, a
    world of trampling and being trampled upon, a world which will grow not
    less but MORE merciless as it refines itself.
  545. stumpy
    short and thick; as e.g. having short legs and heavy musculature
    As the young officer entered and
    stepped aside, there emerged from behind him a short stumpy guard with
    enormous arms and shoulders.
  546. big
    above average in size or number or quantity or magnitude or extent
    '"Down with Big Brother!"
  547. fingernail
    the nail at the end of a finger
    Do you die when you cut your fingernails?'
  548. cringe
    draw back, as with fear or pain
    They wore them down
    by torture and solitude until they were despicable, cringing wretches,
    confessing whatever was put into their mouths, covering themselves with
    abuse, accusing and sheltering behind one another, whimpering for mercy.
  549. smell
    the faculty that enables us to distinguish scents
    It was a noisy, evil-smelling
    place.
  550. testicle
    one of the two male reproductive glands that produce spermatozoa and secrete androgens
    There were times when he rolled about the floor, as shameless
    as an animal, writhing his body this way and that in an endless, hopeless
    effort to dodge the kicks, and simply inviting more and yet more kicks,
    in his ribs, in his belly, on his elbows, on hi
  551. burn out
    melt, break, or become otherwise unusable
    All her rebelliousness, her deceit, her
    folly, her dirty-mindedness--everything has been burned out of her.
  552. difference
    the quality of being unlike or dissimilar
    He had sat silent against the wall, jostled by dirty
    bodies, too preoccupied by fear and the pain in his belly to take much
    interest in his surroundings, but still noticing the astonishing difference
    in demeanour between the Party prisoners and the
  553. prostitution
    offering sexual intercourse for pay
    There was bribery, favouritism, and racketeering of every kind, there was
    homosexuality and prostitution, there was even illicit alcohol distilled
    from potatoes.
  554. humiliated
    subdued or brought low in condition or status
    The heretic, the enemy of society, will always be there, so
    that he can be defeated and humiliated over again.
  555. judgement
    the act of judging or assessing a person or situation or event
    By what external standard could you check
    its judgements?
  556. stand
    be standing; be upright
    At last he stood up,
    waddled clumsily across the cell, dug down into the pocket of his overalls,
    and, with an abashed air, held out a grimy piece of bread to the
    skull-faced man.
  557. astonishing
    so surprisingly impressive as to stun or overwhelm
    He had sat silent against the wall, jostled by dirty
    bodies, too preoccupied by fear and the pain in his belly to take much
    interest in his surroundings, but still noticing the astonishing difference
    in demeanour between the Party prisoners and the
  558. hold up
    be the physical support of; carry the weight of
    O'Brien held up his left hand, its back towards Winston, with the thumb
    hidden and the four fingers extended.
  559. mental attitude
    a complex mental state involving beliefs and feelings and values and dispositions to act in certain ways
    The B vocabulary consisted of words which had been
    deliberately constructed for political purposes: words, that is to say,
    which not only had in every case a political implication, but were intended
    to impose a desirable mental attitude upon the pe
  560. across
    to the opposite side
    They wrenched off the boots with
    which she had been trying to kick them, and dumped her down across
    Winston's lap, almost breaking his thigh-bones.
  561. oblong
    deviating from a square or circle or sphere by being elongated in one direction
    An oblong slip of newspaper had appeared between O'Brien's fingers.
  562. trying
    hard to endure
    They wrenched off the boots with
    which she had been trying to kick them, and dumped her down across
    Winston's lap, almost breaking his thigh-bones.
  563. arithmetical
    relating to or involving arithmetic
    The arithmetical
    problems raised, for instance, by such a statement as 'two and two make
    five' were beyond his intellectual grasp.
  564. slither
    to pass or move unobtrusively or smoothly
    Soon he was wildly excited and shouting with
    laughter as the tiddly-winks climbed hopefully up the ladders and then
    came slithering down the snakes again, almost to the starting-point.
  565. diverging
    tending to move apart in different directions
    It was intended that
    when Newspeak had been adopted once and for all and Oldspeak forgotten,
    a heretical thought--that is, a thought diverging from the principles of
    Ingsoc--should be literally unthinkable, at least so far as thought is
    dependent o
  566. ulcer
    a circumscribed inflammatory and often suppurating lesion on the skin or an internal mucous surface resulting in necrosis of tissue
    Here and there under the dirt there
    were the red scars of wounds, and near the ankle the varicose ulcer was an
    inflamed mass with flakes of skin peeling off it.
  567. diary
    a daily written record of (usually personal) experiences and observations
    'Do you remember,' he went on, 'writing in your diary, "Freedom is the
    freedom to say that two plus two make four"?'
  568. stick out
    extend out or project in space
    He was shoeless; large, dirty toes were
    sticking out of the holes in his socks.
  569. one and only
    eminent beyond or above comparison
    There was one and only one way to save
    himself.
  570. embezzlement
    the fraudulent appropriation of funds or property entrusted to your care but actually owned by someone else
    He confessed to the assassination of eminent Party
    members, the distribution of seditious pamphlets, embezzlement of public
    funds, sale of military secrets, sabotage of every kind.
  571. take pains
    try very hard to do something
    More than ever he had the
    air of a teacher taking pains with a wayward but promising child.
  572. turn
    move around an axis or a center
    She revived, turned to have another look at Winston and seemed immediately
    to take a fancy to him.
  573. sententiously
    in a pithy sententious manner
    'Thoughtcrime is a dreadful thing, old man,'
    he said sententiously.
  574. piece of paper
    paper used for writing or printing
    You pretended that you had seen a piece
    of paper
    which proved them innocent.
  575. espionage
    the systematic use of spies to get military or political secrets
    There was a
    long range of crimes--espionage, sabotage, and the like--to which everyone
    had to confess as a matter of course.
  576. call up
    get or try to get into communication (with someone) by telephone
    The words COMMUNIST INTERNATIONAL, for instance, call up a composite
    picture of universal human brotherhood, red flags, barricades, Karl Marx,
    and the Paris Commune.
  577. Karl Marx
    founder of modern communism; wrote the Communist Manifesto with Engels in 1848; wrote Das Kapital in 1867 (1818-1883)
    The words COMMUNIST INTERNATIONAL, for instance, call up a composite
    picture of universal human brotherhood, red flags, barricades, Karl Marx,
    and the Paris Commune.
  578. plank
    a stout length of sawn timber; made in a wide variety of sizes and used for many purposes
    He remembered a cell
    with a plank bed, a sort of shelf sticking out from the wall, and a tin
    wash-basin, and meals of hot soup and bread and sometimes coffee.
  579. cowardly
    lacking courage; ignobly timid and faint-hearted
    That it sought power because men in the mass were frail,
    cowardly creatures who could not endure liberty or face the truth, and
    must be ruled over and systematically deceived by others who were stronger
    than themselves.
  580. through
    having finished or arrived at completion
    On the other hand some of them seemed to be on
    good terms with the guards, called them by nicknames, and tried to wheedle
    cigarettes through the spyhole in the door.
  581. door
    a swinging or sliding barrier that will close the entrance to a room or building or vehicle
    A bench, or
    shelf, just wide enough to sit on ran round the wall, broken only by the
    door and, at the end opposite the door, a lavatory pan with no wooden
    seat.
  582. and then
    subsequently or soon afterward (often used as sentence connectors)
    Ampleforth made one or two uncertain movements from side to side, as
    though having some idea that there was another door to go out of, and then
    began to wander up and down the cell.
  583. shin
    the front part of the human leg between the knee and the ankle
    He felt the smash of
    truncheons on his elbows and iron-shod boots on his shins; he saw himself
    grovelling on the floor, screaming for mercy through broken teeth.
  584. English language
    an Indo-European language belonging to the West Germanic branch; the official language of Britain and the United States and most of the commonwealth countries
    'Has it ever occurred to you,' he said, 'that the whole history of English
    poetry has been determined by the fact that the English language lacks
    rhymes?'
  585. assemble
    create by putting components or members together
    Even while he saw the black horde racing southward he
    saw another force, mysteriously assembled, suddenly planted in their rear,
    cutting their communications by land and sea.
  586. human beings
    all of the living human inhabitants of the earth
    A thousand times better than Winston he knew what
    the world was really like, in what degradation the mass of human beings
    lived and by what lies and barbarities the Party kept them there.
  587. long
    primarily spatial sense; of relatively great or greater than average spatial extension or extension as specified
    What he longed for above all was a piece of bread.
  588. quick-witted
    mentally nimble and resourceful
    He could
    evade its pangs if he was quick-witted enough: it was chiefly when he
    showed stupidity that O'Brien pulled the lever.
  589. grey
    of an achromatic color of any lightness intermediate between the extremes of white and black
    His pale-grey eyes flitted timorously from face to face
    and turned quickly away again when he caught anyone's eye.
  590. solitary confinement
    confinement of a prisoner in isolation from other prisoners
    They might keep him for years in
    solitary confinement, they might send him to a labour-camp, they might
    release him for a while, as they sometimes did.
  591. formation
    the act of forming or establishing something
    The version in use in 1984, and
    embodied in the Ninth and Tenth Editions of the Newspeak Dictionary, was
    a provisional one, and contained many superfluous words and archaic
    formations which were due to be suppressed later.
  592. normal
    being approximately average or within certain limits in e.g. intelligence and development
    And once--Winston could not remember
    whether it was in drugged sleep, or in normal sleep, or even in a moment
    of wakefulness--a voice murmured in his ear: 'Don't worry, Winston; you
    are in my keeping.
  593. thirty-second
    one part in thirty-two equal parts
    But there had been a moment--he did
    not know how long, thirty seconds, perhaps--of luminous certainty, when
    each new suggestion of O'Brien's had filled up a patch of emptiness and
    become absolute truth, and when two and two could have been three as
  594. noticed
    being perceived or observed
    He had not yet noticed Winston's
    presence.
  595. quack
    the harsh sound of a duck
    This aim was frankly admitted in the Newspeak word
    DUCKSPEAK, meaning 'to quack like a duck'.
  596. for instance
    as an example
    The arithmetical
    problems raised, for instance, by such a statement as 'two and two make
    five' were beyond his intellectual grasp.
  597. demoralization
    depression resulting from an undermining of your morale
    Fragments of triumphant phrases pushed themselves through the din: 'Vast
    strategic manoeuvre--perfect co-ordination--utter rout--half a million
    prisoners--complete demoralization--control of the whole of Africa--bring
    the war within measurable dist
  598. electrically
    by electricity
    He did not know whether the thing was really happening,
    or whether the effect was electrically produced; but his body was being
    wrenched out of shape, the joints were being slowly torn apart.
  599. bullet
    a projectile that is fired from a gun
    Even the victim of the Russian purges could
    carry rebellion locked up in his skull as he walked down the passage
    waiting for the bullet.
  600. orgasm
    the moment of most intense pleasure in sexual intercourse
    We shall abolish the orgasm.
  601. between
    in the interval
    He had sat silent against the wall, jostled by dirty
    bodies, too preoccupied by fear and the pain in his belly to take much
    interest in his surroundings, but still noticing the astonishing difference
    in demeanour between the Party prisoners and the
  602. relinquishing
    the act of giving up and abandoning a struggle or task etc.
    We know that
    no one ever seizes power with the intention of relinquishing it.
  603. covered
    overlaid or spread or topped with or enclosed within something; sometimes used as a combining form
    A scrubby beard covered his face to the cheekbones, giving
    him an air of ruffianism that went oddly with his large weak frame and
    nervous movements.
  604. shrivel
    wither, as with a loss of moisture
    One, a
    woman, was consigned to 'Room 101', and, Winston noticed, seemed to shrivel
    and turn a different colour when she heard the words.
  605. move
    change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically
    He moved himself
    mentally from place to place, and tried to determine by the feeling of his
    body whether he was perched high in the air or buried deep underground.
  606. tear
    separate or cause to separate abruptly
    When his nerves were in rags after hours of
    questioning, even this appeal could reduce him to snivelling tears.
  607. measurable
    capable of being measured
    Fragments of triumphant phrases pushed themselves through the din: 'Vast
    strategic manoeuvre--perfect co-ordination--utter rout--half a million
    prisoners--complete demoralization--control of the whole of Africa--bring
    the war within measurable dist
  608. self-willed
    habitually disposed to disobedience and opposition
    O stubborn, self-willed exile from the loving breast!
  609. outer space
    any location outside the Earth's atmosphere
    He was
    still strapped in the chair, but he had fallen through the floor, through
    the walls of the building, through the earth, through the oceans, through
    the atmosphere, into outer space, into the gulfs between the stars--always
    away, away, away f
  610. euphemism
    an inoffensive or indirect expression that is substituted for one that is considered offensive or too harsh
    A great many were
    euphemisms.
  611. kind
    having or showing a tender and considerate and helpful nature; used especially of persons and their behavior
    But he was also
    hungry, with a gnawing, unwholesome kind of hunger.
  612. materialize
    come into being; become reality
    There was a period of
    blackness and then the cell, or room, in which he now was had gradually
    materialized round him.
  613. diverge
    move or draw apart
    It was intended that
    when Newspeak had been adopted once and for all and Oldspeak forgotten,
    a heretical thought--that is, a thought diverging from the principles of
    Ingsoc--should be literally unthinkable, at least so far as thought is
    dependent o
  614. stink
    smell badly and offensively
    It then turned out that the plug was defective and the cell
    stank abominably for hours afterwards.
  615. definitely
    without question and beyond doubt
    It was definitely, unmistakably, a shade of green.
  616. above all
    above and beyond all other consideration
    What he longed for above all was a piece of bread.
  617. recognize
    perceive to be the same
    It was the place with no darkness: he saw now why O'Brien had seemed to
    recognize the allusion.
  618. a few
    more than one but indefinitely small in number
    He had an idea that there were a few breadcrumbs in the pocket of his
    overalls.
  619. bestride
    get up on the back of
    The colossus that bestrode the world!
  620. free
    able to act at will; not hampered; not under compulsion or restraint
    He took his stand opposite the chinless man,
    and then, at a signal from the officer, let free a frightful blow, with
    all the weight of his body behind it, full in the chinless man's mouth.
  621. snivel
    cry or whine with snuffling
    When his nerves were in rags after hours of
    questioning, even this appeal could reduce him to snivelling tears.
  622. bearable
    capable of being borne though unpleasant
    He would get up
    because the ache in his bones was no longer bearable, and then would sit
    down again almost at once because he was too dizzy to make sure of
    staying on his feet.
  623. squeaking
    having or making a high-pitched sound such as that made by a mouse or a rusty hinge
    A very faint whimpering or squeaking, which seemed
    unconscious, came out of him.
  624. side
    a place within a region identified relative to a center or reference location
    Ampleforth made one or two uncertain movements from side to side, as
    though having some idea that there was another door to go out of, and then
    began to wander up and down the cell.
  625. cold sweat
    the physical condition of concurrent perspiration and chill; associated with fear
    As the door opened, the wave
    of air that it created brought in a powerful smell of cold sweat.
  626. thinness
    relatively small dimension through an object as opposed to its length or width
    Because of
    its thinness the mouth and eyes looked disproportionately large, and the
    eyes seemed filled with a murderous, unappeasable hatred of somebody or
    something.
  627. stupid
    lacking or marked by lack of intellectual acuity
    We are not interested in those stupid crimes that you have
    committed.
  628. can
    airtight sealed metal container for food or drink or paint etc.
    I do not see
    how one can calculate the time.'
  629. hands
    (with `in') guardianship over; in divorce cases it is the right to house and care for and discipline a child
    He sat as still as he could on the narrow bench, with his hands crossed
    on his knee.
  630. two
    the cardinal number that is the sum of one and one or a numeral representing this number
    Only
    once, when two Party members, both women, were pressed close together on
    the bench, he overheard amid the din of voices a few hurriedly-whispered
    words; and in particular a reference to something called 'room one-oh-one',
    which he did not unde
  631. take hold
    have or hold in one's hands or grip
    When it grew better, panic took hold of him.
  632. love
    a strong positive emotion of regard and affection
    Presumably he was in the Ministry of Love,
    but there was no way of making certain.
  633. realize
    be fully aware or cognizant of
    Do you realize that there are only
    twelve rhymes to "rod" in the entire language?
  634. dirt
    the part of the earth's surface consisting of humus and disintegrated rock
    A sort of intellectual warmth, the joy
    of the pedant who has found out some useless fact, shone through the dirt
    and scrubby hair.
  635. wakefulness
    a periodic state during which you are conscious and aware of the world
    And once--Winston could not remember
    whether it was in drugged sleep, or in normal sleep, or even in a moment
    of wakefulness--a voice murmured in his ear: 'Don't worry, Winston; you
    are in my keeping.
  636. beaten
    formed or made thin by hammering
    How many times he had been beaten, how long
    the beatings had continued, he could not remember.
  637. outflank
    get the better of
    Why had it not been possible to outflank them in
    some way?
  638. vitriol
    abusive or venomous language used to express blame or censure or bitter deep-seated ill will
    He heard himself promising to lie, to steal,
    to forge, to murder, to encourage drug-taking and prostitution, to
    disseminate venereal diseases, to throw vitriol in a child's face.
  639. sag
    droop, sink, or settle from or as if from pressure or loss of tautness
    His mind sagged round and round on the same trick, like a ball
    falling again and again into the same series of slots.
  640. inheritor
    a person who is entitled by law or by the terms of a will to inherit the estate of another
    Your kind is extinct; we
    are the inheritors.
  641. smatter
    speak with spotty or superficial knowledge
    Any scientific
    worker or technician could find all the words he needed in the list devoted
    to his own speciality, but he seldom had more than a smattering of the
    words occurring in the other lists.
  642. Central Africa
    a landlocked country in central Africa; formerly under French control; became independent in 1960
    It was not merely a question of
    losing Central Africa: for the first time in the whole war, the territory
    of Oceania itself was menaced.
  643. flattened
    having been flattened
    A terrific painless blow had flattened him out.
  644. smattering
    a slight or superficial understanding of a subject
    Any scientific
    worker or technician could find all the words he needed in the list devoted
    to his own speciality, but he seldom had more than a smattering of the
    words occurring in the other lists.
  645. some
    quantifier; used with either mass nouns or plural count nouns to indicate an unspecified number or quantity
    He did not know how
    long he had been there; some hours at any rate; with no clocks and no
    daylight it was hard to gauge the time.
  646. front
    the side that is forward or prominent
    Winston
    did not look at him again, but the tormented, skull-like face was as
    vivid in his mind as though it had been straight in front of his eyes.
  647. rotund
    spherical in shape
    His questioners now were not ruffians in black uniforms
    but Party intellectuals, little rotund men with quick movements and
    flashing spectacles, who worked on him in relays over periods which
    lasted--he thought, he could not be sure--ten or twelve
  648. peel off
    peel off the outer layer of something
    Here and there under the dirt there
    were the red scars of wounds, and near the ankle the varicose ulcer was an
    inflamed mass with flakes of skin peeling off it.
  649. sexual
    of or relating to or characterized by sexuality
    He confessed that he was a religious believer, an admirer of
    capitalism, and a sexual pervert.
  650. incorrectly
    in an incorrect manner
    A word which was difficult to utter, or was liable
    to be incorrectly heard, was held to be ipso facto a bad word; occasionally
    therefore, for the sake of euphony, extra letters were inserted into a word
    or an archaic formation was retained.
  651. springy
    elastic; rebounds readily
    He could feel the short springy turf under his feet and the gentle sunshine
    on his face.
  652. suppress
    to put down by force or authority
    Some of the drunks were so violent that the other prisoners had to combine
    to suppress them.
  653. filth
    any substance considered disgustingly foul or unpleasant
    A bag of filth.
  654. pointless
    serving no useful purpose; having no excuse for being
    He had made up his mind that he would accompany her as far as the Tube
    station, but suddenly this process of trailing along in the cold seemed
    pointless and unbearable.
  655. all over
    over the entire area
    A young officer, a trim black-uniformed figure who seemed to
    glitter all over with polished leather, and whose pale, straight-featured
    face was like a wax mask, stepped smartly through the doorway.
  656. senile
    mentally or physically infirm with age
    Suppose that we
    quicken the tempo of human life till men are senile at thirty.
  657. rigidly
    in a rigid manner
    It was composed almost entirely of words
    that we already possess words like HIT, RUN, DOG, TREE, SUGAR, HOUSE,
    FIELD--but in comparison with the present-day English vocabulary their
    number was extremely small, while their meanings were far more rigidly
  658. uttered
    communicated in words
    He became simply a mouth that uttered, a hand that
    signed, whatever was demanded of him.
  659. defeated
    people who are defeated
    Perhaps
    that lunatic dislocation in the mind could really happen: that was the
    thought that defeated him.
  660. frantically
    in an uncontrolled manner
    The man looked frantically round at the other prisoners, as though with
    some idea that he could put another victim in his own place.
  661. make sure
    make a point of doing something; act purposefully and intentionally
    He would get up
    because the ache in his bones was no longer bearable, and then would sit
    down again almost at once because he was too dizzy to make sure of
    staying on his feet.
  662. nonsense
    a message that seems to convey no meaning
    He knew, or he could
    imagine, the arguments which proved his own nonexistence; but they were
    nonsense, they were only a play on words.
  663. half-hearted
    feeling or showing little interest or enthusiasm
    He made a half-hearted attempt to catch up,
    then slowed down, turned, and made off in the opposite direction.
  664. narrowed
    made narrow; limited in breadth
    His large ugly face came nearer, with the eyes a little
    narrowed.
  665. abolish
    do away with
    We shall abolish the orgasm.
  666. overtone
    (usually plural) an ulterior implicit meaning or quality
    In some cases they could be translated into
    Oldspeak, or even into words taken from the A vocabulary, but this usually
    demanded a long paraphrase and always involved the loss of certain
    overtones.
  667. years
    a prolonged period of time
    She was about the right age and
    physique, and it was probable that people changed somewhat after twenty
    years in a forced-labour camp.
  668. behind
    in or to or toward the rear
    The skull-faced man had quickly thrust his hands
    behind his back, as though demonstrating to all the world that he refused
    the gift.
  669. opened
    not sealed or having been unsealed
    The steel door opened with
    a clang.
  670. regretful
    feeling or expressing regret or sorrow or a sense of loss over something done or undone
    'They got me a long time ago,' said O'Brien with a mild, almost regretful
    irony.
  671. carnivorous
    relating to or characteristic of carnivores
    'The rat,' said O'Brien, still addressing his invisible audience,
    'although a rodent, is carnivorous.
  672. nose
    the organ of smell and entrance to the respiratory tract; the prominent part of the face of man or other mammals
    For a moment he lay as though stunned, with dark blood oozing from
    his mouth and nose.
  673. every
    (used of count nouns) each and all of the members of a group considered singly and without exception
    There was bribery, favouritism, and racketeering of every kind, there was
    homosexuality and prostitution, there was even illicit alcohol distilled
    from potatoes.
  674. exactitude
    the quality of being exact
    In Newspeak, euphony outweighed every consideration other than exactitude
    of meaning.
  675. smooth out
    free from obstructions
    Everything was settled, smoothed
    out
    , reconciled.
  676. yellow light
    the signal to proceed with caution
    Everything had exploded into yellow
    light
    .
  677. sinecure
    an office that involves minimal duties
    He even had a job, a sinecure, more
    highly-paid than his old job had been.
  678. panic
    an overwhelming feeling of fear and anxiety
    When it grew better, panic took hold of him.
  679. haggling
    an instance of intense argument (as in bargaining)
    But there were other days when
    they settled down to their work almost eagerly, making a tremendous show
    of entering up their minutes and drafting long memoranda which were never
    finished--when the argument as to what they were supposedly arguing about
    gre
  680. pudgy
    short and plump
    Each time he straightened his pudgy knees it was
    apparent that they were trembling.
  681. place
    a point located with respect to surface features of some region
    Before being brought
    here he had been taken to another place which must have been an ordinary
    prison or a temporary lock-up used by the patrols.
  682. clove
    moderate sized very symmetrical red-flowered evergreen widely cultivated in the tropics for its flower buds which are source of cloves
    It was saccharine flavoured
    with cloves, the speciality of the cafe.
  683. before
    at or in the front
    Before being brought
    here he had been taken to another place which must have been an ordinary
    prison or a temporary lock-up used by the patrols.
  684. break
    destroy the integrity of; usually by force; cause to separate into pieces or fragments
    A bench, or
    shelf, just wide enough to sit on ran round the wall, broken only by the
    door and, at the end opposite the door, a lavatory pan with no wooden
    seat.
  685. nag
    bother persistently with trivial complaints
    In the
    end the nagging voices broke him down more completely than the boots and
    fists of the guards.
  686. mouthful
    the quantity that can be held in the mouth
    The stuff grew not less but more
    horrible with every mouthful he drank.
  687. pour forth
    pour out in drops or small quantities or as if in drops or small quantities
    There were times when his nerve
    so forsook him that he began shouting for mercy even before the beating
    began, when the mere sight of a fist drawn back for a blow was enough
    to make him pour forth a confession of real and imaginary crimes.
  688. cheering
    encouragement in the form of cheers from spectators
    Already an
    excited voice was gabbling from the telescreen, but even as it started
    it was almost drowned by a roar of cheering from outside.
  689. settle down
    become settled or established and stable in one's residence or life style
    He put the white knight back in its place, but for the
    moment he could not settle down to serious study of the chess problem.
  690. porcelain
    ceramic ware made of a more or less translucent ceramic
    He was in a high-ceilinged
    windowless cell with walls of glittering white porcelain.
  691. do it
    have sexual intercourse with
    Nor, in the
    circumstances, did it strike him as very important or interesting.
  692. once
    on one occasion
    Only
    once, when two Party members, both women, were pressed close together on
    the bench, he overheard amid the din of voices a few hurriedly-whispered
    words; and in particular a reference to something called 'room one-oh-one',
    which he did not unde
  693. session
    a meeting for execution of a group's functions
    Sometimes he would weep half a dozen times in a
    single session.
  694. difficult
    not easy; requiring great physical or mental effort to accomplish or comprehend or endure
    Twenty minutes, an hour--it was difficult to judge.
  695. growing
    relating to or suitable for growth
    But the craving for food
    was growing upon him.
  696. ingrained
    (used especially of ideas or principles) deeply rooted; firmly fixed or held
    Except for his hands and a circle of his face, his body was grey all
    over with ancient, ingrained dirt.
  697. identity
    the individual characteristics by which a thing or person is recognized or known
    It was
    a photograph, and there was no question of its identity.
  698. technical
    of or relating to technique or proficiency in a practical skill
    In the C vocabulary, which consisted of scientific
    and technical words, it might be necessary to give specialized names to
    certain sexual aberrations, but the ordinary citizen had no need of them.
  699. black
    being of the achromatic color of maximum darkness; having little or no hue owing to absorption of almost all incident light
    There was a constant come-and-go of prisoners of every description:
    drug-peddlers, thieves, bandits, black-marketeers, drunks, prostitutes.
  700. wear down
    exhaust or get tired through overuse or great strain or stress
    I saw them gradually worn down,
    whimpering, grovelling, weeping--and in the end it was not with pain or
    fear, only with penitence.
  701. made
    produced by a manufacturing process
    If you made unexpected
    movements they yelled at you from the telescreen.
  702. open
    affording free passage or access
    The steel door opened with
    a clang.
  703. thumb
    the thick short innermost digit of the forelimb
    O'Brien held up his left hand, its back towards Winston, with the thumb
    hidden and the four fingers extended.
  704. uselessly
    in a useless manner
    In the face of pain
    there are no heroes, no heroes, he thought over and over as he writhed
    on the floor, clutching uselessly at his disabled left arm.
  705. abominably
    in an offensive and hateful manner
    It then turned out that the plug was defective and the cell
    stank abominably for hours afterwards.
  706. why
    the cause or intention underlying an action or situation, especially in the phrase `the whys and wherefores'
    Why,' she
    added sentimentally, 'I might be your mother!'
  707. Inquisitor
    an official of the ecclesiastical court of the Inquisition
    Naturally all the glory belonged to the victim and all the shame
    to the Inquisitor who burned him.
  708. sunlight
    the rays of the sun
    He walked easily,
    with a joy of movement and with a feeling of walking in sunlight.
  709. suffix
    an affix that is added at the end of the word
    Adjectives were formed by
    adding the suffix -FUL to the noun-verb, and adverbs by adding -WISE.
  710. die
    pass from physical life and lose all bodily attributes and functions necessary to sustain life
    The man was dying of starvation.
  711. cover
    provide with a covering or cause to be covered
    A scrubby beard covered his face to the cheekbones, giving
    him an air of ruffianism that went oddly with his large weak frame and
    nervous movements.
  712. now
    at the present moment
    They had put him into a cell similar to the one he was now in,
    but filthily dirty and at all times crowded by ten or fifteen people.
  713. principle
    a basic generalization that is accepted as true and that can be used as a basis for reasoning or conduct
    There is something in the
    universe--I don't know, some spirit, some principle--that you will never
    overcome.'
  714. cheek
    either side of the face below the eyes
    His fat, mottled cheeks were so pouched at the bottom
    that it was difficult not to believe that he had little stores of food
    tucked away there.
  715. felt
    a fabric made of compressed matted animal fibers
    He felt the smash of
    truncheons on his elbows and iron-shod boots on his shins; he saw himself
    grovelling on the floor, screaming for mercy through broken teeth.
  716. sweat
    salty fluid secreted by sweat glands
    As the door opened, the wave
    of air that it created brought in a powerful smell of cold sweat.
  717. momentary
    lasting for a markedly brief time
    The door opened, and another prisoner was brought in whose appearance sent
    a momentary chill through Winston.
  718. tuck away
    eat up; usually refers to a considerable quantity of food
    His fat, mottled cheeks were so pouched at the bottom
    that it was difficult not to believe that he had little stores of food
    tucked away there.
  719. exaltation
    the elevation of a person (as to the status of a god)
    Moreover it
    was filled with a sort of exaltation, a lunatic intensity.
  720. speech
    (language) communication by word of mouth
    In the year 1984
    there was not as yet anyone who used Newspeak as his sole means of
    communication, either in speech or writing.
  721. tearing
    marked by extreme intensity of emotions or convictions; inclined to react violently; fervid
    Power is in tearing
    human minds to pieces and putting them together again in new shapes of
    your own choosing.
  722. weeping
    the process of shedding tears (usually accompanied by sobs or other inarticulate sounds)
    Their real weapon was the merciless questioning
    that went on and on, hour after hour, tripping him up, laying traps for
    him, twisting everything that he said, convicting him at every step of
    lies and self-contradiction until he began weeping as muc
  723. emerge
    come out into view, as from concealment
    As the young officer entered and
    stepped aside, there emerged from behind him a short stumpy guard with
    enormous arms and shoulders.
  724. coarsely
    in coarse pieces
    His features had thickened, the skin on nose and cheekbones was
    coarsely red, even the bald scalp was too deep a pink.
  725. dimly
    with a dim light
    More dimly he thought
    of Julia.
  726. that is to say
    as follows
    That is to say, I collaborated in writing it.
  727. arm
    a human limb; technically the part of the superior limb between the shoulder and the elbow but commonly used to refer to the whole superior limb
    She put a vast arm round his shoulder and drew him
    towards her, breathing beer and vomit into his face.
  728. close together
    located close together
    Only
    once, when two Party members, both women, were pressed close together on
    the bench, he overheard amid the din of voices a few hurriedly-whispered
    words; and in particular a reference to something called 'room one-oh-one',
    which he did not unde
  729. inconceivable
    totally unlikely
    Inconceivable, inconceivable that one blow could cause such pain!
  730. air
    a mixture of gases (especially oxygen) required for breathing; the stuff that the wind consists of
    Concealed lamps
    flooded it with cold light, and there was a low, steady humming sound
    which he supposed had something to do with the air supply.
  731. Tree
    English actor and theatrical producer noted for his lavish productions of Shakespeare (1853-1917)
    Chapter 6



    The Chestnut Tree was almost empty.
  732. momentarily
    for an instant or moment
    'But how can you stop people remembering things?' cried Winston again
    momentarily forgetting the dial.
  733. tear into
    hit violently, as in an attack
    The air tore
    into
    his lungs and issued again in deep groans which even by clenching his
    teeth he could not stop.
  734. merciless
    having or showing no mercy
    Their real weapon was the merciless questioning
    that went on and on, hour after hour, tripping him up, laying traps for
    him, twisting everything that he said, convicting him at every step of
    lies and self-contradiction until he began weeping as muc
  735. hand out
    give to several people
    'Smith!' yelled a voice from the telescreen. '6079 Smith W.! Hands out of
    pockets in the cells!'
  736. being
    the state or fact of existing
    Before being brought
    here he had been taken to another place which must have been an ordinary
    prison or a temporary lock-up used by the patrols.
  737. argument
    a contentious speech act; a dispute where there is strong disagreement
    He knew, or he could
    imagine, the arguments which proved his own nonexistence; but they were
    nonsense, they were only a play on words.
  738. click
    a short light metallic sound
    There was a sharp click.
  739. black hole
    a region of space resulting from the collapse of a star; extremely high gravitational field
    His mouth had swollen into a shapeless cherry-coloured
    mass with a black hole in the middle of it.
  740. sprouted
    (of growing vegetation) having just emerged from the ground
    He had been appointed to a
    sub-committee of a sub-committee which had sprouted from one of the
    innumerable committees dealing with minor difficulties that arose in the
    compilation of the Eleventh Edition of the Newspeak Dictionary.
  741. second
    coming next after the first in position in space or time or degree or magnitude
    There would be perhaps five
    seconds before the guard could rush into the cell.
  742. day
    time for Earth to make a complete rotation on its axis
    More often he wondered where he was, and what time
    of day it was.
  743. forefinger
    the finger next to the thumb
    I can make my thumb and forefinger meet round your bicep.
  744. jerky
    lacking a steady rhythm
    He made a few more jerky movements up and down, several times, casting a
    longing glance at the lavatory pan.
  745. scaly
    having the body covered or partially covered with thin horny plates, as some fish and reptiles
    One of them was leaping up and down, the
    other, an old scaly grandfather of the sewers, stood up, with his pink
    hands against the bars, and fiercely sniffed the air.
  746. improvisation
    a performance given extempore without planning or preparation
    It needed great powers of reasoning and improvisation.
  747. in front
    at or in the front
    Winston
    did not look at him again, but the tormented, skull-like face was as
    vivid in his mind as though it had been straight in front of his eyes.
  748. triumph
    a successful ending of a struggle or contest
    In our world
    there will be no emotions except fear, rage, triumph, and self-abasement.
  749. inviolate
    (of a woman) having the hymen unbroken
    Now he had
    retreated a step further: in the mind he had surrendered, but he had hoped
    to keep the inner heart inviolate.
  750. technician
    someone whose occupation involves training in a specific technical process
    He was a commonplace, mean-looking man
    who might have been an engineer or technician of some kind.
  751. instinctively
    as a matter of instinct
    In
    this place, he knew instinctively, the lights would never be turned out.
  752. disgusting
    highly offensive; arousing aversion or disgust
    Look at that
    disgusting running sore on your leg.
  753. tramp
    travel on foot, especially on a walking expedition
    Soon,
    very soon, perhaps in five minutes, perhaps now, the tramp of boots would
    mean that his own turn had come.
  754. smuggle
    import or export without paying customs duties
    They yelled insults at the guards,
    fought back fiercely when their belongings were impounded, wrote obscene
    words on the floor, ate smuggled food which they produced from mysterious
    hiding-places in their clothes, and even shouted down the telescre
  755. choose
    pick out, select, or choose from a number of alternatives
    Will you please remember, throughout our conversation,
    that I have it in my power to inflict pain on you at any moment and to
    whatever degree I choose?
  756. look at
    look at carefully; study mentally
    She revived, turned to have another look at Winston and seemed immediately
    to take a fancy to him.
  757. immortal
    not subject to death
    Not in the individual
    mind, which can make mistakes, and in any case soon perishes: only in the
    mind of the Party, which is collective and immortal.
  758. light
    (physics) electromagnetic radiation that can produce a visual sensation
    Concealed lamps
    flooded it with cold light, and there was a low, steady humming sound
    which he supposed had something to do with the air supply.
  759. curvature
    the property possessed by the curving of a line or surface
    The curvature of the spine was astonishing.
  760. chiefly
    for the most part
    He remembered them dimly,
    because they were spent chiefly in sleep or stupor.
  761. cutting out
    surgical removal of a body part or tissue
    It was perceived that in thus
    abbreviating a name one narrowed and subtly altered its meaning, by
    cutting out most of the associations that would otherwise cling to it.
  762. fornication
    voluntary sexual intercourse between persons not married to each other
    It covered fornication,
    adultery, homosexuality, and other perversions, and, in addition, normal
    intercourse practised for its own sake.
  763. stool
    a simple seat without a back or arms
    Before he knew what he was doing
    he had collapsed on to a small stool that stood beside the bed and burst
    into tears.
  764. settle on
    become fixed (on)
    His eyes
    settled on the smashed face of the chinless man.
  765. nothing
    in no respect; to no degree
    The Party
    prisoners were always silent and terrified, but the ordinary criminals
    seemed to care nothing for anybody.
  766. glass
    a brittle transparent solid with irregular atomic structure
    He
    moved closer to the glass.
  767. painless
    not causing physical or psychological pain
    A terrific painless blow had flattened him out.
  768. nonexistent
    not having existence or being or actuality
    In Newspeak it was seldom possible to follow a heretical thought further
    than the perception that it WAS heretical: beyond that point the necessary
    words were nonexistent.
  769. walking
    the act of traveling by foot
    He began walking jerkily up and down, evidently
    unable to keep still.
  770. cafe
    a small restaurant where drinks and snacks are sold
    It was saccharine flavoured
    with cloves, the speciality of the cafe.
  771. drenching
    the act of making something completely wet
    He remembered the day
    well, a pelting, drenching day when the water streamed down the window-pane
    and the light indoors was too dull to read by.
  772. nameless
    being or having an unknown or unnamed source
    It could not be used in its old sense of 'politically
    free' or 'intellectually free' since political and intellectual freedom no
    longer existed even as concepts, and were therefore of necessity nameless.
  773. running back
    (football) a back on the offensive team (a fullback or halfback) who tries to advance the ball by carrying it on plays from the line of scrimmage
    A forlorn, jailbird's face with a nobby
    forehead running back into a bald scalp, a crooked nose, and
    battered-looking cheekbones above which his eyes were fierce and watchful.
  774. wantonness
    the trait of lacking restraint or control; reckless freedom from inhibition or worry
    He felt certain that O'Brien was about to twist the dial out of
    sheer wantonness.
  775. unsolved
    not solved
    If we choose to set you free when we
    have finished with you, and if you live to be ninety years old, still you
    will never learn whether the answer to that question is Yes or No. As long
    as you live it will be an unsolved riddle in your mind.'
  776. astonish
    affect with wonder
    He had sat silent against the wall, jostled by dirty
    bodies, too preoccupied by fear and the pain in his belly to take much
    interest in his surroundings, but still noticing the astonishing difference
    in demeanour between the Party prisoners and the
  777. adultery
    extramarital sex that willfully and maliciously interferes with marriage relations
    He had told them everything he knew about her, her habits, her
    character, her past life; he had confessed in the most trivial detail
    everything that had happened at their meetings, all that he had said to
    her and she to him, their black-market meals, thei
  778. immobile
    not capable of movement or of being moved
    O'Brien motioned with his head to the man in the
    white coat, who had stood immobile throughout the proceedings.
  779. hunched
    having the back and shoulders rounded; not erect
    The thin shoulders were
    hunched forward so as to make a cavity of the chest, the scraggy neck
    seemed to be bending double under the weight of the skull.
  780. shout
    utter in a loud voice; talk in a loud voice (usually denoting characteristic manner of speaking)
    They yelled insults at the guards,
    fought back fiercely when their belongings were impounded, wrote obscene
    words on the floor, ate smuggled food which they produced from mysterious
    hiding-places in their clothes, and even shouted down the telescre
  781. ingrain
    produce or try to produce a vivid impression of
    Except for his hands and a circle of his face, his body was grey all
    over with ancient, ingrained dirt.
  782. believe
    accept as true; take to be true
    His fat, mottled cheeks were so pouched at the bottom
    that it was difficult not to believe that he had little stores of food
    tucked away there.
  783. abasement
    depriving one of self-esteem
    In our world
    there will be no emotions except fear, rage, triumph, and self-abasement.
  784. be intimate
    have sexual intercourse with
    In some
    sense that went deeper than friendship, they were intimates: somewhere or
    other, although the actual words might never be spoken, there was a place
    where they could meet and talk.
  785. write down
    put down in writing; of texts, musical compositions, etc.
    It is written down.'
  786. dictatorship
    a form of government in which the ruler is an absolute dictator (not restricted by a constitution or laws or opposition etc.)
    One does not establish a dictatorship in order
    to safeguard a revolution; one makes the revolution in order to establish
    the dictatorship.
  787. needed
    necessary for relief or supply
    At the beginning it needed a hard effort not to look at it,
    but presently hunger gave way to thirst.
  788. aware
    (sometimes followed by `of') having or showing knowledge or understanding or realization or perception
    Even now, I am well
    aware, you are clinging to your disease under the impression that it is
    a virtue.
  789. contained
    gotten under control
    His mind CONTAINED Winston's mind.
  790. Jehovah
    terms referring to the Judeo-Christian God
    He knew Jehovah and the commandments of Jehovah: he knew, therefore, that
    all gods with other names or other attributes were false gods.
  791. brain
    that part of the central nervous system that includes all the higher nervous centers; enclosed within the skull; continuous with the spinal cord
    For days I had racked my
    brains.
  792. unimaginable
    totally unlikely
    There would be many
    crimes and errors which it would be beyond his power to commit, simply
    because they were nameless and therefore unimaginable.
  793. pelting
    anything happening rapidly or in quick successive
    He remembered the day
    well, a pelting, drenching day when the water streamed down the window-pane
    and the light indoors was too dull to read by.
  794. compiler
    a person who compiles information (as for reference purposes)
    The greatest difficulty facing the compilers of the Newspeak
    Dictionary was not to invent new words, but, having invented them, to make
    sure what they meant: to make sure, that is to say, what ranges of words
    they cancelled by their existence.
  795. longer
    for more time
    He would get up
    because the ache in his bones was no longer bearable, and then would sit
    down again almost at once because he was too dizzy to make sure of
    staying on his feet.
  796. on and off
    not regularly
    On and off he had been worrying
    about it all day.
  797. instance
    an item of information that is typical of a class or group
    'I have been able to recall one
    instance--a possible instance.
  798. hideously
    in a hideous manner
    His face looked enormous because of its
    nearness, and hideously ugly because it was seen from below.
  799. extraordinarily
    extremely
    His voice had changed extraordinarily, and his
    face had suddenly become both stern and animated.
  800. disengage
    release from something that holds fast, connects, or entangles
    She made no response whatever to
    the clasp of his arm; she did not even try to disengage herself.
  801. hypocrite
    a person who professes beliefs and opinions that he or she does not hold in order to conceal his or her real feelings or motives
    He is not pretending, thought Winston, he is not a
    hypocrite, he believes every word he says.
  802. start
    take the first step or steps in carrying out an action
    And then I started talking in my
    sleep.
  803. copiously
    in an abundant manner
    She leant forward and vomited copiously on the floor.
  804. begin
    set in motion, cause to start
    Ampleforth made one or two uncertain movements from side to side, as
    though having some idea that there was another door to go out of, and then
    began to wander up and down the cell.
  805. reassuringly
    in a reassuring manner
    O'Brien laid a hand reassuringly, almost kindly, on his.
  806. delude
    be false to; be dishonest with
    When you delude yourself into
    thinking that you see something, you assume that everyone else sees the
    same thing as you.
  807. actually
    in actual fact
    They don't shoot you if you haven't actually done
    anything--only thoughts, which you can't help?
  808. cringing
    totally submissive
    They wore them down
    by torture and solitude until they were despicable, cringing wretches,
    confessing whatever was put into their mouths, covering themselves with
    abuse, accusing and sheltering behind one another, whimpering for mercy.
  809. cracked
    of paint or varnish; having the appearance of alligator hide
    'You can't do that!' he cried out in a high cracked voice.
  810. war
    the waging of armed conflict against an enemy
    At this moment, which power is
    Oceania at war with?'
  811. spraying
    the application of a liquid in the form of small particles ejected from a sprayer
    For the purposes of everyday life it was no doubt necessary, or sometimes
    necessary, to reflect before speaking, but a Party member called upon to
    make a political or ethical judgement should be able to spray forth the
    correct opinions as automatically as
  812. drugged
    under the influence of narcotics
    And once--Winston could not remember
    whether it was in drugged sleep, or in normal sleep, or even in a moment
    of wakefulness--a voice murmured in his ear: 'Don't worry, Winston; you
    are in my keeping.
  813. tried
    tested and proved to be reliable
    They yelled insults at the guards,
    fought back fiercely when their belongings were impounded, wrote obscene
    words on the floor, ate smuggled food which they produced from mysterious
    hiding-places in their clothes, and even shouted down the telescreen when
  814. camouflage
    an outward semblance that misrepresents the true nature of something
    And then
    suddenly, without a word uttered, without a check in his step, without the
    changing of a line in his face--suddenly the camouflage would be down and
    bang! would go the batteries of his hatred.
  815. save
    bring into safety
    The Brotherhood, he
    had said, never tried to save its members.
  816. float
    be afloat either on or below a liquid surface and not sink to the bottom
    Suddenly he floated out of his seat, dived into the eyes, and
    was swallowed up.
  817. shrink
    wither, as with a loss of moisture
    Everything came back to his sick body, which
    shrank trembling from the smallest pain.
  818. empty
    holding or containing nothing
    The humming sound and the unvarying white light induced a
    sort of faintness, an empty feeling inside his head.
  819. questioning
    a request for information
    Their real weapon was the merciless questioning
    that went on and on, hour after hour, tripping him up, laying traps for
    him, twisting everything that he said, convicting him at every step of
    lies and self-contradiction until he began weeping as muc
  820. freedom
    the condition of being free; the power to act or speak or think without externally imposed restraints
    'Do you remember,' he went on, 'writing in your diary, "Freedom is the
    freedom to say that two plus two make four"?'
  821. slightly
    to a small degree or extent
    His frog-like face grew calmer, and even took on a slightly
    sanctimonious expression.
  822. occur
    come to pass
    'Has it ever occurred to you,' he said, 'that the whole history of English
    poetry has been determined by the fact that the English language lacks
    rhymes?'
  823. calculate
    make a mathematical calculation or computation
    Sometimes he tried to calculate the number of porcelain bricks in the
    walls of the cell.
  824. use
    put into service; make work or employ for a particular purpose or for its inherent or natural purpose
    He was not certain that he would
    use the razor blade even if he got the chance.
  825. nostalgic
    unhappy about being away and longing for familiar things or persons
    He had a nostalgic vision
    of his corner table, with the newspaper and the chessboard and the
    ever-flowing gin.
  826. peeling
    loss of bits of outer skin by peeling or shedding or coming off in scales
    Here and there under the dirt there
    were the red scars of wounds, and near the ankle the varicose ulcer was an
    inflamed mass with flakes of skin peeling off it.
  827. contortion
    a tortuous and twisted shape or position
    The
    guard was laughing at his contortions.
  828. flatten
    make flat or flatter
    A terrific painless blow had flattened him out.
  829. cease
    put an end to a state or an activity
    He had ceased to notice whether he was
    crying out or not.
  830. bottle
    a glass or plastic vessel used for storing drinks or other liquids; typically cylindrical without handles and with a narrow neck that can be plugged or capped
    Unbidden, a waiter came and
    filled his glass up with Victory Gin, shaking into it a few drops from
    another bottle with a quill through the cork.
  831. predestined
    established or prearranged unalterably
    Nothing had changed except
    your own attitude: the predestined thing happened in any case.
  832. mysteriously
    in a cryptic manner
    More prisoners came and went, mysteriously.
  833. year
    the period of time that it takes for a planet (as, e.g., Earth or Mars) to make a complete revolution around the sun
    She was about the right age and
    physique, and it was probable that people changed somewhat after twenty
    years in a forced-labour camp.
  834. prick up
    raise
    Even the waiters had started and
    pricked up their ears.
  835. seam
    joint consisting of a line formed by joining two pieces
    The cheeks were seamed, the mouth had a drawn-in look.
  836. inalienable
    incapable of being repudiated or transferred to another
    Take for example the well-known
    passage from the Declaration of Independence:


    WE HOLD THESE TRUTHS TO BE SELF-EVIDENT, THAT ALL MEN ARE CREATED EQUAL,
    THAT THEY ARE ENDOWED BY THEIR CREATOR WITH CERTAIN INALIENABLE RIGHTS,
    THAT AMONG THESE ARE LI
  837. ten
    the cardinal number that is the sum of nine and one; the base of the decimal system
    They had put him into a cell similar to the one he was now in,
    but filthily dirty and at all times crowded by ten or fifteen people.
  838. precede
    be earlier in time; go back further
    In the preceding quarter,
    it appeared, the Tenth Three-Year Plan's quota for bootlaces had been
    overfulfilled by 98 per cent.
  839. conceivable
    capable of being imagined
    It was even
    conceivable that Ampleforth was the bearer of the razor blade.
  840. loosened
    straightened out
    The bonds that had held his
    body down were loosened.
  841. nearer
    (comparative of `near' or `close') within a shorter distance
    His large ugly face came nearer, with the eyes a little
    narrowed.
  842. true
    consistent with fact or reality; not false
    Besides, in a sense it was all
    true.
  843. contain
    contain or hold; have within
    His mind CONTAINED Winston's mind.
  844. times
    a more or less definite period of time now or previously present
    They had put him into a cell similar to the one he was now in,
    but filthily dirty and at all times crowded by ten or fifteen people.
  845. strap
    an elongated leather strip (or a strip of similar material) for binding things together or holding something in position
    He was strapped into a chair surrounded by dials, under dazzling lights.
  846. treachery
    an act of deliberate betrayal
    You believed that three men, three one-time Party members named
    Jones, Aaronson, and Rutherford--men who were executed for treachery and
    sabotage after making the fullest possible confession--were not guilty of
    the crimes they were charged with.
  847. pick up
    take and lift upward
    O'Brien picked up the cage and brought it across to the nearer table.
  848. first
    preceding all others in time or space or degree
    Ampleforth, too large to sit in comfort on the narrow
    bench, fidgeted from side to side, clasping his lank hands first round one
    knee, then round the other.
  849. strong point
    an asset of special worth or utility
    'I told you, Winston,' he said, 'that metaphysics is not your strong
    point
    .
  850. care
    the work of providing treatment for or attending to someone or something
    The Party
    prisoners were always silent and terrified, but the ordinary criminals
    seemed to care nothing for anybody.
  851. the like
    a similar kind
    There was a
    long range of crimes--espionage, sabotage, and the like--to which everyone
    had to confess as a matter of course.
  852. way
    how something is done or how it happens
    Presumably he was in the Ministry of Love,
    but there was no way of making certain.
  853. human face
    the front of the human head from the forehead to the chin and ear to ear
    If you want a
    picture of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a human face--for ever.'
  854. purpose
    what something is used for
    He had
    understood it all, weighed it all, and it made no difference: all was
    justified by the ultimate purpose.
  855. outwards
    toward the outside
    Fixed to the front of it was something that looked
    like a fencing mask, with the concave side outwards.
  856. deriving
    (historical linguistics) an explanation of the historical origins of a word or phrase
    THAT TO SECURE THESE RIGHTS, GOVERNMENTS ARE INSTITUTED AMONG MEN,
    DERIVING THEIR POWERS FROM THE CONSENT OF THE GOVERNED.
  857. groin
    the crease at the junction of the inner part of the thigh with the trunk together with the adjacent region and often including the external genitals
    There were times when he rolled about the floor, as shameless
    as an animal, writhing his body this way and that in an endless, hopeless
    effort to dodge the kicks, and simply inviting more and yet more kicks,
    in his ribs, in his belly, on his elbows, on hi
  858. teacup
    a cup from which tea is drunk
    When he woke, seldom before eleven hundred, with gummed-up eyelids and
    fiery mouth and a back that seemed to be broken, it would have been
    impossible even to rise from the horizontal if it had not been for the
    bottle and teacup placed beside the be
  859. dislocation
    an event that results in a displacement or discontinuity
    Perhaps
    that lunatic dislocation in the mind could really happen: that was the
    thought that defeated him.
  860. political prisoner
    someone who is imprisoned because of their political views
    The
    majority of them were common criminals, but there were a few political
    prisoners
    among them.
  861. well-defined
    accurately stated or described
    The word COMINTERN, on the other hand, suggests
    merely a tightly-knit organization and a well-defined body of doctrine.
  862. single
    existing alone or consisting of one entity or part or aspect or individual
    Sometimes he would weep half a dozen times in a
    single session.
  863. slogan
    a favorite saying of a sect or political group
    'There is a Party slogan dealing with the control of the past,' he said.
  864. plural
    grammatical number category referring to two or more items or units
    All plurals were made by adding -S or -ES as the case might be.
  865. grammar
    the branch of linguistics that deals with syntax and morphology (and sometimes also deals with semantics)
    The grammar of Newspeak had two outstanding peculiarities.
  866. bread
    food made from dough of flour or meal and usually raised with yeast or baking powder and then baked
    What he longed for above all was a piece of bread.
  867. unreservedly
    without reservation
    Immediately--unreservedly.
  868. cold
    having a low or inadequate temperature or feeling a sensation of coldness or having been made cold by e.g. ice or refrigeration
    Concealed lamps
    flooded it with cold light, and there was a low, steady humming sound
    which he supposed had something to do with the air supply.
  869. thoughtfully
    in a thoughtful manner
    He resettled his spectacles
    thoughtfully, and took a pace or two up and down.
  870. unequal to
    not meeting requirements
    Do you suppose our mathematicians
    are unequal to that?
  871. saliva
    a clear liquid secreted into the mouth by the salivary glands and mucous glands of the mouth; moistens the mouth and starts the digestion of starches
    Amid a stream of blood and saliva, the two
    halves of a dental plate fell out of his mouth.
  872. venereal disease
    a communicable infection transmitted by sexual intercourse or genital contact
    He heard himself promising to lie, to steal,
    to forge, to murder, to encourage drug-taking and prostitution, to
    disseminate venereal diseases, to throw vitriol in a child's face.
  873. deceive
    cause someone to believe an untruth
    'Don't deceive yourself.
  874. case
    an occurrence of something
    Not in the individual
    mind, which can make mistakes, and in any case soon perishes: only in the
    mind of the Party, which is collective and immortal.
  875. expression
    the communication (in speech or writing) of your beliefs or opinions
    The expression on his face changed.
  876. such
    of so extreme a degree or extent
    There were moments
    when he foresaw the things that would happen to him with such actuality
    that his heart galloped and his breath stopped.
  877. disprove
    prove to be false
    He had never seen the photograph that disproved
    their guilt.
  878. beyond a doubt
    in a manner or to a degree that could not be doubted
    Finally it was established beyond a
    doubt
    that he was growing fatter; his thighs were now definitely thicker
    than his knees.
  879. bad
    having undesirable or negative qualities
    The
    dull pain in his belly never went away, but sometimes it grew better and
    sometimes worse, and his thoughts expanded or contracted accordingly.
  880. torpid
    in a condition of biological rest or suspended animation
    Even when he was awake he was
    completely torpid.
  881. shorthand
    a method of writing rapidly
    The B words were a sort of verbal shorthand, often packing
    whole ranges of ideas into a few syllables, and at the same time more
    accurate and forcible than ordinary language.
  882. also
    in addition
    But he was also
    hungry, with a gnawing, unwholesome kind of hunger.
  883. rationalism
    the doctrine that reason is the right basis for regulating conduct
    All words
    grouping themselves round the concepts of liberty and equality, for
    instance, were contained in the single word CRIMETHINK, while all words
    grouping themselves round the concepts of objectivity and rationalism
    were contained in the single
  884. bludgeon
    a club used as a weapon
    Whatever he said, the swift answer
    crushed him like a bludgeon.
  885. so-and-so
    a person who is deemed to be despicable or contemptible
    And then you say, "Don't do it
    to me, do it to somebody else, do it to so-and-so."
  886. reassurance
    the act of reassuring; restoring someone's confidence
    As though for reassurance he
    looked up at the imperturbable face in the portrait.
  887. seize
    take hold of; grab
    They pretended, perhaps
    they even believed, that they had seized power unwillingly and for a
    limited time, and that just round the corner there lay a paradise where
    human beings would be free and equal.
  888. grown
    (of animals) fully developed
    His voice had grown almost dreamy.
  889. underwater
    beneath the surface of the water
    He had the impression of swimming up into this room from some quite
    different world, a sort of underwater world far beneath it.
  890. waxen
    made of or covered with wax
    Behind him were the waxen-faced
    officer and the black-uniformed guards.
  891. about
    (of quantities) imprecise but fairly close to correct
    There was much talk about the forced-labour camps to which
    most of the prisoners expected to be sent.
  892. underground
    beneath the surface of the earth
    He moved himself
    mentally from place to place, and tried to determine by the feeling of his
    body whether he was perched high in the air or buried deep underground.
  893. submission
    the act of submitting; usually surrendering power to another
    You would not make the act of submission which is the
    price of sanity.
  894. remembering
    the cognitive processes whereby past experience is remembered
    And if so, then already he would have
    forgotten his denial of remembering it, and forgotten the act of
    forgetting.
  895. broken
    physically and forcibly separated into pieces or cracked or split
    A bench, or
    shelf, just wide enough to sit on ran round the wall, broken only by the
    door and, at the end opposite the door, a lavatory pan with no wooden
    seat.
  896. fifteen
    the cardinal number that is the sum of fourteen and one
    They had put him into a cell similar to the one he was now in,
    but filthily dirty and at all times crowded by ten or fifteen people.
  897. over and over again
    repeatedly
    Said it over and over again,
    it seems.
  898. hear
    perceive (sound) via the auditory sense
    I know they give you a fair
    hearing.
  899. wrenching
    causing great physical or mental suffering
    He made a violent effort to raise
    himself into a sitting position, and merely succeeded in wrenching his
    body painfully.
  900. dice
    a small cube with 1 to 6 spots on the six faces; used in gambling to generate random numbers
    He saw a candle-lit room with a
    vast white-counterpaned bed, and himself, a boy of nine or ten, sitting on
    the floor, shaking a dice-box, and laughing excitedly.
  901. silent
    marked by absence of sound
    He had sat silent against the wall, jostled by dirty
    bodies, too preoccupied by fear and the pain in his belly to take much
    interest in his surroundings, but still noticing the astonishing difference
    in demeanour between the Party prisoners and the
  902. roar
    make a loud noise, as of animal
    There was a furious, deafening roar from the telescreen.
  903. Africa
    the second largest continent; located to the south of Europe and bordered to the west by the South Atlantic and to the east by the Indian Ocean
    It was not merely a question of
    losing Central Africa: for the first time in the whole war, the territory
    of Oceania itself was menaced.
  904. faintness
    the quality of being dim or lacking contrast
    The humming sound and the unvarying white light induced a
    sort of faintness, an empty feeling inside his head.
  905. reduce
    make smaller
    When his nerves were in rags after hours of
    questioning, even this appeal could reduce him to snivelling tears.
  906. regularity
    the quality of being characterized by a fixed principle or rate
    The second distinguishing mark of Newspeak grammar was its regularity.
  907. lay
    put into a certain place or abstract location
    For a moment he lay as though stunned, with dark blood oozing from
    his mouth and nose.
  908. stupidity
    a poor ability to understand or to profit from experience
    He could
    evade its pangs if he was quick-witted enough: it was chiefly when he
    showed stupidity that O'Brien pulled the lever.
  909. minutes
    a written account of what transpired at a meeting
    It was more natural to exist
    from moment to moment, accepting another ten minutes' life even with the
    certainty that there was torture at the end of it.
  910. whole
    all of something including all its component elements or parts
    'Has it ever occurred to you,' he said, 'that the whole history of English
    poetry has been determined by the fact that the English language lacks
    rhymes?'
  911. roaring
    very lively and profitable
    He was rolling down a mighty corridor, a kilometre wide, full of glorious,
    golden light, roaring with laughter and shouting out confessions at the
    top of his voice.
  912. suppressed
    held in check with difficulty
    The version in use in 1984, and
    embodied in the Ninth and Tenth Editions of the Newspeak Dictionary, was
    a provisional one, and contained many superfluous words and archaic
    formations which were due to be suppressed later.
  913. meal
    any of the occasions for eating food that occur by custom or habit at more or less fixed times
    He remembered a cell
    with a plank bed, a sort of shelf sticking out from the wall, and a tin
    wash-basin, and meals of hot soup and bread and sometimes coffee.
  914. defective
    having a defect
    It then turned out that the plug was defective and the cell
    stank abominably for hours afterwards.
  915. devise
    a will disposing of real property
    The Principles of Newspeak



    Newspeak was the official language of Oceania and had been devised to meet
    the ideological needs of Ingsoc, or English Socialism.
  916. saw
    hand tool having a toothed blade for cutting
    He felt the smash of
    truncheons on his elbows and iron-shod boots on his shins; he saw himself
    grovelling on the floor, screaming for mercy through broken teeth.
  917. call
    utter a sudden loud cry
    On the other hand some of them seemed to be on
    good terms with the guards, called them by nicknames, and tried to wheedle
    cigarettes through the spyhole in the door.
  918. Baal
    any of numerous local fertility and nature deities worshipped by ancient Semitic peoples; the Hebrews considered Baal a false god
    He did not need to
    know that these gods were called Baal, Osiris, Moloch, Ashtaroth, and the
    like: probably the less he knew about them the better for his orthodoxy.
  919. one-time
    belonging to some prior time
    You believed that three men, three one-time Party members named
    Jones, Aaronson, and Rutherford--men who were executed for treachery and
    sabotage after making the fullest possible confession--were not guilty of
    the crimes they were charged with.
  920. formality
    a requirement of etiquette or custom
    The confession was a formality,
    though the torture was real.
  921. leafless
    having no leaves
    Presently they
    were in among a clump of ragged leafless shrubs, useless either for
    concealment or as protection from the wind.
  922. falling
    coming down freely under the influence of gravity
    His mind sagged round and round on the same trick, like a ball
    falling again and again into the same series of slots.
  923. presuppose
    take for granted or as a given; suppose beforehand
    It presupposed that somewhere
    or other, outside oneself, there was a 'real' world where 'real' things
    happened.
  924. refine
    reduce to a fine, unmixed, or pure state; separate from extraneous matter or cleanse from impurities
    A world of fear and treachery and torment, a
    world of trampling and being trampled upon, a world which will grow not
    less but MORE merciless as it refines itself.
  925. instant
    a very short time (as the time it takes the eye to blink or the heart to beat)
    For only an instant it was before
    his eyes, then it was out of sight again.
  926. communist
    relating to or marked by communism
    There were the German Nazis
    and the Russian Communists.
  927. head
    the upper part of the human body or the front part of the body in animals; contains the face and brains
    His troubled eyes were gazing at the wall about a metre above
    the level of Winston's head.
  928. different
    unlike in nature or quality or form or degree
    One, a
    woman, was consigned to 'Room 101', and, Winston noticed, seemed to shrivel
    and turn a different colour when she heard the words.
  929. concave
    curving inward
    Fixed to the front of it was something that looked
    like a fencing mask, with the concave side outwards.
  930. speck
    a very small spot
    'But the world itself is only a speck of dust.
  931. drench
    cover with liquid; pour liquid onto
    He was in the middle of a great empty plain, a flat desert drenched with
    sunlight, across which all sounds came to him out of immense distances.
  932. external
    happening or arising or located outside or beyond some limits or especially surface
    You believe that reality is
    something objective, external, existing in its own right.
  933. comma
    a punctuation mark (,) used to indicate the separation of elements within the grammatical structure of a sentence
    It was
    something to do with the question of whether commas should be placed
    inside brackets, or outside.
  934. irrespective
    in spite of everything; without regard to drawbacks
    Only a very few words were common to
    all lists, and there was no vocabulary expressing the function of Science
    as a habit of mind, or a method of thought, irrespective of its particular
    branches.
  935. replace
    put something back where it belongs
    Even the speck of whitish dust on the cover of his
    diary they had carefully replaced.
  936. officer
    someone who is appointed or elected to an office and who holds a position of trust
    A young officer, a trim black-uniformed figure who seemed to
    glitter all over with polished leather, and whose pale, straight-featured
    face was like a wax mask, stepped smartly through the doorway.
  937. political
    involving or characteristic of politics or parties or politicians
    The
    majority of them were common criminals, but there were a few political
    prisoners among them.
  938. southward
    toward the south
    A Eurasian army (Oceania was at war with Eurasia:
    Oceania had always been at war with Eurasia) was moving southward at
    terrifying speed.
  939. tremble
    move or jerk quickly and involuntarily up and down or sideways
    Everything came back to his sick body, which
    shrank trembling from the smallest pain.
  940. dream
    a series of mental images and emotions occurring during sleep
    He
    was not sure whether it was O'Brien's voice; but it was the same voice
    that had said to him, 'We shall meet in the place where there is no
    darkness,' in that other dream, seven years ago.
  941. thirty
    the cardinal number that is the product of ten and three
    It might be twenty-four
    hours since he had eaten, it might be thirty-six.
  942. twinge
    a sudden sharp feeling
    A twinge of pain shot through Winston's jaw.
  943. punishable
    liable to or deserving punishment
    There was no need to enumerate
    them separately, since they were all equally culpable, and, in principle,
    all punishable by death.
  944. thicken
    make thick or thicker
    His features had thickened, the skin on nose and cheekbones was
    coarsely red, even the bald scalp was too deep a pink.
  945. vertically
    in a vertical direction
    The movement of the armies was a diagram: a
    black arrow tearing vertically southward, and a white arrow horizontally
    eastward, across the tail of the first.
  946. cry out
    utter aloud; often with surprise, horror, or joy
    If you tell me any lies, or attempt to
    prevaricate in any way, or even fall below your usual level of
    intelligence, you will cry out with pain, instantly.
  947. held
    occupied or in the control of; often used in combination
    The blade would bite
    into him with a sort of burning coldness, and even the fingers that held
    it would be cut to the bone.
  948. deranged
    driven insane
    You are
    mentally deranged.
  949. jeering
    showing your contempt by derision
    A
    cracked and jeering note, a yellow note, came into it.
  950. surroundings
    the area in which something exists or lives
    He had sat silent against the wall, jostled by dirty
    bodies, too preoccupied by fear and the pain in his belly to take much
    interest in his surroundings, but still noticing the astonishing difference
    in demeanour between the Party prisoners and the
  951. gain ground
    obtain advantages, such as points, etc.
    Meanwhile it gained ground steadily, all
    Party members tending to use Newspeak words and grammatical constructions
    more and more in their everyday speech.
  952. learner
    someone (especially a child) who learns (as from a teacher) or takes up knowledge or beliefs
    'You are a slow learner, Winston,' said O'Brien gently.
  953. hardly
    almost not
    He
    hardly thought of Julia.
  954. tiny
    very small
    And man is tiny--helpless!
  955. here
    in or at this place; where the speaker or writer is
    Before being brought
    here he had been taken to another place which must have been an ordinary
    prison or a temporary lock-up used by the patrols.
  956. shut
    move so that an opening or passage is obstructed; make shut
    The door clanged shut again.
  957. embodied
    possessing or existing in bodily form
    The version in use in 1984, and
    embodied in the Ninth and Tenth Editions of the Newspeak Dictionary, was
    a provisional one, and contained many superfluous words and archaic
    formations which were due to be suppressed later.
  958. fading
    weakening in force or intensity
    Sometimes with a fading hope he thought of
    O'Brien and the razor blade.
  959. stiffen
    make stiff or stiffer
    It was that her waist had grown thicker, and, in a
    surprising way, had stiffened.
  960. spine
    the series of vertebrae forming the axis of the skeleton and protecting the spinal cord
    There were times when he rolled about the floor, as shameless
    as an animal, writhing his body this way and that in an endless, hopeless
    effort to dodge the kicks, and simply inviting more and yet more kicks,
    in his ribs, in his belly, on his elbows, on hi
  961. unsympathetic
    lacking in sympathy and kindness
    He
    remembered a surly barber arriving to scrape his chin and crop his hair,
    and businesslike, unsympathetic men in white coats feeling his pulse,
    tapping his reflexes, turning up his eyelids, running harsh fingers over
    him in search for broken bone
  962. sulkily
    in a sulky manner
    Winston looked at the thing sulkily and
    without interest.
  963. think of
    devise or invent
    He
    hardly thought of Julia.
  964. looking
    appearing to be as specified; usually used as combining forms
    He was a commonplace, mean-looking man
    who might have been an engineer or technician of some kind.
  965. train of thought
    the connections that link the various parts of an event or argument together
    There was no physical act, no word
    spoken aloud, that they had not noticed, no train of thought that they had
    not been able to infer.
  966. red flag
    a flag that serves as a warning signal
    The words COMMUNIST INTERNATIONAL, for instance, call up a composite
    picture of universal human brotherhood, red flags, barricades, Karl Marx,
    and the Paris Commune.
  967. interval
    the distance between things
    There had been times when consciousness, even the sort of
    consciousness that one has in sleep, had stopped dead and started again
    after a blank interval.
  968. twenty-first
    coming next after the twentieth in position
    These translations were
    a slow and difficult business, and it was not expected that they would
    be finished before the first or second decade of the twenty-first
    century.
  969. lock up
    secure by locking
    Even the victim of the Russian purges could
    carry rebellion locked up in his skull as he walked down the passage
    waiting for the bullet.
  970. flat
    having a surface without slope, tilt in which no part is higher or lower than another
    He was almost flat on his back, and unable to move.
  971. reverie
    an abstracted state of absorption
    Often he would lie from one meal to the next almost
    without stirring, sometimes asleep, sometimes waking into vague reveries
    in which it was too much trouble to open his eyes.
  972. flare up
    ignite quickly and suddenly, especially after having died down
    A violent emotion, not fear exactly but a sort of undifferentiated
    excitement, flared up in him, then faded again.
  973. fight back
    defend oneself
    They yelled insults at the guards,
    fought back fiercely when their belongings were impounded, wrote obscene
    words on the floor, ate smuggled food which they produced from mysterious
    hiding-places in their clothes, and even shouted down the telescre
  974. sleep
    a natural and periodic state of rest during which consciousness of the world is suspended
    In my sleep!
  975. think about
    have on one's mind, think about actively
    'I had hardly thought about it.
  976. laughter
    the activity of laughing; the manifestation of joy or mirth or scorn
    He was rolling down a mighty corridor, a kilometre wide, full of glorious,
    golden light, roaring with laughter and shouting out confessions at the
    top of his voice.
  977. cancelled
    (of events) no longer planned or scheduled
    The greatest difficulty facing the compilers of the Newspeak
    Dictionary was not to invent new words, but, having invented them, to make
    sure what they meant: to make sure, that is to say, what ranges of words
    they cancelled by their existence.
  978. ordinary
    lacking special distinction, rank, or status; commonly encountered
    Before being brought
    here he had been taken to another place which must have been an ordinary
    prison or a temporary lock-up used by the patrols.
  979. mix up
    assemble without order or sense
    The cloves and saccharine, themselves disgusting
    enough in their sickly way, could not disguise the flat oily smell; and
    what was worst of all was that the smell of gin, which dwelt with him
    night and day, was inextricably mixed up in his mind with
  980. inimical
    not friendly
    Ideas
    inimical to Ingsoc could only be entertained in a vague wordless form,
    and could only be named in very broad terms which lumped together and
    condemned whole groups of heresies without defining them in doing so.
  981. easy
    posing no difficulty; requiring little effort
    It should have been easy, but he always lost count at
    some point or another.
  982. shoulder
    a ball-and-socket joint between the head of the humerus and a cavity of the scapula
    She put a vast arm round his shoulder and drew him
    towards her, breathing beer and vomit into his face.
  983. larynx
    a cartilaginous structure at the top of the trachea; contains elastic vocal cords that are the source of the vocal tone in speech
    Ultimately it was hoped to
    make articulate speech issue from the larynx without involving the higher
    brain centres at all.
  984. irregular
    (of a surface or shape); not level or flat or symmetrical
    At irregular
    intervals they presented him with a dirty slip of paper which they said
    was the bill, but he had the impression that they always undercharged him.
  985. idea
    the content of cognition; the main thing you are thinking about
    He had an idea that there were a few breadcrumbs in the pocket of his
    overalls.
  986. escape from
    get rid of
    And
    even if we chose to let you live out the natural term of your life, still
    you would never escape from us.
  987. horde
    a vast multitude
    Even while he saw the black horde racing southward he
    saw another force, mysteriously assembled, suddenly planted in their rear,
    cutting their communications by land and sea.
  988. despotism
    dominance through threat of punishment and violence
    The command of the old despotisms was "Thou shalt not".
  989. may
    thorny Eurasian shrub of small tree having dense clusters of white to scarlet flowers followed by deep red berries; established as an escape in eastern North America
    It might be twenty-four
    hours since he had eaten, it might be thirty-six.
  990. mottled
    having spots or patches of color
    His fat, mottled cheeks were so pouched at the bottom
    that it was difficult not to believe that he had little stores of food
    tucked away there.
  991. involuntary
    not subject to the control of the will
    'It is involuntary.
  992. sit down
    take a seat
    'To tell you the truth--' He sat down awkwardly on the bench opposite
    Winston.
  993. simply
    in a simple manner; without extravagance or embellishment
    There were times when he rolled about the floor, as shameless
    as an animal, writhing his body this way and that in an endless, hopeless
    effort to dodge the kicks, and simply inviting more and yet more kicks,
    in his ribs, in his belly, on his elbows
  994. narrow
    not wide
    He sat as still as he could on the narrow bench, with his hands crossed
    on his knee.
  995. somehow
    in some unspecified way or manner; or by some unspecified means
    Some dreadful thing which had lain embedded in the future had
    somehow been skipped over and had not happened.
  996. sit in
    attend as a visitor
    Ampleforth, too large to sit in comfort on the narrow
    bench, fidgeted from side to side, clasping his lank hands first round one
    knee, then round the other.
  997. actuality
    the state of actually existing objectively
    There were moments
    when he foresaw the things that would happen to him with such actuality
    that his heart galloped and his breath stopped.
  998. literature
    published writings in a particular style on a particular subject
    There will be no art, no literature, no science.
  999. shrivelled
    (used especially of vegetation) having lost all moisture
    His mind shrivelled as he thought of the unanswerable, mad arguments with
    which O'Brien would demolish him.
  1000. criminal
    someone who has committed a crime or has been legally convicted of a crime
    The
    majority of them were common criminals, but there were a few political
    prisoners among them.
  1001. a little
    to a small degree; somewhat
    Winston roused himself a little from his lethargy.
  1002. beat
    hit repeatedly
    How many times he had been beaten, how long
    the beatings had continued, he could not remember.
  1003. persecution
    the act of persecuting (especially on the basis of race or religion)
    You have read of the religious persecutions of the past.
  1004. tiled
    covered or furnished with tiles
    He was walking down the white-tiled corridor, with the feeling
    of walking in sunlight, and an armed guard at his back.
  1005. man and wife
    two people who are married to each other
    He knew what was meant by GOODSEX--that is to say, normal intercourse
    between man and wife, for the sole purpose of begetting children, and
    without physical pleasure on the part of the woman: all else was SEXCRIME.
  1006. bang
    the swift release of a store of affective force
    And then
    suddenly, without a word uttered, without a check in his step, without the
    changing of a line in his face--suddenly the camouflage would be down and
    bang! would go the batteries of his hatred.
  1007. unmistakable
    clearly revealed to the mind or the senses or judgment
    You believed that you had seen
    unmistakable documentary evidence proving that their confessions were
    false.
  1008. whatever
    one or some or every or all without specification
    He became simply a mouth that uttered, a hand that
    signed, whatever was demanded of him.
  1009. mates
    a pair of people who live together
    White always
    mates, he thought with a sort of cloudy mysticism.
  1010. surrender
    relinquish possession or control over
    When finally
    you surrender to us, it must be of your own free will.
  1011. passage
    the act of passing from one state or place to the next
    Even the victim of the Russian purges could
    carry rebellion locked up in his skull as he walked down the passage
    waiting for the bullet.
  1012. construct
    make by combining materials and parts
    Its vocabulary was so constructed as to give exact and
    often very subtle expression to every meaning that a Party member could
    properly wish to express, while excluding all other meanings and also the
    possibility of arriving at them by indirect met
  1013. rag
    a small piece of cloth or paper
    When his nerves were in rags after hours of
    questioning, even this appeal could reduce him to snivelling tears.
  1014. running
    the act of running; traveling on foot at a fast pace
    He
    remembered a surly barber arriving to scrape his chin and crop his hair,
    and businesslike, unsympathetic men in white coats feeling his pulse,
    tapping his reflexes, turning up his eyelids, running harsh fingers over
    him in search for broken bone
  1015. kicking
    the act of delivering a blow with the foot
    An enormous wreck of a woman, aged about sixty, with
    great tumbling breasts and thick coils of white hair which had come down
    in her struggles, was carried in, kicking and shouting, by four guards,
    who had hold of her one at each corner.
  1016. aberration
    a state or condition markedly different from the norm
    In the C vocabulary, which consisted of scientific
    and technical words, it might be necessary to give specialized names to
    certain sexual aberrations, but the ordinary citizen had no need of them.
  1017. utilitarian
    having a useful function
    There were also large quantities of merely utilitarian
    literature--indispensable technical manuals, and the like--that had to
    be treated in the same way.
  1018. get
    come into the possession of something concrete or abstract
    Get it up while it's fresh on your stomach, like.'
  1019. terrify
    fill with terror; frighten greatly
    The Party
    prisoners were always silent and terrified, but the ordinary criminals
    seemed to care nothing for anybody.
  1020. culpable
    deserving blame or censure as being wrong or evil or injurious
    There was no need to enumerate
    them separately, since they were all equally culpable, and, in principle,
    all punishable by death.
  1021. slide
    move smoothly along a surface
    Then,
    noticing that she was sitting on something uneven, she slid off Winston's
    knees on to the bench.
  1022. off
    from a particular thing or place or position (`forth' is obsolete)
    They wrenched off the boots with
    which she had been trying to kick them, and dumped her down across
    Winston's lap, almost breaking his thigh-bones.
  1023. shamble
    walk by dragging one's feet
    The
    poet Ampleforth shambled into the cell.
  1024. sentence
    a string of words satisfying the grammatical rules of a language
    Sentence me to twenty-five
    years.
  1025. trickery
    the use of tricks to deceive someone (usually to extract money from them)
    How could one be sure that it was simple trickery?
  1026. wire
    ligament made of metal and used to fasten things or make cages or fences etc
    A guard came in, carrying something made of wire,
    a box or basket of some kind.
  1027. in practice
    in practical applications
    In practice it was not difficult for
    any person well grounded in DOUBLETHINK to avoid doing this, but within
    a couple of generations even the possibility of such a lapse would have
    vanished.
  1028. moustache
    an unshaved growth of hair on the upper lip
    The enormous face
    (because of constantly seeing it on posters he always thought of it as
    being a metre wide), with its heavy black moustache and the eyes that
    followed you to and fro, seemed to float into his mind of its own accord.
  1029. process
    a particular course of action intended to achieve a result
    The whole process seemed to stretch out over a
    long, indefinite time--weeks, possibly--and the intervals between the
    sessions might sometimes have been days, sometimes only an hour or two.
  1030. false
    not in accordance with the fact or reality or actuality
    You believed that you had seen
    unmistakable documentary evidence proving that their confessions were
    false.
  1031. continue
    keep or maintain in unaltered condition; cause to remain or last
    How many times he had been beaten, how long
    the beatings had continued, he could not remember.
  1032. clasp
    hold firmly and tightly
    Ampleforth, too large to sit in comfort on the narrow
    bench, fidgeted from side to side, clasping his lank hands first round one
    knee, then round the other.
  1033. memoranda
    a written proposal or reminder
    But there were other days when
    they settled down to their work almost eagerly, making a tremendous show
    of entering up their minutes and drafting long memoranda which were never
    finished--when the argument as to what they were supposedly arguing ab
  1034. table
    a piece of furniture having a smooth flat top that is usually supported by one or more vertical legs
    All he noticed was that there were two small tables
    straight in front of him, each covered with green baize.
  1035. abstruse
    difficult to penetrate; incomprehensible to one of ordinary understanding or knowledge
    But there were other days when
    they settled down to their work almost eagerly, making a tremendous show
    of entering up their minutes and drafting long memoranda which were never
    finished--when the argument as to what they were supposedly arguing about
    gre
  1036. keyhole
    the hole where a key is inserted
    'She listened at the keyhole.
  1037. Sooner
    a native or resident of Oklahoma
    Sooner or later they will
    see you for what you are, and then they will tear you to pieces.'
  1038. kind of
    to some (great or small) extent
    But he was also
    hungry, with a gnawing, unwholesome kind of hunger.
  1039. unanswerable
    impossible to answer
    His mind shrivelled as he thought of the unanswerable, mad arguments with
    which O'Brien would demolish him.
  1040. heavy
    of comparatively great physical weight or density
    There was another spasm in his
    entrails, the heavy boots were approaching.
  1041. screw up
    make a mess of, destroy or ruin
    Behind his screwed-up eyelids a
    forest of fingers seemed to be moving in a sort of dance, weaving in and
    out, disappearing behind one another and reappearing again.
  1042. pedant
    a person who pays more attention to formal rules and book learning than they merit
    A sort of intellectual warmth, the joy
    of the pedant who has found out some useless fact, shone through the dirt
    and scrubby hair.
  1043. fragment
    a piece broken off or cut off of something else
    And then--no,
    it was not relief, only hope, a tiny fragment of hope.
  1044. drafting
    the craft of drawing blueprints
    But there were other days when
    they settled down to their work almost eagerly, making a tremendous show
    of entering up their minutes and drafting long memoranda which were never
    finished--when the argument as to what they were supposedly arguing ab
  1045. obey
    be obedient to
    The chinless man obeyed.
  1046. taken
    understood in a certain way; made sense of
    Before being brought
    here he had been taken to another place which must have been an ordinary
    prison or a temporary lock-up used by the patrols.
  1047. vertebra
    one of the bony segments of the spinal column
    You have a vivid mental picture of the vertebrae snapping apart
    and the spinal fluid dripping out of them.
  1048. ache
    a dull persistent (usually moderately intense) pain
    There was a dull aching in his belly.
  1049. sound
    mechanical vibrations transmitted by an elastic medium
    Concealed lamps
    flooded it with cold light, and there was a low, steady humming sound
    which he supposed had something to do with the air supply.
  1050. matter
    that which has mass and occupies space
    Suddenly he realized what was the matter.
  1051. spectacle
    something or someone seen (especially a notable or unusual sight)
    His questioners now were not ruffians in black uniforms
    but Party intellectuals, little rotund men with quick movements and
    flashing spectacles, who worked on him in relays over periods which
    lasted--he thought, he could not be sure--ten or twelve
  1052. mirror
    polished surface that forms images by reflecting light
    As he slid
    them to the ground he saw that there was a three-sided mirror at the far
    end of the room.
  1053. turned
    moved around an axis or center
    She revived, turned to have another look at Winston and seemed immediately
    to take a fancy to him.
  1054. wide-open
    open wide
    His eyes had a wide-open, staring look,
    as though he could not prevent himself from gazing at something in the
    middle distance.
  1055. member
    anything that belongs to a set or class
    Only
    once, when two Party members, both women, were pressed close together on
    the bench, he overheard amid the din of voices a few hurriedly-whispered
    words; and in particular a reference to something called 'room one-oh-one',
    which he did not unde
  1056. drug
    a substance that is used as a medicine or narcotic
    There was a constant come-and-go of prisoners of every description:
    drug-peddlers, thieves, bandits, black-marketeers, drunks, prostitutes.
  1057. unconnected
    not joined or linked together
    And all the while he must keep his hatred
    locked up inside him like a ball of matter which was part of himself and
    yet unconnected with the rest of him, a kind of cyst.
  1058. draw in
    pull inward or towards a center
    Winston drew in his breath.
  1059. vague
    lacking clarity or distinctness
    He had told them everything he knew about her, her habits, her
    character, her past life; he had confessed in the most trivial detail
    everything that had happened at their meetings, all that he had said to
    her and she to him, their black-market meals, thei
  1060. whitish
    resembling milk in color not clear
    Even the speck of whitish dust on the cover of his
    diary they had carefully replaced.
  1061. old
    (used especially of persons) having lived for a relatively long time or attained a specific age
    He paused opposite
    Winston and began eagerly appealing to him: 'You don't think they'll shoot
    me, do you, old chap?
  1062. violent
    acting with or marked by or resulting from great force or energy or emotional intensity
    Some of the drunks were so violent that the other prisoners had to combine
    to suppress them.
  1063. verbal
    of or relating to or formed from words in general
    The B words were a sort of verbal shorthand, often packing
    whole ranges of ideas into a few syllables, and at the same time more
    accurate and forcible than ordinary language.
  1064. squeeze
    press firmly
    We shall squeeze you empty, and then we shall fill you with ourselves.'
  1065. long time
    a prolonged period of time
    What seemed like a long time passed.
  1066. set
    put into a certain place or abstract location
    He had set up a wordless
    howling, like an animal.
  1067. self
    your consciousness of your own identity
    This time Winston was startled into self-forgetfulness.
  1068. promptly
    with little or no delay
    It was another copy of the photograph of Jones, Aaronson, and
    Rutherford at the party function in New York, which he had chanced upon
    eleven years ago and promptly destroyed.
  1069. very
    being the exact same one; not any other:
    Nor, in the
    circumstances, did it strike him as very important or interesting.
  1070. intelligible
    capable of being apprehended or understood
    Newspeak was founded on the English language as we now know it, though
    many Newspeak sentences, even when not containing newly-created words,
    would be barely intelligible to an English-speaker of our own day.
  1071. tinkle
    make or emit a high sound
    The tinkling music struck up
    again.
  1072. blow
    be in motion due to some air or water current
    He took his stand opposite the chinless man,
    and then, at a signal from the officer, let free a frightful blow, with
    all the weight of his body behind it, full in the chinless man's mouth.
  1073. hidden
    not accessible to view
    O'Brien held up his left hand, its back towards Winston, with the thumb
    hidden and the four fingers extended.
  1074. rigidity
    the physical property of being stiff and resisting bending
    He remembered how once, after the explosion
    of a rocket bomb, he had helped to drag a corpse out of some ruins, and
    had been astonished not only by the incredible weight of the thing, but by
    its rigidity and awkwardness to handle, which made it see
  1075. businesslike
    exhibiting methodical and systematic characteristics that would be useful in business
    He
    remembered a surly barber arriving to scrape his chin and crop his hair,
    and businesslike, unsympathetic men in white coats feeling his pulse,
    tapping his reflexes, turning up his eyelids, running harsh fingers over
    him in search for broken bone
  1076. push
    move with force, "He pushed the table into a corner"
    Winston was aware of
    some heavy piece of apparatus being pushed into place behind his head.
  1077. colossus
    someone or something that is abnormally large and powerful
    The colossus that bestrode the world!
  1078. obscenity
    the trait of behaving in an obscene manner
    He sank his voice, like someone who is obliged for medical reasons to
    utter an obscenity.
  1079. overt
    open and observable; not secret or hidden
    The Party is not interested in the overt act: the thought is
    all we care about.
  1080. invariably
    without variation or change, in every case
    Comparison of
    adjectives was invariably made by adding -ER, -EST (GOOD, GOODER, GOODEST),
    irregular forms and the MORE, MOST formation being suppressed.
  1081. eleventh
    position 11 in a countable series of things
    He had been appointed to a
    sub-committee of a sub-committee which had sprouted from one of the
    innumerable committees dealing with minor difficulties that arose in the
    compilation of the Eleventh Edition of the Newspeak Dictionary.
  1082. never again
    at no time hereafter
    Never again will you be
    capable of ordinary human feeling.
  1083. for the moment
    temporarily
    For the moment he had even forgotten the
    dial.
  1084. disquieting
    causing mental discomfort
    The news from the African
    front was disquieting in the extreme.
  1085. intelligent
    having the capacity for thought and reason especially to a high degree
    At sight of the heavy, lined face, so ugly and so intelligent, his heart
    seemed to turn over.
  1086. breast
    either of two soft fleshy milk-secreting glandular organs on the chest of a woman
    An enormous wreck of a woman, aged about sixty, with
    great tumbling breasts and thick coils of white hair which had come down
    in her struggles, was carried in, kicking and shouting, by four guards,
    who had hold of her one at each corner.
  1087. cry
    shed tears because of sadness, rage, or pain
    'Of course I'm guilty!' cried Parsons with a servile glance at the
    telescreen.
  1088. deep down
    in reality
    This place was many metres underground,
    as deep down as it was possible to go.
  1089. defined
    showing clearly the outline or profile or boundary
    It struck him at once that she had changed in
    some ill-defined way.
  1090. colour
    a visual attribute of things that results from the light they emit or transmit or reflect
    One, a
    woman, was consigned to 'Room 101', and, Winston noticed, seemed to shrivel
    and turn a different colour when she heard the words.
  1091. run
    move fast by using one's feet, with one foot off the ground at any given time
    A bench, or
    shelf, just wide enough to sit on ran round the wall, broken only by the
    door and, at the end opposite the door, a lavatory pan with no wooden
    seat.
  1092. fewer
    (comparative of `few' used with count nouns) quantifier meaning a smaller number of
    In the same way,
    the associations called up by a word like MINITRUE are fewer and more
    controllable than those called up by MINISTRY OF TRUTH.
  1093. twentieth
    position 20 in a countable series of things
    Later, in the twentieth century, there
    were the totalitarians, as they were called.
  1094. bash
    hit hard
    'You didn't
    hear what he was saying after they bashed his face.
  1095. reasoning
    thinking that is coherent and logical
    They slapped his face, wrung
    his ears, pulled his hair, made him stand on one leg, refused him leave to
    urinate, shone glaring lights in his face until his eyes ran with water;
    but the aim of this was simply to humiliate him and destroy his power of
    argui
  1096. fill
    make full, also in a metaphorical sense
    Because of
    its thinness the mouth and eyes looked disproportionately large, and the
    eyes seemed filled with a murderous, unappeasable hatred of somebody or
    something.
  1097. lank
    long and thin and often limp
    Ampleforth, too large to sit in comfort on the narrow
    bench, fidgeted from side to side, clasping his lank hands first round one
    knee, then round the other.
  1098. here and there
    in or to various places; first this place and then that
    The man in
    the white coat bent down and looked closely into Winston's eyes, felt his
    pulse, laid an ear against his chest, tapped here and there, then he
    nodded to O'Brien.
  1099. right
    free from error; especially conforming to fact or truth
    It was 'all right' in the
    camps, he gathered, so long as you had good contacts and knew the ropes.
  1100. retention
    the act of retaining something
    No etymological principle was followed
    here: in some cases it was the original noun that was chosen for retention,
    in other cases the verb.
  1101. necessary
    absolutely essential
    Stupidity was as necessary as intelligence, and as difficult to
    attain.
  1102. explosion
    the act of exploding or bursting
    At this moment there was a devastating explosion, or what seemed like an
    explosion, though it was not certain whether there was any noise.
  1103. decadence
    the state of being degenerate in mental or moral qualities
    And in
    addition, only a person thoroughly grounded in Ingsoc could appreciate
    the full force of the word BELLYFEEL, which implied a blind, enthusiastic
    acceptance difficult to imagine today; or of the word OLDTHINK, which was
    inextricably mixed up with th
  1104. effort
    use of physical or mental energy; hard work
    At the beginning it needed a hard effort not to look at it,
    but presently hunger gave way to thirst.
  1105. retain
    secure and keep for possible future use or application
    Certain
    of our present-day adjectives, such as GOOD, STRONG, BIG, BLACK, SOFT,
    were retained, but their total number was very small.
  1106. leg
    a human limb; commonly used to refer to a whole limb but technically only the part of the limb between the knee and ankle
    It was even possible--he thought this because from time to time
    something seemed to tickle his leg--that there might be a sizeable bit of
    crust there.
  1107. in some way
    in some unspecified way or manner; or by some unspecified means
    Chapter 2



    He was lying on something that felt like a camp bed, except that it was
    higher off the ground and that he was fixed down in some way so that he
    could not move.
  1108. fear
    an emotion experienced in anticipation of some specific pain or danger (usually accompanied by a desire to flee or fight)
    In the end the temptation to find out overcame his fear; he
    slipped a hand into his pocket.
  1109. straight
    having no deviations
    A young officer, a trim black-uniformed figure who seemed to
    glitter all over with polished leather, and whose pale, straight-featured
    face was like a wax mask, stepped smartly through the doorway.
  1110. thinking
    endowed with the capacity to reason
    That is what you are thinking,
    is it not, Winston?'
  1111. smash
    hit violently
    He felt the smash of
    truncheons on his elbows and iron-shod boots on his shins; he saw himself
    grovelling on the floor, screaming for mercy through broken teeth.
  1112. venereal
    of or relating to the external sex organs
    He heard himself promising to lie, to steal,
    to forge, to murder, to encourage drug-taking and prostitution, to
    disseminate venereal diseases, to throw vitriol in a child's face.
  1113. applied
    concerned with concrete problems or data rather than with fundamental principles
    The tone of his voice
    implied at once a complete admission of his guilt and a sort of incredulous
    horror that such a word could be applied to himself.
  1114. in use
    currently being used
    The version in use in 1984, and
    embodied in the Ninth and Tenth Editions of the Newspeak Dictionary, was
    a provisional one, and contained many superfluous words and archaic
    formations which were due to be suppressed later.
  1115. bring in
    earn on some commercial or business transaction; earn as salary or wages
    He motioned
    to the guards outside to bring in the prisoner they were leading.
  1116. paraphrase
    express the same message in different words
    In some cases they could be translated into
    Oldspeak, or even into words taken from the A vocabulary, but this usually
    demanded a long paraphrase and always involved the loss of certain
    overtones.
  1117. in that
    (formal) in or into that thing or place
    He
    was not sure whether it was O'Brien's voice; but it was the same voice
    that had said to him, 'We shall meet in the place where there is no
    darkness,' in that other dream, seven years ago.
  1118. irregularly
    in an irregular manner
    The only classes of words that were still allowed to inflect irregularly
    were the pronouns, the relatives, the demonstrative adjectives, and the
    auxiliary verbs.
  1119. at any rate
    if nothing else (`leastwise' is informal and `leastways' is colloquial)
    He did not know how
    long he had been there; some hours at any rate; with no clocks and no
    daylight it was hard to gauge the time.
  1120. nausea
    the state that precedes vomiting
    There was a violent convulsion of
    nausea inside him, and he almost lost consciousness.
  1121. panegyric
    formally expressing praise
    A full translation could only be an ideological translation, whereby
    Jefferson's words would be changed into a panegyric on absolute government.
  1122. compose
    form the substance of
    He lay back on the bed and tried to compose himself.
  1123. equal
    having the same quantity, value, or measure as another
    They pretended, perhaps
    they even believed, that they had seized power unwillingly and for a
    limited time, and that just round the corner there lay a paradise where
    human beings would be free and equal.
  1124. seditious
    arousing to action or rebellion
    He confessed to the assassination of eminent Party
    members, the distribution of seditious pamphlets, embezzlement of public
    funds, sale of military secrets, sabotage of every kind.
  1125. check in
    announce one's arrival, e.g. at hotels or airports
    And then
    suddenly, without a word uttered, without a check in his step, without the
    changing of a line in his face--suddenly the camouflage would be down and
    bang! would go the batteries of his hatred.
  1126. demonstrative
    a pronoun that points out an intended referent
    The only classes of words that were still allowed to inflect irregularly
    were the pronouns, the relatives, the demonstrative adjectives, and the
    auxiliary verbs.
  1127. arguing
    a contentious speech act; a dispute where there is strong disagreement
    They slapped his face, wrung
    his ears, pulled his hair, made him stand on one leg, refused him leave to
    urinate, shone glaring lights in his face until his eyes ran with water;
    but the aim of this was simply to humiliate him and destroy his power of
    ar
  1128. three
    the cardinal number that is the sum of one and one and one
    It might be two or three hours ago that they had brought him here.
  1129. above
    in or to a place that is higher
    What he longed for above all was a piece of bread.
  1130. regain
    get or find back; recover the use of
    As his eyes regained their focus he
    remembered who he was, and where he was, and recognized the face that was
    gazing into his own; but somewhere or other there was a large patch of
    emptiness, as though a piece had been taken out of his brain.
  1131. stirring
    exciting strong but not unpleasant emotions
    There was a very faint stirring all the way round the bench.
  1132. sticking
    extending out above or beyond a surface or boundary
    He was shoeless; large, dirty toes were
    sticking out of the holes in his socks.
  1133. hum
    sing with closed lips
    Concealed lamps
    flooded it with cold light, and there was a low, steady humming sound
    which he supposed had something to do with the air supply.
  1134. hours
    an indefinite period of time
    It might be twenty-four
    hours since he had eaten, it might be thirty-six.
  1135. howling
    a long loud emotional utterance
    He had set up a wordless
    howling, like an animal.
  1136. tell
    narrate or give a detailed account of
    'To tell you the truth--' He sat down awkwardly on the bench opposite
    Winston.
  1137. fifty-five
    being five more than fifty
    The needle of the dial had shot up to
    fifty-five.
  1138. stir
    move an implement through
    There was a very faint stirring all the way round the bench.
  1139. hour
    a period of time equal to 1/24th of a day
    It might be twenty-four
    hours since he had eaten, it might be thirty-six.
  1140. overthrow
    rule against
    The secret
    accumulation of knowledge--a gradual spread of enlightenment--ultimately
    a proletarian rebellion--the overthrow of the Party.
  1141. starve
    die of food deprivation
    'You've been starving me for weeks.
  1142. form
    a perceptual structure
    The positions of trust were given only to the common
    criminals, especially the gangsters and the murderers, who formed a sort
    of aristocracy.
  1143. heard
    detected or perceived by the sense of hearing
    Do you know what they heard me saying?'
  1144. weep
    shed tears because of sadness, rage, or pain
    Their real weapon was the merciless questioning
    that went on and on, hour after hour, tripping him up, laying traps for
    him, twisting everything that he said, convicting him at every step of
    lies and self-contradiction until he began weeping as muc
  1145. outburst
    an unrestrained expression of emotion
    They could not
    let such an outburst go unpunished.
  1146. trumpet
    a brass musical instrument with a brilliant tone; has a narrow tube and a flared bell and is played by means of valves
    A shrill trumpet-call had pierced the air.
  1147. sink
    fall or descend to a lower place or level
    He sank his voice, like someone who is obliged for medical reasons to
    utter an obscenity.
  1148. horizontally
    in a horizontal direction
    The movement of the armies was a diagram: a
    black arrow tearing vertically southward, and a white arrow horizontally
    eastward, across the tail of the first.
  1149. full
    containing as much or as many as is possible or normal
    He took his stand opposite the chinless man,
    and then, at a signal from the officer, let free a frightful blow, with
    all the weight of his body behind it, full in the chinless man's mouth.
  1150. wish
    an expression of some desire or inclination
    Besides, was it possible, when you
    were actually suffering it, to wish for any reason that your own pain
    should increase?
  1151. bullying
    the act of intimidating a weaker person to make them do something
    His sole concern was to find out
    what they wanted him to confess, and then confess it quickly, before the
    bullying started anew.
  1152. too
    to a degree exceeding normal or proper limits
    He had sat silent against the wall, jostled by dirty
    bodies, too preoccupied by fear and the pain in his belly to take much
    interest in his surroundings, but still noticing the astonishing difference
    in demeanour between the Party prisoners and the
  1153. imperturbable
    not easily perturbed or excited or upset; marked by extreme calm and composure
    As though for reassurance he
    looked up at the imperturbable face in the portrait.
  1154. airfield
    a place where planes take off and land
    If they could get control of the whole of Africa, if they had
    airfields and submarine bases at the Cape, it would cut Oceania in two.
  1155. prop up
    support by placing against something solid or rigid
    His tiny sister, too young to
    understand what the game was about, had sat propped up against a bolster,
    laughing because the others were laughing.
  1156. get hold of
    get into one's hands, take physically
    It can get hold of you without
    your even knowing it.
  1157. sole
    the underside of the foot
    His sole concern was to find out
    what they wanted him to confess, and then confess it quickly, before the
    bullying started anew.
  1158. fleshy
    of or relating to or resembling flesh
    It was strong and fleshy and brutal, it was full of
    intelligence and a sort of controlled passion before which he felt himself
    helpless; but it was tired.
  1159. laughing
    showing or feeling mirth or pleasure or happiness
    The
    guard was laughing at his contortions.
  1160. chap
    (usually in the plural) leather leggings without a seat; joined by a belt; often have flared outer flaps; worn over trousers by cowboys to protect their legs
    He paused opposite
    Winston and began eagerly appealing to him: 'You don't think they'll shoot
    me, do you, old chap?
  1161. dislike
    a feeling of aversion or antipathy
    It
    was only a momentary glance, full of contempt and dislike.
  1162. horror
    intense and profound fear
    The tone of his voice
    implied at once a complete admission of his guilt and a sort of incredulous
    horror that such a word could be applied to himself.
  1163. walk in
    enter by walking
    He walked easily,
    with a joy of movement and with a feeling of walking in sunlight.
  1164. luminous
    softly bright or radiant
    The eyes grew larger and more
    luminous.
  1165. unanswered
    not returned in kind
    O'Brien left this unanswered.
  1166. clutch
    take hold of; grab
    In the face of pain
    there are no heroes, no heroes, he thought over and over as he writhed
    on the floor, clutching uselessly at his disabled left arm.
  1167. din
    a loud harsh or strident noise
    Only
    once, when two Party members, both women, were pressed close together on
    the bench, he overheard amid the din of voices a few hurriedly-whispered
    words; and in particular a reference to something called 'room one-oh-one',
    which he did not unde
  1168. separately
    apart from others
    It will be simpler to discuss each class separately, but the grammatical
    peculiarities of the language can be dealt with in the section devoted to
    the A vocabulary, since the same rules held good for all three categories.
  1169. obliquely
    to, toward or at one side
    She
    walked obliquely away across the grass as though trying to get rid of him,
    then seemed to resign herself to having him at her side.
  1170. recapture
    the act of taking something back
    It had faded but before
    O'Brien had dropped his hand; but though he could not recapture it, he
    could remember it, as one remembers a vivid experience at some period of
    one's life when one was in effect a different person.
  1171. persecute
    cause to suffer
    The Russians persecuted heresy more cruelly
    than the Inquisition had done.
  1172. lethargy
    inactivity; showing an unusual lack of energy
    Winston roused himself a little from his lethargy.
  1173. backwards
    in a manner or order or direction the reverse of normal
    It was like swimming against a current that swept you backwards
    however hard you struggled, and then suddenly deciding to turn round and
    go with the current instead of opposing it.
  1174. fade
    become less clearly visible or distinguishable; disappear gradually or seemingly
    Sometimes with a fading hope he thought of
    O'Brien and the razor blade.
  1175. tickle
    touch (a body part) lightly so as to excite the surface nerves and cause uneasiness, laughter, or spasmodic movements
    It was even possible--he thought this because from time to time
    something seemed to tickle his leg--that there might be a sizeable bit of
    crust there.
  1176. tripping
    moving easily and quickly; nimble
    Their real weapon was the merciless questioning
    that went on and on, hour after hour, tripping him up, laying traps for
    him, twisting everything that he said, convicting him at every step of
    lies and self-contradiction until he began weeping as muc
  1177. twenty-four hours
    time for Earth to make a complete rotation on its axis
    It might be twenty-four
    hours
    since he had eaten, it might be thirty-six.
  1178. navigate
    direct carefully and safely
    When we navigate the
    ocean, or when we predict an eclipse, we often find it convenient to
    assume that the earth goes round the sun and that the stars are millions
    upon millions of kilometres away.
  1179. crushed
    subdued or brought low in condition or status
    The man was led out, walking unsteadily, with head sunken, nursing his
    crushed hand, all the fight had gone out of him.
  1180. step
    the act of changing location by raising the foot and setting it down
    A young officer, a trim black-uniformed figure who seemed to
    glitter all over with polished leather, and whose pale, straight-featured
    face was like a wax mask, stepped smartly through the doorway.
  1181. oligarchy
    a political system governed by a few people
    We are different from all the oligarchies of the
    past, in that we know what we are doing.
  1182. inflame
    arouse or excite feelings and passions
    Here and there under the dirt there
    were the red scars of wounds, and near the ankle the varicose ulcer was an
    inflamed mass with flakes of skin peeling off it.
  1183. louse
    wingless usually flattened bloodsucking insect parasitic on warm-blooded animals
    The word FREE still existed in Newspeak, but it could only be
    used in such statements as 'This dog is free from lice' or 'This field is
    free from weeds'.
  1184. labour
    productive work (especially physical work done for wages)
    There was much talk about the forced-labour camps to which
    most of the prisoners expected to be sent.
  1185. symbolize
    express indirectly by an image, form, or model; be a symbol
    Did it not symbolize the eternal, unvarying
    triumph of Good over Evil?
  1186. resemble
    appear like; be similar or bear a likeness to
    It resembles my own mind except that you
    happen to be insane.
  1187. get hold
    get something or somebody for a specific purpose
    It can get hold of you without
    your even knowing it.
  1188. vibrate
    sound with resonance
    The fingers stood up
    before his eyes like pillars, enormous, blurry, and seeming to vibrate,
    but unmistakably four.
  1189. hopeless
    without hope because there seems to be no possibility of comfort or success
    There were times when he rolled about the floor, as shameless
    as an animal, writhing his body this way and that in an endless, hopeless
    effort to dodge the kicks, and simply inviting more and yet more kicks,
    in his ribs, in his belly, on his elbows
  1190. tempo
    (music) the speed at which a composition is to be played
    Suppose that we
    quicken the tempo of human life till men are senile at thirty.
  1191. vivid
    having striking color
    Winston
    did not look at him again, but the tormented, skull-like face was as
    vivid in his mind as though it had been straight in front of his eyes.
  1192. cut
    separate with or as if with an instrument
    The blade would bite
    into him with a sort of burning coldness, and even the fingers that held
    it would be cut to the bone.
  1193. forehead
    the part of the face above the eyes
    He put a hand to his forehead and pressed his temples for a moment, as
    though trying to remember something.
  1194. arrow
    a projectile with a straight thin shaft and an arrowhead on one end and stabilizing vanes on the other; intended to be shot from a bow
    The movement of the armies was a diagram: a
    black arrow tearing vertically southward, and a white arrow horizontally
    eastward, across the tail of the first.
  1195. ambiguity
    unclearness by virtue of having more than one meaning
    All ambiguities and shades of meaning had been purged out of
    them.
  1196. mercy
    a disposition to be kind and forgiving
    He felt the smash of
    truncheons on his elbows and iron-shod boots on his shins; he saw himself
    grovelling on the floor, screaming for mercy through broken teeth.
  1197. give
    transfer possession of something concrete or abstract to somebody
    The positions of trust were given only to the common
    criminals, especially the gangsters and the murderers, who formed a sort
    of aristocracy.
  1198. skin
    a natural protective body covering and site of the sense of touch
    There were pouches under the eyes, the skin
    sagged from the cheekbones.
  1199. twig
    a small branch or division of a branch (especially a terminal division); usually applied to branches of the current or preceding year
    The wind whistled through the twigs and fretted the occasional,
    dirty-looking crocuses.
  1200. fall through
    fail utterly; collapse
    He was
    still strapped in the chair, but he had fallen through the floor, through
    the walls of the building, through the earth, through the oceans, through
    the atmosphere, into outer space, into the gulfs between the stars--always
    away, away, away f
  1201. pan
    shallow container made of metal
    A bench, or
    shelf, just wide enough to sit on ran round the wall, broken only by the
    door and, at the end opposite the door, a lavatory pan with no wooden
    seat.
  1202. ear
    the sense organ for hearing and equilibrium
    It might
    fall anywhere; on the crown, on the tip of the ear, on the upper arm, on
    the elbow----

    The elbow!
  1203. ago
    gone by; or in the past
    It might be two or three hours ago that they had brought him here.
  1204. promising
    full or promise
    More than ever he had the
    air of a teacher taking pains with a wayward but promising child.
  1205. posterior
    located at or near or behind a part or near the end of a structure
    He plumped his large posterior into the lavatory pan.
  1206. clumsy
    lacking grace in movement or posture
    He wrote first in large clumsy
    capitals:


    FREEDOM IS SLAVERY


    Then almost without a pause he wrote beneath it:


    TWO AND TWO MAKE FIVE


    But then there came a sort of check.
  1207. writhed
    twisted (especially as in pain or struggle)
    In the face of pain
    there are no heroes, no heroes, he thought over and over as he writhed
    on the floor, clutching uselessly at his disabled left arm.
  1208. keep
    continue a certain state, condition, or activity
    'Never keep it
    down, thass what I say.
  1209. starving
    suffering from lack of food
    'You've been starving me for weeks.
  1210. fist
    a hand with the fingers clenched in the palm (as for hitting)
    Sometimes it was
    fists, sometimes it was truncheons, sometimes it was steel rods, sometimes
    it was boots.
  1211. while
    a period of indeterminate length (usually short) marked by some action or condition
    Get it up while it's fresh on your stomach, like.'
  1212. enough
    sufficient for the purpose
    A bench, or
    shelf, just wide enough to sit on ran round the wall, broken only by the
    door and, at the end opposite the door, a lavatory pan with no wooden
    seat.
  1213. tortured
    experiencing intense pain especially mental pain
    O'Brien
    had tortured him to the edge of lunacy, and in a little while, it was
    certain, he would send him to his death.
  1214. controlled
    restrained or managed or kept within certain bounds
    You have not controlled mine!'
  1215. arrive
    reach a destination; arrive by movement or progress
    It was thinkable that the razor blade might
    arrive concealed in his food, if he were ever fed.
  1216. burst out
    erupt or intensify suddenly
    At the thought the words burst out of him:

    'What is in Room 101?'
  1217. look up
    seek information from
    He opened his eyes and looked up gratefully at O'Brien.
  1218. understanding
    the cognitive condition of someone who understands
    'There is
    learning, there is understanding, and there is acceptance.
  1219. weariness
    temporary loss of strength and energy resulting from hard physical or mental work
    A feeling of
    weariness had overwhelmed him.
  1220. battered
    damaged by blows or hard usage
    As usual, the voice had battered Winston into helplessness.
  1221. exulting
    joyful and proud especially because of triumph or success
    In
    the old days the heretic walked to the stake still a heretic, proclaiming
    his heresy, exulting in it.
  1222. stripping
    the removal of covering
    This was done partly
    by the invention of new words, but chiefly by eliminating undesirable
    words and by stripping such words as remained of unorthodox meanings, and
    so far as possible of all secondary meanings whatever.
  1223. bloat
    swelling of the rumen or intestinal tract of domestic animals caused by excessive gas
    He wondered
    whether it was a dislike that came purely out of the past or whether it
    was inspired also by his bloated face and the water that the wind kept
    squeezing from his eyes.
  1224. discredited
    being unjustly brought into disrepute
    Every day, at
    every moment, they will be defeated, discredited, ridiculed, spat upon and
    yet they will always survive.
  1225. mentally
    in your mind
    He moved himself
    mentally from place to place, and tried to determine by the feeling of his
    body whether he was perched high in the air or buried deep underground.
  1226. frivolity
    the trait of being frivolous; not serious or sensible
    From the
    moment when he was inside the Ministry of Love--and yes, even during those
    minutes when he and Julia had stood helpless while the iron voice from the
    telescreen told them what to do--he had grasped the frivolity, the
    shallowness of his att
  1227. force
    (physics) the influence that produces a change in a physical quantity
    There was much talk about the forced-labour camps to which
    most of the prisoners expected to be sent.
  1228. fling
    throw with force or recklessness
    His body
    was flung across the cell and fetched up against the base of the lavatory
    seat.
  1229. slate
    a fine-grained metamorphic rock that can be split into thin layers
    They had given him a white slate with a stump of pencil tied to the
    corner.
  1230. live out
    live out one's life; live to the end
    And
    even if we chose to let you live out the natural term of your life, still
    you would never escape from us.
  1231. inquisitor
    a questioner who is excessively harsh
    He was the tormentor, he was the protector, he was
    the inquisitor, he was the friend.
  1232. individual
    being or characteristic of a single thing or person
    Not in the individual
    mind, which can make mistakes, and in any case soon perishes: only in the
    mind of the Party, which is collective and immortal.
  1233. ticking
    a metallic tapping sound
    Near at hand some kind of
    instrument was ticking slowly and regularly.
  1234. settle
    become resolved, fixed, established, or quiet
    His eyes
    settled on the smashed face of the chinless man.
  1235. crossed
    placed crosswise
    He sat as still as he could on the narrow bench, with his hands crossed
    on his knee.
  1236. harsh
    disagreeable to the senses
    He
    remembered a surly barber arriving to scrape his chin and crop his hair,
    and businesslike, unsympathetic men in white coats feeling his pulse,
    tapping his reflexes, turning up his eyelids, running harsh fingers over
    him in search for broken bone
  1237. supplementary
    functioning in a supporting capacity
    The C vocabulary was supplementary to the others and
    consisted entirely of scientific and technical terms.
  1238. corner
    the point where three areas or surfaces meet or intersect
    An enormous wreck of a woman, aged about sixty, with
    great tumbling breasts and thick coils of white hair which had come down
    in her struggles, was carried in, kicking and shouting, by four guards,
    who had hold of her one at each corner.
  1239. compilation
    the act of compiling (as into a single book or file or list)
    He had been appointed to a
    sub-committee of a sub-committee which had sprouted from one of the
    innumerable committees dealing with minor difficulties that arose in the
    compilation of the Eleventh Edition of the Newspeak Dictionary.
  1240. understood
    implied by or inferred from actions or statements
    Everything was all right,
    there was no more pain, the last detail of his life was laid bare,
    understood, forgiven.
  1241. musty
    covered with or smelling of mold
    Suddenly the foul musty
    odour of the brutes struck his nostrils.
  1242. loyalty
    the quality of being loyal
    Most of the time they screamed abuse at him and threatened
    at every hesitation to deliver him over to the guards again; but sometimes
    they would suddenly change their tune, call him comrade, appeal to him in
    the name of Ingsoc and Big Brother, and ask him
  1243. answerable
    capable of being answered
    But that question was not answerable yet.
  1244. conversational
    characteristic of informal spoken language or conversation
    When he spoke it was in an easy, conversational tone.
  1245. produce
    bring forth or yield
    They yelled insults at the guards,
    fought back fiercely when their belongings were impounded, wrote obscene
    words on the floor, ate smuggled food which they produced from mysterious
    hiding-places in their clothes, and even shouted down the telescre
  1246. perturbed
    thrown into a state of agitated confusion; (`rattled' is an informal term)
    Ampleforth marched clumsily out between the guards, his face vaguely
    perturbed, but uncomprehending.
  1247. misdeed
    improper or wicked or immoral behavior
    SEXCRIME covered all sexual misdeeds whatever.
  1248. rule
    prescribed guide for conduct or action
    He loved her
    and would not betray her; but that was only a fact, known as he knew the
    rules of arithmetic.
  1249. enemy
    a personal enemy
    It was true that he had been the enemy of the Party, and in the eyes
    of the Party there was no distinction between the thought and the deed.
  1250. unspoken
    expressed without speech
    The tradition--the unspoken tradition:
    somehow you knew it, though you never heard it said--was that they shot
    you from behind; always in the back of the head, without warning, as you
    walked down a corridor from cell to cell.
  1251. answer
    a statement (either spoken or written) that is made to reply to a question or request or criticism or accusation
    One question at any rate was
    answered.
  1252. obediently
    in an obedient manner
    '"Who controls the past controls the future: who controls the present
    controls the past,"' repeated Winston obediently.
  1253. certainty
    the state of being certain
    It was more natural to exist
    from moment to moment, accepting another ten minutes' life even with the
    certainty that there was torture at the end of it.
  1254. shout out
    utter a sudden loud cry
    He was rolling down a mighty corridor, a kilometre wide, full of glorious,
    golden light, roaring with laughter and shouting out confessions at the
    top of his voice.
  1255. tinkling
    like the short high ringing sound of a small bell
    The tinkling music struck up
    again.
  1256. trivial
    (informal) small and of little importance
    He had told them everything he knew about her, her habits, her
    character, her past life; he had confessed in the most trivial detail
    everything that had happened at their meetings, all that he had said to
    her and she to him, their black-market meal
  1257. dental
    of or relating to the teeth
    Amid a stream of blood and saliva, the two
    halves of a dental plate fell out of his mouth.
  1258. fact
    a piece of information about circumstances that exist or events that have occurred
    He loved her
    and would not betray her; but that was only a fact, known as he knew the
    rules of arithmetic.
  1259. respectively
    in the order given
    Thus, for example, UNCOLD meant 'warm', while PLUSCOLD and
    DOUBLEPLUSCOLD meant, respectively, 'very cold' and 'superlatively cold'.
  1260. fix
    restore by replacing a part or putting together what is torn or broken
    He could not fix his mind on her.
  1261. definitive
    clearly defined or formulated
    We
    were producing a definitive edition of the poems of Kipling.
  1262. nostril
    either one of the two external openings to the nasal cavity in the nose
    Suddenly the foul musty
    odour of the brutes struck his nostrils.
  1263. uniform
    clothing of distinctive design worn by members of a particular group as a means of identification
    A young officer, a trim black-uniformed figure who seemed to
    glitter all over with polished leather, and whose pale, straight-featured
    face was like a wax mask, stepped smartly through the doorway.
  1264. many
    a quantifier that can be used with count nouns and is often preceded by `as' or `too' or `so' or `that'; amounting to a large but indefinite number
    For the first time in many years he forgot the
    presence of the telescreen.
  1265. Jones
    American naval commander in the American Revolution (1747-1792)
    You believed that three men, three one-time Party members named
    Jones, Aaronson, and Rutherford--men who were executed for treachery and
    sabotage after making the fullest possible confession--were not guilty of
    the crimes they were charged with.
  1266. oblige
    force somebody to do something
    He sank his voice, like someone who is obliged for medical reasons to
    utter an obscenity.
  1267. frail
    physically weak
    Unseen, the frail slip of paper was whirling
    away on the current of warm air; it was vanishing in a flash of flame.
  1268. drily
    in a dry laconic manner
    He answered drily:

    'You know what is in Room 101, Winston.
  1269. socialism
    a political theory advocating state ownership of industry
    The Principles of Newspeak



    Newspeak was the official language of Oceania and had been devised to meet
    the ideological needs of Ingsoc, or English Socialism.
  1270. crime
    (criminal law) an act punishable by law; usually considered an evil act
    There was a
    long range of crimes--espionage, sabotage, and the like--to which everyone
    had to confess as a matter of course.
  1271. yet
    up to the present time
    He had not yet noticed Winston's
    presence.
  1272. stern
    of a stern or strict bearing or demeanor; forbidding in aspect
    O'Brien's manner grew stern again.
  1273. unthinkable
    incapable of being conceived or considered
    It was intended that
    when Newspeak had been adopted once and for all and Oldspeak forgotten,
    a heretical thought--that is, a thought diverging from the principles of
    Ingsoc--should be literally unthinkable, at least so far as thought is
    dependent o
  1274. seeing
    having vision, not blind
    'How can I help seeing what is in front
    of my eyes?
  1275. persuade
    cause somebody to adopt a certain position, belief, or course of action; twist somebody's arm
    He had the air of a doctor, a teacher, even a
    priest, anxious to explain and persuade rather than to punish.
  1276. come back
    go back to something earlier
    Everything came back to his sick body, which
    shrank trembling from the smallest pain.
  1277. become
    come into existence
    I must hold out till the
    pain becomes unbearable.
  1278. boredom
    the feeling of being bored by something tedious
    The boredom of the two
    children in the dark, cramped bedroom became unbearable.
  1279. food
    any substance that can be metabolized by an animal to give energy and build tissue
    But the craving for food
    was growing upon him.
  1280. far
    at or to or from a great distance in space
    Somewhere or other she was suffering perhaps far worse than he.
  1281. squeezing
    the act of gripping and pressing firmly
    He wondered
    whether it was a dislike that came purely out of the past or whether it
    was inspired also by his bloated face and the water that the wind kept
    squeezing from his eyes.
  1282. at bottom
    in reality
    The old
    feeling, that at bottom it did not matter whether O'Brien was a friend
    or an enemy, had come back.
  1283. rotting
    (biology) the process of decay caused by bacterial or fungal action
    'You are rotting away,' he said; 'you are falling to pieces.
  1284. death
    the permanent end of all life functions in an organism or part of an organism
    O'Brien
    had tortured him to the edge of lunacy, and in a little while, it was
    certain, he would send him to his death.
  1285. packet
    a small package or bundle
    Once there was even
    a packet of cigarettes.
  1286. healing
    the natural process by which the body repairs itself
    Almost in the same instant a blissful,
    healing warmth spread all through his body.
  1287. coherent
    marked by an orderly, logical, and aesthetically consistent relation of parts
    It seemed to make no
    difference, except that one's dreams were more coherent.
  1288. absurdity
    a ludicrous folly
    Did not the statement, 'You do
    not exist', contain a logical absurdity?
  1289. compound
    a whole formed by a union of two or more elements or parts
    Newspeak
    words were divided into three distinct classes, known as the A vocabulary,
    the B vocabulary (also called compound words), and the C vocabulary.
  1290. ending
    the act of ending something
    He did not remember any ending to his interrogation.
  1291. besides
    in addition
    Besides, was it possible, when you
    were actually suffering it, to wish for any reason that your own pain
    should increase?
  1292. recover
    regain or make up for
    Things will happen to you from which you
    could not recover, if you lived a thousand years.
  1293. unwholesome
    detrimental to physical or moral well-being
    But he was also
    hungry, with a gnawing, unwholesome kind of hunger.
  1294. uninhabited
    not having inhabitants; not lived in
    For millions of years the earth was
    uninhabited.'
  1295. filled
    (usually followed by `with' or used as a combining form) generously supplied with
    Because of
    its thinness the mouth and eyes looked disproportionately large, and the
    eyes seemed filled with a murderous, unappeasable hatred of somebody or
    something.
  1296. annihilate
    kill in large numbers
    You will be annihilated in the past as well
    as in the future.
  1297. physical
    involving the body as distinguished from the mind or spirit
    Whenever his physical sensations were a little under
    control the terror returned.
  1298. turn away
    turn away or aside
    O'Brien turned away from the wall.
  1299. existence
    the state or fact of existing
    'Is it your opinion, Winston, that the past has
    real existence?'
  1300. in a flash
    without any delay
    Unseen, the frail slip of paper was whirling
    away on the current of warm air; it was vanishing in a flash of flame.
  1301. minute
    a unit of time equal to 60 seconds or 1/60th of an hour
    It was more natural to exist
    from moment to moment, accepting another ten minutes' life even with the
    certainty that there was torture at the end of it.
  1302. decide
    reach, make, or come to a decision about something
    It
    was he who decided when Winston should scream with pain, when he should
    have a respite, when he should be fed, when he should sleep, when the
    drugs should be pumped into his arm.
  1303. person
    a human being
    O'Brien was a person who could be talked to.
  1304. crush
    to compress with violence, out of natural shape or condition
    The man was led out, walking unsteadily, with head sunken, nursing his
    crushed hand, all the fight had gone out of him.
  1305. embedded
    enclosed firmly in a surrounding mass
    Some dreadful thing which had lain embedded in the future had
    somehow been skipped over and had not happened.
  1306. tormentor
    someone who torments
    He was the tormentor, he was the protector, he was
    the inquisitor, he was the friend.
  1307. embody
    represent in bodily form
    The version in use in 1984, and
    embodied in the Ninth and Tenth Editions of the Newspeak Dictionary, was
    a provisional one, and contained many superfluous words and archaic
    formations which were due to be suppressed later.
  1308. deep
    having great spatial extension or penetration downward or inward from an outer surface or backward or laterally or outward from a center; sometimes used in combination
    He moved himself
    mentally from place to place, and tried to determine by the feeling of his
    body whether he was perched high in the air or buried deep underground.
  1309. so far
    to the degree or extent that
    But at present
    power is only a word so far as you are concerned.
  1310. vision
    the ability to see; the visual faculty
    For
    perhaps five seconds it was within the angle of Winston's vision.
  1311. want
    the state of needing something that is absent or unavailable
    What else is it you want to know?
  1312. rook
    common gregarious Old World bird about the size and color of the American crow
    A person growing up with Newspeak as his sole language would no
    more know that EQUAL had once had the secondary meaning of 'politically
    equal', or that FREE had once meant 'intellectually free', than for
    instance, a person who had never heard of chess wou
  1313. scientific
    conforming with the principles or methods used in science
    In the C vocabulary, which consisted of scientific
    and technical words, it might be necessary to give specialized names to
    certain sexual aberrations, but the ordinary citizen had no need of them.
  1314. start up
    get going or set in motion
    He was starting up from the plank bed in the half-certainty that he had
    heard O'Brien's voice.
  1315. done
    having finished or arrived at completion
    All the dirty jobs were done by the politicals.
  1316. worst
    the least favorable outcome
    Although
    the pain had brought the sweat out on his forehead, the worst of all was
    the fear that his backbone was about to snap.
  1317. nearness
    the spatial property resulting from a relatively small distance
    His face looked enormous because of its
    nearness, and hideously ugly because it was seen from below.
  1318. earth
    the 3rd planet from the sun; the planet we live on
    Never, for any reason on earth, could you wish for an increase
    of pain.
  1319. physique
    constitution of the human body
    She was about the right age and
    physique, and it was probable that people changed somewhat after twenty
    years in a forced-labour camp.
  1320. demonstrate
    give an exhibition of to an interested audience
    The skull-faced man had quickly thrust his hands
    behind his back, as though demonstrating to all the world that he refused
    the gift.
  1321. strip
    take off or remove
    Within quite a small time they
    will strip it to the bones.
  1322. level
    a relative position or degree of value in a graded group
    His troubled eyes were gazing at the wall about a metre above
    the level of Winston's head.
  1323. fixture
    the quality of being fixed in place as by some firm attachment
    From fifteen to closing-time he was a fixture in the Chestnut
    Tree.
  1324. interpose
    introduce
    He must interpose another human being, the BODY of another human
    being, between himself and the rats.
  1325. insane
    afflicted with or characteristic of mental derangement
    It resembles my own mind except that you
    happen to be insane.
  1326. revery
    an abstracted state of absorption
    Often he would lie from one meal to the next almost
    without stirring, sometimes asleep, sometimes waking into vague reveries
    in which it was too much trouble to open his eyes.
  1327. fret
    be agitated or irritated
    The wind whistled through the twigs and fretted the occasional,
    dirty-looking crocuses.
  1328. intermittent
    stopping and starting at irregular intervals
    He began
    to grow actually proud of his body, and to cherish an intermittent belief
    that his face also was growing back to normal.
  1329. edition
    the form in which a text (especially a printed book) is published
    We
    were producing a definitive edition of the poems of Kipling.
  1330. cigarette
    finely ground tobacco wrapped in paper; for smoking
    On the other hand some of them seemed to be on
    good terms with the guards, called them by nicknames, and tried to wheedle
    cigarettes through the spyhole in the door.
  1331. peddler
    someone who travels about selling his wares (as on the streets or at carnivals)
    There was a constant come-and-go of prisoners of every description:
    drug-peddlers, thieves, bandits, black-marketeers, drunks, prostitutes.
  1332. Declaration of Independence
    the document recording the proclamation of the second Continental Congress (4 July 1776) asserting the independence of the Colonies from Great Britain
    Take for example the well-known
    passage from the Declaration of Independence:


    WE HOLD THESE TRUTHS TO BE SELF-EVIDENT, THAT ALL MEN ARE CREATED EQUAL,
    THAT THEY ARE ENDOWED BY THEIR CREATOR WITH CERTAIN INALIENABLE RIGHTS,
    THAT AMONG THESE ARE LI
  1333. swim
    travel through water
    He had the impression of swimming up into this room from some quite
    different world, a sort of underwater world far beneath it.
  1334. pressing
    compelling immediate action
    A world of
    victory after victory, triumph after triumph after triumph: an endless
    pressing, pressing, pressing upon the nerve of power.
  1335. gangster
    a criminal who is a member of gang
    The positions of trust were given only to the common
    criminals, especially the gangsters and the murderers, who formed a sort
    of aristocracy.
  1336. bubble
    a hollow globule of gas (e.g., air or carbon dioxide)
    I could float off this floor like a soap bubble if
    I wish to.
  1337. oily
    containing an unusual amount of grease or oil
    The cloves and saccharine, themselves disgusting
    enough in their sickly way, could not disguise the flat oily smell; and
    what was worst of all was that the smell of gin, which dwelt with him
    night and day, was inextricably mixed up in his mind with
  1338. derive
    come from
    But in
    addition there were great numbers of words which at first sight appeared
    to be mere abbreviations and which derived their ideological colour not
    from their meaning, but from their structure.
  1339. knight
    originally a person of noble birth trained to arms and chivalry; today in Great Britain a person honored by the sovereign for personal merit
    It was a tricky
    ending, involving a couple of knights.
  1340. room
    an area within a building enclosed by walls and floor and ceiling
    Not room 101!'
  1341. ignore
    refuse to acknowledge
    To a surprising extent the ordinary
    criminals ignored the Party prisoners.
  1342. sufficiently
    to a sufficient degree
    Winston had recovered himself sufficiently to speak.
  1343. sorrowfully
    in a sorrowful manner
    Most of the time they screamed abuse at him and threatened
    at every hesitation to deliver him over to the guards again; but sometimes
    they would suddenly change their tune, call him comrade, appeal to him in
    the name of Ingsoc and Big Brother, and ask him
  1344. emotionally
    in an emotional manner
    It is only emotionally that you have failed to make progress.
  1345. ordination
    the act of ordaining; the act of conferring (or receiving) holy orders
    Fragments of triumphant phrases pushed themselves through the din: 'Vast
    strategic manoeuvre--perfect co-ordination--utter rout--half a million
    prisoners--complete demoralization--control of the whole of Africa--bring
    the war within measurable dist
  1346. life
    the organic phenomenon that distinguishes living organisms from nonliving ones
    It was more natural to exist
    from moment to moment, accepting another ten minutes' life even with the
    certainty that there was torture at the end of it.
  1347. no more
    referring to the degree to which a certain quality is present
    Everything was all right,
    there was no more pain, the last detail of his life was laid bare,
    understood, forgiven.
  1348. known
    apprehended with certainty
    He loved her
    and would not betray her; but that was only a fact, known as he knew the
    rules of arithmetic.
  1349. moved
    being excited or provoked to the expression of an emotion
    He moved himself
    mentally from place to place, and tried to determine by the feeling of his
    body whether he was perched high in the air or buried deep underground.
  1350. perturb
    disturb in mind or make uneasy or cause to be worried or alarmed
    Ampleforth marched clumsily out between the guards, his face vaguely
    perturbed, but uncomprehending.
  1351. barbarity
    the quality of being shockingly cruel and inhumane
    A thousand times better than Winston he knew what
    the world was really like, in what degradation the mass of human beings
    lived and by what lies and barbarities the Party kept them there.
  1352. closing
    the act of closing something
    The cage was nearer; it was closing in.
  1353. nineteenth
    position 19 in a countable series of things
    You must
    get rid of those nineteenth-century ideas about the laws of Nature.
  1354. recede
    pull back or move away or backward
    The wave
    of pain receded almost as quickly as it had come.
  1355. persist in
    do something repeatedly and showing no intention to stop
    What can you do, thought Winston,
    against the lunatic who is more intelligent than yourself, who gives your
    arguments a fair hearing and then simply persists in his lunacy?
  1356. complete
    perfect and complete in every respect; having all necessary qualities
    The tone of his voice
    implied at once a complete admission of his guilt and a sort of incredulous
    horror that such a word could be applied to himself.
  1357. tasting
    a kind of sensing; distinguishing substances by means of the taste buds
    His mouth was sticky and
    evil-tasting.
  1358. gaze
    a long fixed look
    His troubled eyes were gazing at the wall about a metre above
    the level of Winston's head.
  1359. humiliation
    depriving one of self-esteem
    His grey eyes still flitted from face to face, more guiltily than ever,
    as though he were trying to discover how much the others despised him for
    his humiliation.
  1360. posterity
    all future generations
    You must stop imagining that posterity will vindicate you, Winston.
  1361. truth
    a true statement
    'To tell you the truth--' He sat down awkwardly on the bench opposite
    Winston.
  1362. pang
    a sudden sharp feeling
    He could
    evade its pangs if he was quick-witted enough: it was chiefly when he
    showed stupidity that O'Brien pulled the lever.
  1363. smuggled
    distributed or sold illicitly
    They yelled insults at the guards,
    fought back fiercely when their belongings were impounded, wrote obscene
    words on the floor, ate smuggled food which they produced from mysterious
    hiding-places in their clothes, and even shouted down the telescre
  1364. arrive at
    reach a destination, either real or abstract
    Its vocabulary was so constructed as to give exact and
    often very subtle expression to every meaning that a Party member could
    properly wish to express, while excluding all other meanings and also the
    possibility of arriving at them by indirect met
  1365. degrade
    reduce in worth or character, usually verbally
    It was a question of degrading himself, mutilating himself.
  1366. facing
    an ornamental coating to a building
    He seized Winston's shoulder and spun him round so that he was facing him.
  1367. large
    above average in size or number or quantity or magnitude or extent
    He was shoeless; large, dirty toes were
    sticking out of the holes in his socks.
  1368. tears
    the process of shedding tears (usually accompanied by sobs or other inarticulate sounds)
    When his nerves were in rags after hours of
    questioning, even this appeal could reduce him to snivelling tears.
  1369. embed
    fix or set securely or deeply
    Some dreadful thing which had lain embedded in the future had
    somehow been skipped over and had not happened.
  1370. perversion
    the action of perverting something (turning it to a wrong use)
    It covered fornication,
    adultery, homosexuality, and other perversions, and, in addition, normal
    intercourse practised for its own sake.
  1371. loosen
    make loose or looser
    The bonds that had held his
    body down were loosened.
  1372. pad
    a flat mass of soft material used for protection, stuffing, or comfort
    Two soft pads, which felt slightly moist, clamped themselves against
    Winston's temples.
  1373. little
    limited or below average in number or quantity or magnitude or extent
    Winston roused himself a little from his lethargy.
  1374. grizzled
    having dark hairs mixed with grey or white
    Winston whined
    and grizzled, made futile demands for food, fretted about the room pulling
    everything out of place and kicking the wainscoting until the neighbours
    banged on the wall, while the younger child wailed intermittently.
  1375. things
    any movable possession (especially articles of clothing)
    There were moments
    when he foresaw the things that would happen to him with such actuality
    that his heart galloped and his breath stopped.
  1376. outweigh
    weigh more heavily
    In Newspeak, euphony outweighed every consideration other than exactitude
    of meaning.
  1377. despicable
    morally reprehensible
    They wore them down
    by torture and solitude until they were despicable, cringing wretches,
    confessing whatever was put into their mouths, covering themselves with
    abuse, accusing and sheltering behind one another, whimpering for mercy.
  1378. subtly
    in a subtle manner
    It was perceived that in thus
    abbreviating a name one narrowed and subtly altered its meaning, by
    cutting out most of the associations that would otherwise cling to it.
  1379. days
    the time during which someone's life continues
    He was also several days away
    from a shave.
  1380. shapeless
    having no definite form or distinct shape
    His mouth had swollen into a shapeless cherry-coloured
    mass with a black hole in the middle of it.
  1381. rewrite
    write differently; alter the writing of
    History had already been rewritten,
    but fragments of the literature of the past survived here and there,
    imperfectly censored, and so long as one retained one's knowledge of
    Oldspeak it was possible to read them.
  1382. own right
    by title vested in yourself or by virtue of qualifications that you have achieved
    You believe that reality is
    something objective, external, existing in its own right.
  1383. habit
    an established custom
    Already we are breaking down
    the habits of thought which have survived from before the Revolution.
  1384. fall
    descend in free fall under the influence of gravity
    His mind sagged round and round on the same trick, like a ball
    falling again and again into the same series of slots.
  1385. defining
    any process serving to define the shape of something
    Ideas
    inimical to Ingsoc could only be entertained in a vague wordless form,
    and could only be named in very broad terms which lumped together and
    condemned whole groups of heresies without defining them in doing so.
  1386. spurious
    plausible but false
    An example was PROLEFEED, meaning the rubbishy
    entertainment and spurious news which the Party handed out to the masses.
  1387. merge
    mix together different elements
    But if he can make complete, utter submission, if he can escape
    from his identity, if he can merge himself in the Party so that he IS the
    Party, then he is all-powerful and immortal.
  1388. write
    write or name the letters that comprise the conventionally accepted form of (a word or part of a word)
    They yelled insults at the guards,
    fought back fiercely when their belongings were impounded, wrote obscene
    words on the floor, ate smuggled food which they produced from mysterious
    hiding-places in their clothes, and even shouted down the telescre
  1389. put
    cause to be in a certain state; cause to be in a certain relation
    They had put him into a cell similar to the one he was now in,
    but filthily dirty and at all times crowded by ten or fifteen people.
  1390. all-powerful
    having unlimited power
    But if he can make complete, utter submission, if he can escape
    from his identity, if he can merge himself in the Party so that he IS the
    Party, then he is all-powerful and immortal.
  1391. breaking
    the act of breaking something
    They wrenched off the boots with
    which she had been trying to kick them, and dumped her down across
    Winston's lap, almost breaking his thigh-bones.
  1392. doleful
    filled with or evoking sadness
    'It was my little daughter,' said Parsons with a sort of doleful pride.
  1393. ointment
    toiletry consisting of any of various substances in the form of a thick liquid that have a soothing and moisturizing effect when applied to the skin
    They had dressed his
    varicose ulcer with soothing ointment.
  1394. hide
    prevent from being seen or discovered
    They yelled insults at the guards,
    fought back fiercely when their belongings were impounded, wrote obscene
    words on the floor, ate smuggled food which they produced from mysterious
    hiding-places in their clothes, and even shouted down the telescre
  1395. awkwardness
    trouble in carrying or managing caused by bulk or shape
    He remembered how once, after the explosion
    of a rocket bomb, he had helped to drag a corpse out of some ruins, and
    had been astonished not only by the incredible weight of the thing, but by
    its rigidity and awkwardness to handle, which made it see
  1396. spray
    water in small drops in the atmosphere; blown from waves or thrown up by a waterfall
    For the purposes of everyday life it was no doubt necessary, or sometimes
    necessary, to reflect before speaking, but a Party member called upon to
    make a political or ethical judgement should be able to spray forth the
    correct opinions as automatic
  1397. remnant
    a small part or portion that remains after the main part no longer exists
    Beneath the overalls his body was looped with filthy yellowish
    rags, just recognizable as the remnants of underclothes.
  1398. leave
    go away from a place
    The howling stopped; the
    man had no breath left for anything except hanging on.
  1399. reason
    a rational motive for a belief or action
    They talked desultorily for some minutes, then, without apparent reason,
    a yell from the telescreen bade them be silent.
  1400. daylight
    the time after sunrise and before sunset while it is light outside
    He did not know how
    long he had been there; some hours at any rate; with no clocks and no
    daylight it was hard to gauge the time.
  1401. not guilty
    declared not guilty of a specific offense or crime; legally blameless
    You believed that three men, three one-time Party members named
    Jones, Aaronson, and Rutherford--men who were executed for treachery and
    sabotage after making the fullest possible confession--were not guilty of
    the crimes they were charged with.
  1402. seldom
    not often
    I have seldom seen anyone come over to us so promptly.
  1403. drip
    flowing in drops; the formation and falling of drops of liquid
    From time to time a little blood dripped on to the breast of his overalls.
  1404. dedicate
    give entirely to a specific person, activity, or cause
    That the party was the eternal guardian of the weak, a dedicated sect
    doing evil that good might come, sacrificing its own happiness to that of
    others.
  1405. interest
    a sense of concern with and curiosity about someone or something
    He had sat silent against the wall, jostled by dirty
    bodies, too preoccupied by fear and the pain in his belly to take much
    interest in his surroundings, but still noticing the astonishing difference
    in demeanour between the Party prisoners and the
  1406. fill up
    become full
    But there had been a moment--he did
    not know how long, thirty seconds, perhaps--of luminous certainty, when
    each new suggestion of O'Brien's had filled up a patch of emptiness and
    become absolute truth, and when two and two could have been three as
  1407. inarticulate
    without or deprived of the use of speech or words
    Feebly, without
    arguments, with nothing to support him except his inarticulate horror of
    what O'Brien had said, he returned to the attack.
  1408. slow
    not moving quickly; taking a comparatively long time
    '"Who controls the present controls the past,"' said O'Brien, nodding his
    head with slow approval.
  1409. dazzle
    brightness enough to blind partially and temporarily
    He was strapped into a chair surrounded by dials, under dazzling lights.
  1410. beginning
    the act of starting something
    At the beginning it needed a hard effort not to look at it,
    but presently hunger gave way to thirst.
  1411. press
    exert pressure or force to or upon
    Only
    once, when two Party members, both women, were pressed close together on
    the bench, he overheard amid the din of voices a few hurriedly-whispered
    words; and in particular a reference to something called 'room one-oh-one',
    which he did not unde
  1412. stirred
    set into a usually circular motion in order to mix or blend
    Only one thought stirred in
    his mind: that he must have been in this place longer than he had imagined.
  1413. face to face
    involving close contact; confronting each other
    His pale-grey eyes flitted timorously from face to face
    and turned quickly away again when he caught anyone's eye.
  1414. gardening
    the cultivation of plants
    The A vocabulary consisted of the words needed for the
    business of everyday life--for such things as eating, drinking, working,
    putting on one's clothes, going up and down stairs, riding in vehicles,
    gardening, cooking, and the like.
  1415. sticky
    having the sticky properties of an adhesive
    His mouth was sticky and
    evil-tasting.
  1416. Kipling
    English author of novels and poetry who was born in India (1865-1936)
    We
    were producing a definitive edition of the poems of Kipling.
  1417. gasp
    a short labored intake of breath with the mouth open
    There was a gasp and a flurry at Winston's side.
  1418. statistical
    of or relating to statistics
    Sanity was statistical.
  1419. biologist
    (biology) a scientist who studies living organisms
    Nineteenth-century
    biologists invented them.
  1420. clean out
    deprive completely of money or goods
    You will be lifted clean out from the
    stream of history.
  1421. get off
    leave a vehicle, aircraft, etc.
    I tried to do my best for the Party, didn't I? I'll get
    off
    with five years, don't you think?
  1422. Smith
    Scottish economist who advocated private enterprise and free trade (1723-1790)
    'Smith!' yelled a voice from the telescreen. '6079 Smith W.! Hands out of
    pockets in the cells!'
  1423. cured
    freed from illness or injury
    You have never
    cured yourself of it, because you did not choose to.
  1424. contracted
    reduced in size or pulled together
    The
    dull pain in his belly never went away, but sometimes it grew better and
    sometimes worse, and his thoughts expanded or contracted accordingly.
  1425. small
    limited or below average in number or quantity or magnitude or extent
    Everything came back to his sick body, which
    shrank trembling from the smallest pain.
  1426. speaking
    capable of or involving speech or speaking
    The Party prisoners seemed terrified
    of speaking to anybody, and above all of speaking to one another.
  1427. suffer
    undergo or be subjected to
    Somewhere or other she was suffering perhaps far worse than he.
  1428. laid
    set down according to a plan:"a carefully laid table with places set for four people"
    Everything was all right,
    there was no more pain, the last detail of his life was laid bare,
    understood, forgiven.
  1429. under
    below some quantity or limit
    Whenever his physical sensations were a little under
    control the terror returned.
  1430. enumerate
    determine the number or amount of
    There was no need to enumerate
    them separately, since they were all equally culpable, and, in principle,
    all punishable by death.
  1431. hunger
    a physiological need for food; the consequence of food deprivation
    But he was also
    hungry, with a gnawing, unwholesome kind of hunger.
  1432. hold down
    restrain
    His body was held down at every essential point.
  1433. guilty
    responsible for or chargeable with a reprehensible act
    'Are you guilty?' said Winston.
  1434. rod
    a long thin implement made of metal or wood
    The rhyme was "rod".
  1435. grip
    hold fast or firmly
    Even the back of his head
    was gripped in some manner.
  1436. check
    examine so as to determine accuracy, quality, or condition
    O'Brien checked his step as though Winston had uttered the
    thought aloud.
  1437. first moment
    the sum of the values of a random variable divided by the number of values
    For the first moment he had
    thought that he had gone grey as well, but it was only the scalp that was
    grey.
  1438. constantly
    without variation or change, in every case
    But always--do not forget this, Winston--always there will be
    the intoxication of power, constantly increasing and constantly growing
    subtler.
  1439. skeleton
    the hard structure (bones and cartilages) that provides a frame for the body of an animal
    A bowed, grey-coloured,
    skeleton-like thing was coming towards him.
  1440. persecutor
    someone who torments
    Did I not tell you just now that we are
    different from the persecutors of the past?
  1441. existent
    having existence or being or actuality
    You are outside
    history, you are non-existent.'
  1442. range
    a variety of different things or activities
    There was a
    long range of crimes--espionage, sabotage, and the like--to which everyone
    had to confess as a matter of course.
  1443. countless
    too numerous to be counted
    Countless other words such as HONOUR, JUSTICE, MORALITY, INTERNATIONALISM,
    DEMOCRACY, SCIENCE, and RELIGION had simply ceased to exist.
  1444. grimy
    thickly covered with ingrained dirt or soot
    At last he stood up,
    waddled clumsily across the cell, dug down into the pocket of his overalls,
    and, with an abashed air, held out a grimy piece of bread to the
    skull-faced man.
  1445. obscene
    offensive to the mind
    They yelled insults at the guards,
    fought back fiercely when their belongings were impounded, wrote obscene
    words on the floor, ate smuggled food which they produced from mysterious
    hiding-places in their clothes, and even shouted down the telescre
  1446. men
    the force of workers available
    There were six prisoners
    in the cell, men and women.
  1447. six times
    by a factor of six
    A time came when he could do it six times running.
  1448. dusty
    covered with a layer of dust
    A ray of sunlight slanting through a
    window fell on dusty table-tops.
  1449. tense
    taut or rigid; stretched tight
    All of these followed their ancient usage, except that
    WHOM had been scrapped as unnecessary, and the SHALL, SHOULD tenses had
    been dropped, all their uses being covered by WILL and WOULD.
  1450. grime
    the state of being covered with unclean things
    'Look at this filthy grime
    all over your body.
  1451. protector
    a person who cares for persons or property
    He was the tormentor, he was the protector, he was
    the inquisitor, he was the friend.
  1452. deviation
    a variation that deviates from the standard or norm
    Even in the instant of death we cannot permit any deviation.
  1453. hiding place
    a place suitable for hiding something (such as yourself)
    They yelled insults at the guards,
    fought back fiercely when their belongings were impounded, wrote obscene
    words on the floor, ate smuggled food which they produced from mysterious
    hiding-places in their clothes, and even shouted down the telescre
  1454. sense
    the faculty through which the external world is apprehended
    Besides, in a sense it was all
    true.
  1455. worn
    affected by wear; damaged by long use
    His face, seen from below, looked coarse and worn, with
    pouches under the eyes and tired lines from nose to chin.
  1456. omnipotent
    having unlimited power
    When
    we are omnipotent we shall have no more need of science.
  1457. tricky
    having concealed difficulty
    It was a tricky
    ending, involving a couple of knights.
  1458. spoken
    uttered through the medium of speech or characterized by speech; sometimes used in combination
    No one else had spoken to him.
  1459. deafening
    loud enough to cause (temporary) hearing loss
    There was a furious, deafening roar from the telescreen.
  1460. loose
    not affixed
    The guards took hold of him to wrench him loose,
    but he clung on with astonishing strength.
  1461. express
    give expression to
    Its vocabulary was so constructed as to give exact and
    often very subtle expression to every meaning that a Party member could
    properly wish to express, while excluding all other meanings and also the
    possibility of arriving at them by indirect met
  1462. grasp
    hold firmly
    You could grasp the mechanics of the Society you lived
    in, but not its underlying motives.
  1463. loved
    held dear
    He loved her
    and would not betray her; but that was only a fact, known as he knew the
    rules of arithmetic.
  1464. easily
    with ease (`easy' is sometimes used informally for `easily')
    But there had been a moment--he did
    not know how long, thirty seconds, perhaps--of luminous certainty, when
    each new suggestion of O'Brien's had filled up a patch of emptiness and
    become absolute truth, and when two and two could have been three as
    eas
  1465. slanting
    having an oblique or slanted direction
    A ray of sunlight slanting through a
    window fell on dusty table-tops.
  1466. startled
    excited by sudden surprise or alarm and making a quick involuntary movement
    Ampleforth paused, mildly startled.
  1467. expose
    to show, make visible or apparent
    Before they exposed their victims to public trial, they
    deliberately set themselves to destroy their dignity.
  1468. camp
    temporary lodgings in the country for travelers or vacationers
    There was much talk about the forced-labour camps to which
    most of the prisoners expected to be sent.
  1469. shod
    wearing footgear
    He felt the smash of
    truncheons on his elbows and iron-shod boots on his shins; he saw himself
    grovelling on the floor, screaming for mercy through broken teeth.
  1470. indispensable
    not to be dispensed with; essential
    Much had changed in him since that first day in the Ministry
    of Love, but the final, indispensable, healing change had never happened,
    until this moment.
  1471. penitence
    remorse for your past conduct
    I saw them gradually worn down,
    whimpering, grovelling, weeping--and in the end it was not with pain or
    fear, only with penitence.
  1472. darkness
    absence of light or illumination
    At one moment he felt certain that it was broad daylight
    outside, and at the next equally certain that it was pitch darkness.
  1473. accepting
    tolerating without protest
    It was more natural to exist
    from moment to moment, accepting another ten minutes' life even with the
    certainty that there was torture at the end of it.
  1474. weight
    the vertical force exerted by a mass as a result of gravity
    He took his stand opposite the chinless man,
    and then, at a signal from the officer, let free a frightful blow, with
    all the weight of his body behind it, full in the chinless man's mouth.
  1475. destroyed
    spoiled or ruined or demolished
    It was another copy of the photograph of Jones, Aaronson, and
    Rutherford at the party function in New York, which he had chanced upon
    eleven years ago and promptly destroyed.
  1476. imply
    express or state indirectly
    The tone of his voice
    implied at once a complete admission of his guilt and a sort of incredulous
    horror that such a word could be applied to himself.
  1477. pretend
    make believe with the intent to deceive
    He is not pretending, thought Winston, he is not a
    hypocrite, he believes every word he says.
  1478. vindicate
    show to be right by providing justification or proof
    You must stop imagining that posterity will vindicate you, Winston.
  1479. textbook
    a book prepared for use in schools or colleges
    It was
    a perfect conversion, a textbook case.'
  1480. pick
    look for and gather
    O'Brien picked up the cage and brought it across to the nearer table.
  1481. insidious
    working or spreading in a hidden and usually injurious way
    'It's insidious.
  1482. cropped
    (of land or soil) used for growing crops
    He was in the Golden
    Country, following the foot-track across the old rabbit-cropped pasture.
  1483. plastered
    (of walls) covered with a coat of plaster
    The wind plastered their
    thin overalls against their bodies.
  1484. clean
    free from dirt or impurities; or having clean habits
    You will be lifted clean out from the
    stream of history.
  1485. ironical
    characterized by often poignant difference or incongruity between what is expected and what actually is
    Even his spectacles seemed to
    wear an ironical gleam.
  1486. strike up
    start playing
    The tinkling music struck up
    again.
  1487. well up
    come up (as of feelings and thoughts, or other ephemeral things)
    And then--perhaps
    it was not happening, perhaps it was only a memory taking on the semblance
    of sound--a voice was singing:


    'Under the spreading chestnut tree
    I sold you and you sold me----'


    The tears welled up in his eyes.
  1488. rib
    any of the 12 pairs of curved arches of bone extending from the spine to or toward the sternum in humans (and similar bones in most vertebrates)
    There were times when he rolled about the floor, as shameless
    as an animal, writhing his body this way and that in an endless, hopeless
    effort to dodge the kicks, and simply inviting more and yet more kicks,
    in his ribs, in his belly, on his elbows
  1489. lying
    the deliberate act of deviating from the truth
    Chapter 2



    He was lying on something that felt like a camp bed, except that it was
    higher off the ground and that he was fixed down in some way so that he
    could not move.
  1490. intellectually
    in an intellectual manner
    Intellectually there is very little wrong with you.
  1491. caption
    brief description accompanying an illustration
    BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU, the caption said.
  1492. pressed
    compacted by ironing
    Only
    once, when two Party members, both women, were pressed close together on
    the bench, he overheard amid the din of voices a few hurriedly-whispered
    words; and in particular a reference to something called 'room one-oh-one',
    which he did not unde
  1493. release
    grant freedom to; free from confinement
    They might keep him for years in
    solitary confinement, they might send him to a labour-camp, they might
    release him for a while, as they sometimes did.
  1494. pour down
    drink down entirely
    He seemed actually to see the Eurasian army swarming
    across the never-broken frontier and pouring down into the tip of Africa
    like a column of ants.
  1495. hurrying
    moving with great haste
    He
    was hurrying along with frozen hands and watering eyes when he saw her not
    ten metres away from him.
  1496. armada
    a large fleet
    He could hear just enough of what was
    issuing from the telescreen to realize that it had all happened, as he had
    foreseen; a vast seaborne armada had secretly assembled a sudden blow in
    the enemy's rear, the white arrow tearing across the tail of t
  1497. lump
    a compact mass
    Suddenly, like a lump of submerged wreckage
    breaking the surface of water, the thought burst into his mind: 'It doesn't
    really happen.
  1498. beating
    the act of overcoming or outdoing
    How many times he had been beaten, how long
    the beatings had continued, he could not remember.
  1499. shaking
    the act of causing something to move up and down (or back and forth) with quick movements
    He felt very cold, he was shaking uncontrollably,
    his teeth were chattering, the tears were rolling down his cheeks.
  1500. smartly
    in a clever manner
    A young officer, a trim black-uniformed figure who seemed to
    glitter all over with polished leather, and whose pale, straight-featured
    face was like a wax mask, stepped smartly through the doorway.
  1501. minimum
    the smallest possible quantity
    Newspeak was designed not to extend
    but to DIMINISH the range of thought, and this purpose was indirectly
    assisted by cutting the choice of words down to a minimum.
  1502. overwhelm
    cover completely or make imperceptible
    A feeling of
    weariness had overwhelmed him.
  1503. vaguely
    in a vague way
    'These things happen,' he began vaguely.
  1504. yellowish
    of the color intermediate between green and orange in the color spectrum; of something resembling the color of an egg yolk
    Beneath the overalls his body was looped with filthy yellowish
    rags, just recognizable as the remnants of underclothes.
  1505. glazed
    having a shiny surface or coating
    Through the midday
    hours he sat with glazed face, the bottle handy, listening to the
    telescreen.
  1506. logical
    based on known statements or events or conditions
    Did not the statement, 'You do
    not exist', contain a logical absurdity?
  1507. either
    after a negative statement used as an intensive meaning something like `likewise' or `also'
    He was in a cell which might have been either dark or light, because he
    could see nothing except a pair of eyes.
  1508. wear
    put clothing on one's body
    He was wearing khaki shorts and a sports-shirt.
  1509. clothes
    clothing in general
    They yelled insults at the guards,
    fought back fiercely when their belongings were impounded, wrote obscene
    words on the floor, ate smuggled food which they produced from mysterious
    hiding-places in their clothes, and even shouted down the telescre
  1510. devote
    dedicate
    It will be simpler to discuss each class separately, but the grammatical
    peculiarities of the language can be dealt with in the section devoted to
    the A vocabulary, since the same rules held good for all three categories.
  1511. together
    in contact with each other or in proximity
    Only
    once, when two Party members, both women, were pressed close together on
    the bench, he overheard amid the din of voices a few hurriedly-whispered
    words; and in particular a reference to something called 'room one-oh-one',
    which he did not unde
  1512. left hand
    the hand that is on the left side of the body
    O'Brien held up his left hand, its back towards Winston, with the thumb
    hidden and the four fingers extended.
  1513. make off
    run away; usually includes taking something or somebody along
    He made a half-hearted attempt to catch up,
    then slowed down, turned, and made off in the opposite direction.
  1514. hair
    a covering for the body (or parts of it) consisting of a dense growth of threadlike structures (as on the human head); helps to prevent heat loss
    An enormous wreck of a woman, aged about sixty, with
    great tumbling breasts and thick coils of white hair which had come down
    in her struggles, was carried in, kicking and shouting, by four guards,
    who had hold of her one at each corner.
  1515. consist
    have its essential character; be comprised or contained in; be embodied in
    The A vocabulary consisted of the words needed for the
    business of everyday life--for such things as eating, drinking, working,
    putting on one's clothes, going up and down stairs, riding in vehicles,
    gardening, cooking, and the like.
  1516. graver
    a tool used by an engraver
    The voice from the telescreen paused and added in a different and much
    graver tone: 'You are warned to stand by for an important announcement at
    fifteen-thirty.
  1517. twenty
    the cardinal number that is the sum of nineteen and one
    It might be twenty-four
    hours since he had eaten, it might be thirty-six.
  1518. ugly
    displeasing to the senses
    At sight of the heavy, lined face, so ugly and so intelligent, his heart
    seemed to turn over.
  1519. news
    information about recent and important events
    The news from the African
    front was disquieting in the extreme.
  1520. just
    and nothing more
    A bench, or
    shelf, just wide enough to sit on ran round the wall, broken only by the
    door and, at the end opposite the door, a lavatory pan with no wooden
    seat.
  1521. commoner
    a person who holds no title
    Because of the great difficulty in securing euphony, irregular formations
    were commoner in the B vocabulary than in the A vocabulary.
  1522. fixed
    fixed and unmoving
    Chapter 2



    He was lying on something that felt like a camp bed, except that it was
    higher off the ground and that he was fixed down in some way so that he
    could not move.
  1523. finished
    ended or brought to an end
    By the time we had finished with them they were
    only the shells of men.
  1524. perpetuate
    cause to continue or prevail
    It set out
    to eradicate heresy, and ended by perpetuating it.
  1525. unwillingly
    in an unwilling manner
    They pretended, perhaps
    they even believed, that they had seized power unwillingly and for a
    limited time, and that just round the corner there lay a paradise where
    human beings would be free and equal.
  1526. happiness
    state of well-being characterized by emotions ranging from contentment to intense joy
    That the choice for mankind lay between freedom and
    happiness, and that, for the great bulk of mankind, happiness was better.
  1527. darkening
    changing to a darker color
    Down one side of his face the
    flesh was darkening.
  1528. heart and soul
    the choicest or most essential or most vital part of some idea or experience
    We burn all evil and all illusion out of him; we bring him over to our
    side, not in appearance, but genuinely, heart and soul.
  1529. immorality
    the quality of not being in accord with standards of right or good conduct
    His sexual life, for example, was entirely regulated by
    the two Newspeak words SEXCRIME (sexual immorality) and GOODSEX (chastity).
  1530. More
    English statesman who opposed Henry VIII's divorce from Catherine of Aragon and was imprisoned and beheaded; recalled for his concept of Utopia, the ideal state
    More often he wondered where he was, and what time
    of day it was.
  1531. invariable
    not liable to or capable of change
    None of the now-existing adverbs was retained,
    except for a very few already ending in -WISE: the -WISE termination was
    invariable.
  1532. exaggerate
    to enlarge beyond bounds or the truth
    This accounted not
    only for the habit of abbreviating whenever possible, but also for the
    almost exaggerated care that was taken to make every word easily
    pronounceable.
  1533. composite
    consisting of separate interconnected parts
    The words COMMUNIST INTERNATIONAL, for instance, call up a composite
    picture of universal human brotherhood, red flags, barricades, Karl Marx,
    and the Paris Commune.
  1534. English
    of or relating to or characteristic of England or its culture or people
    'Has it ever occurred to you,' he said, 'that the whole history of English
    poetry has been determined by the fact that the English language lacks
    rhymes?'
  1535. scar
    a mark left (usually on the skin) by the healing of injured tissue
    Here and there under the dirt there
    were the red scars of wounds, and near the ankle the varicose ulcer was an
    inflamed mass with flakes of skin peeling off it.
  1536. find out
    find out, learn, or determine with certainty, usually by making an inquiry or other effort
    In the end the temptation to find out overcame his fear; he
    slipped a hand into his pocket.
  1537. peculiarity
    an odd or unusual characteristic
    It will be simpler to discuss each class separately, but the grammatical
    peculiarities of the language can be dealt with in the section devoted to
    the A vocabulary, since the same rules held good for all three categories.
  1538. pulse
    the rhythmic contraction and expansion of the arteries with each beat of the heart
    He
    remembered a surly barber arriving to scrape his chin and crop his hair,
    and businesslike, unsympathetic men in white coats feeling his pulse,
    tapping his reflexes, turning up his eyelids, running harsh fingers over
    him in search for broken bone
  1539. glance
    throw a glance at; take a brief look at
    Parsons gave Winston a glance in which there was neither interest nor
    surprise, but only misery.
  1540. deep water
    serious trouble
    If you have come up
    from deep water it is not cowardly to fill your lungs with air.
  1541. ignored
    disregarded
    To a surprising extent the ordinary
    criminals ignored the Party prisoners.
  1542. reflex
    an automatic instinctive unlearned reaction to a stimulus
    He
    remembered a surly barber arriving to scrape his chin and crop his hair,
    and businesslike, unsympathetic men in white coats feeling his pulse,
    tapping his reflexes, turning up his eyelids, running harsh fingers over
    him in search for broken bone
  1543. doubling
    increase by a factor of two
    He thought: 'If I could
    save Julia by doubling my own pain, would I do it?
  1544. in the air
    on everybody's mind
    He moved himself
    mentally from place to place, and tried to determine by the feeling of his
    body whether he was perched high in the air or buried deep underground.
  1545. theoretically
    in theory; according to the assumed facts
    In 1984, when Oldspeak was still the normal means of communication,
    the danger theoretically existed that in using Newspeak words one might
    remember their original meanings.
  1546. exhausting
    having a debilitating effect
    You are under the impression that hatred is more exhausting
    than love.
  1547. betrayal
    the quality of aiding an enemy
    The espionage, the betrayals, the arrests, the tortures, the
    executions, the disappearances will never cease.
  1548. frighten
    cause fear in
    It was a frightening pain, because he could not see
    what was happening, and he had the feeling that some mortal injury was
    being done to him.
  1549. khaki
    a sturdy twilled cloth of a yellowish brown color used especially for military uniforms
    He was wearing khaki shorts and a sports-shirt.
  1550. pumped
    tense with excitement and enthusiasm as from a rush of adrenaline
    It
    was he who decided when Winston should scream with pain, when he should
    have a respite, when he should be fed, when he should sleep, when the
    drugs should be pumped into his arm.
  1551. shrill
    having or emitting a high-pitched and sharp tone or tones
    Winston heard a succession of
    shrill cries which appeared to be occurring in the air above his head.
  1552. aloud
    using the voice; not silently
    O'Brien checked his step as though Winston had uttered the
    thought aloud.
  1553. roll
    move by turning over or rotating
    Then he rolled over and raised himself
    unsteadily on hands and knees.
  1554. quickly
    with little or no delay
    His pale-grey eyes flitted timorously from face to face
    and turned quickly away again when he caught anyone's eye.
  1555. good
    having desirable or positive qualities especially those suitable for a thing specified
    On the other hand some of them seemed to be on
    good terms with the guards, called them by nicknames, and tried to wheedle
    cigarettes through the spyhole in the door.
  1556. persevere
    be persistent, refuse to stop
    The first time he tried to
    smoke it made him sick, but he persevered, and spun the packet out for
    a long time, smoking half a cigarette after each meal.
  1557. clipped
    cut or trimmed by clipping
    And rightly so, since what was required, above all for
    political purposes, was short clipped words of unmistakable meaning which
    could be uttered rapidly and which roused the minimum of echoes in the
    speaker's mind.
  1558. rolling
    propelling something on wheels
    He was rolling down a mighty corridor, a kilometre wide, full of glorious,
    golden light, roaring with laughter and shouting out confessions at the
    top of his voice.
  1559. illicit
    contrary to accepted morality (especially sexual morality) or convention
    There was bribery, favouritism, and racketeering of every kind, there was
    homosexuality and prostitution, there was even illicit alcohol distilled
    from potatoes.
  1560. pocket
    a small pouch inside a garment for carrying small articles
    He had an idea that there were a few breadcrumbs in the pocket of his
    overalls.
  1561. exactly
    indicating exactness or preciseness
    Opposite Winston there sat
    a man with a chinless, toothy face exactly like that of some large,
    harmless rodent.
  1562. concealed
    not accessible to view
    Concealed lamps
    flooded it with cold light, and there was a low, steady humming sound
    which he supposed had something to do with the air supply.
  1563. free will
    the power of making free choices unconstrained by external agencies
    When finally
    you surrender to us, it must be of your own free will.
  1564. undo
    cancel, annul, or reverse an action or its effect
    Most of the time they screamed abuse at him and threatened
    at every hesitation to deliver him over to the guards again; but sometimes
    they would suddenly change their tune, call him comrade, appeal to him in
    the name of Ingsoc and Big Brother, and ask him
  1565. for the first time
    the initial time
    For the first time in many years he forgot the
    presence of the telescreen.
  1566. wreckage
    the remaining parts of something that has been wrecked
    Suddenly, like a lump of submerged wreckage
    breaking the surface of water, the thought burst into his mind: 'It doesn't
    really happen.
  1567. follow
    to travel behind, go after, come after
    The woman hoisted herself
    upright and followed them out with a yell of 'F---- bastards!'
  1568. dispense with
    give up what is not strictly needed
    Quite apart from the suppression of definitely heretical words, reduction
    of vocabulary was regarded as an end in itself, and no word that could be
    dispensed with was allowed to survive.
  1569. hunch
    an impression that something might be the case
    The thin shoulders were
    hunched forward so as to make a cavity of the chest, the scraggy neck
    seemed to be bending double under the weight of the skull.
  1570. left
    being or located on or directed toward the side of the body to the west when facing north
    The howling stopped; the
    man had no breath left for anything except hanging on.
  1571. allow
    make it possible through a specific action or lack of action for something to happen
    I allowed the
    word "God" to remain at the end of a line.
  1572. addition
    the arithmetic operation of summing; calculating the sum of two or more numbers
    In addition, any word--this again applied in principle to every word in
    the language--could be negatived by adding the affix UN-, or could be
    strengthened by the affix PLUS-, or, for still greater emphasis,
    DOUBLEPLUS-.
  1573. freeze
    change from a liquid to a solid when cold
    His heart seemed to be frozen.
  1574. microphone
    device for converting sound waves into electrical energy
    There was no telescreen, but there must be hidden microphones: besides,
    they could be seen.
  1575. terrified
    thrown into a state of intense fear or desperation
    The Party
    prisoners were always silent and terrified, but the ordinary criminals
    seemed to care nothing for anybody.
  1576. discipline
    a system of rules of conduct or method of practice
    You are here because you have failed in humility, in
    self-discipline.
  1577. horrible
    provoking horror
    What was the most horrible,
    sickening thing of all?
  1578. cower
    crouch or curl up
    If it had been possible he would have cowered deeper into
    the bed.
  1579. tentative
    unsettled in mind or opinion
    He drank another mouthful of gin, picked up
    the white knight and made a tentative move.
  1580. abashed
    feeling or caused to feel uneasy and self-conscious
    At last he stood up,
    waddled clumsily across the cell, dug down into the pocket of his overalls,
    and, with an abashed air, held out a grimy piece of bread to the
    skull-faced man.
  1581. zip
    forceful exertion
    The zip
    fastener had long since been wrenched out of them.
  1582. shameless
    feeling no shame
    There were times when he rolled about the floor, as shameless
    as an animal, writhing his body this way and that in an endless, hopeless
    effort to dodge the kicks, and simply inviting more and yet more kicks,
    in his ribs, in his belly, on his elbows
  1583. clocks
    European weed naturalized in southwestern United States and Mexico having reddish decumbent stems with small fernlike leaves and small deep reddish-lavender flowers followed by slender fruits that stick straight up; often grown for forage
    He did not know how
    long he had been there; some hours at any rate; with no clocks and no
    daylight it was hard to gauge the time.
  1584. systematically
    in a systematic or consistent manner
    That it sought power because men in the mass were frail,
    cowardly creatures who could not endure liberty or face the truth, and
    must be ruled over and systematically deceived by others who were stronger
    than themselves.
  1585. weld
    a metal joint formed by softening with heat and fusing or hammering together
    They consisted of two or more words, or portions of words, welded together
    in an easily pronounceable form.
  1586. deformity
    an affliction in which some part of the body is misshapen or malformed
    He saw five fingers, and there was no deformity.
  1587. fencing
    a barrier that serves to enclose an area
    Fixed to the front of it was something that looked
    like a fencing mask, with the concave side outwards.
  1588. finish
    come or bring to a finish or an end
    Finish
    it off and let me die.
  1589. wayward
    resistant to guidance or discipline
    More than ever he had the
    air of a teacher taking pains with a wayward but promising child.
  1590. pace
    the relative speed of progress or change
    He resettled his spectacles
    thoughtfully, and took a pace or two up and down.
  1591. universe
    everything that exists anywhere
    'But the whole universe is outside us.
  1592. apply
    put into service; make work or employ for a particular purpose or for its inherent or natural purpose
    The tone of his voice
    implied at once a complete admission of his guilt and a sort of incredulous
    horror that such a word could be applied to himself.
  1593. go on
    move forward, also in the metaphorical sense
    There were times
    when it went on and on until the cruel, wicked, unforgivable thing seemed
    to him not that the guards continued to beat him but that he could not
    force himself into losing consciousness.
  1594. drag
    pull, as against a resistance
    The
    eyes of the chinless man kept flitting towards the skull-faced man, then
    turning guiltily away, then being dragged back by an irresistible
    attraction.
  1595. evil
    morally bad or wrong
    It was a noisy, evil-smelling
    place.
  1596. chance
    an unknown and unpredictable phenomenon that causes an event to result one way rather than another
    He was not certain that he would
    use the razor blade even if he got the chance.
  1597. appeal
    earnest or urgent request
    He paused opposite
    Winston and began eagerly appealing to him: 'You don't think they'll shoot
    me, do you, old chap?
  1598. neutral
    having no personal preference
    No word in the B vocabulary was ideologically neutral.
  1599. mad
    roused to anger
    But
    in that case how could it be true that O'Brien was mad?
  1600. smashing
    very good
    All day, with little spurts
    of excitement, the thought of a smashing defeat in Africa had been in and
    out of his mind.
  1601. tightly
    in a tight or constricted manner
    He was
    strapped upright in a chair, so tightly that he could move nothing, not
    even his head.
  1602. wiped out
    destroyed completely
    You are
    a stain that must be wiped out.
  1603. bring to
    return to consciousness
    Will you understand,
    Winston, that no one whom we bring to this place ever leaves our hands
    uncured?
  1604. wilful
    done by design
    His training fitted him to do this, the language gave him an almost
    foolproof instrument, and the texture of the words, with their harsh sound
    and a certain wilful ugliness which was in accord with the spirit of
    Ingsoc, assisted the process still f
  1605. Osiris
    Egyptian god of the underworld and judge of the dead; husband and brother of Isis; father of Horus
    He did not need to
    know that these gods were called Baal, Osiris, Moloch, Ashtaroth, and the
    like: probably the less he knew about them the better for his orthodoxy.
  1606. metaphysics
    the philosophical study of being and knowing
    'I told you, Winston,' he said, 'that metaphysics is not your strong
    point.
  1607. bribery
    the practice of offering something (usually money) in order to gain an illicit advantage
    There was bribery, favouritism, and racketeering of every kind, there was
    homosexuality and prostitution, there was even illicit alcohol distilled
    from potatoes.
  1608. moving in
    the act of occupying or taking possession of a building
    Behind his screwed-up eyelids a
    forest of fingers seemed to be moving in a sort of dance, weaving in and
    out, disappearing behind one another and reappearing again.
  1609. Truth
    United States abolitionist and feminist who was freed from slavery and became a leading advocate of the abolition of slavery and for the rights of women (1797-1883)
    Occasionally, perhaps twice a week, he went
    to a dusty, forgotten-looking office in the Ministry of Truth and did
    a little work, or what was called work.
  1610. mathematician
    a person skilled in mathematics
    Do you suppose our mathematicians
    are unequal to that?
  1611. turn over
    cause to overturn from an upright or normal position
    At sight of the heavy, lined face, so ugly and so intelligent, his heart
    seemed to turn over.
  1612. excite
    act as a stimulant
    Soon he was wildly excited and shouting with
    laughter as the tiddly-winks climbed hopefully up the ladders and then
    came slithering down the snakes again, almost to the starting-point.
  1613. slot
    a small slit (as for inserting a coin or depositing mail)
    His mind sagged round and round on the same trick, like a ball
    falling again and again into the same series of slots.
  1614. trouble
    a source of difficulty
    His troubled eyes were gazing at the wall about a metre above
    the level of Winston's head.
  1615. squeal
    utter a high-pitched cry, characteristic of pigs
    There was an outburst of squeals from the cage.
  1616. dual
    consisting of or involving two parts or components usually in pairs
    Do you suppose it is
    beyond us to produce a dual system of astronomy?
  1617. below
    in or to a place that is lower
    His
    cell might be at the heart of the building or against its outer wall; it
    might be ten floors below ground, or thirty above it.
  1618. expected
    considered likely or probable to happen or arrive
    There was much talk about the forced-labour camps to which
    most of the prisoners expected to be sent.
  1619. dust
    fine powdery material such as dry earth or pollen that can be blown about in the air
    Dust.
  1620. pouring
    flowing profusely
    He seemed actually to see the Eurasian army swarming
    across the never-broken frontier and pouring down into the tip of Africa
    like a column of ants.
  1621. close
    at or within a short distance in space or time or having elements near each other
    It had been there ever since they
    had bundled him into the closed van and driven him away.
  1622. and so on
    continuing in the same way
    Thus, in all verbs the preterite and the past
    participle were the same and ended in -ED. The preterite of STEAL was
    STEALED, the preterite of THINK was THINKED, and so on throughout the
    language, all such forms as SWAM, GAVE, BROUGHT, SPOKE, TAKEN,
  1623. beneath
    in or to a place that is lower
    He had the impression of swimming up into this room from some quite
    different world, a sort of underwater world far beneath it.
  1624. stretch out
    extend or stretch out to a greater or the full length
    If he could have moved he would have stretched out
    a hand and laid it on O'Brien's arm.
  1625. unable
    (usually followed by `to') lacking necessary physical or mental ability
    He began walking jerkily up and down, evidently
    unable to keep still.
  1626. term
    a limited period of time
    On the other hand some of them seemed to be on
    good terms with the guards, called them by nicknames, and tried to wheedle
    cigarettes through the spyhole in the door.
  1627. faintly
    to a faint degree or weakly perceived
    O'Brien smiled faintly.
  1628. spurt
    gush forth in a sudden stream or jet
    All day, with little spurts
    of excitement, the thought of a smashing defeat in Africa had been in and
    out of his mind.
  1629. acceptance
    the state of being acceptable and accepted
    'There is
    learning, there is understanding, and there is acceptance.
  1630. let loose
    turn loose or free from restraint
    The trumpet-call had let loose an enormous volume of noise.
  1631. crude
    belonging to an early stage of technical development; characterized by simplicity and (often) crudeness
    It needed also a sort of
    athleticism of mind, an ability at one moment to make the most delicate
    use of logic and at the next to be unconscious of the crudest logical
    errors.
  1632. solely
    without any others being included or involved
    We are not interested in the good
    of others; we are interested solely in power.
  1633. assume
    take to be the case or to be true; accept without verification or proof
    When you delude yourself into
    thinking that you see something, you assume that everyone else sees the
    same thing as you.
  1634. writhing
    moving in a twisting or snake-like or wormlike fashion
    There were times when he rolled about the floor, as shameless
    as an animal, writhing his body this way and that in an endless, hopeless
    effort to dodge the kicks, and simply inviting more and yet more kicks,
    in his ribs, in his belly, on his elbows
  1635. chair
    a seat for one person, with a support for the back
    He was strapped into a chair surrounded by dials, under dazzling lights.
  1636. abash
    cause to be embarrassed; cause to feel self-conscious
    At last he stood up,
    waddled clumsily across the cell, dug down into the pocket of his overalls,
    and, with an abashed air, held out a grimy piece of bread to the
    skull-faced man.
  1637. rise up
    come to the surface
    For every heretic it
    burned at the stake, thousands of others rose up.
  1638. snap
    separate or cause to separate abruptly
    Although
    the pain had brought the sweat out on his forehead, the worst of all was
    the fear that his backbone was about to snap.
  1639. clamp
    a device (generally used by carpenters) that holds things firmly together
    Two soft pads, which felt slightly moist, clamped themselves against
    Winston's temples.
  1640. incredulous
    not disposed or willing to believe; unbelieving
    The tone of his voice
    implied at once a complete admission of his guilt and a sort of incredulous
    horror that such a word could be applied to himself.
  1641. coming
    of the relatively near future
    We shall crush you down to the point from
    which there is no coming back.
  1642. ninety
    the cardinal number that is the product of ten and nine
    Perhaps the needle was eighty--ninety.
  1643. write in
    cast a vote by inserting a name that does not appear on the ballot
    'Do you remember writing in your diary,' he said, 'that it did not matter
    whether I was a friend or an enemy, since I was at least a person who
    understood you and could be talked to?
  1644. onwards
    in a forward direction
    From now onwards he must not only think right;
    he must feel right, dream right.
  1645. original
    preceding all others in time or being as first made or performed
    No etymological principle was followed
    here: in some cases it was the original noun that was chosen for retention,
    in other cases the verb.
  1646. tolerant
    showing or characterized by broad-mindedness
    The more the Party is powerful, the
    less it will be tolerant: the weaker the opposition, the tighter the
    despotism.
  1647. dispensed
    distributed or weighted out in carefully determined portions
    Quite apart from the suppression of definitely heretical words, reduction
    of vocabulary was regarded as an end in itself, and no word that could be
    dispensed with was allowed to survive.
  1648. terms
    status with respect to the relations between people or groups
    On the other hand some of them seemed to be on
    good terms with the guards, called them by nicknames, and tried to wheedle
    cigarettes through the spyhole in the door.
  1649. mysticism
    a religion based on mystical communion with an ultimate reality
    White always
    mates, he thought with a sort of cloudy mysticism.
  1650. register
    an official written record of names or events or transactions
    Nothing will remain of you, not a name in a register, not
    a memory in a living brain.
  1651. drop
    let fall to the ground
    The chinless man dropped the piece of bread on the floor.
  1652. trembling
    vibrating slightly and irregularly; as e.g. with fear or cold or like the leaves of an aspen in a breeze
    Everything came back to his sick body, which
    shrank trembling from the smallest pain.
  1653. enlightenment
    education that results in understanding and the spread of knowledge
    The secret
    accumulation of knowledge--a gradual spread of enlightenment--ultimately
    a proletarian rebellion--the overthrow of the Party.
  1654. sewer
    a waste pipe that carries away sewage or surface water
    One of them was leaping up and down, the
    other, an old scaly grandfather of the sewers, stood up, with his pink
    hands against the bars, and fiercely sniffed the air.
  1655. spinal
    of or relating to the spine or spinal cord
    You have a vivid mental picture of the vertebrae snapping apart
    and the spinal fluid dripping out of them.
  1656. inferiority
    the state of being inferior
    What most oppressed him was the
    consciousness of his own intellectual inferiority.
  1657. preserve
    keep in safety and protect from harm, decay, loss, or destruction
    It was not easy to preserve
    inscrutability when you did not know what your face looked like.
  1658. less
    (comparative of `little' usually used with mass nouns) a quantifier meaning not as great in amount or degree
    The beatings grew less frequent, and became mainly a threat, a horror
    to which he could be sent back at any moment when his answers were
    unsatisfactory.
  1659. flurry
    a rapid active commotion
    There was a gasp and a flurry at Winston's side.
  1660. handle
    the appendage to an object that is designed to be held in order to use or move it
    The guards, too, treated the
    common criminals with a certain forbearance, even when they had to handle
    them roughly.
  1661. more and more
    advancing in amount or intensity
    Meanwhile it gained ground steadily, all
    Party members tending to use Newspeak words and grammatical constructions
    more and more in their everyday speech.
  1662. screw
    a simple machine of the inclined-plane type consisting of a spirally threaded cylindrical rod that engages with a similarly threaded hole
    Behind his screwed-up eyelids a
    forest of fingers seemed to be moving in a sort of dance, weaving in and
    out, disappearing behind one another and reappearing again.
  1663. specialized
    developed or designed for a special activity or function
    In the C vocabulary, which consisted of scientific
    and technical words, it might be necessary to give specialized names to
    certain sexual aberrations, but the ordinary citizen had no need of them.
  1664. overcome
    win a victory over
    In the end the temptation to find out overcame his fear; he
    slipped a hand into his pocket.
  1665. disperse
    move away from each other
    There were days when they assembled
    and then promptly dispersed again, frankly admitting to one another that
    there was not really anything to be done.
  1666. present
    temporal sense; intermediate between past and future; now existing or happening or in consideration
    '"Who controls the past controls the future: who controls the present
    controls the past,"' repeated Winston obediently.
  1667. to and fro
    moving from one place to another and back again
    He watched the heavy
    yet graceful form strolling to and fro, in and out of the range of his
    vision.
  1668. quill
    the hollow spine of a feather
    Unbidden, a waiter came and
    filled his glass up with Victory Gin, shaking into it a few drops from
    another bottle with a quill through the cork.
  1669. faint
    deficient in magnitude; barely perceptible; lacking clarity or brightness or loudness etc
    There was a very faint stirring all the way round the bench.
  1670. evade
    avoid or try to avoid fulfilling, answering, or performing (duties, questions, or issues)
    He could
    evade its pangs if he was quick-witted enough: it was chiefly when he
    showed stupidity that O'Brien pulled the lever.
  1671. interested
    having or showing interest; especially curiosity or fascination or concern
    We are not interested in those stupid crimes that you have
    committed.
  1672. after
    happening at a time subsequent to a reference time
    She was about the right age and
    physique, and it was probable that people changed somewhat after twenty
    years in a forced-labour camp.
  1673. twist
    cause (a plastic object) to assume a crooked or angular form
    Their real weapon was the merciless questioning
    that went on and on, hour after hour, tripping him up, laying traps for
    him, twisting everything that he said, convicting him at every step of
    lies and self-contradiction until he began weeping as muc
  1674. outfit
    a set of clothing (with accessories)
    A lovely
    toy--you'll love it'; and then she had gone out in the rain, to a little
    general shop which was still sporadically open nearby, and came back with
    a cardboard box containing an outfit of Snakes and Ladders.
  1675. organization
    an ordered manner; orderliness by virtue of being methodical and well organized
    He confessed that for years he had been in personal touch
    with Goldstein and had been a member of an underground organization which
    had included almost every human being he had ever known.
  1676. sub
    a submersible warship usually armed with torpedoes
    He had been appointed to a
    sub-committee of a sub-committee which had sprouted from one of the
    innumerable committees dealing with minor difficulties that arose in the
    compilation of the Eleventh Edition of the Newspeak Dictionary.
  1677. each
    (used of count nouns) every one considered individually
    There were four telescreens, one in each wall.
  1678. soap
    a cleansing agent made from the salts of vegetable or animal fats
    I could float off this floor like a soap bubble if
    I wish to.
  1679. too large
    excessively large
    Ampleforth, too large to sit in comfort on the narrow
    bench, fidgeted from side to side, clasping his lank hands first round one
    knee, then round the other.
  1680. much
    (quantifier used with mass nouns) great in quantity or degree or extent
    He had sat silent against the wall, jostled by dirty
    bodies, too preoccupied by fear and the pain in his belly to take much
    interest in his surroundings, but still noticing the astonishing difference
    in demeanour between the Party prisoners and the
  1681. surly
    inclined to anger or bad feelings with overtones of menace
    He
    remembered a surly barber arriving to scrape his chin and crop his hair,
    and businesslike, unsympathetic men in white coats feeling his pulse,
    tapping his reflexes, turning up his eyelids, running harsh fingers over
    him in search for broken bone
  1682. shot
    the act of firing a projectile
    The needle of the dial had shot up to
    fifty-five.
  1683. victim
    an unfortunate person who suffers from some adverse circumstance
    The man looked frantically round at the other prisoners, as though with
    some idea that he could put another victim in his own place.
  1684. inner
    located inward
    We convert him, we capture his inner mind, we reshape him.
  1685. name
    a language unit by which a person or thing is known
    'Wass your name, dearie?' she said.
  1686. half
    one of two equal parts of a divisible whole
    His eyes flitted
    round the walls, as though he half expected to find a window somewhere.
  1687. diminution
    change toward something smaller or lower
    By such methods it was found possible to bring about an enormous
    diminution of vocabulary.
  1688. music
    an artistic form of auditory communication incorporating instrumental or vocal tones in a structured and continuous manner
    A
    tinny music trickled from the telescreens.
  1689. star
    (astronomy) a celestial body of hot gases that radiates energy derived from thermonuclear reactions in the interior
    Look at the stars!
  1690. anywhere
    at or in or to any place
    It might
    fall anywhere; on the crown, on the tip of the ear, on the upper arm, on
    the elbow----

    The elbow!
  1691. degrading
    used of conduct; characterized by dishonor
    It was a question of degrading himself, mutilating himself.
  1692. in fact
    in reality or actuality
    In fact I'm proud of her.
  1693. indiscretion
    the trait of being injudicious
    It was an indiscretion, undoubtedly.
  1694. orthodoxy
    the quality of being orthodox (especially in religion)
    He did not need to
    know that these gods were called Baal, Osiris, Moloch, Ashtaroth, and the
    like: probably the less he knew about them the better for his orthodoxy.
  1695. scrap
    a small fragment of something broken off from the whole
    All of these followed their ancient usage, except that
    WHOM had been scrapped as unnecessary, and the SHALL, SHOULD tenses had
    been dropped, all their uses being covered by WILL and WOULD.
  1696. sickening
    causing or able to cause nausea
    What was the most horrible,
    sickening thing of all?
  1697. eased
    (of pain or sorrow) made easier to bear
    This time the pain was only slightly
    eased.
  1698. accord
    concurrence of opinion
    The stars can be near
    or distant, according as we need them.
  1699. mistake
    a wrong action attributable to bad judgment or ignorance or inattention
    Not in the individual
    mind, which can make mistakes, and in any case soon perishes: only in the
    mind of the Party, which is collective and immortal.
  1700. really
    in actual fact
    He did not know whether the thing was really happening,
    or whether the effect was electrically produced; but his body was being
    wrenched out of shape, the joints were being slowly torn apart.
  1701. mutilated
    having a part of the body crippled or disabled
    The words of
    which they were made up could be any parts of speech, and could be placed
    in any order and mutilated in any way which made them easy to pronounce
    while indicating their derivation.
  1702. wonder
    the feeling aroused by something strange and surprising
    He felt no love for her, and he hardly even wondered
    what was happening to her.
  1703. annihilated
    destroyed completely
    You will be annihilated in the past as well
    as in the future.
  1704. iron
    a heavy ductile magnetic metallic element; is silver-white in pure form but readily rusts; used in construction and tools and armament; plays a role in the transport of oxygen by the blood
    He felt the smash of
    truncheons on his elbows and iron-shod boots on his shins; he saw himself
    grovelling on the floor, screaming for mercy through broken teeth.
  1705. consider
    think about carefully; weigh
    'Until this moment you had never considered what is meant by existence.
  1706. completely
    so as to be complete; with everything necessary
    In the
    end the nagging voices broke him down more completely than the boots and
    fists of the guards.
  1707. mass
    the property of a body that causes it to have weight in a gravitational field
    His mouth had swollen into a shapeless cherry-coloured
    mass with a black hole in the middle of it.
  1708. embodiment
    a concrete representation of an otherwise nebulous concept
    Big Brother is the embodiment of
    the Party.'
  1709. object
    a tangible and visible entity; an entity that can cast a shadow
    Is
    there somewhere or other a place, a world of solid objects, where the past
    is still happening?'
  1710. interim
    the time between one event, process, or period and another
    They were
    engaged in producing something called an Interim Report, but what it was
    that they were reporting on he had never definitely found out.
  1711. explode
    burst and release energy as through a violent chemical or physical reaction;"the bomb detonated at noon"
    Everything had exploded into yellow
    light.
  1712. once again
    anew
    Once
    again
    , why was it?
  1713. batter
    strike violently and repeatedly
    As usual, the voice had battered Winston into helplessness.
  1714. pronunciation
    the manner in which someone utters a word
    WHY so great an importance was
    attached to ease of pronunciation will be made clear later in this essay.
  1715. used
    previously used or owned by another
    Before being brought
    here he had been taken to another place which must have been an ordinary
    prison or a temporary lock-up used by the patrols.
  1716. out of sight
    not accessible to view
    All through his interrogation, although he had
    never seen him, he had had the feeling that O'Brien was at his elbow, just
    out of sight.
  1717. feel like
    have an inclination for something or some activity
    Chapter 2



    He was lying on something that felt like a camp bed, except that it was
    higher off the ground and that he was fixed down in some way so that he
    could not move.
  1718. blasphemy
    blasphemous language (expressing disrespect for God or for something sacred)
    It was of course possible to utter heresies of a very crude kind, a
    species of blasphemy.
  1719. patrol
    the activity of going around or through an area at regular intervals for security purposes
    Before being brought
    here he had been taken to another place which must have been an ordinary
    prison or a temporary lock-up used by the patrols.
  1720. devotee
    an ardent follower and admirer
    The purpose of Newspeak was not only to provide a medium of expression
    for the world-view and mental habits proper to the devotees of Ingsoc,
    but to make all other modes of thought impossible.
  1721. layer
    single thickness of usually some homogeneous substance
    An extraordinary medley
    of feeling--but it was not a medley, exactly; rather it was successive
    layers of feeling, in which one could not say which layer was
    undermost--struggled inside him.
  1722. irrelevant
    having no bearing on or connection with the subject at issue
    The
    others are outside--irrelevant.'
  1723. commit suicide
    kill oneself
    It would commit
    suicide
    .'
  1724. forbearance
    a delay in enforcing rights or claims or privileges; refraining from acting
    The guards, too, treated the
    common criminals with a certain forbearance, even when they had to handle
    them roughly.
  1725. awkwardly
    in an awkward manner
    'To tell you the truth--' He sat down awkwardly on the bench opposite
    Winston.
  1726. slow down
    lose velocity; move more slowly
    He made a half-hearted attempt to catch up,
    then slowed down, turned, and made off in the opposite direction.
  1727. eagerly
    with eagerness; in an eager manner
    He paused opposite
    Winston and began eagerly appealing to him: 'You don't think they'll shoot
    me, do you, old chap?
  1728. forty-eight
    being eight more than forty
    He was older
    than Winston had thought him; he was perhaps forty-eight or fifty.
  1729. shape
    a perceptual structure
    He did not know whether the thing was really happening,
    or whether the effect was electrically produced; but his body was being
    wrenched out of shape, the joints were being slowly torn apart.
  1730. blind
    unable to see
    There
    was undoubtedly a blinding flash of light.
  1731. swimming
    the act of swimming
    He had the impression of swimming up into this room from some quite
    different world, a sort of underwater world far beneath it.
  1732. innumerable
    too numerous to be counted
    Innumerable fingers, like moving trees, were still streaming past in
    either direction, crossing and recrossing.
  1733. demeanour
    (behavioral attributes) the way a person behaves toward other people
    He had sat silent against the wall, jostled by dirty
    bodies, too preoccupied by fear and the pain in his belly to take much
    interest in his surroundings, but still noticing the astonishing difference
    in demeanour between the Party prisoners and the
  1734. punish
    impose a penalty on; inflict punishment on
    He had the air of a doctor, a teacher, even a
    priest, anxious to explain and persuade rather than to punish.
  1735. alive
    possessing life
    He confessed that he had murdered his
    wife, although he knew, and his questioners must have known, that his wife
    was still alive.
  1736. forcible
    impelled by physical force especially against resistance
    The B words were a sort of verbal shorthand, often packing
    whole ranges of ideas into a few syllables, and at the same time more
    accurate and forcible than ordinary language.
  1737. belongings
    something owned; any tangible or intangible possession that is owned by someone
    They yelled insults at the guards,
    fought back fiercely when their belongings were impounded, wrote obscene
    words on the floor, ate smuggled food which they produced from mysterious
    hiding-places in their clothes, and even shouted down the telescre
  1738. weakly
    in a weak or feeble manner or to a minor degree
    'You can't!' he said
    weakly.
  1739. revolution
    a single complete turn (axial or orbital)
    One does not establish a dictatorship in order
    to safeguard a revolution; one makes the revolution in order to establish
    the dictatorship.
  1740. spat
    a quarrel about petty points
    Every day, at
    every moment, they will be defeated, discredited, ridiculed, spat upon and
    yet they will always survive.
  1741. weak
    wanting in physical strength
    A scrubby beard covered his face to the cheekbones, giving
    him an air of ruffianism that went oddly with his large weak frame and
    nervous movements.
  1742. bending
    movement that causes the formation of a curve
    He was bending over Winston.
  1743. awkward
    lacking grace or skill in manner or movement or performance
    The pencil felt thick and awkward in his fingers.
  1744. see to it
    be careful or certain to do something; make certain of something
    These other questioners saw to it that he was in constant slight pain, but
    it was not chiefly pain that they relied on.
  1745. fiercely
    in a physically fierce manner
    They yelled insults at the guards,
    fought back fiercely when their belongings were impounded, wrote obscene
    words on the floor, ate smuggled food which they produced from mysterious
    hiding-places in their clothes, and even shouted down the telescre
  1746. turn back
    go back to a previous state
    He turned back to the chessboard and picked up the white knight
    again.
  1747. starting
    appropriate to the beginning or start of an event
    He was starting up from the plank bed in the half-certainty that he had
    heard O'Brien's voice.
  1748. breakdown
    the act of disrupting an established order so it fails to continue
    It
    might mean anything: defeat, breakdown, the redivision of the world, the
    destruction of the Party!
  1749. bolster
    support and strengthen
    His tiny sister, too young to
    understand what the game was about, had sat propped up against a bolster,
    laughing because the others were laughing.
  1750. uneven
    (of a contest or contestants) not fairly matched as opponents
    Then,
    noticing that she was sitting on something uneven, she slid off Winston's
    knees on to the bench.
  1751. distance
    the property created by the space between two objects or points
    His eyes had a wide-open, staring look,
    as though he could not prevent himself from gazing at something in the
    middle distance.
  1752. reduction
    the act of decreasing or reducing something
    Quite apart from the suppression of definitely heretical words, reduction
    of vocabulary was regarded as an end in itself, and no word that could be
    dispensed with was allowed to survive.
  1753. intelligence
    the ability to comprehend; to understand and profit from experience
    If you tell me any lies, or attempt to
    prevaricate in any way, or even fall below your usual level of
    intelligence, you will cry out with pain, instantly.
  1754. alter
    cause to change; make different; cause a transformation
    The past never had been
    altered.
  1755. clothe
    provide with clothes or put clothes on
    They yelled insults at the guards,
    fought back fiercely when their belongings were impounded, wrote obscene
    words on the floor, ate smuggled food which they produced from mysterious
    hiding-places in their clothes, and even shouted down the telescre
  1756. intoxication
    the physiological state produced by a poison or other toxic substance
    But always--do not forget this, Winston--always there will be
    the intoxication of power, constantly increasing and constantly growing
    subtler.
  1757. preliminary
    denoting an action or event preceding or in preparation for something more important; designed to orient or acquaint with a situation before proceeding
    Later he was
    to realize that all that then happened was merely a preliminary, a routine
    interrogation to which nearly all prisoners were subjected.
  1758. genuinely
    in accordance with truth or fact or reality
    We burn all evil and all illusion out of him; we bring him over to our
    side, not in appearance, but genuinely, heart and soul.
  1759. basin
    a bowl-shaped vessel; usually used for holding food or liquids
    He remembered a cell
    with a plank bed, a sort of shelf sticking out from the wall, and a tin
    wash-basin, and meals of hot soup and bread and sometimes coffee.
  1760. think over
    reflect deeply on a subject
    In the face of pain
    there are no heroes, no heroes, he thought over and over as he writhed
    on the floor, clutching uselessly at his disabled left arm.
  1761. equality
    the quality of being the same in quantity or measure or value or status
    All words
    grouping themselves round the concepts of liberty and equality, for
    instance, were contained in the single word CRIMETHINK, while all words
    grouping themselves round the concepts of objectivity and rationalism
    were contained in the single
  1762. real
    being or occurring in fact or actuality; having verified existence; not illusory
    The confession was a formality,
    though the torture was real.
  1763. point
    a distinguishing or individuating characteristic
    It should have been easy, but he always lost count at
    some point or another.
  1764. forgetfulness
    tendency to forget
    This time Winston was startled into self-forgetfulness.
  1765. squeak
    make a high-pitched, screeching noise
    A very faint whimpering or squeaking, which seemed
    unconscious, came out of him.
  1766. deafen
    make or render deaf
    There was a furious, deafening roar from the telescreen.
  1767. arrange
    put into a proper or systematic order
    Always, without
    exception, it is so arranged.
  1768. equally
    in equal amounts or shares; in a balanced or impartial way
    At one moment he felt certain that it was broad daylight
    outside, and at the next equally certain that it was pitch darkness.
  1769. mammoth
    any of numerous extinct elephants widely distributed in the Pleistocene; extremely large with hairy coats and long upcurved tusks
    'But the rocks are full of the bones of extinct animals--mammoths and
    mastodons and enormous reptiles which lived here long before man was ever
    heard of.'
  1770. saving
    recovery or preservation from loss or danger
    "Thank you," I'm going to say, "thank you for saving me
    before it was too late."'
  1771. animate
    make lively
    His voice had changed extraordinarily, and his
    face had suddenly become both stern and animated.
  1772. flickering
    shining unsteadily
    He thought oftener of O'Brien, with a flickering
    hope.
  1773. mate
    a person's partner in marriage
    'White to play and mate in two
    moves.'
  1774. supposedly
    believed or reputed to be the case
    But there were other days when
    they settled down to their work almost eagerly, making a tremendous show
    of entering up their minutes and drafting long memoranda which were never
    finished--when the argument as to what they were supposedly arguing ab
  1775. individually
    apart from others
    No book is
    produced individually, as you know.'
  1776. function
    what something is used for
    It was another copy of the photograph of Jones, Aaronson, and
    Rutherford at the party function in New York, which he had chanced upon
    eleven years ago and promptly destroyed.
  1777. untrue
    not according with the facts
    In the first place, because the confessions that they
    had made were obviously extorted and untrue.
  1778. yes
    an affirmative
    Yes,
    that's a fact.
  1779. wash
    clean with some chemical process
    He remembered a cell
    with a plank bed, a sort of shelf sticking out from the wall, and a tin
    wash-basin, and meals of hot soup and bread and sometimes coffee.
  1780. miserable
    very unhappy; full of misery
    Even those three miserable traitors in whose innocence you once
    believed--Jones, Aaronson, and Rutherford--in the end we broke them down.
  1781. heart
    the hollow muscular organ located behind the sternum and between the lungs; its rhythmic contractions move the blood through the body
    There were moments
    when he foresaw the things that would happen to him with such actuality
    that his heart galloped and his breath stopped.
  1782. imperfectly
    in an imperfect or faulty way
    History had already been rewritten,
    but fragments of the literature of the past survived here and there,
    imperfectly censored, and so long as one retained one's knowledge of
    Oldspeak it was possible to read them.
  1783. stream
    a natural body of running water flowing on or under the earth
    Amid a stream of blood and saliva, the two
    halves of a dental plate fell out of his mouth.
  1784. act
    behave in a certain manner; show a certain behavior; conduct or comport oneself
    And if so, then already he would have
    forgotten his denial of remembering it, and forgotten the act of
    forgetting.
  1785. future
    the time yet to come
    Some dreadful thing which had lain embedded in the future had
    somehow been skipped over and had not happened.
  1786. servile
    submissive or fawning in attitude or behavior
    'Of course I'm guilty!' cried Parsons with a servile glance at the
    telescreen.
  1787. relay
    the act of passing something along from one person or group to another
    His questioners now were not ruffians in black uniforms
    but Party intellectuals, little rotund men with quick movements and
    flashing spectacles, who worked on him in relays over periods which
    lasted--he thought, he could not be sure--ten or twelve
  1788. hauling
    the activity of transporting goods by truck
    For perhaps twenty seconds
    they were hauling at him.
  1789. bracket
    either of two punctuation marks ([ or ]) used to enclose textual material
    It was
    something to do with the question of whether commas should be placed
    inside brackets, or outside.
  1790. palpable
    capable of being perceived; especially capable of being handled or touched or felt
    It did not contain a grammatical error, but it expressed
    a palpable untruth--i.e. that all men are of equal size, weight, or
    strength.
  1791. diminishing
    becoming smaller or less or appearing to do so
    And it was to be
    foreseen that with the passage of time the distinguishing characteristics
    of Newspeak would become more and more pronounced--its words growing
    fewer and fewer, their meanings more and more rigid, and the chance of
    putting them to improper
  1792. gravity
    (physics) the force of attraction between all masses in the universe; especially the attraction of the earth's mass for bodies near its surface
    'You don't even control
    the climate or the law of gravity.
  1793. vanishing
    a sudden or mysterious disappearance
    Unseen, the frail slip of paper was whirling
    away on the current of warm air; it was vanishing in a flash of flame.
  1794. grating
    unpleasantly harsh or grating in sound
    O'Brien lifted the grating.
  1795. rolled
    rolled up and secured
    Then he rolled over and raised himself
    unsteadily on hands and knees.
  1796. martyr
    one who voluntarily suffers death as the penalty for refusing to renounce their religion
    And they imagined that they had learned
    from the mistakes of the past; they knew, at any rate, that one must not
    make martyrs.
  1797. sure
    having or feeling no doubt or uncertainty; confident and assured
    He would get up
    because the ache in his bones was no longer bearable, and then would sit
    down again almost at once because he was too dizzy to make sure of
    staying on his feet.
  1798. whistle
    the sound made by something moving rapidly or by steam coming out of a small aperture
    The wind whistled through the twigs and fretted the occasional,
    dirty-looking crocuses.
  1799. burned
    destroyed or badly damaged by fire
    For every heretic it
    burned at the stake, thousands of others rose up.
  1800. nip
    sever or remove by pinching or snipping
    Heard what I was saying, and nipped off to
    the patrols the very next day.
  1801. in advance
    ahead of time; in anticipation
    Understand that in advance.
  1802. turn around
    turn abruptly and face the other way, either physically or metaphorically
    Now turn around and look into that mirror again.
  1803. devastating
    wreaking or capable of wreaking complete destruction
    At this moment there was a devastating explosion, or what seemed like an
    explosion, though it was not certain whether there was any noise.
  1804. cutting
    the act of penetrating or opening open with a sharp edge
    Even while he saw the black horde racing southward he
    saw another force, mysteriously assembled, suddenly planted in their rear,
    cutting their communications by land and sea.
  1805. twenty-four
    the cardinal number that is the sum of twenty-three and one
    It might be twenty-four
    hours since he had eaten, it might be thirty-six.
  1806. toy
    an artifact designed to be played with
    In the
    end his mother said, 'Now be good, and I'll buy you a toy.
  1807. distill
    undergo condensation; change from a gaseous to a liquid state and fall in drops
    There was bribery, favouritism, and racketeering of every kind, there was
    homosexuality and prostitution, there was even illicit alcohol distilled
    from potatoes.
  1808. submerged
    beneath the surface of the water
    Suddenly, like a lump of submerged wreckage
    breaking the surface of water, the thought burst into his mind: 'It doesn't
    really happen.
  1809. blinding
    shining intensely
    There
    was undoubtedly a blinding flash of light.
  1810. negative
    characterized by or displaying negation or denial or opposition or resistance; having no positive features
    We are not content with
    negative obedience, nor even with the most abject submission.
  1811. a couple of
    more than one but indefinitely small in number
    The wire door was a couple of hand-spans from his face.
  1812. kill
    cause to die; put to death, usually intentionally or knowingly
    It was he who
    set the guards on to Winston and who prevented them from killing him.
  1813. cramped
    constricted in size
    The boredom of the two
    children in the dark, cramped bedroom became unbearable.
  1814. reclaim
    claim back
    They would have blown his brain to pieces
    before they could reclaim it.
  1815. Marx
    founder of modern communism; wrote the Communist Manifesto with Engels in 1848; wrote Das Kapital in 1867 (1818-1883)
    The words COMMUNIST INTERNATIONAL, for instance, call up a composite
    picture of universal human brotherhood, red flags, barricades, Karl Marx,
    and the Paris Commune.
  1816. waxed
    treated with wax
    The waxed-faced officer marched in,
    followed by two guards.
  1817. view as
    keep in mind or convey as a conviction or view
    You shall
    see the side view as well.'
  1818. pencil
    a thin cylindrical pointed writing implement; a rod of marking substance encased in wood
    They had given him a white slate with a stump of pencil tied to the
    corner.
  1819. impression
    a vague idea in which some confidence is placed
    He had the impression of swimming up into this room from some quite
    different world, a sort of underwater world far beneath it.
  1820. track
    a line or route along which something travels or moves
    The chinless man
    jumped in his tracks.
  1821. switch
    control consisting of a mechanical or electrical or electronic device for making or breaking or changing the connections in a circuit
    'It is switched
    off.
  1822. shoot up
    rise dramatically
    The needle of the dial had shot up to
    fifty-five.
  1823. respite
    a pause from doing something (as work)
    It
    was he who decided when Winston should scream with pain, when he should
    have a respite, when he should be fed, when he should sleep, when the
    drugs should be pumped into his arm.
  1824. assisted
    having help; often used as a combining form
    Newspeak was designed not to extend
    but to DIMINISH the range of thought, and this purpose was indirectly
    assisted by cutting the choice of words down to a minimum.
  1825. in for
    certain to get or have
    'What are you in for?'
  1826. quite
    to the greatest extent; completely
    'Pardon,' she said, 'I ain't meself, quite.'
  1827. sixty
    the cardinal number that is the product of ten and six
    An enormous wreck of a woman, aged about sixty, with
    great tumbling breasts and thick coils of white hair which had come down
    in her struggles, was carried in, kicking and shouting, by four guards,
    who had hold of her one at each corner.
  1828. indoors
    within a building
    He remembered the day
    well, a pelting, drenching day when the water streamed down the window-pane
    and the light indoors was too dull to read by.
  1829. so long
    a farewell remark
    It was 'all right' in the
    camps, he gathered, so long as you had good contacts and knew the ropes.
  1830. suppose
    expect, believe, or suppose
    Concealed lamps
    flooded it with cold light, and there was a low, steady humming sound
    which he supposed had something to do with the air supply.
  1831. lung
    either of two saclike respiratory organs in the chest of vertebrates; serves to remove carbon dioxide and provide oxygen to the blood
    The air tore
    into his lungs and issued again in deep groans which even by clenching his
    teeth he could not stop.
  1832. bond
    a connection that fastens things together
    The bonds that had held his
    body down were loosened.
  1833. god
    any supernatural being worshipped as controlling some part of the world or some aspect of life or who is the personification of a force
    He wrote:


    GOD IS POWER


    He accepted everything.
  1834. usual
    occurring or encountered or experienced or observed frequently or in accordance with regular practice or procedure
    Light that seemed stronger than usual was falling on his
    face.
  1835. stay on
    continue in a place, position, or situation
    He would get up
    because the ache in his bones was no longer bearable, and then would sit
    down again almost at once because he was too dizzy to make sure of
    staying on his feet.
  1836. bastard
    the illegitimate offspring of unmarried parents
    The woman hoisted herself
    upright and followed them out with a yell of 'F---- bastards!'
  1837. require
    have need of
    You will do what is required of
    you.'
  1838. somebody
    a human being
    Because of
    its thinness the mouth and eyes looked disproportionately large, and the
    eyes seemed filled with a murderous, unappeasable hatred of somebody or
    something.
  1839. ground
    the solid part of the earth's surface
    His
    cell might be at the heart of the building or against its outer wall; it
    might be ten floors below ground, or thirty above it.
  1840. hopefully
    it is hoped
    Soon he was wildly excited and shouting with
    laughter as the tiddly-winks climbed hopefully up the ladders and then
    came slithering down the snakes again, almost to the starting-point.
  1841. play
    engage in recreational activities rather than work; occupy oneself in a diversion
    He knew, or he could
    imagine, the arguments which proved his own nonexistence; but they were
    nonsense, they were only a play on words.
  1842. better
    (comparative of `good') superior to another (of the same class or set or kind) in excellence or quality or desirability or suitability; more highly skilled than another
    'Thass better,' she said, leaning back with closed eyes.
  1843. human nature
    the shared psychological attributes of humankind that are assumed to be shared by all human beings
    You are imagining that there
    is something called human nature which will be outraged by what we do and
    will turn against us.
  1844. move out
    move out of one's old house or office
    He could not move out of a
    walk, he could not hold his stool out at arm's length, he could not stand
    on one leg without falling over.
  1845. out in
    enter a harbor
    They stood out in his mind
    disconnectedly, like pictures with blackness all round them.
  1846. pelt
    the dressed hairy coat of a mammal
    He remembered the day
    well, a pelting, drenching day when the water streamed down the window-pane
    and the light indoors was too dull to read by.
  1847. burst
    come open suddenly and violently, as if from internal pressure
    At the thought the words burst out of him:

    'What is in Room 101?'
  1848. knowing
    alert and fully informed
    It can get hold of you without
    your even knowing it.
  1849. roughly
    with rough motion as over a rough surface
    The guards, too, treated the
    common criminals with a certain forbearance, even when they had to handle
    them roughly.
  1850. preoccupied
    having or showing excessive or compulsive concern with something
    He had sat silent against the wall, jostled by dirty
    bodies, too preoccupied by fear and the pain in his belly to take much
    interest in his surroundings, but still noticing the astonishing difference
    in demeanour between the Party prisoners and the
  1851. high up
    at a great altitude
    The room where he had been interrogated by
    O'Brien was high up near the roof.
  1852. stroll
    a leisurely walk (usually in some public place)
    He watched the heavy
    yet graceful form strolling to and fro, in and out of the range of his
    vision.
  1853. perfect
    being complete of its kind and without defect or blemish
    I shall save you, I shall make you perfect.'
  1854. intend
    have in mind as a purpose
    'You are thinking,' he said, 'that since we intend to destroy you utterly,
    so that nothing that you say or do can make the smallest difference--in
    that case, why do we go to the trouble of interrogating you first?
  1855. swallow up
    enclose or envelop completely, as if by swallowing
    Suddenly he floated out of his seat, dived into the eyes, and
    was swallowed up.
  1856. lessened
    impaired by diminution
    The pain lessened again.
  1857. thirty-six
    being six more than thirty
    It might be twenty-four
    hours since he had eaten, it might be thirty-six.
  1858. exact
    marked by strict and particular and complete accordance with fact
    It is the exact opposite of the stupid hedonistic Utopias that
    the old reformers imagined.
  1859. recall
    call to mind
    'I have been able to recall one
    instance--a possible instance.
  1860. drenched
    abundantly covered or supplied with; often used in combination
    He was in the middle of a great empty plain, a flat desert drenched with
    sunlight, across which all sounds came to him out of immense distances.
  1861. draw
    cause to move by pulling
    She put a vast arm round his shoulder and drew him
    towards her, breathing beer and vomit into his face.
  1862. distil
    undergo condensation; change from a gaseous to a liquid state and fall in drops
    There was bribery, favouritism, and racketeering of every kind, there was
    homosexuality and prostitution, there was even illicit alcohol distilled
    from potatoes.
  1863. terrifying
    causing extreme terror
    A Eurasian army (Oceania was at war with Eurasia:
    Oceania had always been at war with Eurasia) was moving southward at
    terrifying speed.
  1864. frankly
    (used as intensives reflecting the speaker's attitude) it is sincerely the case that
    There were days when they assembled
    and then promptly dispersed again, frankly admitting to one another that
    there was not really anything to be done.
  1865. burn
    destroy by fire
    The blade would bite
    into him with a sort of burning coldness, and even the fingers that held
    it would be cut to the bone.
  1866. carrot
    perennial plant widely cultivated as an annual in many varieties for its long conical orange edible roots; temperate and tropical regions
    I could
    snap your neck like a carrot.
  1867. to it
    to that
    These other questioners saw to it that he was in constant slight pain, but
    it was not chiefly pain that they relied on.
  1868. disease
    an impairment of health or a condition of abnormal functioning
    Even now, I am well
    aware, you are clinging to your disease under the impression that it is
    a virtue.
  1869. illusion
    an erroneous mental representation
    We burn all evil and all illusion out of him; we bring him over to our
    side, not in appearance, but genuinely, heart and soul.
  1870. induce
    cause to do; cause to act in a specified manner
    The humming sound and the unvarying white light induced a
    sort of faintness, an empty feeling inside his head.
  1871. chastity
    abstaining from sexual relations (as because of religious vows)
    His sexual life, for example, was entirely regulated by
    the two Newspeak words SEXCRIME (sexual immorality) and GOODSEX (chastity).
  1872. disquiet
    a feeling of mild anxiety about possible developments
    The news from the African
    front was disquieting in the extreme.
  1873. struck
    (used in combination) affected by something overwhelming
    Winston was struck, as he had been struck before, by the tiredness of
    O'Brien's face.
  1874. featured
    made a feature or highlight; given prominence
    A young officer, a trim black-uniformed figure who seemed to
    glitter all over with polished leather, and whose pale, straight-featured
    face was like a wax mask, stepped smartly through the doorway.
  1875. gulp
    utter or make a noise, as when swallowing too quickly
    He picked up his glass and drained it
    at a gulp.
  1876. pull
    apply force so as to cause motion towards the source of the motion
    They slapped his face, wrung
    his ears, pulled his hair, made him stand on one leg, refused him leave to
    urinate, shone glaring lights in his face until his eyes ran with water;
    but the aim of this was simply to humiliate him and destroy his power o
  1877. get rid of
    dispose of
    You must
    get rid of those nineteenth-century ideas about the laws of Nature.
  1878. unintelligible
    not clearly understood or expressed
    In the future such fragments, even
    if they chanced to survive, would be unintelligible and untranslatable.
  1879. crack
    a narrow opening
    'You can't do that!' he cried out in a high cracked voice.
  1880. seventy-five
    being five more than seventy
    The needle must be at seventy,
    seventy-five.
  1881. toe
    one of the digits of the foot
    He was shoeless; large, dirty toes were
    sticking out of the holes in his socks.
  1882. please
    give pleasure to or be pleasing to
    The annoyance passed out of it and for
    a moment he looked almost pleased.
  1883. to that
    to that
    'You don't have to take me to that place!
  1884. form of government
    the members of a social organization who are in power
    THAT WHENEVER
    ANY FORM OF GOVERNMENT BECOMES DESTRUCTIVE OF THOSE ENDS, IT IS THE RIGHT
    OF THE PEOPLE TO ALTER OR ABOLISH IT, AND TO INSTITUTE NEW GOVERNMENT...
  1885. upright
    in a vertical position; not sloping
    The woman hoisted herself
    upright and followed them out with a yell of 'F---- bastards!'
  1886. stuff
    the tangible substance that goes into the makeup of a physical object
    There I was, working away, trying to do my bit--never knew
    I had any bad stuff in my mind at all.
  1887. wide
    having great (or a certain) extent from one side to the other
    A bench, or
    shelf, just wide enough to sit on ran round the wall, broken only by the
    door and, at the end opposite the door, a lavatory pan with no wooden
    seat.
  1888. sleep with
    have sexual intercourse with
    He had long grown
    used to sleeping with a strong light on his face.
  1889. up to
    busy or occupied with
    'You can see that the numbers on this dial
    run up to a hundred.
  1890. faded
    having lost freshness or brilliance of color
    It had faded but before
    O'Brien had dropped his hand; but though he could not recapture it, he
    could remember it, as one remembers a vivid experience at some period of
    one's life when one was in effect a different person.
  1891. articulate
    express or state clearly
    Ultimately it was hoped to
    make articulate speech issue from the larynx without involving the higher
    brain centres at all.
  1892. involved
    connected by participation or association or use
    Courage and cowardice are not involved.
  1893. statement
    the act of affirming or asserting or stating something
    Did not the statement, 'You do
    not exist', contain a logical absurdity?
  1894. extort
    obtain by coercion or intimidation
    In the first place, because the confessions that they
    had made were obviously extorted and untrue.
  1895. instinct
    inborn pattern of behavior often responsive to specific stimuli
    The sex instinct will be eradicated.
  1896. preoccupy
    engage or engross the interest or attention of beforehand or occupy urgently or obsessively
    He had sat silent against the wall, jostled by dirty
    bodies, too preoccupied by fear and the pain in his belly to take much
    interest in his surroundings, but still noticing the astonishing difference
    in demeanour between the Party prisoners and the
  1897. bundle
    a collection of things wrapped or boxed together
    It had been there ever since they
    had bundled him into the closed van and driven him away.
  1898. presently
    at this time or period; now
    Presently he began to fidget on his seat.
  1899. hole
    an opening into or through something
    He was shoeless; large, dirty toes were
    sticking out of the holes in his socks.
  1900. admonish
    take to task
    No one cared what he did any longer, no whistle woke him, no
    telescreen admonished him.
  1901. commit
    engage in or perform
    'And have you committed it?'
  1902. suffering
    feelings of mental or physical pain
    Somewhere or other she was suffering perhaps far worse than he.
  1903. proud of
    feeling pleasurable satisfaction over something by which you measures your self-worth
    In fact I'm proud of her.
  1904. tenth
    position ten in a countable series of things
    In the preceding quarter,
    it appeared, the Tenth Three-Year Plan's quota for bootlaces had been
    overfulfilled by 98 per cent.
  1905. struggle
    strenuous effort
    An enormous wreck of a woman, aged about sixty, with
    great tumbling breasts and thick coils of white hair which had come down
    in her struggles, was carried in, kicking and shouting, by four guards,
    who had hold of her one at each corner.
  1906. arithmetic
    the branch of pure mathematics dealing with the theory of numerical calculations
    He loved her
    and would not betray her; but that was only a fact, known as he knew the
    rules of arithmetic.
  1907. history
    a record or narrative description of past events
    'Has it ever occurred to you,' he said, 'that the whole history of English
    poetry has been determined by the fact that the English language lacks
    rhymes?'
  1908. ultimately
    as the end result of a succession or process
    The secret
    accumulation of knowledge--a gradual spread of enlightenment--ultimately
    a proletarian rebellion--the overthrow of the Party.
  1909. shelf
    a support that consists of a horizontal surface for holding objects
    A bench, or
    shelf, just wide enough to sit on ran round the wall, broken only by the
    door and, at the end opposite the door, a lavatory pan with no wooden
    seat.
  1910. out of place
    of an inappropriate or misapplied nature
    Winston whined
    and grizzled, made futile demands for food, fretted about the room pulling
    everything out of place and kicking the wainscoting until the neighbours
    banged on the wall, while the younger child wailed intermittently.
  1911. cut to
    move to another scene when filming
    The blade would bite
    into him with a sort of burning coldness, and even the fingers that held
    it would be cut to the bone.
  1912. frozen
    turned into ice; affected by freezing or by long and severe cold
    His heart seemed to be frozen.
  1913. roll over
    make a rolling motion or turn
    Then he rolled over and raised himself
    unsteadily on hands and knees.
  1914. flake
    a small fragment of something broken off from the whole
    Here and there under the dirt there
    were the red scars of wounds, and near the ankle the varicose ulcer was an
    inflamed mass with flakes of skin peeling off it.
  1915. pour
    cause to run
    There were times when his nerve
    so forsook him that he began shouting for mercy even before the beating
    began, when the mere sight of a fist drawn back for a blow was enough
    to make him pour forth a confession of real and imaginary crimes.
  1916. intended
    resulting from one's intentions
    And yet, in the sense in
    which he intended the word, he had not betrayed her.
  1917. absolute
    perfect or complete or pure
    But there had been a moment--he did
    not know how long, thirty seconds, perhaps--of luminous certainty, when
    each new suggestion of O'Brien's had filled up a patch of emptiness and
    become absolute truth, and when two and two could have been three as
  1918. slip
    move obliquely or sideways, usually in an uncontrolled manner
    In the end the temptation to find out overcame his fear; he
    slipped a hand into his pocket.
  1919. nerve
    any bundle of nerve fibers running to various organs and tissues of the body
    There were times when his nerve
    so forsook him that he began shouting for mercy even before the beating
    began, when the mere sight of a fist drawn back for a blow was enough
    to make him pour forth a confession of real and imaginary crimes.
  1920. glaze
    a coating for ceramics, metal, etc.
    Through the midday
    hours he sat with glazed face, the bottle handy, listening to the
    telescreen.
  1921. sake
    the purpose of achieving or obtaining
    The Party
    seeks power entirely for its own sake.
  1922. accusing
    containing or expressing accusation
    They wore them down
    by torture and solitude until they were despicable, cringing wretches,
    confessing whatever was put into their mouths, covering themselves with
    abuse, accusing and sheltering behind one another, whimpering for mercy.
  1923. announcement
    a public statement containing information about an event that has happened or is going to happen
    It was merely a
    brief announcement from the Ministry of Plenty.
  1924. extended
    fully extended or stretched forth
    O'Brien held up his left hand, its back towards Winston, with the thumb
    hidden and the four fingers extended.
  1925. portrait
    any likeness of a person, in any medium
    Winston looked up at the portrait of Big Brother.
  1926. provisional
    under terms not final or fully worked out or agreed upon
    The version in use in 1984, and
    embodied in the Ninth and Tenth Editions of the Newspeak Dictionary, was
    a provisional one, and contained many superfluous words and archaic
    formations which were due to be suppressed later.
  1927. blown
    being moved or acted upon by moving air or vapor
    They would have blown his brain to pieces
    before they could reclaim it.
  1928. smaller
    small or little relative to something else
    Newspeak, indeed, differed from most all other
    languages in that its vocabulary grew smaller instead of larger every
    year.
  1929. irregularity
    not characterized by a fixed principle or rate; at irregular intervals
    There were
    also certain irregularities in word-formation arising out of the need for
    rapid and easy speech.
  1930. talk
    use language
    There was much talk about the forced-labour camps to which
    most of the prisoners expected to be sent.
  1931. now and again
    now and then or here and there
    Now and again
    he glanced up at a vast face which eyed him from the opposite wall.
  1932. delirium
    a usually brief state of excitement and mental confusion often accompanied by hallucinations
    He was
    not any longer in the narrow white corridors in the Ministry of Love, he
    was in the enormous sunlit passage, a kilometre wide, down which he had
    seemed to walk in the delirium induced by drugs.
  1933. writing
    letters or symbols that are written or imprinted on a surface to represent the sounds or words of a language
    'Do you remember writing in your diary,' he said, 'that it did not matter
    whether I was a friend or an enemy, since I was at least a person who
    understood you and could be talked to?
  1934. indifferently
    with indifference; in an indifferent manner
    'What are the stars?' said O'Brien indifferently.
  1935. tapping
    the sound of light blow or knock
    He
    remembered a surly barber arriving to scrape his chin and crop his hair,
    and businesslike, unsympathetic men in white coats feeling his pulse,
    tapping his reflexes, turning up his eyelids, running harsh fingers over
    him in search for broken bone
  1936. wax
    any of various substances of either mineral origin or plant or animal origin; they are solid at normal temperatures and insoluble in water
    A young officer, a trim black-uniformed figure who seemed to
    glitter all over with polished leather, and whose pale, straight-featured
    face was like a wax mask, stepped smartly through the doorway.
  1937. altered
    changed in form or character without becoming something else
    The past never had been
    altered.
  1938. smoothed
    made smooth by ironing
    Everything was settled, smoothed
    out, reconciled.
  1939. on the other hand
    (contrastive) from another point of view
    On the other hand some of them seemed to be on
    good terms with the guards, called them by nicknames, and tried to wheedle
    cigarettes through the spyhole in the door.
  1940. well
    (often used as a combining form) in a good or proper or satisfactory manner or to a high standard (`good' is a nonstandard dialectal variant for `well')
    You know perfectly well what is the matter with you.
  1941. raised
    located or moved above the surround or above the normal position
    Then he rolled over and raised himself
    unsteadily on hands and knees.
  1942. penitent
    feeling or expressing remorse for misdeeds
    Always we shall have the heretic here
    at our mercy, screaming with pain, broken up, contemptible--and in the end
    utterly penitent, saved from himself, crawling to our feet of his own
    accord.
  1943. whereabouts
    the general location where something is
    Chapter 5



    At each stage of his imprisonment he had known, or seemed to know,
    whereabouts he was in the windowless building.
  1944. astronomy
    the branch of physics that studies celestial bodies and the universe as a whole
    Do you suppose it is
    beyond us to produce a dual system of astronomy?
  1945. encourage
    inspire with confidence; give hope or courage to
    He heard himself promising to lie, to steal,
    to forge, to murder, to encourage drug-taking and prostitution, to
    disseminate venereal diseases, to throw vitriol in a child's face.
  1946. cross
    a marking that consists of lines that cross each other
    He sat as still as he could on the narrow bench, with his hands crossed
    on his knee.
  1947. pretended
    adopted in order to deceive
    You pretended that you had seen a piece
    of paper which proved them innocent.
  1948. capitalism
    an economic system based on private ownership of capital
    He confessed that he was a religious believer, an admirer of
    capitalism, and a sexual pervert.
  1949. desirable
    worth having or seeking or achieving
    The B vocabulary consisted of words which had been
    deliberately constructed for political purposes: words, that is to say,
    which not only had in every case a political implication, but were intended
    to impose a desirable mental attitude upon the pe
  1950. vast
    unusually great in size or amount or degree or especially extent or scope
    She put a vast arm round his shoulder and drew him
    towards her, breathing beer and vomit into his face.
  1951. guilt
    the state of having committed an offense
    The tone of his voice
    implied at once a complete admission of his guilt and a sort of incredulous
    horror that such a word could be applied to himself.
  1952. warmth
    the quality of having a moderate degree of heat
    A sort of intellectual warmth, the joy
    of the pedant who has found out some useless fact, shone through the dirt
    and scrubby hair.
  1953. ladder
    steps consisting of two parallel members connected by rungs; for climbing up or down
    A lovely
    toy--you'll love it'; and then she had gone out in the rain, to a little
    general shop which was still sporadically open nearby, and came back with
    a cardboard box containing an outfit of Snakes and Ladders.
  1954. divide
    a serious disagreement between two groups of people (typically producing tension or hostility)
    Although it was three
    or four metres away from him, he could see that the cage was divided
    lengthways into two compartments, and that there was some kind of creature
    in each.
  1955. feed
    provide as food
    Since he was arrested he had not been fed.
  1956. abject
    of the most contemptible kind
    We are not content with
    negative obedience, nor even with the most abject submission.
  1957. consciously
    with awareness
    When he did recall it,
    it was only by consciously reasoning out what it must be: it did not come
    of its own accord.
  1958. bewilderment
    confusion resulting from failure to understand
    Then
    everything was normal again, and the old fear, the hatred, and the
    bewilderment came crowding back again.
  1959. eleven
    the cardinal number that is the sum of ten and one
    It was another copy of the photograph of Jones, Aaronson, and
    Rutherford at the party function in New York, which he had chanced upon
    eleven years ago and promptly destroyed.
  1960. pervert
    corrupt morally or by intemperance or sensuality
    He confessed that he was a religious believer, an admirer of
    capitalism, and a sexual pervert.
  1961. breath
    the process of taking in and expelling air during breathing
    There were moments
    when he foresaw the things that would happen to him with such actuality
    that his heart galloped and his breath stopped.
  1962. beyond
    farther along in space or time or degree
    Do you suppose it is
    beyond us to produce a dual system of astronomy?
  1963. disappearing
    the act of leaving secretly or without explanation
    Behind his screwed-up eyelids a
    forest of fingers seemed to be moving in a sort of dance, weaving in and
    out, disappearing behind one another and reappearing again.
  1964. hope
    the general feeling that some desire will be fulfilled
    He thought oftener of O'Brien, with a flickering
    hope.
  1965. current
    occurring in or belonging to the present time
    Unseen, the frail slip of paper was whirling
    away on the current of warm air; it was vanishing in a flash of flame.
  1966. take on
    take on titles, offices, duties, responsibilities
    His frog-like face grew calmer, and even took on a slightly
    sanctimonious expression.
  1967. destruction
    an event (or the result of an event) that completely destroys something
    It needs an act of self-destruction, an effort of the
    will.
  1968. phrase
    an expression consisting of one or more words forming a grammatical constituent of a sentence
    Fragments of triumphant phrases pushed themselves through the din: 'Vast
    strategic manoeuvre--perfect co-ordination--utter rout--half a million
    prisoners--complete demoralization--control of the whole of Africa--bring
    the war within measurable dist
  1969. disagreement
    a conflict of people's opinions or actions or characters
    Moreover he
    was in dread that if he persisted in his disagreement O'Brien would twist
    the dial again.
  1970. waist
    the narrowing of the body between the ribs and hips
    He put his arm round her waist.
  1971. brute
    resembling a beast; showing lack of human sensibility
    These starving brutes will shoot out of it like bullets.
  1972. howl
    cry loudly, as of animals
    He had set up a wordless
    howling, like an animal.
  1973. oftener
    more often or more frequently
    He thought oftener of O'Brien, with a flickering
    hope.
  1974. midday
    the middle of the day
    Through the midday
    hours he sat with glazed face, the bottle handy, listening to the
    telescreen.
  1975. subtle
    difficult to detect or grasp by the mind or analyze
    But there were other days when
    they settled down to their work almost eagerly, making a tremendous show
    of entering up their minutes and drafting long memoranda which were never
    finished--when the argument as to what they were supposedly arguing about
    gre
  1976. continued
    without stop or interruption
    How many times he had been beaten, how long
    the beatings had continued, he could not remember.
  1977. endless
    having no known beginning and presumably no end
    There were times when he rolled about the floor, as shameless
    as an animal, writhing his body this way and that in an endless, hopeless
    effort to dodge the kicks, and simply inviting more and yet more kicks,
    in his ribs, in his belly, on his elbows
  1978. documentary
    a film or TV program presenting the facts about a person or event
    You believed that you had seen
    unmistakable documentary evidence proving that their confessions were
    false.
  1979. educate
    give an education to
    He sat down on the plank bed, his back against
    the wall and the slate on his knees, and set to work deliberately at the
    task of re-educating himself.
  1980. torment
    intense feelings of suffering; acute mental or physical pain
    Winston
    did not look at him again, but the tormented, skull-like face was as
    vivid in his mind as though it had been straight in front of his eyes.
  1981. flood
    the rising of a body of water and its overflowing onto normally dry land
    Concealed lamps
    flooded it with cold light, and there was a low, steady humming sound
    which he supposed had something to do with the air supply.
  1982. problem
    a question raised for consideration or solution
    The arithmetical
    problems raised, for instance, by such a statement as 'two and two make
    five' were beyond his intellectual grasp.
  1983. denounce
    speak out against
    'Who denounced you?' said Winston.
  1984. tremor
    an involuntary vibration (as if from illness or fear)
    A sort of premonitory tremor, a fear of he was not certain what, had
    passed through Winston as soon as he caught his first glimpse of the cage.
  1985. six
    the cardinal number that is the sum of five and one
    It might be twenty-four
    hours since he had eaten, it might be thirty-six.
  1986. powerful
    having great power or force or potency or effect
    As the door opened, the wave
    of air that it created brought in a powerful smell of cold sweat.
  1987. look back
    look towards one's back
    Only when he chanced to put
    his hand on his bald scalp did he remember the seamed, ruined face that
    had looked back at him out of the mirror.
  1988. played
    (of games) engaged in
    This drama that I have played out with you
    during seven years will be played out over and over again generation after
    generation, always in subtler forms.
  1989. come out
    appear or become visible; make a showing
    A very faint whimpering or squeaking, which seemed
    unconscious, came out of him.
  1990. sprout
    produce buds, branches, or germinate
    He had been appointed to a
    sub-committee of a sub-committee which had sprouted from one of the
    innumerable committees dealing with minor difficulties that arose in the
    compilation of the Eleventh Edition of the Newspeak Dictionary.
  1991. unsatisfactory
    not giving satisfaction
    The beatings grew less frequent, and became mainly a threat, a horror
    to which he could be sent back at any moment when his answers were
    unsatisfactory.
  1992. erroneous
    containing or characterized by error
    It is intolerable to us that an erroneous
    thought should exist anywhere in the world, however secret and powerless
    it may be.
  1993. fall over
    fall forward and down
    He could not move out of a
    walk, he could not hold his stool out at arm's length, he could not stand
    on one leg without falling over.
  1994. required
    required by rule
    You will do what is required of
    you.'
  1995. perfectly
    in a perfect or faultless way
    You know perfectly well what is the matter with you.
  1996. feature
    a prominent attribute or aspect of something
    A young officer, a trim black-uniformed figure who seemed to
    glitter all over with polished leather, and whose pale, straight-featured
    face was like a wax mask, stepped smartly through the doorway.
  1997. manner
    how something is done or how it happens
    Even the back of his head
    was gripped in some manner.
  1998. tuft
    a bunch of hair or feathers or growing grass
    He plucked at Winston's head and brought away a tuft
    of hair.
  1999. well-nigh
    (of actions or states) slightly short of or not quite accomplished; all but
    From the foregoing account it will be seen that in Newspeak the expression
    of unorthodox opinions, above a very low level, was well-nigh impossible.
  2000. short
    (primarily spatial sense) having little length or lacking in length
    He was wearing khaki shorts and a sports-shirt.
  2001. pacing
    (music) the speed at which a composition is to be played
    In a little while he could walk three kilometres,
    measured by pacing the cell, and his bowed shoulders were growing
    straighter.
  2002. weaving
    creating fabric
    Behind his screwed-up eyelids a
    forest of fingers seemed to be moving in a sort of dance, weaving in and
    out, disappearing behind one another and reappearing again.
  2003. standing
    social or financial or professional status or reputation
    'Remain standing where you are,' said the voice.
  2004. bother
    cause annoyance in; disturb, especially by minor irritations
    Then why bother to torture me? thought Winston, with a momentary
    bitterness.
  2005. sunken
    having a sunken area
    The man was led out, walking unsteadily, with head sunken, nursing his
    crushed hand, all the fight had gone out of him.
  2006. hold back
    refrain from doing
    He was confessing everything, even the things he had
    succeeded in holding back under the torture.
  2007. instantly
    without delay or hesitation; with no time intervening
    If you tell me any lies, or attempt to
    prevaricate in any way, or even fall below your usual level of
    intelligence, you will cry out with pain, instantly.
  2008. from time to time
    now and then or here and there
    It was even possible--he thought this because from time to time
    something seemed to tickle his leg--that there might be a sizeable bit of
    crust there.
  2009. watch
    look attentively
    You can take the whole lot of them and cut their throats in
    front of my eyes, and I'll stand by and watch it.
  2010. mattress
    a large thick pad filled with resilient material and often incorporating coiled springs, used as a bed or part of a bed
    There was a
    pillow and a mattress on the plank bed, and a stool to sit on.
  2011. regularly
    in a regular manner
    Near at hand some kind of
    instrument was ticking slowly and regularly.
  2012. at first sight
    immediately
    But in
    addition there were great numbers of words which at first sight appeared
    to be mere abbreviations and which derived their ideological colour not
    from their meaning, but from their structure.
  2013. dizzy
    having or causing a whirling sensation; liable to falling
    He would get up
    because the ache in his bones was no longer bearable, and then would sit
    down again almost at once because he was too dizzy to make sure of
    staying on his feet.
  2014. slump
    fall or sink heavily
    He had slumped to his knees, almost paralysed, clasping the
    stricken elbow with his other hand.
  2015. lean
    to incline or bend from a vertical position
    She leant forward and vomited copiously on the floor.
  2016. course
    a connected series of events or actions or developments
    Not brainy, of
    course, but keen.
  2017. nickname
    a familiar name for a person (often a shortened version of a person's given name)
    On the other hand some of them seemed to be on
    good terms with the guards, called them by nicknames, and tried to wheedle
    cigarettes through the spyhole in the door.
  2018. further
    to or at a greater extent or degree or a more advanced stage (`further' is used more often than `farther' in this abstract sense)
    Between you and me, old man, I'm glad they got me before it went
    any further.
  2019. blood
    the fluid (red in vertebrates) that is pumped through the body by the heart and contains plasma, blood cells, and platelets
    The pain in his belly; a piece of bread; the blood and the
    screaming; O'Brien; Julia; the razor blade.
  2020. other than
    in another and different manner
    What was required in a Party member was an outlook similar
    to that of the ancient Hebrew who knew, without knowing much else, that
    all nations other than his own worshipped 'false gods'.
  2021. cherish
    be fond of; be attached to
    If you have ever
    cherished any dreams of violent insurrection, you must abandon them.
  2022. occasionally
    now and then or here and there
    Occasionally, perhaps twice a week, he went
    to a dusty, forgotten-looking office in the Ministry of Truth and did
    a little work, or what was called work.
  2023. disciplined
    obeying the rules
    Only the
    disciplined mind can see reality, Winston.
  2024. later
    happening at a time subsequent to a reference time
    Later he was
    to realize that all that then happened was merely a preliminary, a routine
    interrogation to which nearly all prisoners were subjected.
  2025. consign
    give over to another for care or safekeeping
    One, a
    woman, was consigned to 'Room 101', and, Winston noticed, seemed to shrivel
    and turn a different colour when she heard the words.
  2026. dull
    so lacking in interest as to cause mental weariness
    There was a dull aching in his belly.
  2027. hate
    the emotion of intense dislike; a feeling of dislike so strong that it demands action
    He obeyed the Party, but he still hated the Party.
  2028. surprising
    causing surprise or wonder or amazement
    To a surprising extent the ordinary
    criminals ignored the Party prisoners.
  2029. error
    a wrong action attributable to bad judgment or ignorance or inattention
    It needed also a sort of
    athleticism of mind, an ability at one moment to make the most delicate
    use of logic and at the next to be unconscious of the crudest logical
    errors.
  2030. harshly
    in a harsh or unkind manner
    His manner changed and he said more
    harshly: 'And you consider yourself morally superior to us, with our lies
    and our cruelty?'
  2031. live
    have life, be alive
    Nothing will remain of you, not a name in a register, not
    a memory in a living brain.
  2032. tone
    (music) the distinctive property of a complex sound (a voice or noise or musical sound)
    The tone of his voice
    implied at once a complete admission of his guilt and a sort of incredulous
    horror that such a word could be applied to himself.
  2033. conscious
    knowing and perceiving; having awareness of surroundings and sensations and thoughts
    'I am conscious of my own identity.
  2034. convenient
    suited to your comfort or purpose or needs
    When we navigate the
    ocean, or when we predict an eclipse, we often find it convenient to
    assume that the earth goes round the sun and that the stars are millions
    upon millions of kilometres away.
  2035. contrive
    make or work out a plan for; devise
    So far as it could be contrived, everything that had or might have
    political significance of any kind was fitted into the B vocabulary.
  2036. at all
    in the slightest degree or in any respect
    They had put him into a cell similar to the one he was now in,
    but filthily dirty and at all times crowded by ten or fifteen people.
  2037. recognized
    generally approved or compelling recognition
    As his eyes regained their focus he
    remembered who he was, and where he was, and recognized the face that was
    gazing into his own; but somewhere or other there was a large patch of
    emptiness, as though a piece had been taken out of his brain.
  2038. fleeting
    lasting for a markedly brief time
    And he did see them, for a fleeting instant, before the scenery of his
    mind changed.
  2039. motive
    the psychological feature that arouses an organism to action toward a desired goal; the reason for the action; that which gives purpose and direction to behavior
    You could grasp the mechanics of the Society you lived
    in, but not its underlying motives.
  2040. perfected
    (of plans, ideas, etc.) perfectly formed
    It is with the final,
    perfected version, as embodied in the Eleventh Edition of the Dictionary,
    that we are concerned here.
  2041. metallic
    containing or made of or resembling or characteristic of a metal
    But through the darkness that enveloped him he heard
    another metallic click, and knew that the cage door had clicked shut and
    not open.
  2042. dispense
    administer or bestow, as in small portions
    Quite apart from the suppression of definitely heretical words, reduction
    of vocabulary was regarded as an end in itself, and no word that could be
    dispensed with was allowed to survive.
  2043. vehemently
    in a vehement manner
    Then he continued less vehemently:

    'The first thing for you to understand is that in this place there are no
    martyrdoms.
  2044. racket
    a sports implement (usually consisting of a handle and an oval frame with a tightly interlaced network of strings) used to strike a ball (or shuttlecock) in various games
    There was bribery, favouritism, and racketeering of every kind, there was
    homosexuality and prostitution, there was even illicit alcohol distilled
    from potatoes.
  2045. coloured
    having color or a certain color; sometimes used in combination
    His mouth had swollen into a shapeless cherry-coloured
    mass with a black hole in the middle of it.
  2046. faster
    more quickly
    His breast rose and fell a little faster.
  2047. gratefully
    with appreciation; in a grateful manner
    He opened his eyes and looked up gratefully at O'Brien.
  2048. middle
    an area that is approximately central within some larger region
    His eyes had a wide-open, staring look,
    as though he could not prevent himself from gazing at something in the
    middle distance.
  2049. gone
    no longer retained
    The man was led out, walking unsteadily, with head sunken, nursing his
    crushed hand, all the fight had gone out of him.
  2050. holding
    the act of retaining something
    At
    the other side of him stood a man in a white coat, holding a hypodermic
    syringe.
  2051. cure
    a medicine or therapy that cures disease or relieve pain
    You have never
    cured yourself of it, because you did not choose to.
  2052. making
    the act that results in something coming to be
    Presumably he was in the Ministry of Love,
    but there was no way of making certain.
  2053. flog
    beat severely with a whip or rod
    You have been kicked and flogged and
    insulted, you have screamed with pain, you have rolled on the floor in
    your own blood and vomit.
  2054. count
    determine the number or amount of
    It should have been easy, but he always lost count at
    some point or another.
  2055. alone
    isolated from others
    Winston was
    alone, and had been alone for hours.
  2056. worse
    (comparative of `bad') inferior to another in quality or condition or desirability
    The
    dull pain in his belly never went away, but sometimes it grew better and
    sometimes worse, and his thoughts expanded or contracted accordingly.
  2057. taking
    the act of someone who picks up or takes something
    'That's the one you ought to be taking, not me!' he shouted.
  2058. exercising
    the activity of exerting your muscles in various ways to keep fit
    After that, reluctantly at first, he began exercising
    himself regularly.
  2059. focus
    the concentration of attention or energy on something
    His eyes focused themselves slowly on Winston.
  2060. until now
    used in negative statement to describe a situation that has existed up to this point or up to the present time
    Until now he had
    not seemed to notice how thin and weak he was.
  2061. inflict
    impose something unpleasant
    Will you please remember, throughout our conversation,
    that I have it in my power to inflict pain on you at any moment and to
    whatever degree I choose?
  2062. smelling
    the act of perceiving the odor of something
    It was a noisy, evil-smelling
    place.
  2063. given
    acknowledged as a supposition
    The positions of trust were given only to the common
    criminals, especially the gangsters and the murderers, who formed a sort
    of aristocracy.
  2064. take to
    have a fancy or particular liking or desire for
    Before being brought
    here he had been taken to another place which must have been an ordinary
    prison or a temporary lock-up used by the patrols.
  2065. danger
    the condition of being susceptible to harm or injury
    He had no difficulty in disposing of the fallacy, and he was in no danger
    of succumbing to it.
  2066. barely
    in a sparse or scanty way
    Newspeak was founded on the English language as we now know it, though
    many Newspeak sentences, even when not containing newly-created words,
    would be barely intelligible to an English-speaker of our own day.
  2067. prostitute
    a woman who engages in sexual intercourse for money
    There was a constant come-and-go of prisoners of every description:
    drug-peddlers, thieves, bandits, black-marketeers, drunks, prostitutes.
  2068. drop out
    give up in the face of defeat of lacking hope; admit defeat
    And the few you have left are dropping out of your
    head.
  2069. at once
    without delay or hesitation; with no time intervening
    The tone of his voice
    implied at once a complete admission of his guilt and a sort of incredulous
    horror that such a word could be applied to himself.
  2070. possibility
    capability of existing or happening or being true
    At present only music was coming
    out of it, but there was a possibility that at any moment there might be
    a special bulletin from the Ministry of Peace.
  2071. rid of
    do away with
    You must
    get rid of those nineteenth-century ideas about the laws of Nature.
  2072. distraction
    the act of distracting; drawing someone's attention away from something
    He was not bored, he had no desire
    for conversation or distraction.
  2073. late
    at or toward an end or late period or stage of development
    "Thank you," I'm going to say, "thank you for saving me
    before it was too late."'
  2074. manoeuvre
    a military training exercise
    Fragments of triumphant phrases pushed themselves through the din: 'Vast
    strategic manoeuvre--perfect co-ordination--utter rout--half a million
    prisoners--complete demoralization--control of the whole of Africa--bring
    the war within measurable dist
  2075. heal
    heal or recover
    Almost in the same instant a blissful,
    healing warmth spread all through his body.
  2076. evident
    clearly revealed to the mind or the senses or judgment
    You also believe
    that the nature of reality is self-evident.
  2077. distribute
    give to several people
    Almost invariably
    these words--GOODTHINK, MINIPAX, PROLEFEED, SEXCRIME, JOYCAMP, INGSOC,
    BELLYFEEL, THINKPOL, and countless others--were words of two or three
    syllables, with the stress distributed equally between the first syllable
    and the last.
  2078. severed
    detached by cutting
    When Oldspeak had been once and for all superseded, the last link with
    the past would have been severed.
  2079. enrol
    register formally as a participant or member
    It was a sound-track of the
    conversation he had had with O'Brien, on the night when he had enrolled
    himself in the Brotherhood.
  2080. chattering
    the high-pitched continuing noise made by animals (birds or monkeys)
    He felt very cold, he was shaking uncontrollably,
    his teeth were chattering, the tears were rolling down his cheeks.
  2081. diagram
    a drawing intended to explain how something works; a drawing showing the relation between the parts
    The movement of the armies was a diagram: a
    black arrow tearing vertically southward, and a white arrow horizontally
    eastward, across the tail of the first.
  2082. sight
    the ability to see; the visual faculty
    The shock of the sight had driven all
    caution out of him.
  2083. forth
    forward in time or order or degree
    There were times when his nerve
    so forsook him that he began shouting for mercy even before the beating
    began, when the mere sight of a fist drawn back for a blow was enough
    to make him pour forth a confession of real and imaginary crimes.
  2084. extend
    stretch out over a distance, space, time, or scope; run or extend between two points or beyond a certain point
    O'Brien held up his left hand, its back towards Winston, with the thumb
    hidden and the four fingers extended.
  2085. deceit
    the quality of being fraudulent
    All her rebelliousness, her deceit, her
    folly, her dirty-mindedness--everything has been burned out of her.
  2086. forced
    forced or compelled
    There was much talk about the forced-labour camps to which
    most of the prisoners expected to be sent.
  2087. ruin
    an irrecoverable state of devastation and destruction
    Then suddenly as he fixed the miserable rags round himself a feeling of
    pity for his ruined body overcame him.
  2088. bite
    to grip, cut off, or tear with or as if with the teeth or jaws
    It was even possible--he thought this because from time to time
    something seemed to tickle his leg--that there might be a sizeable bit of
    crust there.
  2089. communication
    the activity of communicating; the activity of conveying information
    Even while he saw the black horde racing southward he
    saw another force, mysteriously assembled, suddenly planted in their rear,
    cutting their communications by land and sea.
  2090. quail
    small gallinaceous game birds
    He quailed.
  2091. mental
    involving the mind or an intellectual process
    You have a vivid mental picture of the vertebrae snapping apart
    and the spinal fluid dripping out of them.
  2092. bowels
    the center of the Earth
    His bowels seemed to turn to water.
  2093. intercourse
    the act of sexual procreation between a man and a woman; the man's penis is inserted into the woman's vagina and excited until orgasm and ejaculation occur
    It covered fornication,
    adultery, homosexuality, and other perversions, and, in addition, normal
    intercourse practised for its own sake.
  2094. persist
    be persistent, refuse to stop
    What can you do, thought Winston,
    against the lunatic who is more intelligent than yourself, who gives your
    arguments a fair hearing and then simply persists in his lunacy?
  2095. worrying
    the act of harassing someone
    On and off he had been worrying
    about it all day.
  2096. eclipse
    one celestial body obscures another
    When we navigate the
    ocean, or when we predict an eclipse, we often find it convenient to
    assume that the earth goes round the sun and that the stars are millions
    upon millions of kilometres away.
  2097. contemptible
    deserving of contempt or scorn
    Always we shall have the heretic here
    at our mercy, screaming with pain, broken up, contemptible--and in the end
    utterly penitent, saved from himself, crawling to our feet of his own
    accord.
  2098. fifty
    the cardinal number that is the product of ten and five
    He was older
    than Winston had thought him; he was perhaps forty-eight or fifty.
  2099. get back
    recover something or somebody that appeared to be lost
    'And now let us get
    back
    to the question of "how" and "why".
  2100. crowding
    a situation in which people or things are crowded together
    Then
    everything was normal again, and the old fear, the hatred, and the
    bewilderment came crowding back again.
  2101. booty
    goods or money obtained illegally
    The voice from the telescreen was still pouring forth its tale of prisoners
    and booty and slaughter, but the shouting outside had died down a little.
  2102. dying
    in or associated with the process of passing from life or ceasing to be
    The man was dying of starvation.
  2103. shades of
    something that reminds you of someone or something
    All ambiguities and shades of meaning had been purged out of
    them.
  2104. unconscious
    not conscious; lacking awareness and the capacity for sensory perception as if asleep or dead
    A very faint whimpering or squeaking, which seemed
    unconscious, came out of him.
  2105. abreast
    alongside each other, facing in the same direction
    She did not actually try to shake him off, but
    walked at just such a speed as to prevent his keeping abreast of her.
  2106. bothered
    caused to show discomposure
    He never even bothered to count his drinks.
  2107. flesh
    the soft tissue of the body of a vertebrate: mainly muscle tissue and fat
    Down one side of his face the
    flesh was darkening.
  2108. barricade
    a barrier (usually thrown up hastily) to impede the advance of an enemy
    The words COMMUNIST INTERNATIONAL, for instance, call up a composite
    picture of universal human brotherhood, red flags, barricades, Karl Marx,
    and the Paris Commune.
  2109. on the table
    able to be negotiated or arranged by compromise
    He had moved a little to one side, so that Winston had a better view of
    the thing on the table.
  2110. fight
    be engaged in a fight; carry on a fight
    They yelled insults at the guards,
    fought back fiercely when their belongings were impounded, wrote obscene
    words on the floor, ate smuggled food which they produced from mysterious
    hiding-places in their clothes, and even shouted down the telescre
  2111. cloudy
    full of or covered with clouds
    White always
    mates, he thought with a sort of cloudy mysticism.
  2112. magnify
    increase in size, volume or significance
    He knew now that for seven years the Thought Police had watched him
    like a beetle under a magnifying glass.
  2113. chin
    the protruding part of the lower jaw
    He
    remembered a surly barber arriving to scrape his chin and crop his hair,
    and businesslike, unsympathetic men in white coats feeling his pulse,
    tapping his reflexes, turning up his eyelids, running harsh fingers over
    him in search for broken bone
  2114. astray
    away from the right path or direction
    No one who has once gone astray is ever spared.
  2115. twenty-five
    the cardinal number that is the sum of twenty-four and one
    Sentence me to twenty-five
    years.
  2116. work
    activity directed toward making or doing something
    There I was, working away, trying to do my bit--never knew
    I had any bad stuff in my mind at all.
  2117. tormented
    experiencing intense pain especially mental pain
    Winston
    did not look at him again, but the tormented, skull-like face was as
    vivid in his mind as though it had been straight in front of his eyes.
  2118. crawling
    a slow mode of locomotion on hands and knees or dragging the body
    Always we shall have the heretic here
    at our mercy, screaming with pain, broken up, contemptible--and in the end
    utterly penitent, saved from himself, crawling to our feet of his own
    accord.
  2119. accumulation
    the act of accumulating
    The secret
    accumulation of knowledge--a gradual spread of enlightenment--ultimately
    a proletarian rebellion--the overthrow of the Party.
  2120. underlying
    being or involving basic facts or principles
    You could grasp the mechanics of the Society you lived
    in, but not its underlying motives.
  2121. scented
    filled or impregnated with perfume
    Two gin-scented tears trickled down the sides of his nose.
  2122. new
    not of long duration; having just (or relatively recently) come into being or been made or acquired or discovered
    There was pain coming, a new kind of pain.
  2123. bringing
    the act of delivering or distributing something (as goods or mail)
    O'Brien leaned over him, deliberately bringing
    the worn face nearer.
  2124. accept
    receive willingly something given or offered
    It was more natural to exist
    from moment to moment, accepting another ten minutes' life even with the
    certainty that there was torture at the end of it.
  2125. tap
    strike lightly
    He
    remembered a surly barber arriving to scrape his chin and crop his hair,
    and businesslike, unsympathetic men in white coats feeling his pulse,
    tapping his reflexes, turning up his eyelids, running harsh fingers over
    him in search for broken bone
  2126. burrow
    a hole made by an animal, usually for shelter
    Sometimes they
    burrow through the cheeks and devour the tongue.'
  2127. trailing
    the pursuit (of a person or animal) by following tracks or marks they left behind
    He had made up his mind that he would accompany her as far as the Tube
    station, but suddenly this process of trailing along in the cold seemed
    pointless and unbearable.
  2128. Down
    English physician who first described Down's syndrome (1828-1896)
    '"Down with Big Brother!"
  2129. lose
    fail to keep or to maintain; cease to have, either physically or in an abstract sense
    It should have been easy, but he always lost count at
    some point or another.
  2130. watering
    wetting with water
    He
    was hurrying along with frozen hands and watering eyes when he saw her not
    ten metres away from him.
  2131. go up
    move upward
    Do you know what I'm going to say to them when I go up before
    the tribunal?
  2132. semblance
    an outward or token appearance or form that is deliberately misleading
    And then--perhaps
    it was not happening, perhaps it was only a memory taking on the semblance
    of sound--a voice was singing:


    'Under the spreading chestnut tree
    I sold you and you sold me----'


    The tears welled up in his eyes.
  2133. apart
    separated or at a distance in place or position or time
    He did not know whether the thing was really happening,
    or whether the effect was electrically produced; but his body was being
    wrenched out of shape, the joints were being slowly torn apart.
  2134. tube
    a hollow cylindrical shape
    She said
    something about catching her Tube and stood up to go.
  2135. lit
    provided with artificial light
    He saw a candle-lit room with a
    vast white-counterpaned bed, and himself, a boy of nine or ten, sitting on
    the floor, shaking a dice-box, and laughing excitedly.
  2136. focused
    being in focus or brought into focus
    His eyes focused themselves slowly on Winston.
  2137. whiskers
    the hair growing on the lower part of a man's face
    Winston could see
    the whiskers and the yellow teeth.
  2138. science
    ability to produce solutions in some problem domain
    There will be no art, no literature, no science.
  2139. demolish
    destroy completely
    His mind shrivelled as he thought of the unanswerable, mad arguments with
    which O'Brien would demolish him.
  2140. older
    used of the older of two persons of the same name especially used to distinguish a father from his son
    He was older
    than Winston had thought him; he was perhaps forty-eight or fifty.
  2141. temptation
    the act of influencing by exciting hope or desire
    In the end the temptation to find out overcame his fear; he
    slipped a hand into his pocket.
  2142. exult
    feel extreme happiness or elation
    In
    the old days the heretic walked to the stake still a heretic, proclaiming
    his heresy, exulting in it.
  2143. animal
    a living organism characterized by voluntary movement
    He had set up a wordless
    howling, like an animal.
  2144. Congo
    a major African river (one of the world's longest); flows through Congo into the South Atlantic
    The mid-day bulletin had not mentioned any definite
    area, but it was probable that already the mouth of the Congo was a
    battlefield.
  2145. learn
    gain knowledge or skills
    He had already learned to sit still.
  2146. diminish
    decrease in size, extent, or range
    Newspeak was designed not to extend
    but to DIMINISH the range of thought, and this purpose was indirectly
    assisted by cutting the choice of words down to a minimum.
  2147. cruelty
    the quality of being cruel and causing tension or annoyance
    'It is impossible to found a civilization on fear and hatred and cruelty.
  2148. snake
    limbless scaly elongate reptile; some are venomous
    A lovely
    toy--you'll love it'; and then she had gone out in the rain, to a little
    general shop which was still sporadically open nearby, and came back with
    a cardboard box containing an outfit of Snakes and Ladders.
  2149. slavery
    the state of being under the control of another person
    You know the Party slogan: "Freedom is
    Slavery".
  2150. stoop to
    make concessions to
    The two sturdy guards had stooped to take him by the arms.
  2151. bend
    form a curve
    The man in
    the white coat bent down and looked closely into Winston's eyes, felt his
    pulse, laid an ear against his chest, tapped here and there, then he
    nodded to O'Brien.
  2152. bandit
    an armed thief who is (usually) a member of a band
    There was a constant come-and-go of prisoners of every description:
    drug-peddlers, thieves, bandits, black-marketeers, drunks, prostitutes.
  2153. obedience
    the trait of being willing to obey
    We are not content with
    negative obedience, nor even with the most abject submission.
  2154. beetle
    insect having biting mouthparts and front wings modified to form horny covers overlying the membranous rear wings
    He knew now that for seven years the Thought Police had watched him
    like a beetle under a magnifying glass.
  2155. take out
    cause to leave
    Sometimes he was beaten till he could hardly
    stand, then flung like a sack of potatoes on to the stone floor of a cell,
    left to recuperate for a few hours, and then taken out and beaten again.
  2156. wake
    stop sleeping
    Often he would lie from one meal to the next almost
    without stirring, sometimes asleep, sometimes waking into vague reveries
    in which it was too much trouble to open his eyes.
  2157. aching
    a dull persistent (usually moderately intense) pain
    There was a dull aching in his belly.
  2158. break out
    begin suddenly and sometimes violently
    An involuntary cry
    had broken out of him.
  2159. plus
    on the positive side or higher end of a scale
    'Do you remember,' he went on, 'writing in your diary, "Freedom is the
    freedom to say that two plus two make four"?'
  2160. cheer
    a cry or shout of approval
    Already an
    excited voice was gabbling from the telescreen, but even as it started
    it was almost drowned by a roar of cheering from outside.
  2161. dreamy
    dreamy in mood or nature
    His voice had grown almost dreamy.
  2162. million
    the number that is represented as a one followed by 6 zeros
    The proletarians will
    never revolt, not in a thousand years or a million.
  2163. cork
    outer bark of the cork oak; used for stoppers for bottles etc.
    Unbidden, a waiter came and
    filled his glass up with Victory Gin, shaking into it a few drops from
    another bottle with a quill through the cork.
  2164. to begin with
    before now
    To begin with, in
    order to grasp the full meaning of the Newspeak sentence quoted above,
    one would have to have a clear idea of what is meant by INGSOC.
  2165. disabled
    people collectively who are crippled or otherwise physically handicapped
    In the face of pain
    there are no heroes, no heroes, he thought over and over as he writhed
    on the floor, clutching uselessly at his disabled left arm.
  2166. coldness
    the absence of heat
    The blade would bite
    into him with a sort of burning coldness, and even the fingers that held
    it would be cut to the bone.
  2167. seven
    the cardinal number that is the sum of six and one
    Pretty smart for a nipper of seven, eh?
  2168. inflamed
    resulting from inflammation; hot and swollen and reddened
    Here and there under the dirt there
    were the red scars of wounds, and near the ankle the varicose ulcer was an
    inflamed mass with flakes of skin peeling off it.
  2169. malignant
    dangerous to health; characterized by progressive and uncontrolled growth (especially of a tumor)
    At a guess he
    would have said that it was the body of a man of sixty, suffering from
    some malignant disease.
  2170. reasoned
    logically valid
    But this statement, which to an orthodox ear merely
    conveyed a self-evident absurdity, could not have been sustained by
    reasoned argument, because the necessary words were not available.
  2171. gnaw
    bite or chew on with the teeth
    But he was also
    hungry, with a gnawing, unwholesome kind of hunger.
  2172. more than
    (comparative of `much' used with mass nouns) a quantifier meaning greater in size or amount or extent or degree
    More than ever he had the
    air of a teacher taking pains with a wayward but promising child.
  2173. method
    a way of doing something, especially a systematic way; implies an orderly logical arrangement (usually in steps)
    The German Nazis and the
    Russian Communists came very close to us in their methods, but they never
    had the courage to recognize their own motives.
  2174. matter of course
    an inevitable ending
    There was a
    long range of crimes--espionage, sabotage, and the like--to which everyone
    had to confess as a matter of course.
  2175. spin
    revolve quickly and repeatedly around one's own axis
    He seized Winston's shoulder and spun him round so that he was facing him.
  2176. ruined
    destroyed physically or morally
    Then suddenly as he fixed the miserable rags round himself a feeling of
    pity for his ruined body overcame him.
  2177. meet
    come together
    He
    was not sure whether it was O'Brien's voice; but it was the same voice
    that had said to him, 'We shall meet in the place where there is no
    darkness,' in that other dream, seven years ago.
  2178. murderous
    characteristic of or capable of or having a tendency toward killing another human being
    Because of
    its thinness the mouth and eyes looked disproportionately large, and the
    eyes seemed filled with a murderous, unappeasable hatred of somebody or
    something.
  2179. suppression
    forceful prevention; putting down by power or authority
    Quite apart from the suppression of definitely heretical words, reduction
    of vocabulary was regarded as an end in itself, and no word that could be
    dispensed with was allowed to survive.
  2180. overnight
    during or for the length of one night
    When he woke, seldom before eleven hundred, with gummed-up eyelids and
    fiery mouth and a back that seemed to be broken, it would have been
    impossible even to rise from the horizontal if it had not been for the
    bottle and teacup placed beside the bed ov
  2181. silenced
    reduced to silence
    And there are disease, pain, death----'

    O'Brien silenced him by a movement of his hand.
  2182. nature
    the natural physical world including plants and animals and landscapes etc.
    You also believe
    that the nature of reality is self-evident.
  2183. commune
    communicate intimately with; be in a state of heightened, intimate receptivity
    The words COMMUNIST INTERNATIONAL, for instance, call up a composite
    picture of universal human brotherhood, red flags, barricades, Karl Marx,
    and the Paris Commune.
  2184. censor
    a person who is authorized to read publications or correspondence or to watch theatrical performances and suppress in whole or in part anything considered obscene or politically unacceptable
    History had already been rewritten,
    but fragments of the literature of the past survived here and there,
    imperfectly censored, and so long as one retained one's knowledge of
    Oldspeak it was possible to read them.
  2185. servitude
    state of subjection to an owner or master or forced labor imposed as punishment
    How
    many years had he added to his servitude by that moment of weakness?
  2186. induced
    brought about or caused; not spontaneous
    The humming sound and the unvarying white light induced a
    sort of faintness, an empty feeling inside his head.
  2187. indirect
    not direct in spatial dimension; not leading by a straight line or course to a destination
    Its vocabulary was so constructed as to give exact and
    often very subtle expression to every meaning that a Party member could
    properly wish to express, while excluding all other meanings and also the
    possibility of arriving at them by indirect met
  2188. rebellion
    organized opposition to authority; a conflict in which one faction tries to wrest control from another
    Even the victim of the Russian purges could
    carry rebellion locked up in his skull as he walked down the passage
    waiting for the bullet.
  2189. and so
    subsequently or soon afterward (often used as sentence connectors)
    At sight of the heavy, lined face, so ugly and so intelligent, his heart
    seemed to turn over.
  2190. gradually
    in a gradual manner
    Even after his eyes were open he took in his surroundings only gradually.
  2191. turning
    a movement in a new direction
    The
    eyes of the chinless man kept flitting towards the skull-faced man, then
    turning guiltily away, then being dragged back by an irresistible
    attraction.
  2192. record
    anything (such as a document or a phonograph record or a photograph) providing permanent evidence of or information about past events
    They'll know my record, won't they?
  2193. glitter
    the quality of shining with a bright reflected light
    He was in a high-ceilinged
    windowless cell with walls of glittering white porcelain.
  2194. conformity
    correspondence in form or appearance
    In the old days he had
    hidden a heretical mind beneath an appearance of conformity.
  2195. but then
    (contrastive) from another point of view
    He wrote first in large clumsy
    capitals:


    FREEDOM IS SLAVERY


    Then almost without a pause he wrote beneath it:


    TWO AND TWO MAKE FIVE


    But then there came a sort of check.
  2196. pronoun
    a function word that is used in place of a noun or noun phrase
    The only classes of words that were still allowed to inflect irregularly
    were the pronouns, the relatives, the demonstrative adjectives, and the
    auxiliary verbs.
  2197. satisfying
    providing abundant nourishment
    Merely to be alone, not to be beaten
    or questioned, to have enough to eat, and to be clean all over, was
    completely satisfying.
  2198. mildly
    to a moderate degree
    Ampleforth paused, mildly startled.
  2199. shut out
    prevent from entering; shut out
    The circle of the mask was large enough now to shut out the vision of
    anything else.
  2200. tin
    a silvery malleable metallic element that resists corrosion; used in many alloys and to coat other metals to prevent corrosion; obtained chiefly from cassiterite where it occurs as tin oxide
    He remembered a cell
    with a plank bed, a sort of shelf sticking out from the wall, and a tin
    wash-basin, and meals of hot soup and bread and sometimes coffee.
  2201. drained
    emptied or exhausted of (as by drawing off e.g. water or other liquid)
    He picked up his glass and drained it
    at a gulp.
  2202. pierce
    penetrate or cut through with a sharp instrument
    A shrill trumpet-call had pierced the air.