George Orwell's "1984" Part 2 (comprehensive) 2441 words

Comprehensive vocabulary list for George Orwell's "1984" (Part 2).
  1. gateleg table
    a drop-leaf table with the drop-leaves supported by hinged legs
    In the corner, on the gateleg table, the
    glass paperweight which he had bought on his last visit gleamed softly out
    of the half-darkness.
  2. labour camp
    a penal institution for political prisoners who are used as forced labor
    Nor did
    one know what became of them, apart from the few who were hanged as
    war-criminals: the others simply vanished, presumably into forced-labour
    camps
    .
  3. Eurasia
    the land mass formed by the continents of Europe and Asia
    Foreigners,
    whether from Eurasia or from Eastasia, were a kind of strange animal.
  4. prole
    a member of the working class (not necessarily employed)
    Soon he was within arm's length of the girl,
    but the way was blocked by an enormous prole and an almost equally enormous
    woman, presumably his wife, who seemed to form an impenetrable wall of
    flesh.
  5. newspeak
    deliberately ambiguous and contradictory language use to mislead and manipulate the public
    He noticed that she never used Newspeak words
    except the ones that had passed into everyday use.
  6. oilstove
    heater that burns oil (as kerosine) for heating or cooking
    In the fender was a battered tin oilstove, a saucepan, and two cups,
    provided by Mr Charrington.
  7. Oceania
    a large group of islands in the south Pacific including Melanesia and Micronesia and Polynesia (and sometimes Australasia and the Malay Archipelago)
    She might have been vaporized, she might
    have committed suicide, she might have been transferred to the other end
    of Oceania: worst and likeliest of all, she might simply have changed her
    mind and decided to avoid him.
  8. paperweight
    a weight used to hold down a stack of papers
    In the corner, on the gateleg table, the
    glass paperweight which he had bought on his last visit gleamed softly out
    of the half-darkness.
  9. doublethink
    believing two contradictory ideas at the same time
    Whenever he began to talk of the principles of Ingsoc, doublethink, the
    mutability of the past, and the denial of objective reality, and to use
    Newspeak words, she became bored and confused and said that she never paid
    any attention to that kind of thing.
  10. Neolithic Age
    latest part of the Stone Age beginning about 10,000 BC in the Middle East (but later elsewhere)
    The inscription on the title-page ran:


    THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF
    OLIGARCHICAL COLLECTIVISM
    by
    Emmanuel Goldstein


    Winston began reading:


    Chapter I
    Ignorance is Strength

    Throughout recorded time, and probably since the end of the Neolithic Age,
    there have been three kinds of people in the world, the High, the Middle,
    and the Low. They have been subdivided in many ways, they have borne
    countless different names, and their relative numbers, as well as their
    attitude toward...
  11. gas ring
    gas burner consisting of a circular metal pipe with several small holes through which gas can escape to be burned
    There was a gas ring
    in the fender, and a shelf where food was kept, and on the landing outside
    there was a brown earthenware sink, common to several rooms.
  12. clothes peg
    wood or plastic fastener; for holding clothes on a clothesline
    Whenever her mouth was not corked with clothes pegs she
    was singing in a powerful contralto:


    It was only an 'opeless fancy.
  13. Big Brother
    an authoritarian leader and invader of privacy
    He was particularly enthusiastic about a papier-mache model of Big
    Brother
    's head, two metres wide, which was being made for the occasion by
    his daughter's troop of Spies.
  14. baking hot
    as hot as if in an oven
    The weather was baking hot.
  15. etiolate
    make weak by stunting the growth or development of
    Already on the walk from the station the May sunshine had made him
    feel dirty and etiolated, a creature of indoors, with the sooty dust of
    London in the pores of his skin.
  16. hierarchical
    classified according to various criteria into successive levels or layers
    But it was also clear that an all-round increase in wealth threatened the
    destruction--indeed, in some sense was the destruction--of a hierarchical
    society.
  17. literate person
    a person who can read and write
    In the early twentieth century, the vision of
    a future society unbelievably rich, leisured, orderly, and efficient--a
    glittering antiseptic world of glass and steel and snow-white concrete--was
    part of the consciousness of nearly every literate person.
  18. Eurasian
    relating to, or coming from, Europe and Asia
    He wandered round
    the base of the enormous fluted column, at the top of which Big Brother's
    statue gazed southward towards the skies where he had vanquished the
    Eurasian aeroplanes (the Eastasian aeroplanes, it had been, a few years
    ago) in the Battle of Airstrip One. In the street in front of it there was
    a statue of a man on horseback which was supposed to represent Oliver
    Cromwell.
  19. dilapidate
    fall into decay or ruin
    The world of today is a bare, hungry,
    dilapidated place compared with the world that existed before 1914, and
    still more so if compared with the imaginary future to which the people of
    that period looked forward.
  20. resettle
    settle in a new place
    Sometimes it stopped
    for a few seconds, spread out and resettled its wings, then swelled its
    speckled breast and again burst into song.
  21. niggle
    worry unnecessarily or excessively
    What was even
    worse than having to focus his mind on a series of niggling jobs was the
    need to conceal his agitation from the telescreen.
  22. face guard
    face mask consisting of a strong wire mesh on the front of football helmets
    A long line of trucks, with wooden-faced guards armed with sub-machine
    guns standing upright in each corner, was passing slowly down the street.
  23. resettled
    settled in a new location
    Sometimes it stopped
    for a few seconds, spread out and resettled its wings, then swelled its
    speckled breast and again burst into song.
  24. potato peelings
    crisp fried potato peeling
    He remembered long afternoons spent with other boys
    in scrounging round dustbins and rubbish heaps, picking out the ribs of
    cabbage leaves, potato peelings, sometimes even scraps of stale breadcrust
    from which they carefully scraped away the cinders; and also in waiting
    for the passing of trucks which travelled over a certain route and were
    known to carry cattle feed, and which, when they jolted over the bad
    patches in the road, sometimes spilt a few fragments of oil-cake.
  25. unperson
    a person regarded as nonexistent and having no rights; a person whose existence is systematically ignored (especially for ideological or political reasons)
    But Syme was not only dead,
    he was abolished, an unperson.
  26. amateurishly
    in an amateurish manner
    A heavy black volume, amateurishly bound, with no name or title on the
    cover.
  27. twentieth century
    the century from 1901 to 2000
    Suddenly, as one sometimes does with a book of which one
    knows that one will ultimately read and re-read every word, he opened it
    at a different place and found himself at Chapter III. He went on reading:


    Chapter III
    War is Peace

    The splitting up of the world into three great super-states was an event
    which could be and indeed was foreseen before the middle of the twentieth
    century
    .
  28. Utopianism
    the political orientation of a Utopian who believes in impossibly idealistic schemes of social perfection
    Socialism, a theory which appeared in the early nineteenth century and was
    the last link in a chain of thought stretching back to the slave rebellions
    of antiquity, was still deeply infected by the Utopianism of past ages.
  29. predestine
    decree or determine beforehand
    It was curious how that predestined horror moved in and out of one's
    consciousness.
  30. conquerable
    capable of being surmounted or excelled
    Each of the three powers which now divide the world is in
    fact unconquerable, and could only become conquerable through slow
    demographic changes which a government with wide powers can easily avert.
  31. fifties
    the decade from 1950 to 1959
    'They were quite common in the
    fifties.
  32. washtub
    a tub in which clothes or linens can be washed
    The June sun was still high in the sky,
    and in the sun-filled court below, a monstrous woman, solid as a Norman
    pillar, with brawny red forearms and a sacking apron strapped about her
    middle, was stumping to and fro between a washtub and a clothes line,
    pegging out a series of square white things which Winston recognized as
    babies' diapers.
  33. expropriate
    deprive of possessions
    It had always been assumed that if the capitalist class
    were expropriated, Socialism must follow: and unquestionably the
    capitalists had been expropriated.
  34. saccharine
    overly sweet
    The queue edged forward till Winston was almost at the counter, then was
    held up for two minutes because someone in front was complaining that he
    had not received his tablet of saccharine.
  35. hazel tree
    Australian tree grown especially for ornament and its fine-grained wood and bearing edible nuts
    But the mindless tenderness that he had felt under
    the hazel tree, while the thrush was singing, had not quite come back.
  36. bulkiness
    an unwieldy largeness
    In spite of the
    bulkiness of his body there was a remarkable grace in his movements.
  37. bluebell
    one of the most handsome prairie wildflowers having large erect bell-shaped bluish flowers; of moist places in prairies and fields from eastern Colorado and Nebraska south to New Mexico and Texas
    Under the
    trees to the left of him the ground was misty with bluebells.
  38. party
    an occasion on which people can assemble for social interaction and entertainment
    It consisted in falsifying a
    series of production reports of two years ago, in such a way as to cast
    discredit on a prominent member of the Inner Party, who was now under a
    cloud.
  39. varicose
    abnormally swollen or knotty
    I've
    got varicose veins.
  40. canteen
    sells food and personal items to personnel at an institution or school or camp etc.
    Lunch in the hot, crowded, noise-filled
    canteen was torment.
  41. atomic bomb
    a nuclear weapon in which enormous energy is released by nuclear fission (splitting the nuclei of a heavy element like uranium 235 or plutonium 239)
    That was in another hiding-place known to Julia,
    the belfry of a ruinous church in an almost-deserted stretch of country
    where an atomic bomb had fallen thirty years earlier.
  42. Neolithic
    latest part of the Stone Age beginning about 10,000 BC in the Middle East (but later elsewhere)
    The inscription on the title-page ran:


    THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF
    OLIGARCHICAL COLLECTIVISM
    by
    Emmanuel Goldstein


    Winston began reading:


    Chapter I
    Ignorance is Strength

    Throughout recorded time, and probably since the end of the Neolithic Age,
    there have been three kinds of people in the world, the High, the Middle,
    and the Low. They have been subdivided in many ways, they have borne
    countless different names, and their relative numbers, as well as their
    attitude toward...
  43. Rumpelstiltskin
    a dwarf in one of the fairy stories of the brothers Grimm; tells a woman he will not hold her to a promise if she can guess his name and when she discovers it he is so furious that he destroys himself
    A little
    Rumpelstiltskin figure, contorted with hatred, he gripped the neck of the
    microphone with one hand while the other, enormous at the end of a bony
    arm, clawed the air menacingly above his head.
  44. brotherhood
    the kinship relation between a male offspring and the siblings
    Perhaps the Brotherhood existed after all!
  45. wainscoting
    wooden panels that can be used to line the walls of a room
    I saw him stick his beastly nose out of the wainscoting.
  46. super
    a caretaker for an apartment house; represents the owner as janitor and rent collector
    Suddenly, as one sometimes does with a book of which one
    knows that one will ultimately read and re-read every word, he opened it
    at a different place and found himself at Chapter III. He went on reading:


    Chapter III
    War is Peace

    The splitting up of the world into three great super-states was an event
    which could be and indeed was foreseen before the middle of the twentieth
    century.
  47. inner
    located inward
    It consisted in falsifying a
    series of production reports of two years ago, in such a way as to cast
    discredit on a prominent member of the Inner Party, who was now under a
    cloud.
  48. engrave
    carve, cut, or etch into a material or surface
    'And that picture over there'--she nodded at the engraving on the opposite
    wall--'would that be a hundred years old?'
  49. etiolated
    (especially of plants) developed without chlorophyll by being deprived of light
    Already on the walk from the station the May sunshine had made him
    feel dirty and etiolated, a creature of indoors, with the sooty dust of
    London in the pores of his skin.
  50. chocolate
    a food made from roasted ground cacao beans
    Then,
    as though touching her waist had reminded her of something, she felt in
    the pocket of her overalls and produced a small slab of chocolate.
  51. consumable
    may be used up
    It
    eats up the surplus of consumable goods, and it helps to preserve the
    special mental atmosphere that a hierarchical society needs.
  52. expressionless
    deliberately impassive in manner
    Neither of them looked up; steadily they spooned the
    watery stuff into their mouths, and between spoonfuls exchanged the few
    necessary words in low expressionless voices.
  53. daydream
    absentminded dreaming while awake
    It was hopeless even as a daydream.
  54. silkiness
    the smooth feel of silk fabric
    They were very good cigarettes, very thick and
    well-packed, with an unfamiliar silkiness in the paper.
  55. loosestrife
    any of numerous herbs and subshrubs of the genus Lythrum
    But at this moment Winston noticed some
    tufts of loosestrife growing in the cracks of the cliff beneath them.
  56. aeroplane
    an aircraft that has a fixed wing and is powered by propellers or jets
    He wandered round
    the base of the enormous fluted column, at the top of which Big Brother's
    statue gazed southward towards the skies where he had vanquished the
    Eurasian aeroplanes (the Eastasian aeroplanes, it had been, a few years
    ago) in the Battle of Airstrip One. In the street in front of it there was
    a statue of a man on horseback which was supposed to represent Oliver
    Cromwell.
  57. varicose vein
    a vein that is permanently dilated; most common in the legs
    I've
    got varicose veins.
  58. ruling class
    the class of people exerting power or authority
    War was a
    sure safeguard of sanity, and so far as the ruling classes were concerned
    it was probably the most important of all safeguards.
  59. steel engraving
    the act of engraving on a steel plate
    He had the feeling that he could get inside it, and that in
    fact he was inside it, along with the mahogany bed and the gateleg table,
    and the clock and the steel engraving and the paperweight itself.
  60. vaporized
    converted into a gas or vapor
    She might have been vaporized, she might
    have committed suicide, she might have been transferred to the other end
    of Oceania: worst and likeliest of all, she might simply have changed her
    mind and decided to avoid him.
  61. industriousness
    persevering determination to perform a task
    Eurasia is protected by its vast land spaces, Oceania
    by the width of the Atlantic and the Pacific, Eastasia by the fecundity
    and industriousness of its inhabitants.
  62. neurotically
    in a neurotic manner
    It was like struggling with some crushing physical task,
    something which one had the right to refuse and which one was nevertheless
    neurotically anxious to accomplish.
  63. hunch forward
    round one's back by bending forward and drawing the shoulders forward
    The orator,
    still gripping the neck of the microphone, his shoulders hunched forward,
    his free hand clawing at the air, had gone straight on with his speech.
  64. metre
    the basic unit of length adopted under the Systeme International d'Unites (approximately 1.094 yards)
    They were perhaps four metres apart when the girl stumbled and fell almost
    flat on her face.
  65. alterable
    capable of being changed or altered in some characteristic
    The cyclical movement of history was now
    intelligible, or appeared to be so; and if it was intelligible, then it
    was alterable.
  66. amputate
    remove surgically
    Sometimes we even amputate a limb.'
  67. tunefully
    in a melodious manner
    But the woman sang so tunefully as to turn the dreadful rubbish into an
    almost pleasant sound.
  68. Oceanic
    an eastern subfamily of Malayo-Polynesian languages
    If Oceania were
    to conquer the areas that used once to be known as France and Germany, it
    would be necessary either to exterminate the inhabitants, a task of great
    physical difficulty, or to assimilate a population of about a hundred
    million people, who, so far as technical development goes, are roughly on
    the Oceanic level.
  69. war
    the waging of armed conflict against an enemy
    Nor did
    one know what became of them, apart from the few who were hanged as
    war-criminals: the others simply vanished, presumably into forced-labour
    camps.
  70. twentieth
    position 20 in a countable series of things
    Suddenly, as one sometimes does with a book of which one
    knows that one will ultimately read and re-read every word, he opened it
    at a different place and found himself at Chapter III. He went on reading:


    Chapter III
    War is Peace

    The splitting up of the world into three great super-states was an event
    which could be and indeed was foreseen before the middle of the twentieth
    century.
  71. sixties
    the time of life between 60 and 70
    She had no memories of anything before the early sixties and the only
    person she had ever known who talked frequently of the days before the
    Revolution was a grandfather who had disappeared when she was eight.
  72. poster
    a sign posted in a public place as an advertisement
    Then he saw the girl standing at the base of the monument, reading or
    pretending to read a poster which ran spirally up the column.
  73. translucency
    the quality of allowing light to pass diffusely
    His body seemed to have not only the
    weakness of a jelly, but its translucency.
  74. springiness
    the elasticity of something that can be stretched and returns to its original length
    There were no sheets, but the blanket they lay on was
    threadbare and smooth, and the size and springiness of the bed astonished
    both of them.
  75. Low
    British political cartoonist (born in New Zealand) who created the character Colonel Blimp (1891-1963)
    The inscription on the title-page ran:


    THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF
    OLIGARCHICAL COLLECTIVISM
    by
    Emmanuel Goldstein


    Winston began reading:


    Chapter I
    Ignorance is Strength

    Throughout recorded time, and probably since the end of the Neolithic Age,
    there have been three kinds of people in the world, the High, the Middle,
    and the Low. They have been subdivided in many ways, they have borne
    countless different names, and their relative numbers, as well as their
    attitude toward...
  76. collectivism
    a political theory that the people should own the means of production
    The inscription on the title-page ran:


    THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF
    OLIGARCHICAL COLLECTIVISM
    by
    Emmanuel Goldstein


    Winston began reading:


    Chapter I
    Ignorance is Strength

    Throughout recorded time, and probably since the end of the Neolithic Age,
    there have been three kinds of people in the world, the High, the Middle,
    and the Low. They have been subdivided in many ways, they have borne
    countless different names, and their relative numbers, as well as their
    attitude toward...
  77. music department
    the academic department responsible for teaching music and music appreciation
    It was one of countless
    similar songs published for the benefit of the proles by a sub-section of
    the Music Department.
  78. subdivide
    form into subdivisions
    The inscription on the title-page ran:


    THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF
    OLIGARCHICAL COLLECTIVISM
    by
    Emmanuel Goldstein


    Winston began reading:


    Chapter I
    Ignorance is Strength

    Throughout recorded time, and probably since the end of the Neolithic Age,
    there have been three kinds of people in the world, the High, the Middle,
    and the Low. They have been subdivided in many ways, they have borne
    countless different names, and their relative numbers, as well as their
    attitude toward...
  79. waxwork
    an effigy (usually of a famous person) made of wax
    Processions, meetings,
    military parades, lectures, waxworks, displays, film shows, telescreen
    programmes all had to be organized; stands had to be erected, effigies
    built, slogans coined, songs written, rumours circulated, photographs
    faked.
  80. unorthodoxy
    the quality of being unorthodox
    Katharine would unquestionably
    have denounced him to the Thought Police if she had not happened to be too
    stupid to detect the unorthodoxy of his opinions.
  81. rubbish
    worthless material that is to be disposed of
    Chocolate normally was
    dull-brown crumbly stuff that tasted, as nearly as one could describe it,
    like the smoke of a rubbish fire.
  82. kilometre
    a metric unit of length equal to 1000 meters (or 0.621371 miles)
    A half-hour railway journey; turn left outside
    the station; two kilometres along the road; a gate with the top bar
    missing; a path across a field; a grass-grown lane; a track between bushes;
    a dead tree with moss on it.
  83. Old Bailey
    the central criminal court in London
    To his astonishment she capped the line:


    'You owe me three farthings, say the bells of St Martin's,
    When will you pay me? say the bells of Old Bailey----'


    'I can't remember how it goes on after that.
  84. microphone
    device for converting sound waves into electrical energy
    There were no telescreens, of course, but there
    was always the danger of concealed microphones by which your voice might
    be picked up and recognized; besides, it was not easy to make a journey
    by yourself without attracting attention.
  85. realizable
    capable of being realized
    The earthly paradise had been discredited at exactly the
    moment when it became realizable.
  86. cyclical
    recurring in cycles
    There then rose schools of thinkers who
    interpreted history as a cyclical process and claimed to show that
    inequality was the unalterable law of human life.
  87. inexhaustibly
    with indefatigable energy
    The inexhaustibly interesting thing was not the fragment of coral but the
    interior of the glass itself.
  88. incriminate
    suggest that someone is guilty
    On it was written, in a large
    unformed handwriting:

    I LOVE YOU.

    For several seconds he was too stunned even to throw the incriminating
    thing into the memory hole.
  89. gyroscope
    rotating mechanism in the form of a universally mounted spinning wheel that offers resistance to turns in any direction
    Even after enormous
    upheavals and seemingly irrevocable changes, the same pattern has always
    reasserted itself, just as a gyroscope will always return to equilibrium,
    however far it is pushed one way or the other.
  90. proletarian
    belonging to or characteristic of the proletariat
    There she had remained for
    a year, helping to produce booklets in sealed packets with titles like
    'Spanking Stories' or 'One Night in a Girls' School', to be bought
    furtively by proletarian youths who were under the impression that they
    were buying something illegal.
  91. bomb
    an explosive device fused to explode under specific conditions
    That was in another hiding-place known to Julia,
    the belfry of a ruinous church in an almost-deserted stretch of country
    where an atomic bomb had fallen thirty years earlier.
  92. political theory
    an orientation that characterizes the thinking of a group or nation
    Every new political theory, by whatever
    name it called itself, led back to hierarchy and regimentation.
  93. sluttish
    casual and unrestrained in sexual behavior
    He
    sat down in the sluttish armchair and undid the straps of the brief-case.
  94. decanter
    a bottle with a stopper; for serving wine or water
    Winston saw that he was carrying a tray with a decanter
    and glasses.
  95. overall
    including everything
    As she came nearer he saw that her right arm was in a sling, not noticeable
    at a distance because it was of the same colour as her overalls.
  96. unbearably
    to an unbearable degree
    The Parsons children
    played it at all hours of the night and day, unbearably, on a comb and a
    piece of toilet paper.
  97. Parsons
    United States sociologist (1902-1979)
    He had hoped to be alone for a little while during
    the lunch hour, but as bad luck would have it the imbecile Parsons flopped
    down beside him, the tang of his sweat almost defeating the tinny smell of
    stew, and kept up a stream of talk about the preparations for Hate Week.
  98. hostel
    a hotel providing overnight lodging for travelers
    She lived in a hostel with thirty other
    girls ('Always in the stink of women!
  99. shock therapy
    treatment of certain psychotic states by the administration of shocks that are followed by convulsions
    The scientist of today is either a mixture of psychologist and inquisitor,
    studying with real ordinary minuteness the meaning of facial expressions,
    gestures, and tones of voice, and testing the truth-producing effects of
    drugs, shock therapy, hypnosis, and physical torture; or he is chemist,
    physicist, or biologist concerned only with such branches of his special
    subject as are relevant to the taking of life.
  100. falsification
    a willful perversion of facts
    I know, of course, that the
    past is falsified, but it would never be possible for me to prove it, even
    when I did the falsification myself.
  101. unbelievably
    not easy to believe
    He led a ghostlike existence between the
    tiny, dark shop, and an even tinier back kitchen where he prepared his
    meals and which contained, among other things, an unbelievably ancient
    gramophone with an enormous horn.
  102. enormous
    extraordinarily large in size or extent or amount or power or degree
    But the physical difficulty of
    meeting was enormous.
  103. grizzle
    a grey wig
    In the last truck he could see an
    aged man, his face a mass of grizzled hair, standing upright with wrists
    crossed in front of him, as though he were used to having them bound
    together.
  104. nervous impulse
    the electrical discharge that travels along a nerve fiber
    He was alone: no telescreen, no ear at
    the keyhole, no nervous impulse to glance over his shoulder or cover the
    page with his hand.
  105. water closet
    a toilet in Britain
    For a moment he was tempted to take it into one of the water-closets
    and read it at once.
  106. scrounge
    obtain or seek to obtain by cadging or wheedling
    He remembered long afternoons spent with other boys
    in scrounging round dustbins and rubbish heaps, picking out the ribs of
    cabbage leaves, potato peelings, sometimes even scraps of stale breadcrust
    from which they carefully scraped away the cinders; and also in waiting
    for the passing of trucks which travelled over a certain route and were
    known to carry cattle feed, and which, when they jolted over the bad
    patches in the road, sometimes spilt a few fragments of oil-cake.
  107. strenuousness
    extreme effortfulness
    Who knew, perhaps the Party was rotten under the surface,
    its cult of strenuousness and self-denial simply a sham concealing
    iniquity.
  108. inequality
    lack of equality
    From the moment when the machine first made its appearance it
    was clear to all thinking people that the need for human drudgery, and
    therefore to a great extent for human inequality, had disappeared.
  109. continuous
    continuing in time or space without interruption
    Above all he remembered his continuous hunger, and the
    fierce sordid battles at mealtimes.
  110. immunize
    perform vaccinations or produce immunity in by inoculation
    Some are
    concerned simply with planning the logistics of future wars; others devise
    larger and larger rocket bombs, more and more powerful explosives, and more
    and more impenetrable armour-plating; others search for new and deadlier
    gases, or for soluble poisons capable of being produced in such quantities
    as to destroy the vegetation of whole continents, or for breeds of disease
    germs immunized against all possible antibodies; others strive to produce
    a vehicle that shall bore its wa...
  111. gelatinous
    thick like gelatin
    Chapter 9



    Winston was gelatinous with fatigue.
  112. rackety
    uncontrollably noisy
    He remembered better the rackety, uneasy circumstances of
    the time: the periodical panics about air-raids and the sheltering in Tube
    stations, the piles of rubble everywhere, the unintelligible proclamations
    posted at street corners, the gangs of youths in shirts all the same
    colour, the enormous queues outside the bakeries, the intermittent
    machine-gun fire in the distance--above all, the fact that there was
    never enough to eat.
  113. inviolate
    (of a woman) having the hymen unbroken
    To know
    that it was there, inviolate, was almost the same as being in it.
  114. equality before the law
    the right to equal protection of the laws
    The
    heirs of the French, English, and American revolutions had partly believed
    in their own phrases about the rights of man, freedom of speech, equality
    before the law
    , and the like, and have even allowed their conduct to be
    influenced by them to some extent.
  115. inefficiently
    in an inefficient manner
    Either it is conquered from without, or it governs so inefficiently that
    the masses are stirred to revolt, or it allows a strong and discontented
    Middle group to come into being, or it loses its own self-confidence and
    willingness to govern.
  116. written communication
    communication by means of written symbols (either printed or handwritten)
    However, it made no difference, for it was inconceivable that
    they could ever meet indoors or exchange any kind of written communication.
  117. sacking
    coarse fabric used for bags or sacks
    The June sun was still high in the sky,
    and in the sun-filled court below, a monstrous woman, solid as a Norman
    pillar, with brawny red forearms and a sacking apron strapped about her
    middle, was stumping to and fro between a washtub and a clothes line,
    pegging out a series of square white things which Winston recognized as
    babies' diapers.
  118. somewhere
    in or at or to some place
    If he had known where she lived, and at what time she left work,
    he could have contrived to meet her somewhere on her way home; but to try
    to follow her home was not safe, because it would mean loitering about
    outside the Ministry, which was bound to be noticed.
  119. insatiably
    to an insatiable degree
    The trucks were still filing past,
    the people still insatiably gaping.
  120. overpoweringly
    incapable of being resisted
    The air in the
    little square chamber above the bells was hot and stagnant, and smelt
    overpoweringly of pigeon dung.
  121. ministry
    the work of a minister of religion
    If he had known where she lived, and at what time she left work,
    he could have contrived to meet her somewhere on her way home; but to try
    to follow her home was not safe, because it would mean loitering about
    outside the Ministry, which was bound to be noticed.
  122. face
    the front of the human head from the forehead to the chin and ear to ear
    They were perhaps four metres apart when the girl stumbled and fell almost
    flat on her face.
  123. bootlace
    a long lace for fastening boots
    Books were
    just a commodity that had to be produced, like jam or bootlaces.
  124. interstellar space
    the space between stars
    Cut off from contact with the outer world,
    and with the past, the citizen of Oceania is like a man in interstellar
    space
    , who has no way of knowing which direction is up and which is down.
  125. stratified
    deposited or arranged in horizontal layers
    It is
    true that our society is stratified, and very rigidly stratified, on what
    at first sight appear to be hereditary lines.
  126. cobblestone
    rectangular paving stone with curved top; once used to make roads
    Only five nights ago he had contemplated smashing her skull in with
    a cobblestone, but that was of no importance.
  127. floodlit
    illuminated by means of floodlights
    It was night, and the white faces and the scarlet banners were
    luridly floodlit.
  128. cheekbone
    the arch of bone beneath the eye that forms the prominence of the cheek
    From over scrubby cheekbones eyes
    looked into Winston's, sometimes with strange intensity, and flashed away
    again.
  129. round
    having a circular shape
    Probably
    she had crushed her hand while swinging round one of the big kaleidoscopes
    on which the plots of novels were 'roughed in'.
  130. stratify
    form, arrange, or deposit in layers
    It is
    true that our society is stratified, and very rigidly stratified, on what
    at first sight appear to be hereditary lines.
  131. Mongolian
    a member of the nomadic peoples of Mongolia
    Their sad, Mongolian faces gazed out over the sides
    of the trucks utterly incurious.
  132. regroup
    organize anew, as after a setback
    To understand the nature of the present war--for in spite of the regrouping
    which occurs every few years, it is always the same war--one must realize
    in the first place that it is impossible for it to be decisive.
  133. indecipherable
    not easily deciphered
    His solid form towered over the pair of them,
    and the expression on his face was still indecipherable.
  134. nose out
    recognize or detect by or as if by smelling
    I saw him stick his beastly nose out of the wainscoting.
  135. smell
    the faculty that enables us to distinguish scents
    He had hoped to be alone for a little while during
    the lunch hour, but as bad luck would have it the imbecile Parsons flopped
    down beside him, the tang of his sweat almost defeating the tinny smell of
    stew, and kept up a stream of talk about the preparations for Hate Week.
  136. almost
    (of actions or states) slightly short of or not quite accomplished; all but
    They were perhaps four metres apart when the girl stumbled and fell almost
    flat on her face.
  137. seem
    give a certain impression or have a certain outward aspect
    At the sight of the words I LOVE YOU
    the desire to stay alive had welled up in him, and the taking of minor
    risks suddenly seemed stupid.
  138. summery
    belonging to or characteristic of or occurring in summer
    The train was full of proles, in holiday mood because of
    the summery weather.
  139. commit suicide
    kill oneself
    The thing that was written on the paper might be a threat, a
    summons, an order to commit suicide, a trap of some description.
  140. daydreaming
    absentminded dreaming while awake
    As we have seen, researches that could be called scientific
    are still carried out for the purposes of war, but they are essentially a
    kind of daydreaming, and their failure to show results is not important.
  141. rename
    assign a new name to
    Every record has been
    destroyed or falsified, every book has been rewritten, every picture has
    been repainted, every statue and street and building has been renamed,
    every date has been altered.
  142. habit-forming
    causing or characterized by addiction
    'You are prepared to cheat, to forge, to blackmail, to corrupt the minds
    of children, to distribute habit-forming drugs, to encourage prostitution,
    to disseminate venereal diseases--to do anything which is likely to cause
    demoralization and weaken the power of the Party?'
  143. alter
    cause to change; make different; cause a transformation
    It's a little chunk of history that
    they've forgotten to alter.
  144. moment
    an indefinitely short time
    In the moment when he had seen her fall on
    the bandaged arm, it had been as though he felt the pain in his own body.
  145. immunized
    having been rendered unsusceptible to a disease
    Some are
    concerned simply with planning the logistics of future wars; others devise
    larger and larger rocket bombs, more and more powerful explosives, and more
    and more impenetrable armour-plating; others search for new and deadlier
    gases, or for soluble poisons capable of being produced in such quantities
    as to destroy the vegetation of whole continents, or for breeds of disease
    germs immunized against all possible antibodies; others strive to produce
    a vehicle that shall bore its wa...
  146. nostalgically
    in a nostalgic manner
    The fragment of rhyme that Mr Charrington had taught him came back into
    his head, and he added half-nostalgically: "Oranges and lemons, say the
    bells of St Clement's!"
  147. fascinate
    to render motionless, as with a fixed stare or by arousing terror or awe
    Winston and Julia clung
    together, fascinated.
  148. exist
    have an existence, be extant
    Perhaps the Brotherhood existed after all!
  149. falsify
    make false by mutilation or addition; as of a message or story
    It consisted in falsifying a
    series of production reports of two years ago, in such a way as to cast
    discredit on a prominent member of the Inner Party, who was now under a
    cloud.
  150. minute
    a unit of time equal to 60 seconds or 1/60th of an hour
    The whole incident could
    not have taken as much as half a minute.
  151. empirical
    derived from experiment and observation rather than theory
    This failed to happen, partly
    because of the impoverishment caused by a long series of wars and
    revolutions, partly because scientific and technical progress depended on
    the empirical habit of thought, which could not survive in a strictly
    regimented society.
  152. fluctuate
    move or sway in a rising and falling or wavelike pattern
    The
    frontiers between the three super-states are in some places arbitrary, and
    in others they fluctuate according to the fortunes of war, but in general
    they follow geographical lines.
  153. youth movement
    political or religious or social reform movement or agitation consisting chiefly of young people
    And in the Youth Movement.
  154. memorize
    commit to memory; learn by heart
    Nevertheless he carefully memorized what was
    written on it, and some hours later dropped it into the memory hole along
    with a mass of other papers.
  155. flagstone
    stratified stone that splits into pieces suitable as paving stones
    He could hear the woman singing and the scrape of
    her shoes on the flagstones, and the cries of the children in the street,
    and somewhere in the far distance a faint roar of traffic, and yet the
    room seemed curiously silent, thanks to the absence of a telescreen.
  156. orgiastic
    used of frenzied sexual activity
    Even the humblest Party member is
    expected to be competent, industrious, and even intelligent within narrow
    limits, but it is also necessary that he should be a credulous and ignorant
    fanatic whose prevailing moods are fear, hatred, adulation, and orgiastic
    triumph.
  157. kind of
    to some (great or small) extent
    Whatever was written on the paper, it must have some kind of political
    meaning.
  158. feel
    be conscious of a physical, mental, or emotional state
    In the moment when he had seen her fall on
    the bandaged arm, it had been as though he felt the pain in his own body.
  159. cargo ship
    a ship designed to carry cargo
    A Floating Fortress, for example, has locked up in it the labour that
    would build several hundred cargo-ships.
  160. comradely
    heartily friendly and congenial
    He was everywhere at once,
    pushing, pulling, sawing, hammering, improvising, jollying everyone along
    with comradely exhortations and giving out from every fold of his body what
    seemed an inexhaustible supply of acrid-smelling sweat.
  161. minutes
    a written account of what transpired at a meeting
    'Five minutes,' he told himself,
    'five minutes at the very least!'
  162. niggling
    (informal) small and of little importance
    What was even
    worse than having to focus his mind on a series of niggling jobs was the
    need to conceal his agitation from the telescreen.
  163. member
    anything that belongs to a set or class
    It consisted in falsifying a
    series of production reports of two years ago, in such a way as to cast
    discredit on a prominent member of the Inner Party, who was now under a
    cloud.
  164. speckle
    a small contrasting part of something
    Sometimes it stopped
    for a few seconds, spread out and resettled its wings, then swelled its
    speckled breast and again burst into song.
  165. another
    any of various alternatives; some other
    But there
    was another, wilder possibility that kept raising its head, though he
    tried vainly to suppress it.
  166. ruling
    exercising power or authority
    The effect was to convince the ruling groups of all
    countries that a few more atomic bombs would mean the end of organized
    society, and hence of their own power.
  167. pull up short
    stop abruptly
    They had only lagged behind
    the others for a couple of minutes, but they took a wrong turning, and
    presently found themselves pulled up short by the edge of an old chalk
    quarry.
  168. rocket
    a jet engine containing its own propellant and driven by reaction propulsion
    A rocket bomb must have dropped quite near at
    hand.
  169. crumbly
    easily broken into small fragments or reduced to powder
    Chocolate normally was
    dull-brown crumbly stuff that tasted, as nearly as one could describe it,
    like the smoke of a rubbish fire.
  170. thick skin
    skin that is very thick (as an elephant or rhinoceros)
    They're a kind
    of round yellow fruit with a thick skin.'
  171. war criminal
    an offender who violates international law during times of war
    Nor did
    one know what became of them, apart from the few who were hanged as
    war-criminals: the others simply vanished, presumably into forced-labour
    camps.
  172. European Russia
    the part of Russia that is part of Europe
    At that time some hundreds of bombs were dropped on
    industrial centres, chiefly in European Russia, Western Europe, and
    North America.
  173. table tennis
    a game (trademark Ping-Pong) resembling tennis but played on a table with paddles and a light hollow ball
    He wolfed another tasteless meal in the canteen, hurried
    off to the Centre, took part in the solemn foolery of a 'discussion group',
    played two games of table tennis, swallowed several glasses of gin, and
    sat for half an hour through a lecture entitled 'Ingsoc in relation to
    chess'.
  174. lavatory
    a room or building equipped with one or more toilets
    It was the middle of the morning, and Winston had left the cubicle to go
    to the lavatory.
  175. prosaically
    in a matter-of-fact manner
    'We're not dead yet,' said Julia prosaically.
  176. middle
    an area that is approximately central within some larger region
    It was the middle of the morning, and Winston had left the cubicle to go
    to the lavatory.
  177. double bed
    a bed wide enough to accommodate two sleepers
    One never saw a double bed nowadays, except in the homes of the proles.
  178. dustbin
    a bin that holds rubbish until it is collected
    He remembered long afternoons spent with other boys
    in scrounging round dustbins and rubbish heaps, picking out the ribs of
    cabbage leaves, potato peelings, sometimes even scraps of stale breadcrust
    from which they carefully scraped away the cinders; and also in waiting
    for the passing of trucks which travelled over a certain route and were
    known to carry cattle feed, and which, when they jolted over the bad
    patches in the road, sometimes spilt a few fragments of oil-cake.
  179. swine
    stout-bodied short-legged omnivorous animals
    There's
    always the chance of one of those swine recognizing your voice.
  180. happening
    an event that happens
    He was glad that this was
    happening, but he had no physical desire.
  181. simply
    in a simple manner; without extravagance or embellishment
    What he feared
    more than anything else was that she would simply change her mind if he
    did not get in touch with her quickly.
  182. kaleidoscope
    an optical toy in a tube; it produces symmetrical patterns as bits of colored glass are reflected by mirrors
    Probably
    she had crushed her hand while swinging round one of the big kaleidoscopes
    on which the plots of novels were 'roughed in'.
  183. make love
    have sexual intercourse with
    During
    the month of May there was only one further occasion on which they actually
    succeeded in making love.
  184. tiredness
    temporary loss of strength and energy resulting from hard physical or mental work
    Solitude
    and safety were physical sensations, mixed up somehow with the tiredness
    of his body, the softness of the chair, the touch of the faint breeze from
    the window that played upon his cheek.
  185. luridly
    in a lurid manner
    It was night, and the white faces and the scarlet banners were
    luridly floodlit.
  186. cubicle
    small area set off by walls for special use
    It was the middle of the morning, and Winston had left the cubicle to go
    to the lavatory.
  187. synthesize
    combine and form a synthesis
    All of the disputed territories contain valuable minerals, and some of
    them yield important vegetable products such as rubber which in colder
    climates it is necessary to synthesize by comparatively expensive methods.
  188. inconsequently
    lacking consequence
    I wonder what a
    lemon was,' she added inconsequently.
  189. glass
    a brittle transparent solid with irregular atomic structure
    He wolfed another tasteless meal in the canteen, hurried
    off to the Centre, took part in the solemn foolery of a 'discussion group',
    played two games of table tennis, swallowed several glasses of gin, and
    sat for half an hour through a lecture entitled 'Ingsoc in relation to
    chess'.
  190. hate
    the emotion of intense dislike; a feeling of dislike so strong that it demands action
    He had hoped to be alone for a little while during
    the lunch hour, but as bad luck would have it the imbecile Parsons flopped
    down beside him, the tang of his sweat almost defeating the tinny smell of
    stew, and kept up a stream of talk about the preparations for Hate Week.
  191. soundlessly
    without a sound
    His
    tongue worked soundlessly, forming the opening syllables first of one word,
    then of the other, over and over again.
  192. queue
    a line of people or vehicles waiting for something
    The queue edged forward till Winston was almost at the counter, then was
    held up for two minutes because someone in front was complaining that he
    had not received his tablet of saccharine.
  193. stuff
    the tangible substance that goes into the makeup of a physical object
    He had imagined her a fool
    like all the rest of them, her head stuffed with lies and hatred, her
    belly full of ice.
  194. saucepan
    a deep pan with a handle; used for stewing or boiling
    In the fender was a battered tin oilstove, a saucepan, and two cups,
    provided by Mr Charrington.
  195. hour
    a period of time equal to 1/24th of a day
    He had hoped to be alone for a little while during
    the lunch hour, but as bad luck would have it the imbecile Parsons flopped
    down beside him, the tang of his sweat almost defeating the tinny smell of
    stew, and kept up a stream of talk about the preparations for Hate Week.
  196. spanner
    a hand tool that is used to hold or twist a nut or bolt
    She fell on her knees, threw open the bag, and tumbled out some spanners
    and a screwdriver that filled the top part of it.
  197. unsinkable
    incapable of being sunk
    Helicopters are more used than they were formerly, bombing
    planes have been largely superseded by self-propelled projectiles, and the
    fragile movable battleship has given way to the almost unsinkable Floating
    Fortress; but otherwise there has been little development.
  198. self-propelled
    containing within itself the means of propulsion or movement
    Helicopters are more used than they were formerly, bombing
    planes have been largely superseded by self-propelled projectiles, and the
    fragile movable battleship has given way to the almost unsinkable Floating
    Fortress; but otherwise there has been little development.
  199. collectivization
    the organization of a nation or economy on the basis of collectivism
    In the years following the
    Revolution it was able to step into this commanding position almost
    unopposed, because the whole process was represented as an act of
    collectivization.
  200. distribute
    give to several people
    She spent an astonishing amount of time in attending lectures and
    demonstrations, distributing literature for the junior Anti-Sex League,
    preparing banners for Hate Week, making collections for the savings
    campaign, and such-like activities.
  201. thirty-second
    one part in thirty-two equal parts
    If he could get her at a table by herself,
    somewhere in the middle of the room, not too near the telescreens, and
    with a sufficient buzz of conversation all round--if these conditions
    endured for, say, thirty seconds, it might be possible to exchange a few
    words.
  202. human
    any living or extinct member of the family Hominidae characterized by superior intelligence, articulate speech, and erect carriage
    In front of him was an enemy
    who was trying to kill him: in front of him, also, was a human creature,
    in pain and perhaps with a broken bone.
  203. shoelace
    a lace used for fastening shoes
    She would be hanging
    about among the stalls, pretending to be in search of shoelaces or
    sewing-thread.
  204. past
    earlier than the present time; no longer current
    Four days had gone
    past since the evening when he had run into her outside the junk-shop.
  205. urinal
    a plumbing fixture (usually attached to the wall) used by men to urinate
    While he stood at the urinal he managed, with a little more fingering, to
    get it unfolded.
  206. think
    judge or regard; look upon; judge
    One, much
    the more likely, was that the girl was an agent of the Thought Police,
    just as he had feared.
  207. state of war
    a legal state created by a declaration of war and ended by official declaration during which the international rules of war apply
    In other words it is necessary that he should have the mentality
    appropriate to a state of war.
  208. irrationally
    in an irrational manner
    Slowly, in
    mild afternoon sunshine, he walked up a dingy street in the direction
    of Mr Charrington's shop, keeping one eye open for the patrols, but
    irrationally convinced that this afternoon there was no danger of anyone
    interfering with him.
  209. pinchbeck
    an alloy of copper and zinc that is used in cheap jewelry to imitate gold
    With a sort of faded enthusiasm he would finger this scrap of rubbish or
    that--a china bottle-stopper, the painted lid of a broken snuffbox, a
    pinchbeck locket containing a strand of some long-dead baby's hair--never
    asking that Winston should buy it, merely that he should admire it.
  210. actually
    in actual fact
    Actually, all the possible ways of communicating with her had occurred to
    him within five minutes of reading the note; but now, with time to think,
    he went over them one by one, as though laying out a row of instruments
    on a table.
  211. Brazzaville
    the capital and largest city of the Republic of the Congo
    Between the frontiers of
    the super-states, and not permanently in the possession of any of them,
    there lies a rough quadrilateral with its corners at Tangier, Brazzaville,
    Darwin, and Hong Kong, containing within it about a fifth of the population
    of the earth.
  212. recognize
    perceive to be the same
    After having been recognized, he could not go and sit at
    a table with an unattended girl.
  213. sea lane
    a lane at sea that is a regularly used route for vessels
    The fighting, when there is any, takes place on the vague
    frontiers whose whereabouts the average man can only guess at, or round
    the Floating Fortresses which guard strategic spots on the sea lanes.
  214. unconquerable
    not capable of being conquered or vanquished or overcome
    To hang on from day to day
    and from week to week, spinning out a present that had no future, seemed
    an unconquerable instinct, just as one's lungs will always draw the next
    breath so long as there is air available.
  215. banding
    a stripe or stripes of contrasting color
    But one can imagine
    little knots of resistance springing up here and there--small groups of
    people banding themselves together, and gradually growing, and even leaving
    a few records behind, so that the next generations can carry on where we
    leave off.'
  216. wrist
    a joint between the distal end of the radius and the proximal row of carpal bones
    'I only gave my wrist a bit of a
    bang.
  217. inside
    relating to or being on the side closer to the center or within a defined space
    It was as though she had a map inside her
    head.
  218. intimidating
    discouraging through fear
    The whole
    atmosphere of the huge block of flats, the richness and spaciousness of
    everything, the unfamiliar smells of good food and good tobacco, the
    silent and incredibly rapid lifts sliding up and down, the white-jacketed
    servants hurrying to and fro--everything was intimidating.
  219. truck
    an automotive vehicle suitable for hauling
    A long line of trucks, with wooden-faced guards armed with sub-machine
    guns standing upright in each corner, was passing slowly down the street.
  220. never
    not ever; at no time in the past or future
    One
    literally never saw them except in the guise of prisoners, and even as
    prisoners one never got more than a momentary glimpse of them.
  221. fender
    a cushion-like device that reduces shock due to an impact
    In the fender was a battered tin oilstove, a saucepan, and two cups,
    provided by Mr Charrington.
  222. get in touch
    establish communication with someone
    It was a physical problem that had to be solved: how to get in touch with
    the girl and arrange a meeting.
  223. single-mindedness
    characterized by one unified purpose
    However
    much in earnest he might be, he had nothing of the single-mindedness that
    belongs to a fanatic.
  224. remember
    recall knowledge from memory; have a recollection
    You'll have to remember this.
  225. atomic
    of or relating to or comprising atoms
    That was in another hiding-place known to Julia,
    the belfry of a ruinous church in an almost-deserted stretch of country
    where an atomic bomb had fallen thirty years earlier.
  226. thought
    the content of cognition; the main thing you are thinking about
    One, much
    the more likely, was that the girl was an agent of the Thought Police,
    just as he had feared.
  227. scrap
    a small fragment of something broken off from the whole
    It was a scrap of paper
    folded into a square.
  228. banner
    long strip of cloth or paper used for decoration or advertising
    Banners,
    processions, slogans, games, community hikes all that stuff.
  229. lingua franca
    a common language used by speakers of different languages
    Except that English is its chief LINGUA FRANCA and Newspeak its
    official language, it is not centralized in any way.
  230. controllable
    capable of being controlled
    The theory was that men, whose sex
    instincts were less controllable than those of women, were in greater
    danger of being corrupted by the filth they handled.
  231. plumping
    very large; of exceptional size for its kind
    With one hand in her pocket and a piece of bread and jam in the other,
    Julia wandered about the room, glancing indifferently at the bookcase,
    pointing out the best way of repairing the gateleg table, plumping herself
    down in the ragged arm-chair to see if it was comfortable, and examining
    the absurd twelve-hour clock with a sort of tolerant amusement.
  232. scribble
    write down quickly without much attention to detail
    Immediately beneath the telescreen, in
    such a position that anyone who was watching at the other end of the
    instrument could read what he was writing, he scribbled an address, tore
    out the page and handed it to Winston.
  233. obviously
    unmistakably (`plain' is often used informally for `plainly')
    Obviously there must be a message of some kind written on
    it.
  234. group
    any number of entities (members) considered as a unit
    He wolfed another tasteless meal in the canteen, hurried
    off to the Centre, took part in the solemn foolery of a 'discussion group',
    played two games of table tennis, swallowed several glasses of gin, and
    sat for half an hour through a lecture entitled 'Ingsoc in relation to
    chess'.
  235. stopped
    (of a nose) blocked
    Winston stopped short.
  236. ghostlike
    resembling or characteristic of a phantom
    He led a ghostlike existence between the
    tiny, dark shop, and an even tinier back kitchen where he prepared his
    meals and which contained, among other things, an unbelievably ancient
    gramophone with an enormous horn.
  237. tinny
    thin and metallic in sound; lacking resonance
    He had hoped to be alone for a little while during
    the lunch hour, but as bad luck would have it the imbecile Parsons flopped
    down beside him, the tang of his sweat almost defeating the tinny smell of
    stew, and kept up a stream of talk about the preparations for Hate Week.
  238. counterpane
    decorative cover for a bed
    He remembered the room where they lived, a dark, close-smelling room that
    seemed half filled by a bed with a white counterpane.
  239. tray
    an open receptacle for holding or displaying or serving articles or food
    But the girl was still alone
    when Winston secured his tray and began to make for her table.
  240. prepare
    make ready or suitable or equip in advance for a particular purpose or for some use, event, etc
    She spent an astonishing amount of time in attending lectures and
    demonstrations, distributing literature for the junior Anti-Sex League,
    preparing banners for Hate Week, making collections for the savings
    campaign, and such-like activities.
  241. mass
    the property of a body that causes it to have weight in a gravitational field
    Already a dense mass of people was blocking the south side of the square.
  242. labour
    productive work (especially physical work done for wages)
    Nor did
    one know what became of them, apart from the few who were hanged as
    war-criminals: the others simply vanished, presumably into forced-labour
    camps.
  243. dictionary
    a reference book containing an alphabetical list of words with information about them
    She suddenly twisted herself over in the bed, seized a shoe from the floor,
    and sent it hurtling into the corner with a boyish jerk of her arm, exactly
    as he had seen her fling the dictionary at Goldstein, that morning during
    the Two Minutes Hate.
  244. oligarchical
    of or relating to or supporting or characteristic of an oligarchy
    The inscription on the title-page ran:


    THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF
    OLIGARCHICAL COLLECTIVISM
    by
    Emmanuel Goldstein


    Winston began reading:


    Chapter I
    Ignorance is Strength

    Throughout recorded time, and probably since the end of the Neolithic Age,
    there have been three kinds of people in the world, the High, the Middle,
    and the Low. They have been subdivided in many ways, they have borne
    countless different names, and their relative numbers, as well as their
    attitude toward...
  245. sapling
    young tree
    When Winston
    followed her, he found that they were in a natural clearing, a tiny grassy
    knoll surrounded by tall saplings that shut it in completely.
  246. spirally
    with spirals
    Then he saw the girl standing at the base of the monument, reading or
    pretending to read a poster which ran spirally up the column.
  247. rubbish heap
    an accumulation of refuse and discarded matter
    He remembered long afternoons spent with other boys
    in scrounging round dustbins and rubbish heaps, picking out the ribs of
    cabbage leaves, potato peelings, sometimes even scraps of stale breadcrust
    from which they carefully scraped away the cinders; and also in waiting
    for the passing of trucks which travelled over a certain route and were
    known to carry cattle feed, and which, when they jolted over the bad
    patches in the road, sometimes spilt a few fragments of oil-cake.
  248. snuffbox
    a small ornamental box for carrying snuff in your pocket
    With a sort of faded enthusiasm he would finger this scrap of rubbish or
    that--a china bottle-stopper, the painted lid of a broken snuffbox, a
    pinchbeck locket containing a strand of some long-dead baby's hair--never
    asking that Winston should buy it, merely that he should admire it.
  249. intermittently
    in an intermittent manner
    Winston knew they
    were there but he saw them only intermittently.
  250. in practice
    in practical applications
    In practice no one power ever controls the whole of the
    disputed area.
  251. regimentation
    the imposition of order or discipline
    Every new political theory, by whatever
    name it called itself, led back to hierarchy and regimentation.
  252. kill off
    kill en masse; kill on a large scale; kill many
    And you
    thought that if I had a quarter of a chance I'd denounce you as a
    thought-criminal and get you killed off?'
  253. determining factor
    a determining or causal element or factor
    Ultimately
    the determining factor is the mental attitude of the ruling class itself.
  254. Bering Strait
    a strait connecting the Bering Sea to the Arctic Ocean
    Eurasia comprises the whole of the northern
    part of the European and Asiatic land-mass, from Portugal to the Bering
    Strait
    .
  255. inconceivable
    totally unlikely
    To turn his head and look at her would have
    been inconceivable folly.
  256. produce
    bring forth or yield
    Then,
    as though touching her waist had reminded her of something, she felt in
    the pocket of her overalls and produced a small slab of chocolate.
  257. hand
    the (prehensile) extremity of the superior limb
    Probably
    she had crushed her hand while swinging round one of the big kaleidoscopes
    on which the plots of novels were 'roughed in'.
  258. freckle
    a small brownish spot (of the pigment melanin) on the skin
    But for a moment he did not look at her body;
    his eyes were anchored by the freckled face with its faint, bold smile.
  259. spectacles
    optical instrument consisting of a frame that holds a pair of lenses for correcting defective vision
    He went back to his cubicle, sat down, threw the fragment of paper
    casually among the other papers on the desk, put on his spectacles and
    hitched the speakwrite towards him.
  260. Bolshevism
    Soviet communism
    In Oceania the prevailing philosophy is called
    Ingsoc, in Eurasia it is called Neo-Bolshevism, and in Eastasia it is
    called by a Chinese name usually translated as Death-Worship, but perhaps
    better rendered as Obliteration of the Self.
  261. startle
    to stimulate to action
    In the
    afternoon hush the volume of sound was startling.
  262. opposite number
    a person or thing having the same function or characteristics as another
    As compared with their
    opposite numbers in past ages, they were less avaricious, less tempted by
    luxury, hungrier for pure power, and, above all, more conscious of what
    they were doing and more intent on crushing opposition.
  263. leisured
    free from duties or responsibilities
    In the early twentieth century, the vision of
    a future society unbelievably rich, leisured, orderly, and efficient--a
    glittering antiseptic world of glass and steel and snow-white concrete--was
    part of the consciousness of nearly every literate person.
  264. society
    an extended social group having a distinctive cultural and economic organization
    Later I shall send you a book from which you will
    learn the true nature of the society we live in, and the strategy by which
    we shall destroy it.
  265. hiker
    a foot traveler; someone who goes on an extended walk (for pleasure)
    To be away
    from the noisy mob of hikers even for a moment gave her a feeling of
    wrong-doing.
  266. regimented
    strictly controlled
    This failed to happen, partly
    because of the impoverishment caused by a long series of wars and
    revolutions, partly because scientific and technical progress depended on
    the empirical habit of thought, which could not survive in a strictly
    regimented society.
  267. helicopter
    an aircraft without wings that obtains its lift from the rotation of overhead blades
    There were evenings when they reached their rendezvous and then had to
    walk past one another without a sign, because a patrol had just come round
    the corner or a helicopter was hovering overhead.
  268. hours
    an indefinite period of time
    Immediately after lunch there arrived a
    delicate, difficult piece of work which would take several hours and
    necessitated putting everything else aside.
  269. rewrite
    write differently; alter the writing of
    She could describe the whole process of composing a novel,
    from the general directive issued by the Planning Committee down to the
    final touching-up by the Rewrite Squad.
  270. hockey team
    a team that plays ice hockey
    At
    school she had been captain of the hockey team and had won the gymnastics
    trophy two years running.
  271. using up
    the act of consuming something
    The way
    she put it was:

    'When you make love you're using up energy; and afterwards you feel happy
    and don't give a damn for anything.
  272. parasitical
    relating to or caused by parasites
    It had been preached by kings and aristocrats and by the priests,
    lawyers, and the like who were parasitical upon them, and it had generally
    been softened by promises of compensation in an imaginary world beyond the
    grave.
  273. in principle
    with regard to fundamentals although not concerning details
    In principle
    the war effort is always so planned as to eat up any surplus that might
    exist after meeting the bare needs of the population.
  274. police
    the force of policemen and officers
    One, much
    the more likely, was that the girl was an agent of the Thought Police,
    just as he had feared.
  275. fall asleep
    change from a waking to a sleeping state
    Almost immediately
    they fell asleep and slept for about half an hour.
  276. feeling
    a physical sensation that you experience
    Not to let one's feelings appear
    in one's face was a habit that had acquired the status of an instinct,
    and in any case they had been standing straight in front of a telescreen
    when the thing happened.
  277. abstractedly
    in an absentminded or preoccupied manner
    Winston gazed abstractedly through the muslin curtain.
  278. mechanization
    the act of implementing the control of equipment with advanced technology; usually involving electronic hardware
    It conflicted with the tendency
    towards mechanization which had become quasi-instinctive throughout almost
    the whole world, and moreover, any country which remained industrially
    backward was helpless in a military sense and was bound to be dominated,
    directly or indirectly, by its more advanced rivals.
  279. in any case
    making an additional point; anyway
    Not to let one's feelings appear
    in one's face was a habit that had acquired the status of an instinct,
    and in any case they had been standing straight in front of a telescreen
    when the thing happened.
  280. to and fro
    moving from one place to another and back again
    The June sun was still high in the sky,
    and in the sun-filled court below, a monstrous woman, solid as a Norman
    pillar, with brawny red forearms and a sacking apron strapped about her
    middle, was stumping to and fro between a washtub and a clothes line,
    pegging out a series of square white things which Winston recognized as
    babies' diapers.
  281. diaper
    a fabric (usually cotton or linen) with a distinctive woven pattern of small repeated figures
    The June sun was still high in the sky,
    and in the sun-filled court below, a monstrous woman, solid as a Norman
    pillar, with brawny red forearms and a sacking apron strapped about her
    middle, was stumping to and fro between a washtub and a clothes line,
    pegging out a series of square white things which Winston recognized as
    babies' diapers.
  282. physical
    involving the body as distinguished from the mind or spirit
    It was a physical problem that had to be solved: how to get in touch with
    the girl and arrange a meeting.
  283. switch on
    cause to operate by flipping a switch
    He stopped, turned aside and pressed a switch on the wall.
  284. necessary
    absolutely essential
    For the messages that it was occasionally
    necessary to send, there were printed postcards with long lists of phrases,
    and you struck out the ones that were inapplicable.
  285. underfoot
    under the feet
    The bluebells were so thick underfoot
    that it was impossible not to tread on them.
  286. waist
    the narrowing of the body between the ribs and hips
    She sat against him, putting her arm round his
    waist.
  287. hesitantly
    with hesitation; in a hesitant manner
    'In the place where there is no darkness?'
    he said hesitantly.
  288. undifferentiated
    not differentiated
    Not merely the love of one
    person but the animal instinct, the simple undifferentiated desire: that
    was the force that would tear the Party to pieces.
  289. coffee
    any of several small trees and shrubs native to the tropical Old World yielding coffee beans
    The little man was sprawling on all fours, his tray had gone flying,
    two streams of soup and coffee were flowing across the floor.
  290. in effect
    exerting force or influence
    The family had become in effect an extension
    of the Thought Police.
  291. millimetre
    a metric unit of length equal to one thousandth of a meter
    But no
    advance in wealth, no softening of manners, no reform or revolution has
    ever brought human equality a millimetre nearer.
  292. look at
    look at carefully; study mentally
    He did not look at her.
  293. table
    a piece of furniture having a smooth flat top that is usually supported by one or more vertical legs
    Just once
    he caught a glimpse of the girl, at a table with two other girls at the
    far end of the room.
  294. sash
    a band of material around the waist that strengthens a skirt or trousers
    His first feeling was relief, but as
    he watched the strong slender body moving in front of him, with the scarlet
    sash that was just tight enough to bring out the curve of her hips, the
    sense of his own inferiority was heavy upon him.
  295. Brother
    (Roman Catholic Church) a title given to a monk and used as form of address
    He was particularly enthusiastic about a papier-mache model of Big
    Brother's head, two metres wide, which was being made for the occasion by
    his daughter's troop of Spies.
  296. parenthetically
    in a parenthetical manner
    How I hate women!' she said
    parenthetically), and she worked, as he had guessed, on the novel-writing
    machines in the Fiction Department.
  297. feral
    wild and menacing
    One minute more, and the feral roars of rage were again bursting from the
    crowd.
  298. work
    activity directed toward making or doing something
    Fortunately the piece of work he was engaged on was
    mere routine, the rectification of a long list of figures, not needing
    close attention.
  299. glance over
    examine hastily
    He stopped and glanced over his shoulder, with the feeling that the door
    had opened.
  300. mealtime
    the hour at which a meal is habitually or customarily eaten
    Above all he remembered his continuous hunger, and the
    fierce sordid battles at mealtimes.
  301. wriggle
    to move in a twisting or contorted motion, (especially when struggling)
    Winston wriggled himself sideways, and with a violent lunge managed
    to drive his shoulder between them.
  302. draughty
    not airtight
    So, one evening every week, Winston spent four hours of paralysing
    boredom, screwing together small bits of metal which were probably parts
    of bomb fuses, in a draughty, ill-lit workshop where the knocking of
    hammers mingled drearily with the music of the telescreens.
  303. revolution
    a single complete turn (axial or orbital)
    She had no memories of anything before the early sixties and the only
    person she had ever known who talked frequently of the days before the
    Revolution was a grandfather who had disappeared when she was eight.
  304. look
    perceive with attention; direct one's gaze towards
    Her eyes were fixed on his, with an
    appealing expression that looked more like fear than pain.
  305. masses
    the common people generally
    In the ragged
    hedge on the opposite side the boughs of the elm trees swayed just
    perceptibly in the breeze, and their leaves stirred faintly in dense
    masses like women's hair.
  306. get hold of
    get into one's hands, take physically
    The wooden-seated carriage in which he travelled was
    filled to overflowing by a single enormous family, ranging from a toothless
    great-grandmother to a month-old baby, going out to spend an afternoon
    with 'in-laws' in the country, and, as they freely explained to Winston,
    to get hold of a little black-market butter.
  307. paralyse
    cause to be paralyzed and immobile
    So, one evening every week, Winston spent four hours of paralysing
    boredom, screwing together small bits of metal which were probably parts
    of bomb fuses, in a draughty, ill-lit workshop where the knocking of
    hammers mingled drearily with the music of the telescreens.
  308. hysteria
    state of violent mental agitation
    What was more
    important was that sexual privation induced hysteria, which was desirable
    because it could be transformed into war-fever and leader-worship.
  309. manipulate
    influence or control shrewdly or deviously
    It
    came out even in the gesture with which he thrust a hand into his pocket,
    or manipulated a cigarette.
  310. occur
    come to pass
    It was not till a couple
    of minutes later that the other, more probable explanation had occurred to
    him.
  311. arm
    a human limb; technically the part of the superior limb between the shoulder and the elbow but commonly used to refer to the whole superior limb
    As she came nearer he saw that her right arm was in a sling, not noticeable
    at a distance because it was of the same colour as her overalls.
  312. schooldays
    the time of life when you are going to school
    (In his own
    schooldays, Winston remembered, in the late fifties, it was only the
    helicopter that the Party claimed to have invented; a dozen years later,
    when Julia was at school, it was already claiming the aeroplane; one
    generation more, and it would be claiming the steam engine.)
  313. simian
    relating to or resembling an ape
    For hours at a
    time she would sit almost immobile on the bed, nursing his young sister,
    a tiny, ailing, very silent child of two or three, with a face made simian
    by thinness.
  314. Junior
    a son who has the same first name as his father
    'It's this bloody thing that does it,' she said, ripping off the scarlet
    sash of the Junior Anti-Sex League and flinging it on to a bough.
  315. reducible
    capable of being reduced
    But there was still that memory moving round the edges of
    his consciousness, something strongly felt but not reducible to definite
    shape, like an object seen out of the corner of one's eye.
  316. smelling
    the act of perceiving the odor of something
    He had got together a big bunch and was smelling their faint sickly
    scent when a sound at his back froze him, the unmistakable crackle of a
    foot on twigs.
  317. get hold
    get something or somebody for a specific purpose
    The wooden-seated carriage in which he travelled was
    filled to overflowing by a single enormous family, ranging from a toothless
    great-grandmother to a month-old baby, going out to spend an afternoon
    with 'in-laws' in the country, and, as they freely explained to Winston,
    to get hold of a little black-market butter.
  318. papier-mache
    a substance made from paper pulp that can be molded when wet and painted when dry
    He was particularly enthusiastic about a papier-mache model of Big
    Brother's head, two metres wide, which was being made for the occasion by
    his daughter's troop of Spies.
  319. few
    a quantifier that can be used with count nouns and is often preceded by `a'; a small but indefinite number
    Actually, few
    people ever wrote letters.
  320. persiflage
    light teasing
    When he spoke of murder, suicide, venereal disease,
    amputated limbs, and altered faces, it was with a faint air of persiflage.
  321. vaguely
    in a vague way
    He wondered vaguely how many others like her there
    might be in the younger generation people who had grown up in the world of
    the Revolution, knowing nothing else, accepting the Party as something
    unalterable, like the sky, not rebelling against its authority but simply
    evading it, as a rabbit dodges a dog.
  322. except
    prevent from being included or considered or accepted
    One
    literally never saw them except in the guise of prisoners, and even as
    prisoners one never got more than a momentary glimpse of them.
  323. twig
    a small branch or division of a branch (especially a terminal division); usually applied to branches of the current or preceding year
    He had got together a big bunch and was smelling their faint sickly
    scent when a sound at his back froze him, the unmistakable crackle of a
    foot on twigs.
  324. morale
    a state of individual psychological well-being based upon a sense of confidence and usefulness and purpose
    What is concerned here is not the morale of masses,
    whose attitude is unimportant so long as they are kept steadily at work,
    but the morale of the Party itself.
  325. peg
    a wooden pin pushed or driven into a surface
    The June sun was still high in the sky,
    and in the sun-filled court below, a monstrous woman, solid as a Norman
    pillar, with brawny red forearms and a sacking apron strapped about her
    middle, was stumping to and fro between a washtub and a clothes line,
    pegging out a series of square white things which Winston recognized as
    babies' diapers.
  326. execrate
    curse or declare to be evil or anathema or threaten with divine punishment
    The citizen of Oceania is not
    allowed to know anything of the tenets of the other two philosophies, but
    he is taught to execrate them as barbarous outrages upon morality and
    common sense.
  327. toilet paper
    a soft thin absorbent paper for use in toilets
    The Parsons children
    played it at all hours of the night and day, unbearably, on a comb and a
    piece of toilet paper.
  328. aim
    point or cause to go (blows, weapons, or objects such as photographic equipment) towards
    But between the general aims that we are fighting for
    and the immediate tasks of the moment, you will never know anything.
  329. masse
    a shot in billiards made by hitting the cue ball with the cue held nearly vertically; the cue ball spins around another ball before hitting the object ball
    In the ragged
    hedge on the opposite side the boughs of the elm trees swayed just
    perceptibly in the breeze, and their leaves stirred faintly in dense
    masses like women's hair.
  330. servicing
    the act of mating by male animals
    She enjoyed her work, which consisted
    chiefly in running and servicing a powerful but tricky electric motor.
  331. making love
    sexual activities (often including sexual intercourse) between two people
    During
    the month of May there was only one further occasion on which they actually
    succeeded in making love.
  332. down
    spatially or metaphorically from a higher to a lower level or position
    He went back to his cubicle, sat down, threw the fragment of paper
    casually among the other papers on the desk, put on his spectacles and
    hitched the speakwrite towards him.
  333. incurious
    showing absence of intellectual inquisitiveness or natural curiosity
    Their sad, Mongolian faces gazed out over the sides
    of the trucks utterly incurious.
  334. Centre
    a low-lying region in central France
    Tonight was one of his nights at the
    Community Centre.
  335. populate
    inhabit or live in; be an inhabitant of
    It is for the possession of these thickly-populated regions,
    and of the northern ice-cap, that the three powers are constantly
    struggling.
  336. centralized
    drawn toward a center or brought under the control of a central authority
    These people, whose
    origins lay in the salaried middle class and the upper grades of the
    working class, had been shaped and brought together by the barren world of
    monopoly industry and centralized government.
  337. hike
    walk a long way, as for pleasure or physical exercise
    I found it when I got lost once on a community
    hike.
  338. suicide
    the act of killing yourself
    The thing that was written on the paper might be a threat, a
    summons, an order to commit suicide, a trap of some description.
  339. crowd
    a large number of things or people considered together
    Lunch in the hot, crowded, noise-filled
    canteen was torment.
  340. quadrilateral
    a four-sided polygon
    Between the frontiers of
    the super-states, and not permanently in the possession of any of them,
    there lies a rough quadrilateral with its corners at Tangier, Brazzaville,
    Darwin, and Hong Kong, containing within it about a fifth of the population
    of the earth.
  341. molehill
    a mound of earth made by moles while burrowing
    An old, close-bitten pasture, with a
    footpath wandering across it and a molehill here and there.
  342. change hands
    be transferred to another owner
    It is therefore realized on all sides that however often Persia,
    or Egypt, or Java, or Ceylon may change hands, the main frontiers must
    never be crossed by anything except bombs.
  343. venereal disease
    a communicable infection transmitted by sexual intercourse or genital contact
    'You are prepared to cheat, to forge, to blackmail, to corrupt the minds
    of children, to distribute habit-forming drugs, to encourage prostitution,
    to disseminate venereal diseases--to do anything which is likely to cause
    demoralization and weaken the power of the Party?'
  344. merely
    and nothing more
    Merely from feeling it he would have known it by sight.
  345. wake up
    stop sleeping
    As soon as she woke up her demeanour had changed.
  346. hoarding
    large outdoor signboard
    It aroused
    in Winston dim memories of something seen long ago on a wall or a
    hoarding--a vast bottle composed of electric lights which seemed to move
    up and down and pour its contents into a glass.
  347. hatred
    the emotion of intense dislike; a feeling of dislike so strong that it demands action
    He had imagined her a fool
    like all the rest of them, her head stuffed with lies and hatred, her
    belly full of ice.
  348. literate
    able to read and write
    In the early twentieth century, the vision of
    a future society unbelievably rich, leisured, orderly, and efficient--a
    glittering antiseptic world of glass and steel and snow-white concrete--was
    part of the consciousness of nearly every literate person.
  349. deportation
    the act of expelling a person from their native land
    His voice, made metallic by
    the amplifiers, boomed forth an endless catalogue of atrocities, massacres,
    deportations, lootings, rapings, torture of prisoners, bombing of
    civilians, lying propaganda, unjust aggressions, broken treaties.
  350. news item
    an item in a newspaper
    Winston, in addition to his regular work, spent long periods every day in
    going through back files of 'The Times' and altering and embellishing news
    items
    which were to be quoted in speeches.
  351. perhaps
    by chance
    They were perhaps four metres apart when the girl stumbled and fell almost
    flat on her face.
  352. rectification
    the act of offering an improvement to replace a mistake; setting right
    Fortunately the piece of work he was engaged on was
    mere routine, the rectification of a long list of figures, not needing
    close attention.
  353. spaciousness
    spatial largeness and extensiveness (especially inside a building)
    The whole
    atmosphere of the huge block of flats, the richness and spaciousness of
    everything, the unfamiliar smells of good food and good tobacco, the
    silent and incredibly rapid lifts sliding up and down, the white-jacketed
    servants hurrying to and fro--everything was intimidating.
  354. falsifying
    the act of determining that something is false
    It consisted in falsifying a
    series of production reports of two years ago, in such a way as to cast
    discredit on a prominent member of the Inner Party, who was now under a
    cloud.
  355. black-market
    distributed or sold illicitly
    The wooden-seated carriage in which he travelled was
    filled to overflowing by a single enormous family, ranging from a toothless
    great-grandmother to a month-old baby, going out to spend an afternoon
    with 'in-laws' in the country, and, as they freely explained to Winston,
    to get hold of a little black-market butter.
  356. possible
    capable of happening or existing
    Actually, all the possible ways of communicating with her had occurred to
    him within five minutes of reading the note; but now, with time to think,
    he went over them one by one, as though laying out a row of instruments
    on a table.
  357. reassert
    strengthen or make more firm
    Even after enormous
    upheavals and seemingly irrevocable changes, the same pattern has always
    reasserted itself, just as a gyroscope will always return to equilibrium,
    however far it is pushed one way or the other.
  358. human being
    any living or extinct member of the family Hominidae characterized by superior intelligence, articulate speech, and erect carriage
    The only evidence is inside my own mind, and I don't know
    with any certainty that any other human being shares my memories.
  359. some
    quantifier; used with either mass nouns or plural count nouns to indicate an unspecified number or quantity
    She had regained
    some of her colour, and appeared very much better.
  360. destructiveness
    the quality of causing destruction
    In the past, the ruling groups
    of all countries, although they might recognize their common interest and
    therefore limit the destructiveness of war, did fight against one another,
    and the victor always plundered the vanquished.
  361. cross out
    remove from a list
    It looked almost exactly as it had looked before--nothing had
    been crossed out--but it was one name shorter.
  362. need
    have need of
    Fortunately the piece of work he was engaged on was
    mere routine, the rectification of a long list of figures, not needing
    close attention.
  363. thrush
    songbirds characteristically having brownish upper plumage with a spotted breast
    A thrush had alighted on a bough not five metres away, almost at the level
    of their faces.
  364. jolted
    bumped or shaken jerkily
    Occasionally when a truck jolted there
    was a clank-clank of metal: all the prisoners were wearing leg-irons.
  365. smashing
    very good
    Only five nights ago he had contemplated smashing her skull in with
    a cobblestone, but that was of no importance.
  366. packet
    a small package or bundle
    There she had remained for
    a year, helping to produce booklets in sealed packets with titles like
    'Spanking Stories' or 'One Night in a Girls' School', to be bought
    furtively by proletarian youths who were under the impression that they
    were buying something illegal.
  367. comma
    a punctuation mark (,) used to indicate the separation of elements within the grammatical structure of a sentence
    Then he pulled the speakwrite towards
    him and rapped out a message in the hybrid jargon of the Ministries:

    'Items one comma five comma seven approved fullwise stop suggestion
    contained item six doubleplus ridiculous verging crimethink cancel stop
    unproceed constructionwise antegetting plusfull estimates machinery
    overheads stop end message.'
  368. human beings
    all of the living human inhabitants of the earth
    So long as human beings stay human, death and life are the
    same thing.'
  369. industrially
    by industrial means
    It conflicted with the tendency
    towards mechanization which had become quasi-instinctive throughout almost
    the whole world, and moreover, any country which remained industrially
    backward was helpless in a military sense and was bound to be dominated,
    directly or indirectly, by its more advanced rivals.
  370. rush hour
    the times at the beginning and end of the working day when many people are traveling to or from work
    In the labyrinthine Ministry the windowless,
    air-conditioned rooms kept their normal temperature, but outside the
    pavements scorched one's feet and the stench of the Tubes at the rush hours
    was a horror.
  371. self-contained
    constituting a complete and independent unit in and of itself
    With the establishment of
    self-contained economies, in which production and consumption are geared
    to one another, the scramble for markets which was a main cause of
    previous wars has come to an end, while the competition for raw materials
    is no longer a matter of life and death.
  372. warfare
    the waging of armed conflict against an enemy
    It is a warfare of limited aims between
    combatants who are unable to destroy one another, have no material cause
    for fighting and are not divided by any genuine ideological difference.
  373. enunciate
    express or state clearly
    'Never go home
    the same way as you went out,' she said, as though enunciating an important
    general principle.
  374. rouged
    marked by the use of various kinds of red makeup
    Her lips were deeply reddened,
    her cheeks rouged, her nose powdered; there was even a touch of something
    under the eyes to make them brighter.
  375. altered
    changed in form or character without becoming something else
    Every record has been
    destroyed or falsified, every book has been rewritten, every picture has
    been repainted, every statue and street and building has been renamed,
    every date has been altered.
  376. out of
    motivated by
    A sharp cry of pain was wrung out of her.
  377. sort of
    to some (great or small) extent
    His whole mind and body seemed to be afflicted with an unbearable
    sensitivity, a sort of transparency, which made every movement, every
    sound, every contact, every word that he had to speak or listen to, an
    agony.
  378. prevailing
    most frequent or common
    The prevailing emotion was simply curiosity.
  379. haricot
    a French variety of green bean plant bearing light-colored beans
    The stuff they were eating was
    a thin stew, actually a soup, of haricot beans.
  380. centimetre
    a metric unit of length equal to one hundredth of a meter
    Suddenly he became aware of Julia's face a few centimetres from his
    own, deathly white, as white as chalk.
  381. over
    beyond the top or upper surface or edge; forward from an upright position
    Actually, all the possible ways of communicating with her had occurred to
    him within five minutes of reading the note; but now, with time to think,
    he went over them one by one, as though laying out a row of instruments
    on a table.
  382. murmur
    a low continuous indistinct sound; often accompanied by movement of the lips without the production of articulate speech
    And even now, though his intellect told him that the message probably
    meant death--still, that was not what he believed, and the unreasonable
    hope persisted, and his heart banged, and it was with difficulty that he
    kept his voice from trembling as he murmured his figures into the
    speakwrite.
  383. looting
    plundering during riots or in wartime
    His voice, made metallic by
    the amplifiers, boomed forth an endless catalogue of atrocities, massacres,
    deportations, lootings, rapings, torture of prisoners, bombing of
    civilians, lying propaganda, unjust aggressions, broken treaties.
  384. felt
    a fabric made of compressed matted animal fibers
    In the moment when he had seen her fall on
    the bandaged arm, it had been as though he felt the pain in his own body.
  385. downhearted
    filled with melancholy and despondency
    And don't be
    too downhearted.
  386. crackle
    make a crackling sound
    He had got together a big bunch and was smelling their faint sickly
    scent when a sound at his back froze him, the unmistakable crackle of a
    foot on twigs.
  387. British Isles
    Great Britain and Ireland and adjacent islands in the north Atlantic
    Oceania comprises the Americas, the Atlantic islands including the
    British Isles, Australasia, and the southern portion of Africa.
  388. uncontrollably
    in an uncontrolled manner
    At every few moments the fury of the crowd boiled over and the
    voice of the speaker was drowned by a wild beast-like roaring that rose
    uncontrollably from thousands of throats.
  389. stagnate
    stand still
    The economy
    of many countries was allowed to stagnate, land went out of cultivation,
    capital equipment was not added to, great blocks of the population were
    prevented from working and kept half alive by State charity.
  390. paper
    a material made of cellulose pulp derived mainly from wood or rags or certain grasses
    It was a scrap of paper
    folded into a square.
  391. mutability
    the quality of being capable of mutation
    Whenever he began to talk of the principles of Ingsoc, doublethink, the
    mutability of the past, and the denial of objective reality, and to use
    Newspeak words, she became bored and confused and said that she never paid
    any attention to that kind of thing.
  392. folly
    the trait of acting stupidly or rashly
    But that would be shocking folly, as he well knew.
  393. splitting
    resembling a sound of violent tearing as of something ripped apart or lightning splitting a tree
    Suddenly, as one sometimes does with a book of which one
    knows that one will ultimately read and re-read every word, he opened it
    at a different place and found himself at Chapter III. He went on reading:


    Chapter III
    War is Peace

    The splitting up of the world into three great super-states was an event
    which could be and indeed was foreseen before the middle of the twentieth
    century.
  394. intimidate
    to compel or deter by or as if by threats
    The whole
    atmosphere of the huge block of flats, the richness and spaciousness of
    everything, the unfamiliar smells of good food and good tobacco, the
    silent and incredibly rapid lifts sliding up and down, the white-jacketed
    servants hurrying to and fro--everything was intimidating.
  395. nineteen
    the cardinal number that is the sum of eighteen and one
    'I'm due back at nineteen-thirty.
  396. memory
    the cognitive processes whereby past experience is remembered
    On it was written, in a large
    unformed handwriting:

    I LOVE YOU.

    For several seconds he was too stunned even to throw the incriminating
    thing into the memory hole.
  397. presumably
    by reasonable assumption
    Presumably she had been changed on to a later shift.
  398. clearing
    a tract of land with few or no trees in the middle of a wooded area
    When Winston
    followed her, he found that they were in a natural clearing, a tiny grassy
    knoll surrounded by tall saplings that shut it in completely.
  399. again
    anew
    When he did so, although he knew very well the
    danger of showing too much interest, he could not resist reading it once
    again, just to make sure that the words were really there.
  400. nineteenth
    position 19 in a countable series of things
    Ever since the end
    of the nineteenth century, the problem of what to do with the surplus of
    consumption goods has been latent in industrial society.
  401. achieve
    to gain with effort
    A mighty deed, which could never be mentioned, had been
    achieved.
  402. ruminant
    any of various cud-chewing hoofed mammals having a stomach divided into four (occasionally three) compartments
    It is like the battles between certain ruminant
    animals whose horns are set at such an angle that they are incapable of
    hurting one another.
  403. different
    unlike in nature or quality or form or degree
    Their mouths clung together; it was quite different from the hard
    kisses they had exchanged earlier.
  404. freckled
    relating to or covered with or resembling freckles
    But for a moment he did not look at her body;
    his eyes were anchored by the freckled face with its faint, bold smile.
  405. screwdriver
    a hand tool for driving screws; has a tip that fits into the head of a screw
    She fell on her knees, threw open the bag, and tumbled out some spanners
    and a screwdriver that filled the top part of it.
  406. squeeze out
    extract (liquid) by squeezing or pressing
    They could be tracked down
    by enquiry, they could be squeezed out of you by torture.
  407. turn
    move around an axis or a center
    Her face had turned a milky yellow colour against which her
    mouth stood out redder than ever.
  408. orthodoxy
    the quality of being orthodox (especially in religion)
    There was a direct intimate connexion
    between chastity and political orthodoxy.
  409. interstellar
    between or among stars
    Cut off from contact with the outer world,
    and with the past, the citizen of Oceania is like a man in interstellar
    space, who has no way of knowing which direction is up and which is down.
  410. body
    an individual 3-dimensional object that has mass and that is distinguishable from other objects
    In the moment when he had seen her fall on
    the bandaged arm, it had been as though he felt the pain in his own body.
  411. unavoidable
    impossible to avoid or evade:"inescapable conclusion"
    That is unavoidable.
  412. bell
    a hollow device made of metal that makes a ringing sound when struck
    He walked slowly up to the north side of the square and
    got a sort of pale-coloured pleasure from identifying St Martin's Church,
    whose bells, when it had bells, had chimed 'You owe me three farthings.'
  413. literally
    (intensifier before a figurative expression) without exaggeration
    One
    literally never saw them except in the guise of prisoners, and even as
    prisoners one never got more than a momentary glimpse of them.
  414. fall apart
    go to pieces
    Presently the rising and falling of their breasts slowed to
    normal speed, and in a sort of pleasant helplessness they fell apart.
  415. amplifier
    electronic equipment that increases strength of signals passing through it
    His voice, made metallic by
    the amplifiers, boomed forth an endless catalogue of atrocities, massacres,
    deportations, lootings, rapings, torture of prisoners, bombing of
    civilians, lying propaganda, unjust aggressions, broken treaties.
  416. middle distance
    the part of a scene between the foreground and the background
    Instead he looked into the middle distance and spoke in
    generalities, with so delicate an air as to give the impression that he
    had become partly invisible.
  417. directive
    a pronouncement encouraging or banning some activity
    She could describe the whole process of composing a novel,
    from the general directive issued by the Planning Committee down to the
    final touching-up by the Rewrite Squad.
  418. make
    perform or carry out
    When he did so, although he knew very well the
    danger of showing too much interest, he could not resist reading it once
    again, just to make sure that the words were really there.
  419. room
    an area within a building enclosed by walls and floor and ceiling
    Just once
    he caught a glimpse of the girl, at a table with two other girls at the
    far end of the room.
  420. blank space
    a blank area
    The thing had been
    plastered on every blank space on every wall, even outnumbering the
    portraits of Big Brother.
  421. belfry
    a bell tower; usually stands alone unattached to a building
    That was in another hiding-place known to Julia,
    the belfry of a ruinous church in an almost-deserted stretch of country
    where an atomic bomb had fallen thirty years earlier.
  422. hiding
    the activity of keeping something secret
    That was in another hiding-place known to Julia,
    the belfry of a ruinous church in an almost-deserted stretch of country
    where an atomic bomb had fallen thirty years earlier.
  423. footpath
    a trodden path
    The lane widened, and in a minute he came to the footpath she had told him
    of, a mere cattle-track which plunged between the bushes.
  424. alive
    possessing life
    At the sight of the words I LOVE YOU
    the desire to stay alive had welled up in him, and the taking of minor
    risks suddenly seemed stupid.
  425. unalterable
    not capable of being changed or altered
    He wondered vaguely how many others like her there
    might be in the younger generation people who had grown up in the world of
    the Revolution, knowing nothing else, accepting the Party as something
    unalterable, like the sky, not rebelling against its authority but simply
    evading it, as a rabbit dodges a dog.
  426. same
    same in identity
    As she came nearer he saw that her right arm was in a sling, not noticeable
    at a distance because it was of the same colour as her overalls.
  427. population
    the people who inhabit a territory or state
    The
    whole population of the neighbourhood turned out for a long, trailing
    funeral which went on for hours and was in effect an indignation meeting.
  428. department
    a specialized division of a large organization
    It was a common accident
    in the Fiction Department.
  429. crumple
    to gather something into small wrinkles or folds
    There was one about four and twenty blackbirds, and
    another about a cow with a crumpled horn, and another about the death
    of poor Cock Robin.
  430. fragment
    a piece broken off or cut off of something else
    He went back to his cubicle, sat down, threw the fragment of paper
    casually among the other papers on the desk, put on his spectacles and
    hitched the speakwrite towards him.
  431. febrile
    of or relating to or characterized by fever
    Late at night, when crowds of
    rowdy proles roamed the streets, the town had a curiously febrile air.
  432. outer
    located outside
    Winston, at normal times the kind of person who gravitates to the outer
    edge of any kind of scrimmage, shoved, butted, squirmed his way forward
    into the heart of the crowd.
  433. equality
    the quality of being the same in quantity or measure or value or status
    But no
    advance in wealth, no softening of manners, no reform or revolution has
    ever brought human equality a millimetre nearer.
  434. message
    a communication (usually brief) that is written or spoken or signaled
    Obviously there must be a message of some kind written on
    it.
  435. magenta
    a primary subtractive color for light; a dark purple-red color; the dye for magenta was discovered in 1859, the year of the battle of Magenta
    One tuft was of two colours, magenta and brick-red, apparently growing on
    the same root.
  436. thing
    a separate and self-contained entity
    Not to let one's feelings appear
    in one's face was a habit that had acquired the status of an instinct,
    and in any case they had been standing straight in front of a telescreen
    when the thing happened.
  437. rhyme
    correspondence in the sounds of two or more lines (especially final sounds)
    The fragment of rhyme that Mr Charrington had taught him came back into
    his head, and he added half-nostalgically: "Oranges and lemons, say the
    bells of St Clement's!"
  438. undigested
    not digested
    They simply swallowed everything, and what they swallowed did them no harm,
    because it left no residue behind, just as a grain of corn will pass
    undigested through the body of a bird.
  439. power
    possession of the qualities (especially mental qualities) required to do something or get something done
    The terrible thing that the Party had done was to
    persuade you that mere impulses, mere feelings, were of no account, while
    at the same time robbing you of all power over the material world.
  440. foreshorten
    shorten lines in a drawing so as to create an illusion of depth
    From whatever
    angle you looked at the poster, the muzzle of the gun, magnified by the
    foreshortening, seemed to be pointed straight at you.
  441. world
    the 3rd planet from the sun; the planet we live on
    He wondered vaguely how many others like her there
    might be in the younger generation people who had grown up in the world of
    the Revolution, knowing nothing else, accepting the Party as something
    unalterable, like the sky, not rebelling against its authority but simply
    evading it, as a rabbit dodges a dog.
  442. disappear
    become invisible or unnoticeable
    She flung herself into his arms, kissed him almost violently, and a moment
    later pushed her way through the saplings and disappeared into the wood
    with very little noise.
  443. equatorial
    of or existing at or near the geographic equator
    Whichever
    power controls equatorial Africa, or the countries of the Middle East, or
    Southern India, or the Indonesian Archipelago, disposes also of the bodies
    of scores or hundreds of millions of ill-paid and hard-working coolies.
  444. indefatigably
    with indefatigable energy
    In the vast laboratories
    of the Ministry of Peace, and in the experimental stations hidden in the
    Brazilian forests, or in the Australian desert, or on lost islands of
    the Antarctic, the teams of experts are indefatigably at work.
  445. frontier
    a wilderness at the edge of a settled area of a country
    The
    frontiers between the three super-states are in some places arbitrary, and
    in others they fluctuate according to the fortunes of war, but in general
    they follow geographical lines.
  446. gesture
    motion of hands or body to emphasize or help to express a thought or feeling
    Almost as swiftly as he had imagined it, she had torn her clothes
    off, and when she flung them aside it was with that same magnificent
    gesture by which a whole civilization seemed to be annihilated.
  447. structure
    a thing constructed; a complex entity constructed of many parts
    All the blood and
    lymph had been drained out of him by an enormous debauch of work, leaving
    only a frail structure of nerves, bones, and skin.
  448. slip of paper
    a small sheet of paper
    He told her the story of Jones, Aaronson, and
    Rutherford and the momentous slip of paper which he had once held between
    his fingers.
  449. clock
    a timepiece that shows the time of day
    The old-fashioned clock with the twelve-hour face was
    ticking away on the mantelpiece.
  450. comprise
    be composed of
    Eurasia comprises the whole of the northern
    part of the European and Asiatic land-mass, from Portugal to the Bering
    Strait.
  451. impoverishment
    the state of having little or no money and few or no material possessions
    This failed to happen, partly
    because of the impoverishment caused by a long series of wars and
    revolutions, partly because scientific and technical progress depended on
    the empirical habit of thought, which could not survive in a strictly
    regimented society.
  452. already
    prior to a specified or implied time
    Already he had instinctively
    started forward to help her.
  453. sling
    a simple weapon consisting of a looped strap in which a projectile is whirled and then released
    As she came nearer he saw that her right arm was in a sling, not noticeable
    at a distance because it was of the same colour as her overalls.
  454. free hand
    freedom to do as you see fit
    She held out her free hand to him, and he helped her up.
  455. farthing
    a former British bronze coin worth a quarter of a penny
    He walked slowly up to the north side of the square and
    got a sort of pale-coloured pleasure from identifying St Martin's Church,
    whose bells, when it had bells, had chimed 'You owe me three farthings.'
  456. dream
    a series of mental images and emotions occurring during sleep
    He thought of her naked,
    youthful body, as he had seen it in his dream.
  457. well-timed
    done or happening at the appropriate or proper time
    The plan is, by a combination of fighting, bargaining, and
    well-timed strokes of treachery, to acquire a ring of bases completely
    encircling one or other of the rival states, and then to sign a pact of
    friendship with that rival and remain on peaceful terms for so many years
    as to lull suspicion to sleep.
  458. indestructible
    not easily destroyed
    Nothing holds it together except an idea which is indestructible.
  459. focusing
    the concentration of attention or energy on something
    Some are
    concerned simply with planning the logistics of future wars; others devise
    larger and larger rocket bombs, more and more powerful explosives, and more
    and more impenetrable armour-plating; others search for new and deadlier
    gases, or for soluble poisons capable of being produced in such quantities
    as to destroy the vegetation of whole continents, or for breeds of disease
    germs immunized against all possible antibodies; others strive to produce
    a vehicle that shall bore its way under...
  460. Mongolia
    a landlocked socialist republic in central Asia
    Eastasia,
    smaller than the others and with a less definite western frontier,
    comprises China and the countries to the south of it, the Japanese islands
    and a large but fluctuating portion of Manchuria, Mongolia, and Tibet.
  461. make-up
    the way in which someone or something is composed
    She must have slipped into some shop in the proletarian quarters and bought
    herself a complete set of make-up materials.
  462. indoors
    within a building
    Already on the walk from the station the May sunshine had made him
    feel dirty and etiolated, a creature of indoors, with the sooty dust of
    London in the pores of his skin.
  463. streamer
    a long flag; often tapering
    Squads of
    volunteers, organized by Parsons, were preparing the street for Hate Week,
    stitching banners, painting posters, erecting flagstaffs on the roofs, and
    perilously slinging wires across the street for the reception of streamers.
  464. century
    a period of 100 years
    Suddenly, as one sometimes does with a book of which one
    knows that one will ultimately read and re-read every word, he opened it
    at a different place and found himself at Chapter III. He went on reading:


    Chapter III
    War is Peace

    The splitting up of the world into three great super-states was an event
    which could be and indeed was foreseen before the middle of the twentieth
    century.
  465. turned
    moved around an axis or center
    Her face had turned a milky yellow colour against which her
    mouth stood out redder than ever.
  466. sweat
    salty fluid secreted by sweat glands
    He had hoped to be alone for a little while during
    the lunch hour, but as bad luck would have it the imbecile Parsons flopped
    down beside him, the tang of his sweat almost defeating the tinny smell of
    stew, and kept up a stream of talk about the preparations for Hate Week.
  467. singing
    the act of singing vocal music
    For whom, for what, was that bird singing?
  468. disentangled
    straightened out
    'I've got THE BOOK,' he said as they disentangled themselves.
  469. venereal
    of or relating to the external sex organs
    'You are prepared to cheat, to forge, to blackmail, to corrupt the minds
    of children, to distribute habit-forming drugs, to encourage prostitution,
    to disseminate venereal diseases--to do anything which is likely to cause
    demoralization and weaken the power of the Party?'
  470. street
    a thoroughfare (usually including sidewalks) that is lined with buildings
    He wandered round
    the base of the enormous fluted column, at the top of which Big Brother's
    statue gazed southward towards the skies where he had vanquished the
    Eurasian aeroplanes (the Eastasian aeroplanes, it had been, a few years
    ago) in the Battle of Airstrip One. In the street in front of it there was
    a statue of a man on horseback which was supposed to represent Oliver
    Cromwell.
  471. Australasia
    Australia, New Zealand, and neighboring islands in the South Pacific
    Oceania comprises the Americas, the Atlantic islands including the
    British Isles, Australasia, and the southern portion of Africa.
  472. willow tree
    any of numerous deciduous trees and shrubs of the genus Salix
    You can watch them lying
    in the pools under the willow trees, waving their tails.'
  473. faint
    deficient in magnitude; barely perceptible; lacking clarity or brightness or loudness etc
    He had got together a big bunch and was smelling their faint sickly
    scent when a sound at his back froze him, the unmistakable crackle of a
    foot on twigs.
  474. normal
    being approximately average or within certain limits in e.g. intelligence and development
    Winston, at normal times the kind of person who gravitates to the outer
    edge of any kind of scrimmage, shoved, butted, squirmed his way forward
    into the heart of the crowd.
  475. singe
    burn superficially or lightly
    For whom, for what, was that bird singing?
  476. irrevocable
    incapable of being retracted or revoked
    Even after enormous
    upheavals and seemingly irrevocable changes, the same pattern has always
    reasserted itself, just as a gyroscope will always return to equilibrium,
    however far it is pushed one way or the other.
  477. lemon
    a small evergreen tree that originated in Asia but is widely cultivated for its fruit
    The fragment of rhyme that Mr Charrington had taught him came back into
    his head, and he added half-nostalgically: "Oranges and lemons, say the
    bells of St Clement's!"
  478. people
    (plural) any group of human beings (men or women or children) collectively
    Actually, few
    people ever wrote letters.
  479. stratosphere
    the atmospheric layer between the troposphere and the mesosphere
    War is a way of shattering to pieces,
    or pouring into the stratosphere, or sinking in the depths of the sea,
    materials which might otherwise be used to make the masses too comfortable,
    and hence, in the long run, too intelligent.
  480. compose
    form the substance of
    She could describe the whole process of composing a novel,
    from the general directive issued by the Planning Committee down to the
    final touching-up by the Rewrite Squad.
  481. identifiable
    capable of being identified
    Any identifiable reference to him would have
    been mortally dangerous.
  482. earlier
    (comparative and superlative of `early') more early than; most early
    Their mouths clung together; it was quite different from the hard
    kisses they had exchanged earlier.
  483. bloody
    having or covered with or accompanied by blood
    'It's this bloody thing that does it,' she said, ripping off the scarlet
    sash of the Junior Anti-Sex League and flinging it on to a bough.
  484. plating
    the application of a thin coat of metal (as by electrolysis)
    Some are
    concerned simply with planning the logistics of future wars; others devise
    larger and larger rocket bombs, more and more powerful explosives, and more
    and more impenetrable armour-plating; others search for new and deadlier
    gases, or for soluble poisons capable of being produced in such quantities
    as to destroy the vegetation of whole continents, or for breeds of disease
    germs immunized against all possible antibodies; others strive to produce
    a vehicle that shall bore its wa...
  485. place
    a point located with respect to surface features of some region
    There was no place where you could be more certain that the telescreens
    were watched continuously.
  486. continue
    keep or maintain in unaltered condition; cause to remain or last
    As they drifted
    down the crowded pavements, not quite abreast and never looking at one
    another, they carried on a curious, intermittent conversation which flicked
    on and off like the beams of a lighthouse, suddenly nipped into silence
    by the approach of a Party uniform or the proximity of a telescreen, then
    taken up again minutes later in the middle of a sentence, then abruptly
    cut short as they parted at the agreed spot, then continued almost without
    introduction on the following day.
  487. irreconcilable
    impossible to reconcile
    The aims of these groups are entirely irreconcilable...
  488. between
    in the interval
    Neither of them looked up; steadily they spooned the
    watery stuff into their mouths, and between spoonfuls exchanged the few
    necessary words in low expressionless voices.
  489. sabotage
    a deliberate act of destruction or disruption in which equipment is damaged
    'To commit acts of sabotage which may cause the death of hundreds of
    innocent people?'
  490. gramophone
    an antique record player; the sound of the vibrating needle is amplified acoustically
    He led a ghostlike existence between the
    tiny, dark shop, and an even tinier back kitchen where he prepared his
    meals and which contained, among other things, an unbelievably ancient
    gramophone with an enormous horn.
  491. untruthful
    not expressing or given to expressing the truth
    In his capacity
    as an administrator, it is often necessary for a member of the Inner Party
    to know that this or that item of war news is untruthful, and he may often
    be aware that the entire war is spurious and is either not happening or
    is being waged for purposes quite other than the declared ones: but such
    knowledge is easily neutralized by the technique of DOUBLETHINK.
  492. stirred
    set into a usually circular motion in order to mix or blend
    A curious emotion stirred in Winston's heart.
  493. slinging
    throwing with a wide motion (as if with a sling)
    Squads of
    volunteers, organized by Parsons, were preparing the street for Hate Week,
    stitching banners, painting posters, erecting flagstaffs on the roofs, and
    perilously slinging wires across the street for the reception of streamers.
  494. above all
    above and beyond all other consideration
    THEM, it appeared, meant the Party, and above all the Inner Party, about
    whom she talked with an open jeering hatred which made Winston feel uneasy,
    although he knew that they were safe here if they could be safe anywhere.
  495. impossible
    not capable of occurring or being accomplished or dealt with
    Until he could be alone it was impossible
    to think this new development out.
  496. brawny
    (of a person) possessing physical strength and weight; rugged and powerful
    The June sun was still high in the sky,
    and in the sun-filled court below, a monstrous woman, solid as a Norman
    pillar, with brawny red forearms and a sacking apron strapped about her
    middle, was stumping to and fro between a washtub and a clothes line,
    pegging out a series of square white things which Winston recognized as
    babies' diapers.
  497. corked
    (of wine) tainted in flavor by a cork containing excess tannin
    Whenever her mouth was not corked with clothes pegs she
    was singing in a powerful contralto:


    It was only an 'opeless fancy.
  498. clement
    (of weather or climate) physically mild
    St Clement Danes its name was.'
  499. voice
    the sound made by the vibration of vocal folds modified by the resonance of the vocal tract
    And even now, though his intellect told him that the message probably
    meant death--still, that was not what he believed, and the unreasonable
    hope persisted, and his heart banged, and it was with difficulty that he
    kept his voice from trembling as he murmured his figures into the
    speakwrite.
  500. shabby
    showing signs of wear and tear
    In the trucks little yellow men in shabby greenish uniforms were squatting,
    jammed close together.
  501. normally
    under normal conditions
    There had been no difficulties about the journey, and
    the girl was so evidently experienced that he was less frightened than he
    would normally have been.
  502. tickle
    touch (a body part) lightly so as to excite the surface nerves and cause uneasiness, laughter, or spasmodic movements
    The sun blazed down upon them, the sweat tickled his
    face.
  503. straggle
    wander from a direct or straight course
    On a scarlet-draped platform an orator of the Inner Party, a small
    lean man with disproportionately long arms and a large bald skull over
    which a few lank locks straggled, was haranguing the crowd.
  504. turn off
    cause to stop operating by disengaging a switch
    'That thing is really turned off?'
  505. hide
    prevent from being seen or discovered
    'I didn't want to say anything in the lane,' she went on, 'in case there's
    a mike hidden there.
  506. later
    happening at a time subsequent to a reference time
    It was not till a couple
    of minutes later that the other, more probable explanation had occurred to
    him.
  507. continuously
    at every point
    There was no place where you could be more certain that the telescreens
    were watched continuously.
  508. disputed
    subject to disagreement and debate
    In practice no one power ever controls the whole of the
    disputed area.
  509. edge
    a line determining the limits of an area
    The queue edged forward till Winston was almost at the counter, then was
    held up for two minutes because someone in front was complaining that he
    had not received his tablet of saccharine.
  510. wake
    stop sleeping
    Winston woke first.
  511. beforehand
    ahead of time; in anticipation
    On the evening
    beforehand they met briefly in the street.
  512. indifferently
    with indifference; in an indifferent manner
    'Black market,' she said indifferently.
  513. inapplicable
    not capable of being applied
    For the messages that it was occasionally
    necessary to send, there were printed postcards with long lists of phrases,
    and you struck out the ones that were inapplicable.
  514. whereabouts
    the general location where something is
    If she had worked in the Records Department it might have
    been comparatively simple, but he had only a very dim idea whereabouts in
    the building the Fiction Department lay, and he had no pretext for going
    there.
  515. safe
    free from danger or the risk of harm
    It was not till twenty-three hours, when he
    was home and in bed--in the darkness, where you were safe even from the
    telescreen so long as you kept silent--that he was able to think
    continuously.
  516. bug
    general term for any insect or similar creeping or crawling invertebrate
    'It's sure to be full of bugs, but who cares?' said Julia.
  517. afternoon
    the part of the day between noon and evening
    The afternoon was more bearable.
  518. unroll
    unroll, unfold, or spread out or be unrolled, unfolded, or spread out from a furled state
    He unrolled and read it without
    pausing in his speech.
  519. piece of work
    a product produced or accomplished through the effort or activity or agency of a person or thing
    Fortunately the piece of work he was engaged on was
    mere routine, the rectification of a long list of figures, not needing
    close attention.
  520. surprise attack
    an attack without warning
    When any large operation is undertaken, it is
    usually a surprise attack against an ally.
  521. sensuality
    desire for sensual pleasures
    At the beginning there
    had been little true sensuality in it.
  522. powdery
    consisting of fine particles
    But there was some powdery stuff that got in the way of his
    lips.
  523. spy
    (military) a secret agent hired by a state to obtain information about its enemies or by a business to obtain industrial secrets from competitors
    He was particularly enthusiastic about a papier-mache model of Big
    Brother's head, two metres wide, which was being made for the occasion by
    his daughter's troop of Spies.
  524. permanently
    for a long time without essential change
    In one combination or another, these three super-states are permanently at
    war, and have been so for the past twenty-five years.
  525. colour
    a visual attribute of things that results from the light they emit or transmit or reflect
    As she came nearer he saw that her right arm was in a sling, not noticeable
    at a distance because it was of the same colour as her overalls.
  526. electric motor
    a motor that converts electricity to mechanical work
    She enjoyed her work, which consisted
    chiefly in running and servicing a powerful but tricky electric motor.
  527. to a great extent
    to a considerable degree
    From the moment when the machine first made its appearance it
    was clear to all thinking people that the need for human drudgery, and
    therefore to a great extent for human inequality, had disappeared.
  528. blackberry
    bramble with sweet edible black or dark purple berries that usually do not separate from the receptacle
    Not blackberry leaves.'
  529. burying
    concealing something under the ground
    One fell on a crowded film
    theatre in Stepney, burying several hundred victims among the ruins.
  530. political movement
    a group of people working together to achieve a political goal
    Such a thing as an independent political movement was
    outside her imagination: and in any case the Party was invincible.
  531. repaint
    paint again
    Every record has been
    destroyed or falsified, every book has been rewritten, every picture has
    been repainted, every statue and street and building has been renamed,
    every date has been altered.
  532. devastate
    cause extensive destruction or ruin utterly
    During this time rockets loaded with atomic
    bombs can be assembled at all the strategic spots; finally they will all
    be fired simultaneously, with effects so devastating as to make retaliation
    impossible.
  533. pick
    look for and gather
    Winston had a
    hallucination of himself smashing a pick-axe right into the middle of it.
  534. give a damn
    show no concern or interest; always used in the negative
    The way
    she put it was:

    'When you make love you're using up energy; and afterwards you feel happy
    and don't give a damn for anything.
  535. read
    look at, interpret, and say out loud something that is written or printed
    For a moment he was tempted to take it into one of the water-closets
    and read it at once.
  536. being
    the state or fact of existing
    He was particularly enthusiastic about a papier-mache model of Big
    Brother's head, two metres wide, which was being made for the occasion by
    his daughter's troop of Spies.
  537. chalk up
    keep score, as in games
    Julia, however, seemed unable to mention
    the Party, and especially the Inner Party, without using the kind of words
    that you saw chalked up in dripping alley-ways.
  538. hypnosis
    a state that resembles sleep but that is induced by suggestion
    The scientist of today is either a mixture of psychologist and inquisitor,
    studying with real ordinary minuteness the meaning of facial expressions,
    gestures, and tones of voice, and testing the truth-producing effects of
    drugs, shock therapy, hypnosis, and physical torture; or he is chemist,
    physicist, or biologist concerned only with such branches of his special
    subject as are relevant to the taking of life.
  539. Martin
    French bishop who is a patron saint of France (died in 397)
    He walked slowly up to the north side of the square and
    got a sort of pale-coloured pleasure from identifying St Martin's Church,
    whose bells, when it had bells, had chimed 'You owe me three farthings.'
  540. nothing
    in no respect; to no degree
    'It's nothing.
  541. contact
    the act of touching physically
    His whole mind and body seemed to be afflicted with an unbearable
    sensitivity, a sort of transparency, which made every movement, every
    sound, every contact, every word that he had to speak or listen to, an
    agony.
  542. impassively
    in an impassive manner
    'Martin is one of us,' said O'Brien impassively.
  543. all-important
    of the greatest importance
    It was all-important to speak at once, before anyone else came, but now
    a terrible fear had taken possession of him.
  544. exactly
    indicating exactness or preciseness
    'Well, perhaps not exactly that.
  545. obliteration
    destruction by annihilating something
    In Oceania the prevailing philosophy is called
    Ingsoc, in Eurasia it is called Neo-Bolshevism, and in Eastasia it is
    called by a Chinese name usually translated as Death-Worship, but perhaps
    better rendered as Obliteration of the Self.
  546. disseminate
    cause to become widely known
    'You are prepared to cheat, to forge, to blackmail, to corrupt the minds
    of children, to distribute habit-forming drugs, to encourage prostitution,
    to disseminate venereal diseases--to do anything which is likely to cause
    demoralization and weaken the power of the Party?'
  547. Vistula
    a European river; flows into the Baltic Sea
    Eurasia, for example, could easily conquer the
    British Isles, which are geographically part of Europe, or on the other
    hand it would be possible for Oceania to push its frontiers to the Rhine
    or even to the Vistula.
  548. unimportant
    not important
    But the issue still struck her as
    unimportant.
  549. submerge
    put under water
    Nevertheless, the few luxuries that he does enjoy
    his large, well-appointed flat, the better texture of his clothes, the
    better quality of his food and drink and tobacco, his two or three
    servants, his private motor-car or helicopter--set him in a different world
    from a member of the Outer Party, and the members of the Outer Party have
    a similar advantage in comparison with the submerged masses whom we call
    'the proles'.
  550. fretfully
    in a fretful manner
    She had already turned to go, but she did rather fretfully come back for
    a moment.
  551. difference
    the quality of being unlike or dissimilar
    However, it made no difference, for it was inconceivable that
    they could ever meet indoors or exchange any kind of written communication.
  552. twenty-three
    the cardinal number that is the sum of twenty-two and one
    It was not till twenty-three hours, when he
    was home and in bed--in the darkness, where you were safe even from the
    telescreen so long as you kept silent--that he was able to think
    continuously.
  553. conscious
    knowing and perceiving; having awareness of surroundings and sensations and thoughts
    Folly, folly, his heart kept saying: conscious, gratuitous, suicidal folly.
  554. obsolete
    no longer in use
    Then he went on:

    'What I had really intended to say was that in your article I noticed you
    had used two words which have become obsolete.
  555. dribble
    flowing in drops; the formation and falling of drops of liquid
    On the morning of the sixth day the dribble of cylinders slowed
    down.
  556. facial expression
    a gesture executed with the facial muscles
    The scientist of today is either a mixture of psychologist and inquisitor,
    studying with real ordinary minuteness the meaning of facial expressions,
    gestures, and tones of voice, and testing the truth-producing effects of
    drugs, shock therapy, hypnosis, and physical torture; or he is chemist,
    physicist, or biologist concerned only with such branches of his special
    subject as are relevant to the taking of life.
  557. torture
    the deliberate, systematic, or wanton infliction of physical or mental suffering by one or more persons in an attempt to force another person to yield information or to make a confession or for any other reason
    They torture you.'
  558. false teeth
    a removable denture
    I've got five false teeth.'
  559. reality
    the state of being actual or real
    In
    reality there was no escape.
  560. square
    (geometry) a plane rectangle with four equal sides and four right angles; a four-sided regular polygon
    It was a scrap of paper
    folded into a square.
  561. shoulder
    a ball-and-socket joint between the head of the humerus and a cavity of the scapula
    Winston wriggled himself sideways, and with a violent lunge managed
    to drive his shoulder between them.
  562. distinguishable
    capable of being perceived as different or distinct
    Actually the three philosophies are barely distinguishable,
    and the social systems which they support are not distinguishable at all.
  563. boredom
    the feeling of being bored by something tedious
    His soul writhed with boredom, but for once he had had no impulse
    to shirk his evening at the Centre.
  564. process
    a particular course of action intended to achieve a result
    She could describe the whole process of composing a novel,
    from the general directive issued by the Planning Committee down to the
    final touching-up by the Rewrite Squad.
  565. enquiry
    an instance of questioning
    There
    was no enquiry he could make.
  566. gravitate
    move toward
    Winston, at normal times the kind of person who gravitates to the outer
    edge of any kind of scrimmage, shoved, butted, squirmed his way forward
    into the heart of the crowd.
  567. youthfulness
    the freshness and vitality characteristic of a young person
    He was
    aware, in spite of his youthfulness and selfishness, that this was somehow
    connected with the never-mentioned thing that was about to happen.
  568. horseflesh
    the flesh of horses as food
    The social atmosphere is that of a besieged city, where the
    possession of a lump of horseflesh makes the difference between wealth and
    poverty.
  569. bough
    any of the larger branches of a tree
    Chapter 2



    Winston picked his way up the lane through dappled light and shade,
    stepping out into pools of gold wherever the boughs parted.
  570. stir
    move an implement through
    A curious emotion stirred in Winston's heart.
  571. barely
    in a sparse or scanty way
    A blond-headed, silly-faced young man named Wilsher, whom he barely knew,
    was inviting him with a smile to a vacant place at his table.
  572. impulse
    an impelling force or strength
    His soul writhed with boredom, but for once he had had no impulse
    to shirk his evening at the Centre.
  573. book
    physical objects consisting of a number of pages bound together
    Books were
    just a commodity that had to be produced, like jam or bootlaces.
  574. annihilate
    kill in large numbers
    Almost as swiftly as he had imagined it, she had torn her clothes
    off, and when she flung them aside it was with that same magnificent
    gesture by which a whole civilization seemed to be annihilated.
  575. misprint
    a mistake in printed matter resulting from mechanical failures of some kind
    One day in the fairly near
    future--I cannot give a date--one of the messages among your morning's
    work will contain a misprinted word, and you will have to ask for a
    repeat.
  576. betray
    deliver to an enemy by treachery
    Nevertheless it had been very difficult not to
    betray a momentary surprise, for in the two or three seconds while he was
    helping her up the girl had slipped something into his hand.
  577. snowdrift
    a mass of snow heaped up by the wind
    Each time that Winston broke off for one of his spells of
    sleep he tried to leave his desk clear of work, and each time that he
    crawled back sticky-eyed and aching, it was to find that another shower
    of paper cylinders had covered the desk like a snowdrift, half-burying the
    speakwrite and overflowing on to the floor, so that the first job was
    always to stack them into a neat enough pile to give him room to work.
  578. reading
    written material intended to be read
    When he did so, although he knew very well the
    danger of showing too much interest, he could not resist reading it once
    again, just to make sure that the words were really there.
  579. past times
    the time that has elapsed
    The
    recurrent economic crises of past times were totally unnecessary and are
    not now permitted to happen, but other and equally large dislocations
    can and do happen without having political results, because there is no
    way in which discontent can become articulate.
  580. victoriously
    in a victorious manner
    Meanwhile
    no Inner Party member wavers for an instant in his mystical belief that
    the war is real, and that it is bound to end victoriously, with Oceania
    the undisputed master of the entire world.
  581. in front
    at or in the front
    In front of him was an enemy
    who was trying to kill him: in front of him, also, was a human creature,
    in pain and perhaps with a broken bone.
  582. rumour
    gossip (usually a mixture of truth and untruth) passed around by word of mouth
    Processions, meetings,
    military parades, lectures, waxworks, displays, film shows, telescreen
    programmes all had to be organized; stands had to be erected, effigies
    built, slogans coined, songs written, rumours circulated, photographs
    faked.
  583. submachine gun
    machine gun that is a portable automatic firearm
    It had no caption,
    and represented simply the monstrous figure of a Eurasian soldier, three
    or four metres high, striding forward with expressionless Mongolian face
    and enormous boots, a submachine gun pointed from his hip.
  584. every
    (used of count nouns) each and all of the members of a group considered singly and without exception
    His whole mind and body seemed to be afflicted with an unbearable
    sensitivity, a sort of transparency, which made every movement, every
    sound, every contact, every word that he had to speak or listen to, an
    agony.
  585. racial discrimination
    discriminatory or abusive behavior towards members of another race
    Nor is there any racial discrimination, or any marked
    domination of one province by another.
  586. well-appointed
    having a full array of suitable equipment or furnishings
    Nevertheless, the few luxuries that he does enjoy
    his large, well-appointed flat, the better texture of his clothes, the
    better quality of his food and drink and tobacco, his two or three
    servants, his private motor-car or helicopter--set him in a different world
    from a member of the Outer Party, and the members of the Outer Party have
    a similar advantage in comparison with the submerged masses whom we call
    'the proles'.
  587. might
    physical strength
    The thing that was written on the paper might be a threat, a
    summons, an order to commit suicide, a trap of some description.
  588. shapely
    having a well-proportioned and pleasing shape
    He explored the long fingers, the shapely nails, the
    work-hardened palm with its row of callouses, the smooth flesh under the
    wrist.
  589. unformed
    not having form or shape
    On it was written, in a large
    unformed handwriting:

    I LOVE YOU.

    For several seconds he was too stunned even to throw the incriminating
    thing into the memory hole.
  590. chess
    a board game for two players who move their 16 pieces according to specific rules; the object is to checkmate the opponent's king
    He wolfed another tasteless meal in the canteen, hurried
    off to the Centre, took part in the solemn foolery of a 'discussion group',
    played two games of table tennis, swallowed several glasses of gin, and
    sat for half an hour through a lecture entitled 'Ingsoc in relation to
    chess'.
  591. before
    at or in the front
    It was all-important to speak at once, before anyone else came, but now
    a terrible fear had taken possession of him.
  592. jam
    press tightly together or cram
    In the trucks little yellow men in shabby greenish uniforms were squatting,
    jammed close together.
  593. slogan
    a favorite saying of a sect or political group
    Banners,
    processions, slogans, games, community hikes all that stuff.
  594. manage
    be in charge of, act on, or dispose of
    While he stood at the urinal he managed, with a little more fingering, to
    get it unfolded.
  595. magnify
    increase in size, volume or significance
    From whatever
    angle you looked at the poster, the muzzle of the gun, magnified by the
    foreshortening, seemed to be pointed straight at you.
  596. little
    limited or below average in number or quantity or magnitude or extent
    While he stood at the urinal he managed, with a little more fingering, to
    get it unfolded.
  597. intermittent
    stopping and starting at irregular intervals
    As they drifted
    down the crowded pavements, not quite abreast and never looking at one
    another, they carried on a curious, intermittent conversation which flicked
    on and off like the beams of a lighthouse, suddenly nipped into silence
    by the approach of a Party uniform or the proximity of a telescreen, then
    taken up again minutes later in the middle of a sentence, then abruptly
    cut short as they parted at the agreed spot, then continued almost without
    introduction on the following day.
  598. cigarette
    finely ground tobacco wrapped in paper; for smoking
    The
    girl finished her lunch quickly and made off, while Winston stayed to
    smoke a cigarette.
  599. floodlight
    light that is a source of artificial illumination having a broad beam; used in photography
    It was night, and the white faces and the scarlet banners were
    luridly floodlit.
  600. expending
    the act of spending money for goods or services
    Even when weapons of war are
    not actually destroyed, their manufacture is still a convenient way of
    expending labour power without producing anything that can be consumed.
  601. whole
    all of something including all its component elements or parts
    The whole incident could
    not have taken as much as half a minute.
  602. rule
    prescribed guide for conduct or action
    If you kept the small rules, you could break the big ones.
  603. conquer
    take possession of by force, as after an invasion
    Her head rested on his shoulder, the pleasant smell of her
    hair conquering the pigeon dung.
  604. stumping
    campaigning for something by making political speeches (stump speeches)
    The June sun was still high in the sky,
    and in the sun-filled court below, a monstrous woman, solid as a Norman
    pillar, with brawny red forearms and a sacking apron strapped about her
    middle, was stumping to and fro between a washtub and a clothes line,
    pegging out a series of square white things which Winston recognized as
    babies' diapers.
  605. clothes
    clothing in general
    Almost as swiftly as he had imagined it, she had torn her clothes
    off, and when she flung them aside it was with that same magnificent
    gesture by which a whole civilization seemed to be annihilated.
  606. abolish
    do away with
    The family could not actually be
    abolished, and, indeed, people were encouraged to be fond of their
    children, in almost the old-fashioned way.
  607. disproportionately
    to a disproportionate degree
    On a scarlet-draped platform an orator of the Inner Party, a small
    lean man with disproportionately long arms and a large bald skull over
    which a few lank locks straggled, was haranguing the crowd.
  608. dapple
    a small contrasting part of something
    Chapter 2



    Winston picked his way up the lane through dappled light and shade,
    stepping out into pools of gold wherever the boughs parted.
  609. end
    either extremity of something that has length
    A solitary figure was coming towards him from the other end of the long,
    brightly-lit corridor.
  610. intoxicate
    make drunk (with alcoholic drinks)
    For some reason
    he had always thought of wine as having an intensely sweet taste, like
    that of blackberry jam and an immediate intoxicating effect.
  611. over and over again
    repeatedly
    He would ask his mother naggingly,
    over and over again, why there was not more food, he would shout and storm
    at her (he even remembered the tones of his voice, which was beginning to
    break prematurely and sometimes boomed in a peculiar way), or he would
    attempt a snivelling note of pathos in his efforts to get more than his
    share.
  612. instinct
    inborn pattern of behavior often responsive to specific stimuli
    Not to let one's feelings appear
    in one's face was a habit that had acquired the status of an instinct,
    and in any case they had been standing straight in front of a telescreen
    when the thing happened.
  613. machine
    any mechanical or electrical device that transmits or modifies energy to perform or assist in the performance of human tasks
    A long line of trucks, with wooden-faced guards armed with sub-machine
    guns standing upright in each corner, was passing slowly down the street.
  614. talking
    an exchange of ideas via conversation
    They sat talking for hours on the dusty,
    twig-littered floor, one or other of them getting up from time to time to
    cast a glance through the arrowslits and make sure that no one was coming.
  615. self-deception
    a misconception that is favorable to the person who holds it
    In the dream his deepest feeling was always one of
    self-deception, because he did in fact know what was behind the wall of
    darkness.
  616. keep
    continue a certain state, condition, or activity
    But there
    was another, wilder possibility that kept raising its head, though he
    tried vainly to suppress it.
  617. fighting
    the act of fighting; any contest or struggle
    'You understand,' he said, 'that you will be fighting in the dark.
  618. arrange
    put into a proper or systematic order
    It was a physical problem that had to be solved: how to get in touch with
    the girl and arrange a meeting.
  619. asleep
    in a state of sleep
    Almost immediately
    they fell asleep and slept for about half an hour.
  620. needed
    necessary for relief or supply
    For how could the fear, the
    hatred, and the lunatic credulity which the Party needed in its members be
    kept at the right pitch, except by bottling down some powerful instinct
    and using it as a driving force?
  621. give
    transfer possession of something concrete or abstract to somebody
    'I only gave my wrist a bit of a
    bang.
  622. labyrinthine
    resembling a labyrinth in form or complexity
    In the labyrinthine Ministry the windowless,
    air-conditioned rooms kept their normal temperature, but outside the
    pavements scorched one's feet and the stench of the Tubes at the rush hours
    was a horror.
  623. wealth
    property that has economic utility: a monetary value or an exchange value
    They add nothing to the wealth of
    the world, since whatever they produce is used for purposes of war, and
    the object of waging a war is always to be in a better position in which
    to wage another war.
  624. touch up
    alter so as to produce a more desirable appearance
    She could describe the whole process of composing a novel,
    from the general directive issued by the Planning Committee down to the
    final touching-up by the Rewrite Squad.
  625. take
    get into one's hands, take physically
    The whole incident could
    not have taken as much as half a minute.
  626. powerful
    having great power or force or potency or effect
    The first whiff of its scent
    had stirred up some memory which he could not pin down, but which was
    powerful and troubling.
  627. private property
    movable property (as distinguished from real estate)
    The so-called
    'abolition of private property' which took place in the middle years of
    the century meant, in effect, the concentration of property in far fewer
    hands than before: but with this difference, that the new owners were a
    group instead of a mass of individuals.
  628. parson
    a person authorized to conduct religious worship
    He had hoped to be alone for a little while during
    the lunch hour, but as bad luck would have it the imbecile Parsons flopped
    down beside him, the tang of his sweat almost defeating the tinny smell of
    stew, and kept up a stream of talk about the preparations for Hate Week.
  629. loudness
    the magnitude of sound (usually in a specified direction)
    His heart bumped in his breast with
    frightening loudness.
  630. drudgery
    hard monotonous routine work
    From the moment when the machine first made its appearance it
    was clear to all thinking people that the need for human drudgery, and
    therefore to a great extent for human inequality, had disappeared.
  631. appear
    come into sight or view
    She had regained
    some of her colour, and appeared very much better.
  632. ever
    at all times; all the time and on every occasion
    Her face had turned a milky yellow colour against which her
    mouth stood out redder than ever.
  633. driving force
    the act of applying force to propel something
    For how could the fear, the
    hatred, and the lunatic credulity which the Party needed in its members be
    kept at the right pitch, except by bottling down some powerful instinct
    and using it as a driving force?
  634. rosewood
    any of those hardwood trees of the genus Dalbergia that yield rosewood--valuable cabinet woods of a dark red or purplish color streaked and variegated with black
    Instead of anything directly connected with O'Brien or the
    Brotherhood, there came into his mind a sort of composite picture of the
    dark bedroom where his mother had spent her last days, and the little room
    over Mr Charrington's shop, and the glass paperweight, and the steel
    engraving in its rosewood frame.
  635. imagine
    expect, believe, or suppose
    He had imagined her a fool
    like all the rest of them, her head stuffed with lies and hatred, her
    belly full of ice.
  636. marching
    the act of marching; walking with regular steps (especially in a procession of some kind)
    All this marching
    up and down and cheering and waving flags is simply sex gone sour.
  637. very
    being the exact same one; not any other:
    She had certainly turned
    very pale.
  638. engraving
    making engraved or etched plates and printing designs from them
    'And that picture over there'--she nodded at the engraving on the opposite
    wall--'would that be a hundred years old?'
  639. incredulity
    doubt about the truth of something
    At the beginning he had no feeling except sheer incredulity.
  640. intentionally
    with intention; in an intentional manner
    There was no
    question that she had done it intentionally.
  641. shop
    a mercantile establishment for the retail sale of goods or services
    Four days had gone
    past since the evening when he had run into her outside the junk-shop.
  642. danger
    the condition of being susceptible to harm or injury
    When he did so, although he knew very well the
    danger of showing too much interest, he could not resist reading it once
    again, just to make sure that the words were really there.
  643. sometimes
    on certain occasions or in certain cases but not always
    If there was any relief, it was in
    his work, in which he could sometimes forget himself for ten minutes at a
    stretch.
  644. year
    the period of time that it takes for a planet (as, e.g., Earth or Mars) to make a complete revolution around the sun
    It consisted in falsifying a
    series of production reports of two years ago, in such a way as to cast
    discredit on a prominent member of the Inner Party, who was now under a
    cloud.
  645. cease
    put an end to a state or an activity
    With Julia he felt no difficulty in
    talking about such things: Katharine, in any case, had long ceased to be
    a painful memory and became merely a distasteful one.
  646. can
    airtight sealed metal container for food or drink or paint etc.
    'Where can we meet?'
  647. eyes
    opinion or judgment
    Her eyes were fixed on his, with an
    appealing expression that looked more like fear than pain.
  648. dung
    fecal matter of animals
    The air in the
    little square chamber above the bells was hot and stagnant, and smelt
    overpoweringly of pigeon dung.
  649. incapable
    (followed by `of') lacking capacity or ability
    Meaning naturally
    orthodox, incapable of thinking a bad thought?'
  650. circulate
    move through a space, circuit or system, returning to the starting point
    Processions, meetings,
    military parades, lectures, waxworks, displays, film shows, telescreen
    programmes all had to be organized; stands had to be erected, effigies
    built, slogans coined, songs written, rumours circulated, photographs
    faked.
  651. eye
    the organ of sight
    Her eyes were fixed on his, with an
    appealing expression that looked more like fear than pain.
  652. after
    happening at a time subsequent to a reference time
    Perhaps the Brotherhood existed after all!
  653. dividing line
    a conceptual separation or distinction
    The frontiers of Eurasia flow back and forth between the basin of the Congo
    and the northern shore of the Mediterranean; the islands of the Indian
    Ocean and the Pacific are constantly being captured and recaptured by
    Oceania or by Eastasia; in Mongolia the dividing line between Eurasia and
    Eastasia is never stable; round the Pole all three powers lay claim to
    enormous territories which in fact are largely uninhabited and unexplored:
    but the balance of power always remains roughly even...
  654. meaning
    the message that is intended or expressed or signified
    Whatever was written on the paper, it must have some kind of political
    meaning.
  655. sticky
    having the sticky properties of an adhesive
    He turned and fled down
    the stairs, with the chocolate growing sticky in his hand.
  656. impossibly
    to a degree impossible of achievement
    Curiously enough,
    this did not strike her as an impossibly rash thing to do.
  657. victory
    a successful ending of a struggle or contest
    Winston was in Victory Square before the appointed time.
  658. statuesque
    suggestive of a statue
    He remembered
    his mother's statuesque body bending over the gas ring to stir at something
    in a saucepan.
  659. casually
    in an unconcerned manner
    He went back to his cubicle, sat down, threw the fragment of paper
    casually among the other papers on the desk, put on his spectacles and
    hitched the speakwrite towards him.
  660. inefficient
    not producing desired results; wasteful
    Inefficient
    nations were always conquered sooner or later, and the struggle for
    efficiency was inimical to illusions.
  661. annihilating
    wreaking or capable of wreaking complete destruction
    War, however, is no
    longer the desperate, annihilating struggle that it was in the early
    decades of the twentieth century.
  662. pediment
    a triangular gable between a horizontal entablature and a sloping roof
    There were
    telescreens all round the pediment.
  663. sooner
    comparatives of `soon' or `early'
    In a way she realized
    that she herself was doomed, that sooner or later the Thought Police would
    catch her and kill her, but with another part of her mind she believed
    that it was somehow possible to construct a secret world in which you could
    live as you chose.
  664. mark down
    reduce the price of
    The
    most gifted among them, who might possibly become nuclei of discontent,
    are simply marked down by the Thought Police and eliminated.
  665. zipper
    a fastener for locking together two toothed edges by means of a sliding tab
    She stood looking at him for an instant,
    then felt at the zipper of her overalls.
  666. mother
    a woman who has given birth to a child (also used as a term of address to your mother)
    The dream had also been comprehended by--indeed, in some sense it had
    consisted in--a gesture of the arm made by his mother, and made again
    thirty years later by the Jewish woman he had seen on the news film,
    trying to shelter the small boy from the bullets, before the helicopter
    blew them both to pieces.
  667. surname
    the name used to identify the members of a family (as distinguished from each member's given name)
    It occurred to him that he still did not know her surname or where
    she lived.
  668. tread on
    place or press the foot on
    The bluebells were so thick underfoot
    that it was impossible not to tread on them.
  669. drivel
    saliva spilling from the mouth
    She knew the whole drivelling song by heart, it seemed.
  670. evening
    the latter part of the day (the period of decreasing daylight from late afternoon until nightfall)
    Four days had gone
    past since the evening when he had run into her outside the junk-shop.
  671. scarlet
    a variable color that is vivid red but sometimes with an orange tinge
    His first feeling was relief, but as
    he watched the strong slender body moving in front of him, with the scarlet
    sash that was just tight enough to bring out the curve of her hips, the
    sense of his own inferiority was heavy upon him.
  672. simultaneously
    at the same instant
    The primary aim of modern warfare (in accordance with the principles of
    DOUBLETHINK, this aim is simultaneously recognized and not recognized by
    the directing brains of the Inner Party) is to use up the products of the
    machine without raising the general standard of living.
  673. sniff
    perceive by inhaling through the nose
    The smell was
    already filling the room, a rich hot smell which seemed like an emanation
    from his early childhood, but which one did occasionally meet with even
    now, blowing down a passage-way before a door slammed, or diffusing itself
    mysteriously in a crowded street, sniffed for an instant and then lost
    again.
  674. mix up
    assemble without order or sense
    It was as
    though it were a kind of liquid stuff that poured all over him and got
    mixed up with the sunlight that filtered through the leaves.
  675. forties
    the time of life between 40 and 50
    Although the Party, according to its
    habit, claims the invention for itself, atomic bombs first appeared as
    early as the nineteen-forties, and were first used on a large scale about
    ten years later.
  676. write on
    write about a particular topic
    Obviously there must be a message of some kind written on
    it.
  677. greenness
    green color or pigment; resembling the color of growing grass
    The sweetness of the air and the greenness of the leaves daunted
    him.
  678. notice
    the act of noticing or paying attention
    If he had known where she lived, and at what time she left work,
    he could have contrived to meet her somewhere on her way home; but to try
    to follow her home was not safe, because it would mean loitering about
    outside the Ministry, which was bound to be noticed.
  679. unquestionably
    without question
    Katharine would unquestionably
    have denounced him to the Thought Police if she had not happened to be too
    stupid to detect the unorthodoxy of his opinions.
  680. remain
    continue in a place, position, or situation
    There she had remained for
    a year, helping to produce booklets in sealed packets with titles like
    'Spanking Stories' or 'One Night in a Girls' School', to be bought
    furtively by proletarian youths who were under the impression that they
    were buying something illegal.
  681. quite
    to the greatest extent; completely
    When he came into the canteen she was sitting at a table well out from the
    wall, and was quite alone.
  682. soundless
    marked by absence of sound
    He rose deliberately from his chair and came towards them across the
    soundless carpet.
  683. plaster
    a mixture of lime or gypsum with sand and water; hardens into a smooth solid; used to cover walls and ceilings
    Her arm was out of the sling and she had a
    band of sticking-plaster round her wrist.
  684. clank
    a loud resonant repeating noise
    Occasionally when a truck jolted there
    was a clank-clank of metal: all the prisoners were wearing leg-irons.
  685. solve
    find the solution to (a problem or question) or understand the meaning of
    It was a physical problem that had to be solved: how to get in touch with
    the girl and arrange a meeting.
  686. float
    be afloat either on or below a liquid surface and not sink to the bottom
    Actually the idea had first floated into his head in
    the form of a vision, of the glass paperweight mirrored by the surface
    of the gateleg table.
  687. filthy
    disgustingly dirty; filled or smeared with offensive matter
    Did
    you bring some of that filthy Victory Coffee?
  688. loose end
    work that is left incomplete
    The ruling groups
    were always infected to some extent by liberal ideas, and were content to
    leave loose ends everywhere, to regard only the overt act and to be
    uninterested in what their subjects were thinking.
  689. mean
    denote or connote
    Whatever was written on the paper, it must have some kind of political
    meaning.
  690. shirk
    avoid (one's assigned duties)
    His soul writhed with boredom, but for once he had had no impulse
    to shirk his evening at the Centre.
  691. commit
    engage in or perform
    The thing that was written on the paper might be a threat, a
    summons, an order to commit suicide, a trap of some description.
  692. chop off
    remove by or as if by cutting
    But anyway I remember it ends
    up, "Here comes a candle to light you to bed, here comes a chopper to chop
    off
    your head!"'
  693. hundred
    ten 10s
    If anyone was coming you could hear them a hundred metres away.'
  694. curiously
    in a manner differing from the usual or expected
    'What are these books like?' said Winston curiously.
  695. neo
    (used as a combining form) recent or new
    In Oceania the prevailing philosophy is called
    Ingsoc, in Eurasia it is called Neo-Bolshevism, and in Eastasia it is
    called by a Chinese name usually translated as Death-Worship, but perhaps
    better rendered as Obliteration of the Self.
  696. mindless
    devoid of intelligence
    But the mindless tenderness that he had felt under
    the hazel tree, while the thrush was singing, had not quite come back.
  697. hurtle
    move with or as if with a rushing sound
    She suddenly twisted herself over in the bed, seized a shoe from the floor,
    and sent it hurtling into the corner with a boyish jerk of her arm, exactly
    as he had seen her fling the dictionary at Goldstein, that morning during
    the Two Minutes Hate.
  698. speak
    use language
    She spoke as though her heart were fluttering.
  699. surplus
    a quantity much larger than is needed
    Ever since the end
    of the nineteenth century, the problem of what to do with the surplus of
    consumption goods has been latent in industrial society.
  700. life
    the organic phenomenon that distinguishes living organisms from nonliving ones
    For a week after this, life was like a restless dream.
  701. outside
    the region that is outside of something
    Four days had gone
    past since the evening when he had run into her outside the junk-shop.
  702. unmistakable
    clearly revealed to the mind or the senses or judgment
    He knew
    that it was not so, because of her unmistakable agitation when she handed
    him the note.
  703. high-sounding
    pretentious (especially with regard to language or ideals)
    There did not seem to be any further question that he
    wanted to ask: still less did he feel any impulse to utter high-sounding
    generalities.
  704. relevance
    the relation of something to the matter at hand
    And in thinking this he remembered, without apparent relevance, how a few
    weeks ago he had seen a severed hand lying on the pavement and had kicked
    it into the gutter as though it had been a cabbage-stalk.
  705. numbers
    an illegal daily lottery
    As though to harmonize with the general mood, the rocket bombs had been
    killing larger numbers of people than usual.
  706. possibility
    capability of existing or happening or being true
    So far as he could see there were two possibilities.
  707. standing
    social or financial or professional status or reputation
    Not to let one's feelings appear
    in one's face was a habit that had acquired the status of an instinct,
    and in any case they had been standing straight in front of a telescreen
    when the thing happened.
  708. tablet
    a small flat compressed cake of some substance
    The queue edged forward till Winston was almost at the counter, then was
    held up for two minutes because someone in front was complaining that he
    had not received his tablet of saccharine.
  709. completely
    so as to be complete; with everything necessary
    When Winston
    followed her, he found that they were in a natural clearing, a tiny grassy
    knoll surrounded by tall saplings that shut it in completely.
  710. confess
    admit (to a wrongdoing)
    'And a good job too,'
    said Julia, 'otherwise they'd have had my name out of him when he
    confessed.'
  711. collectively
    in conjunction with; combined
    We cannot act
    collectively.
  712. corner
    the point where three areas or surfaces meet or intersect
    A long line of trucks, with wooden-faced guards armed with sub-machine
    guns standing upright in each corner, was passing slowly down the street.
  713. uninterested
    not having or showing interest
    The ruling groups
    were always infected to some extent by liberal ideas, and were content to
    leave loose ends everywhere, to regard only the overt act and to be
    uninterested in what their subjects were thinking.
  714. boo
    show displeasure, as after a performance or speech
    At the start there had been a few boos
    and hisses, but it came only from the Party members among the crowd, and
    had soon stopped.
  715. infected
    containing or resulting from disease-causing organisms
    If he could have infected the whole lot of them with leprosy or
    syphilis, how gladly he would have done so!
  716. undetected
    not perceived or discerned
    Or
    they would disappear, alter themselves out of recognition, learn to speak
    with proletarian accents, get jobs in a factory and live out their lives
    undetected in a back-street.
  717. small
    limited or below average in number or quantity or magnitude or extent
    It was something small and
    flat.
  718. strap
    an elongated leather strip (or a strip of similar material) for binding things together or holding something in position
    The June sun was still high in the sky,
    and in the sun-filled court below, a monstrous woman, solid as a Norman
    pillar, with brawny red forearms and a sacking apron strapped about her
    middle, was stumping to and fro between a washtub and a clothes line,
    pegging out a series of square white things which Winston recognized as
    babies' diapers.
  719. elm tree
    any of various trees of the genus Ulmus: important timber or shade trees
    In the ragged
    hedge on the opposite side the boughs of the elm trees swayed just
    perceptibly in the breeze, and their leaves stirred faintly in dense
    masses like women's hair.
  720. fall
    descend in free fall under the influence of gravity
    They were perhaps four metres apart when the girl stumbled and fell almost
    flat on her face.
  721. clasp
    hold firmly and tightly
    It could not have been ten seconds, and yet it seemed a long time that
    their hands were clasped together.
  722. meet
    come together
    It was a physical problem that had to be solved: how to get in touch with
    the girl and arrange a meeting.
  723. hair
    a covering for the body (or parts of it) consisting of a dense growth of threadlike structures (as on the human head); helps to prevent heat loss
    It was the girl with dark hair.
  724. mantelpiece
    shelf that projects from wall above fireplace
    The old-fashioned clock with the twelve-hour face was
    ticking away on the mantelpiece.
  725. pneumatic
    of or relating to or using air (or a similar gas)
    He rolled up the completed bundle of work and slid it into the pneumatic
    tube.
  726. Bailey
    English lexicographer who was the first to treat etymology consistently; his work was used as a reference by Samuel Johnson (died in 1742)
    To his astonishment she capped the line:


    'You owe me three farthings, say the bells of St Martin's,
    When will you pay me? say the bells of Old Bailey----'


    'I can't remember how it goes on after that.
  727. use up
    use up (resources or materials)
    The primary aim of modern warfare (in accordance with the principles of
    DOUBLETHINK, this aim is simultaneously recognized and not recognized by
    the directing brains of the Inner Party) is to use up the products of the
    machine without raising the general standard of living.
  728. used
    previously used or owned by another
    In the last truck he could see an
    aged man, his face a mass of grizzled hair, standing upright with wrists
    crossed in front of him, as though he were used to having them bound
    together.
  729. dark
    devoid of or deficient in light or brightness; shadowed or black
    It was the girl with dark hair.
  730. pull
    apply force so as to cause motion towards the source of the motion
    He had pulled her down on to the
    ground, she was utterly unresisting, he could do what he liked with her.
  731. perpetuate
    cause to continue or prevail
    The new movements which appeared in the middle years of the
    century, Ingsoc in Oceania, Neo-Bolshevism in Eurasia, Death-Worship, as
    it is commonly called, in Eastasia, had the conscious aim of perpetuating
    UNfreedom and INequality.
  732. confuse
    mistake one thing for another
    Whenever he began to talk of the principles of Ingsoc, doublethink, the
    mutability of the past, and the denial of objective reality, and to use
    Newspeak words, she became bored and confused and said that she never paid
    any attention to that kind of thing.
  733. darkening
    changing to a darker color
    The room was darkening.
  734. brute
    resembling a beast; showing lack of human sensibility
    But you have to get in earlier than that,
    because--Hi! Get out, you filthy brute!'
  735. quilted
    made of layers of fabric held together by patterned stitching
    Exactly as his mother
    had sat on the dingy white-quilted bed, with the child clinging to her, so
    she had sat in the sunken ship, far underneath him, and drowning deeper
    every minute, but still looking up at him through the darkening water.
  736. endless
    having no known beginning and presumably no end
    One had the feeling that she would have been perfectly
    content, if the June evening had been endless and the supply of clothes
    inexhaustible, to remain there for a thousand years, pegging out diapers
    and singing rubbish.
  737. betrayal
    the quality of aiding an enemy
    Confession is not betrayal.
  738. virtuosity
    technical skill or fluency or style exhibited by a virtuoso
    The music went on and on, minute after minute, with
    astonishing variations, never once repeating itself, almost as though the
    bird were deliberately showing off its virtuosity.
  739. act upon
    have and exert influence or effect
    Motives which were already present to some small extent in the
    great wars of the early twentieth century have now become dominant and
    are consciously recognized and acted upon.
  740. equator
    an imaginary line around the Earth forming the great circle that is equidistant from the north and south poles
    Moreover, the labour of the exploited peoples round the Equator is not
    really necessary to the world's economy.
  741. begin
    set in motion, cause to start
    But the girl was still alone
    when Winston secured his tray and began to make for her table.
  742. incriminating
    charging or suggestive of guilt or blame
    On it was written, in a large
    unformed handwriting:

    I LOVE YOU.

    For several seconds he was too stunned even to throw the incriminating
    thing into the memory hole.
  743. spectacle
    something or someone seen (especially a notable or unusual sight)
    He went back to his cubicle, sat down, threw the fragment of paper
    casually among the other papers on the desk, put on his spectacles and
    hitched the speakwrite towards him.
  744. tiny
    very small
    The person immediately
    ahead of him in the queue was a small, swiftly-moving, beetle-like man
    with a flat face and tiny, suspicious eyes.
  745. nose
    the organ of smell and entrance to the respiratory tract; the prominent part of the face of man or other mammals
    He re-adjusted his spectacles on his nose,
    sighed, and drew the next batch of work towards him, with the scrap of
    paper on top of it.
  746. diffusing
    spreading by diffusion
    The smell was
    already filling the room, a rich hot smell which seemed like an emanation
    from his early childhood, but which one did occasionally meet with even
    now, blowing down a passage-way before a door slammed, or diffusing itself
    mysteriously in a crowded street, sniffed for an instant and then lost
    again.
  747. alone
    isolated from others
    He had hoped to be alone for a little while during
    the lunch hour, but as bad luck would have it the imbecile Parsons flopped
    down beside him, the tang of his sweat almost defeating the tinny smell of
    stew, and kept up a stream of talk about the preparations for Hate Week.
  748. pavement
    the paved surface of a thoroughfare
    As they drifted
    down the crowded pavements, not quite abreast and never looking at one
    another, they carried on a curious, intermittent conversation which flicked
    on and off like the beams of a lighthouse, suddenly nipped into silence
    by the approach of a Party uniform or the proximity of a telescreen, then
    taken up again minutes later in the middle of a sentence, then abruptly
    cut short as they parted at the agreed spot, then continued almost without
    introduction on the following day.
  749. offensively
    in an unpleasantly offensive manner
    Nor did he seem shocked or become offensively
    knowing when it was made clear that Winston wanted the room for the purpose
    of a love-affair.
  750. apart
    separated or at a distance in place or position or time
    They were perhaps four metres apart when the girl stumbled and fell almost
    flat on her face.
  751. contain
    contain or hold; have within
    He led a ghostlike existence between the
    tiny, dark shop, and an even tinier back kitchen where he prepared his
    meals and which contained, among other things, an unbelievably ancient
    gramophone with an enormous horn.
  752. consciousness
    an alert cognitive state in which you are aware of yourself and your situation
    But there was still that memory moving round the edges of
    his consciousness, something strongly felt but not reducible to definite
    shape, like an object seen out of the corner of one's eye.
  753. squeeze
    press firmly
    But at the
    last moment, while the crowd still hemmed them in, her hand felt for his
    and gave it a fleeting squeeze.
  754. white bread
    bread made with finely ground and usually bleached wheat flour
    And here's a loaf of bread--proper
    white bread, not our bloody stuff--and a little pot of jam.
  755. listening
    the act of hearing attentively
    Perhaps at the other end of the instrument some small,
    beetle-like man was listening intently--listening to that.
  756. air
    a mixture of gases (especially oxygen) required for breathing; the stuff that the wind consists of
    The air
    seemed to kiss one's skin.
  757. piece
    a separate part of a whole
    Fortunately the piece of work he was engaged on was
    mere routine, the rectification of a long list of figures, not needing
    close attention.
  758. sanity
    normal or sound powers of mind
    At present nothing is possible
    except to extend the area of sanity little by little.
  759. spontaneously
    in a spontaneous manner
    It struck him as a curious fact that he had never
    heard a member of the Party singing alone and spontaneously.
  760. thirty
    the cardinal number that is the product of ten and three
    If he could get her at a table by herself,
    somewhere in the middle of the room, not too near the telescreens, and
    with a sufficient buzz of conversation all round--if these conditions
    endured for, say, thirty seconds, it might be possible to exchange a few
    words.
  761. leave
    go away from a place
    It was the middle of the morning, and Winston had left the cubicle to go
    to the lavatory.
  762. prisoner
    a person who is confined; especially a prisoner of war
    As he ran, he gathered from some shouted remarks that
    a convoy of Eurasian prisoners was passing.
  763. airstrip
    an airfield without normal airport facilities
    He wandered round
    the base of the enormous fluted column, at the top of which Big Brother's
    statue gazed southward towards the skies where he had vanquished the
    Eurasian aeroplanes (the Eastasian aeroplanes, it had been, a few years
    ago) in the Battle of Airstrip One. In the street in front of it there was
    a statue of a man on horseback which was supposed to represent Oliver
    Cromwell.
  764. generality
    the quality of being general or widespread or having general applicability
    Instead he looked into the middle distance and spoke in
    generalities, with so delicate an air as to give the impression that he
    had become partly invisible.
  765. improvise
    manage in a makeshift way; do with whatever is at hand
    He was everywhere at once,
    pushing, pulling, sawing, hammering, improvising, jollying everyone along
    with comradely exhortations and giving out from every fold of his body what
    seemed an inexhaustible supply of acrid-smelling sweat.
  766. sleeplessness
    a temporary state in which you are unable (or unwilling) to sleep
    One did not know what happened
    inside the Ministry of Love, but it was possible to guess: tortures, drugs,
    delicate instruments that registered your nervous reactions, gradual
    wearing-down by sleeplessness and solitude and persistent questioning.
  767. mental attitude
    a complex mental state involving beliefs and feelings and values and dispositions to act in certain ways
    Ultimately
    the determining factor is the mental attitude of the ruling class itself.
  768. second
    coming next after the first in position in space or time or degree or magnitude
    It'll be all right in a second.'
  769. demonstration
    a show or display; the act of presenting something to sight or view
    She spent an astonishing amount of time in attending lectures and
    demonstrations, distributing literature for the junior Anti-Sex League,
    preparing banners for Hate Week, making collections for the savings
    campaign, and such-like activities.
  770. clothe
    provide with clothes or put clothes on
    Almost as swiftly as he had imagined it, she had torn her clothes
    off, and when she flung them aside it was with that same magnificent
    gesture by which a whole civilization seemed to be annihilated.
  771. upheaval
    a violent disturbance
    Even after enormous
    upheavals and seemingly irrevocable changes, the same pattern has always
    reasserted itself, just as a gyroscope will always return to equilibrium,
    however far it is pushed one way or the other.
  772. atmosphere
    the envelope of gases surrounding any celestial body
    It was as though the surface of the glass
    had been the arch of the sky, enclosing a tiny world with its atmosphere
    complete.
  773. safeguard
    a precautionary measure warding off impending danger or damage or injury etc.
    War was a
    sure safeguard of sanity, and so far as the ruling classes were concerned
    it was probably the most important of all safeguards.
  774. suddenly
    happening unexpectedly
    At the sight of the words I LOVE YOU
    the desire to stay alive had welled up in him, and the taking of minor
    risks suddenly seemed stupid.
  775. important
    important in effect or meaning
    It was all-important to speak at once, before anyone else came, but now
    a terrible fear had taken possession of him.
  776. dark-blue
    of a dark shade of blue
    The
    telescreen was dimmed to a low murmur; the richness of the dark-blue carpet
    gave one the impression of treading on velvet.
  777. pyramidal
    resembling a pyramid
    Everywhere there is the same pyramidal structure, the same worship of
    semi-divine leader, the same economy existing by and for continuous
    warfare.
  778. destroy
    do away with, cause the destruction or undoing of
    It was not merely that the sex
    instinct created a world of its own which was outside the Party's control
    and which therefore had to be destroyed if possible.
  779. logistics
    handling an operation that involves providing labor and materials be supplied as needed
    Some are
    concerned simply with planning the logistics of future wars; others devise
    larger and larger rocket bombs, more and more powerful explosives, and more
    and more impenetrable armour-plating; others search for new and deadlier
    gases, or for soluble poisons capable of being produced in such quantities
    as to destroy the vegetation of whole continents, or for breeds of disease
    germs immunized against all possible antibodies; others strive to produce
    a vehicle that shall bore its wa...
  780. efficiency
    skillfulness in avoiding wasted time and effort
    All rulers in all ages have tried
    to impose a false view of the world upon their followers, but they could
    not afford to encourage any illusion that tended to impair military
    efficiency.
  781. hands
    (with `in') guardianship over; in divorce cases it is the right to house and care for and discipline a child
    It could not have been ten seconds, and yet it seemed a long time that
    their hands were clasped together.
  782. speaking
    capable of or involving speech or speaking
    On the following day he very nearly succeeded in speaking to her.
  783. unopposed
    not having opposition or an opponent
    In the years following the
    Revolution it was able to step into this commanding position almost
    unopposed, because the whole process was represented as an act of
    collectivization.
  784. somehow
    in some unspecified way or manner; or by some unspecified means
    It
    was merely one symptom of her revolt against the Party and all its ways,
    and somehow it seemed natural and healthy, like the sneeze of a horse that
    smells bad hay.
  785. espionage
    the systematic use of spies to get military or political secrets
    Certain backward areas have advanced, and various
    devices, always in some way connected with warfare and police espionage,
    have been developed, but experiment and invention have largely stopped,
    and the ravages of the atomic war of the nineteen-fifties have never been
    fully repaired.
  786. come back
    go back to something earlier
    Then the memory of her face came back, and with it a raging,
    intolerable desire to be alone.
  787. chequered
    patterned with alternating squares of color
    They had left the clearing and were wandering again
    through the chequered shade, with their arms round each other's waists
    whenever it was wide enough to walk two abreast.
  788. article of faith
    an unshakable belief in something without need for proof or evidence
    All members of the Inner Party believe in this coming conquest as an
    article of faith.
  789. church tower
    the tower of a church
    When they met in the church tower the gaps in their fragmentary
    conversation were filled up.
  790. in so far
    to the degree or extent that
    In so far as he had time to remember
    it, he was not troubled by the fact that every word he murmured into the
    speakwrite, every stroke of his ink-pencil, was a deliberate lie.
  791. ideological
    of or pertaining to or characteristic of an orientation that characterizes the thinking of a group or nation
    She had grown up since the
    Revolution and was too young to remember the ideological battles of the
    fifties and sixties.
  792. kept
    (especially of promises or contracts) not violated or disregarded
    But there
    was another, wilder possibility that kept raising its head, though he
    tried vainly to suppress it.
  793. adulterer
    someone who commits adultery or fornication
    We are
    also adulterers.
  794. effigy
    a representation of a person (especially in the form of sculpture)
    Processions, meetings,
    military parades, lectures, waxworks, displays, film shows, telescreen
    programmes all had to be organized; stands had to be erected, effigies
    built, slogans coined, songs written, rumours circulated, photographs
    faked.
  795. far
    at or to or from a great distance in space
    So far as he could see there were two possibilities.
  796. eat up
    use up (resources or materials)
    In principle
    the war effort is always so planned as to eat up any surplus that might
    exist after meeting the bare needs of the population.
  797. scrape
    cut the surface of; wear away the surface of
    And in her practical way she scraped together a small square of dust,
    and with a twig from a pigeon's nest began drawing a map on the floor.
  798. railway station
    terminal where trains load or unload passengers or goods
    For distances of less than
    100 kilometres it was not necessary to get your passport endorsed, but
    sometimes there were patrols hanging about the railway stations, who
    examined the papers of any Party member they found there and asked awkward
    questions.
  799. so long
    a farewell remark
    It was not till twenty-three hours, when he
    was home and in bed--in the darkness, where you were safe even from the
    telescreen so long as you kept silent--that he was able to think
    continuously.
  800. in some way
    in some unspecified way or manner; or by some unspecified means
    But she only questioned the teachings of the Party when they
    in some way touched upon her own life.
  801. fling
    throw with force or recklessness
    'It's this bloody thing that does it,' she said, ripping off the scarlet
    sash of the Junior Anti-Sex League and flinging it on to a bough.
  802. mind
    that which is responsible for one's thoughts and feelings; the seat of the faculty of reason
    No doubt the idea was absurd, but it had sprung into his mind in the very
    instant of feeling the scrap of paper in his hand.
  803. glasses
    optical instrument consisting of a frame that holds a pair of lenses for correcting defective vision
    He wolfed another tasteless meal in the canteen, hurried
    off to the Centre, took part in the solemn foolery of a 'discussion group',
    played two games of table tennis, swallowed several glasses of gin, and
    sat for half an hour through a lecture entitled 'Ingsoc in relation to
    chess'.
  804. disentangle
    separate the tangles of
    'I've got THE BOOK,' he said as they disentangled themselves.
  805. spiritless
    lacking ardor or vigor or energy
    She seemed to have
    become completely spiritless.
  806. lipstick
    makeup that is used to color the lips
    I'll get the
    lipstick off your face afterwards.'
  807. unresisting
    offering no resistance
    He had pulled her down on to the
    ground, she was utterly unresisting, he could do what he liked with her.
  808. partly
    in part; in some degree; not wholly
    He knelt down and began
    picking some partly to pass the time away, but also from a vague idea that
    he would like to have a bunch of flowers to offer to the girl when they
    met.
  809. foolery
    foolish or senseless behavior
    He wolfed another tasteless meal in the canteen, hurried
    off to the Centre, took part in the solemn foolery of a 'discussion group',
    played two games of table tennis, swallowed several glasses of gin, and
    sat for half an hour through a lecture entitled 'Ingsoc in relation to
    chess'.
  810. boggy
    (of soil) soft and watery
    Obviously she had been that way
    before, for she dodged the boggy bits as though by habit.
  811. reassure
    cause to feel sure; give reassurance to
    She pressed herself against him and wound her limbs round him, as though
    to reassure him with the warmth of her body.
  812. fact
    a piece of information about circumstances that exist or events that have occurred
    It struck him as a curious fact that he had never
    heard a member of the Party singing alone and spontaneously.
  813. fecundity
    the state of being fertile; capable of producing offspring
    Eurasia is protected by its vast land spaces, Oceania
    by the width of the Atlantic and the Pacific, Eastasia by the fecundity
    and industriousness of its inhabitants.
  814. demoralization
    depression resulting from an undermining of your morale
    'You are prepared to cheat, to forge, to blackmail, to corrupt the minds
    of children, to distribute habit-forming drugs, to encourage prostitution,
    to disseminate venereal diseases--to do anything which is likely to cause
    demoralization and weaken the power of the Party?'
  815. up and down
    moving backward and forward along a given course
    All this marching
    up and down and cheering and waving flags is simply sex gone sour.
  816. heartland
    the central region of a country or continent; especially a region that is important to a country or to a culture
    The frontiers of Eurasia flow back and forth between the basin of the Congo
    and the northern shore of the Mediterranean; the islands of the Indian
    Ocean and the Pacific are constantly being captured and recaptured by
    Oceania or by Eastasia; in Mongolia the dividing line between Eurasia and
    Eastasia is never stable; round the Pole all three powers lay claim to
    enormous territories which in fact are largely uninhabited and unexplored:
    but the balance of power always remains roughly even, and t...
  817. orgasm
    the moment of most intense pleasure in sexual intercourse
    On the sixth day of Hate Week, after the processions, the speeches, the
    shouting, the singing, the banners, the posters, the films, the waxworks,
    the rolling of drums and squealing of trumpets, the tramp of marching feet,
    the grinding of the caterpillars of tanks, the roar of massed planes,
    the booming of guns--after six days of this, when the great orgasm was
    quivering to its climax and the general hatred of Eurasia had boiled up
    into such delirium that if the crowd could have got th...
  818. kilo
    one thousand grams; the basic unit of mass adopted under the Systeme International d'Unites
    There's a whole kilo here,' she said.
  819. sweating
    the process of the sweat glands of the skin secreting a salty fluid
    For a moment it felt as though his
    entrails were being ground to pulp between the two muscular hips, then he
    had broken through, sweating a little.
  820. over again
    anew
    He would ask his mother naggingly,
    over and over again, why there was not more food, he would shout and storm
    at her (he even remembered the tones of his voice, which was beginning to
    break prematurely and sometimes boomed in a peculiar way), or he would
    attempt a snivelling note of pathos in his efforts to get more than his
    share.
  821. scores
    a large number or amount
    Hundreds of times--well, scores of times, anyway.'
  822. part
    one of the portions into which something is regarded as divided and which together constitute a whole
    Perhaps the girl was part of it!
  823. brief
    of short duration or distance
    Do
    you carry a brief-case to work with you?' he added.
  824. too
    to a degree exceeding normal or proper limits
    On it was written, in a large
    unformed handwriting:

    I LOVE YOU.

    For several seconds he was too stunned even to throw the incriminating
    thing into the memory hole.
  825. in full swing
    proceeding with full vigor
    The preparations for Hate Week were in full swing, and the
    staffs of all the Ministries were working overtime.
  826. tear down
    tear down so as to make flat with the ground
    There were further angry
    demonstrations, Goldstein was burned in effigy, hundreds of copies of the
    poster of the Eurasian soldier were torn down and added to the flames, and
    a number of shops were looted in the turmoil; then a rumour flew round
    that spies were directing the rocket bombs by means of wireless waves, and
    an old couple who were suspected of being of foreign extraction had their
    house set on fire and perished of suffocation.
  827. fiction
    a literary work based on the imagination and not necessarily on fact
    It was a common accident
    in the Fiction Department.
  828. tolerant
    showing or characterized by broad-mindedness
    With one hand in her pocket and a piece of bread and jam in the other,
    Julia wandered about the room, glancing indifferently at the bookcase,
    pointing out the best way of repairing the gateleg table, plumping herself
    down in the ragged arm-chair to see if it was comfortable, and examining
    the absurd twelve-hour clock with a sort of tolerant amusement.
  829. flat
    having a surface without slope, tilt in which no part is higher or lower than another
    They were perhaps four metres apart when the girl stumbled and fell almost
    flat on her face.
  830. rip off
    deprive somebody of something by deceit
    'It's this bloody thing that does it,' she said, ripping off the scarlet
    sash of the Junior Anti-Sex League and flinging it on to a bough.
  831. magnified
    enlarged to an abnormal degree
    From whatever
    angle you looked at the poster, the muzzle of the gun, magnified by the
    foreshortening, seemed to be pointed straight at you.
  832. push
    move with force, "He pushed the table into a corner"
    He pushed it
    away from him, aware only that it was the memory of some action which he
    would have liked to undo but could not.
  833. fascinated
    having your attention fixated as though by a spell
    Winston and Julia clung
    together, fascinated.
  834. geographically
    with respect to geography
    Eurasia, for example, could easily conquer the
    British Isles, which are geographically part of Europe, or on the other
    hand it would be possible for Oceania to push its frontiers to the Rhine
    or even to the Vistula.
  835. movement
    a change of position that does not entail a change of location
    His whole mind and body seemed to be afflicted with an unbearable
    sensitivity, a sort of transparency, which made every movement, every
    sound, every contact, every word that he had to speak or listen to, an
    agony.
  836. age
    how long something has existed
    It's impossible to discover
    the age of anything nowadays.'
  837. snivel
    cry or whine with snuffling
    He would ask his mother naggingly,
    over and over again, why there was not more food, he would shout and storm
    at her (he even remembered the tones of his voice, which was beginning to
    break prematurely and sometimes boomed in a peculiar way), or he would
    attempt a snivelling note of pathos in his efforts to get more than his
    share.
  838. bearable
    capable of being borne though unpleasant
    The afternoon was more bearable.
  839. pretending
    the act of giving a false appearance
    Then he saw the girl standing at the base of the monument, reading or
    pretending to read a poster which ran spirally up the column.
  840. frightening
    causing fear or dread or terror
    His heart bumped in his breast with
    frightening loudness.
  841. seize
    take hold of; grab
    A kind of fever seized him at the thought that he might
    lose her, the white youthful body might slip away from him!
  842. lit
    provided with artificial light
    A solitary figure was coming towards him from the other end of the long,
    brightly-lit corridor.
  843. thinness
    relatively small dimension through an object as opposed to its length or width
    For hours at a
    time she would sit almost immobile on the bed, nursing his young sister,
    a tiny, ailing, very silent child of two or three, with a face made simian
    by thinness.
  844. discover
    discover or determine the existence, presence, or fact of
    He always woke
    up without discovering what it was: but somehow it was connected with what
    Julia had been saying when he cut her short.
  845. such
    of so extreme a degree or extent
    He did not know why the Thought Police should
    choose to deliver their messages in such a fashion, but perhaps they had
    their reasons.
  846. territory
    a region marked off for administrative or other purposes
    All of the disputed territories contain valuable minerals, and some of
    them yield important vegetable products such as rubber which in colder
    climates it is necessary to synthesize by comparatively expensive methods.
  847. rival
    the contestant you hope to defeat
    No mate,
    no rival was watching it.
  848. screwing
    slang for sexual intercourse
    So, one evening every week, Winston spent four hours of paralysing
    boredom, screwing together small bits of metal which were probably parts
    of bomb fuses, in a draughty, ill-lit workshop where the knocking of
    hammers mingled drearily with the music of the telescreens.
  849. contorted
    twisted (especially as in pain or struggle)
    A little
    Rumpelstiltskin figure, contorted with hatred, he gripped the neck of the
    microphone with one hand while the other, enormous at the end of a bony
    arm, clawed the air menacingly above his head.
  850. touch
    make physical contact with, come in contact with
    It was a physical problem that had to be solved: how to get in touch with
    the girl and arrange a meeting.
  851. talking to
    a lengthy rebuke
    It would even
    have seemed slightly unorthodox, a dangerous eccentricity, like talking to
    oneself.
  852. synthetic
    a compound made artificially by chemical reactions
    As he took her in his arms a wave of synthetic violets
    flooded his nostrils.
  853. case
    an occurrence of something
    Not to let one's feelings appear
    in one's face was a habit that had acquired the status of an instinct,
    and in any case they had been standing straight in front of a telescreen
    when the thing happened.
  854. shade
    relative darkness caused by light rays being intercepted by an opaque body
    Chapter 2



    Winston picked his way up the lane through dappled light and shade,
    stepping out into pools of gold wherever the boughs parted.
  855. anywhere
    at or in or to any place
    THEM, it appeared, meant the Party, and above all the Inner Party, about
    whom she talked with an open jeering hatred which made Winston feel uneasy,
    although he knew that they were safe here if they could be safe anywhere.
  856. underestimate
    make too low an estimate of
    In practice the needs
    of the population are always underestimated, with the result that there is
    a chronic shortage of half the necessities of life; but this is looked on
    as an advantage.
  857. dappled
    having spots or patches of color
    Chapter 2



    Winston picked his way up the lane through dappled light and shade,
    stepping out into pools of gold wherever the boughs parted.
  858. menacingly
    in a menacing manner
    A little
    Rumpelstiltskin figure, contorted with hatred, he gripped the neck of the
    microphone with one hand while the other, enormous at the end of a bony
    arm, clawed the air menacingly above his head.
  859. faced
    having a face or facing especially of a specified kind or number; often used in combination
    Whichever way you turned, the telescreen faced you.
  860. limply
    without rigidity
    He might have
    flinched altogether from speaking if at this moment he had not seen
    Ampleforth, the hairy-eared poet, wandering limply round the room with
    a tray, looking for a place to sit down.
  861. illiteracy
    an inability to read
    If the
    machine were used deliberately for that end, hunger, overwork, dirt,
    illiteracy, and disease could be eliminated within a few generations.
  862. aware
    (sometimes followed by `of') having or showing knowledge or understanding or realization or perception
    He pushed it
    away from him, aware only that it was the memory of some action which he
    would have liked to undo but could not.
  863. flagstaff
    a tall staff or pole on which a flag is raised
    Squads of
    volunteers, organized by Parsons, were preparing the street for Hate Week,
    stitching banners, painting posters, erecting flagstaffs on the roofs, and
    perilously slinging wires across the street for the reception of streamers.
  864. pin down
    attach with or as if with a pin
    The first whiff of its scent
    had stirred up some memory which he could not pin down, but which was
    powerful and troubling.
  865. occasionally
    now and then or here and there
    For the messages that it was occasionally
    necessary to send, there were printed postcards with long lists of phrases,
    and you struck out the ones that were inapplicable.
  866. meaningless
    having no meaning or direction or purpose
    It would not have occurred to her that an action which is
    ineffectual thereby becomes meaningless.
  867. spotting
    the act of spotting or staining something
    I'm good at
    spotting people who don't belong.
  868. Bering
    Danish explorer who explored the northern Pacific Ocean for the Russians and discovered the Bering Strait (1681-1741)
    Eurasia comprises the whole of the northern
    part of the European and Asiatic land-mass, from Portugal to the Bering
    Strait.
  869. recur
    happen or occur again
    It
    struck him that when one lived with a woman this particular disappointment
    must be a normal, recurring event; and a deep tenderness, such as he had
    not felt for her before, suddenly took hold of him.
  870. area
    the extent of a 2-dimensional surface enclosed within a boundary
    At present nothing is possible
    except to extend the area of sanity little by little.
  871. all-round
    many-sided
    But it was also clear that an all-round increase in wealth threatened the
    destruction--indeed, in some sense was the destruction--of a hierarchical
    society.
  872. air-conditioned
    cooled by air conditioning
    In the labyrinthine Ministry the windowless,
    air-conditioned rooms kept their normal temperature, but outside the
    pavements scorched one's feet and the stench of the Tubes at the rush hours
    was a horror.
  873. recognized
    generally approved or compelling recognition
    After having been recognized, he could not go and sit at
    a table with an unattended girl.
  874. believe
    accept as true; take to be true
    And even now, though his intellect told him that the message probably
    meant death--still, that was not what he believed, and the unreasonable
    hope persisted, and his heart banged, and it was with difficulty that he
    kept his voice from trembling as he murmured his figures into the
    speakwrite.
  875. enough
    sufficient for the purpose
    Surely enough, she was at
    a table in about the same place, and again alone.
  876. neutralized
    made neutral in some respect; deprived of distinctive characteristics
    In his capacity
    as an administrator, it is often necessary for a member of the Inner Party
    to know that this or that item of war news is untruthful, and he may often
    be aware that the entire war is spurious and is either not happening or
    is being waged for purposes quite other than the declared ones: but such
    knowledge is easily neutralized by the technique of DOUBLETHINK.
  877. once
    on one occasion
    For a moment he was tempted to take it into one of the water-closets
    and read it at once.
  878. squealing
    having or making a high-pitched sound such as that made by a mouse or a rusty hinge
    On the sixth day of Hate Week, after the processions, the speeches, the
    shouting, the singing, the banners, the posters, the films, the waxworks,
    the rolling of drums and squealing of trumpets, the tramp of marching feet,
    the grinding of the caterpillars of tanks, the roar of massed planes,
    the booming of guns--after six days of this, when the great orgasm was
    quivering to its climax and the general hatred of Eurasia had boiled up
    into such delirium that if the crowd could have got th...
  879. lingua
    a mobile mass of muscular tissue covered with mucous membrane and located in the oral cavity
    Except that English is its chief LINGUA FRANCA and Newspeak its
    official language, it is not centralized in any way.
  880. bung
    a plug used to close a hole in a barrel or flask
    And next time we
    come here I'll bring some plaster and bung it up properly.'
  881. filled
    (usually followed by `with' or used as a combining form) generously supplied with
    Lunch in the hot, crowded, noise-filled
    canteen was torment.
  882. Oliver Cromwell
    English general and statesman who led the parliamentary army in the English Civil War (1599-1658)
    He wandered round
    the base of the enormous fluted column, at the top of which Big Brother's
    statue gazed southward towards the skies where he had vanquished the
    Eurasian aeroplanes (the Eastasian aeroplanes, it had been, a few years
    ago) in the Battle of Airstrip One. In the street in front of it there was
    a statue of a man on horseback which was supposed to represent Oliver
    Cromwell
    .
  883. patrol
    the activity of going around or through an area at regular intervals for security purposes
    For distances of less than
    100 kilometres it was not necessary to get your passport endorsed, but
    sometimes there were patrols hanging about the railway stations, who
    examined the papers of any Party member they found there and asked awkward
    questions.
  884. infect
    contaminate with a disease or microorganism
    If he could have infected the whole lot of them with leprosy or
    syphilis, how gladly he would have done so!
  885. foretaste
    an early limited awareness of something yet to occur
    But it was frightening: or, more exactly, it was like
    a foretaste of death, like being a little less alive.
  886. evenly
    in a level and regular way
    They are too evenly matched, and their natural defences
    are too formidable.
  887. glance
    throw a glance at; take a brief look at
    They
    passed each other without a glance.
  888. physically
    in accord with physical laws
    'Not physically.
  889. early childhood
    the early stage of growth or development
    The smell was
    already filling the room, a rich hot smell which seemed like an emanation
    from his early childhood, but which one did occasionally meet with even
    now, blowing down a passage-way before a door slammed, or diffusing itself
    mysteriously in a crowded street, sniffed for an instant and then lost
    again.
  890. all over
    over the entire area
    Hours
    and hours I've spent pasting their bloody rot all over London.
  891. renting
    the act of paying for the use of something (as an apartment or house or car)
    It was not actually at that moment, but at some time on the
    following day, that the idea of renting Mr Charrington's room had occurred
    to him.
  892. much
    (quantifier used with mass nouns) great in quantity or degree or extent
    She had regained
    some of her colour, and appeared very much better.
  893. every week
    without missing a week
    So, one evening every week, Winston spent four hours of paralysing
    boredom, screwing together small bits of metal which were probably parts
    of bomb fuses, in a draughty, ill-lit workshop where the knocking of
    hammers mingled drearily with the music of the telescreens.
  894. shout
    utter in a loud voice; talk in a loud voice (usually denoting characteristic manner of speaking)
    But at this moment there was a din of
    shouting and a zoom of heavy vehicles from somewhere to the left.
  895. corridor
    an enclosed passageway; rooms usually open onto it
    A solitary figure was coming towards him from the other end of the long,
    brightly-lit corridor.
  896. pressed
    compacted by ironing
    The girl's shoulder, and
    her arm right down to the elbow, were pressed against his.
  897. bolster
    support and strengthen
    Beside the window the enormous bed was made up, with ragged blankets and
    a coverless bolster.
  898. in the long run
    after a very lengthy period of time
    In the long run, a hierarchical society was only possible on a
    basis of poverty and ignorance.
  899. salaried
    receiving a salary
    These people, whose
    origins lay in the salaried middle class and the upper grades of the
    working class, had been shaped and brought together by the barren world of
    monopoly industry and centralized government.
  900. half-hearted
    feeling or showing little interest or enthusiasm
    By comparison with that existing today, all the
    tyrannies of the past were half-hearted and inefficient.
  901. intently
    with strained or eager attention
    Perhaps at the other end of the instrument some small,
    beetle-like man was listening intently--listening to that.
  902. tidal wave
    an unusual (and often destructive) rise of water along the seashore caused by a storm or a combination of wind and high tide
    Some are
    concerned simply with planning the logistics of future wars; others devise
    larger and larger rocket bombs, more and more powerful explosives, and more
    and more impenetrable armour-plating; others search for new and deadlier
    gases, or for soluble poisons capable of being produced in such quantities
    as to destroy the vegetation of whole continents, or for breeds of disease
    germs immunized against all possible antibodies; others strive to produce
    a vehicle that shall bore its way under...
  903. words
    language that is spoken or written
    When he did so, although he knew very well the
    danger of showing too much interest, he could not resist reading it once
    again, just to make sure that the words were really there.
  904. friendliness
    a feeling of liking for another person; enjoyment in their company
    With the curious,
    disarming friendliness that he always managed to put in to the gesture he
    resettled his spectacles on his nose.
  905. tang
    a tart spicy quality
    He had hoped to be alone for a little while during
    the lunch hour, but as bad luck would have it the imbecile Parsons flopped
    down beside him, the tang of his sweat almost defeating the tinny smell of
    stew, and kept up a stream of talk about the preparations for Hate Week.
  906. change
    become different in some particular way, without permanently losing one's or its former characteristics or essence
    What he feared
    more than anything else was that she would simply change her mind if he
    did not get in touch with her quickly.
  907. sobering
    tending to make sober or more serious
    For
    in that case each would still be a self-contained universe, freed for ever
    from the sobering influence of external danger.
  908. forgery
    criminal falsification by making or altering an instrument with intent to defraud
    Sometimes he talked to her of the Records Department and the impudent
    forgeries that he committed there.
  909. less
    (comparative of `little' usually used with mass nouns) a quantifier meaning not as great in amount or degree
    There had been no difficulties about the journey, and
    the girl was so evidently experienced that he was less frightened than he
    would normally have been.
  910. chalk
    a soft whitish calcite
    Julia, however, seemed unable to mention
    the Party, and especially the Inner Party, without using the kind of words
    that you saw chalked up in dripping alley-ways.
  911. generation
    group of genetically related organisms constituting a single step in the line of descent
    He wondered vaguely how many others like her there
    might be in the younger generation people who had grown up in the world of
    the Revolution, knowing nothing else, accepting the Party as something
    unalterable, like the sky, not rebelling against its authority but simply
    evading it, as a rabbit dodges a dog.
  912. foresee
    realize beforehand
    As he had foreseen, Mr Charrington had made no
    difficulty about letting the room.
  913. invention
    the act of inventing
    The invention of aeroplanes dated
    from long before her birth, but the switchover in the war had happened
    only four years ago, well after she was grown up.
  914. twenty
    the cardinal number that is the sum of nineteen and one
    It was not till twenty-three hours, when he
    was home and in bed--in the darkness, where you were safe even from the
    telescreen so long as you kept silent--that he was able to think
    continuously.
  915. just
    and nothing more
    One, much
    the more likely, was that the girl was an agent of the Thought Police,
    just as he had feared.
  916. oblige
    force somebody to do something
    We may be obliged to give him a new identity.
  917. countersign
    add one's signature to after another's to attest authenticity
    It was like the two halves of a countersign.
  918. early
    at or near the beginning of a period of time or course of events or before the usual or expected time
    It was early, and the place was not very full.
  919. wring out
    extract (liquid) by squeezing or pressing
    A sharp cry of pain was wrung out of her.
  920. socialism
    a political theory advocating state ownership of industry
    Socialism, a theory which appeared in the early nineteenth century and was
    the last link in a chain of thought stretching back to the slave rebellions
    of antiquity, was still deeply infected by the Utopianism of past ages.
  921. now
    at the present moment
    And even now, though his intellect told him that the message probably
    meant death--still, that was not what he believed, and the unreasonable
    hope persisted, and his heart banged, and it was with difficulty that he
    kept his voice from trembling as he murmured his figures into the
    speakwrite.
  922. alignment
    the spatial property possessed by an arrangement or position of things in a straight line or in parallel lines
    Portions of it are constantly changing hands, and it is the
    chance of seizing this or that fragment by a sudden stroke of treachery
    that dictates the endless changes of alignment.
  923. walk
    use one's feet to advance; advance by steps
    And with that she walked on in the direction in which she had been going,
    as briskly as though it had really been nothing.
  924. inconvenient
    not conveniently timed
    She was very young, he thought, she
    still expected something from life, she did not understand that to push
    an inconvenient person over a cliff solves nothing.
  925. tear
    separate or cause to separate abruptly
    Almost as swiftly as he had imagined it, she had torn her clothes
    off, and when she flung them aside it was with that same magnificent
    gesture by which a whole civilization seemed to be annihilated.
  926. deprecate
    express strong disapproval of; deplore
    'It just occurred to me you might be interested,' he
    would say with a deprecating little laugh whenever he produced a new
    fragment.
  927. air raid
    an attack by armed planes on a surface target
    He remembered better the rackety, uneasy circumstances of
    the time: the periodical panics about air-raids and the sheltering in Tube
    stations, the piles of rubble everywhere, the unintelligible proclamations
    posted at street corners, the gangs of youths in shirts all the same
    colour, the enormous queues outside the bakeries, the intermittent
    machine-gun fire in the distance--above all, the fact that there was
    never enough to eat.
  928. frighten
    cause fear in
    His heart bumped in his breast with
    frightening loudness.
  929. biased
    favoring one person or side over another
    Newspapers and history
    books were, of course, always coloured and biased, but falsification of
    the kind that is practised today would have been impossible.
  930. rectified
    having been put right
    Reports and records of all kinds, newspapers, books,
    pamphlets, films, sound-tracks, photographs--all had to be rectified at
    lightning speed.
  931. for the moment
    temporarily
    But for the moment they could not
    extricate themselves from the crowd.
  932. probably
    with considerable certainty; without much doubt
    Probably
    she had crushed her hand while swinging round one of the big kaleidoscopes
    on which the plots of novels were 'roughed in'.
  933. away
    at a distance in space or time
    A kind of fever seized him at the thought that he might
    lose her, the white youthful body might slip away from him!
  934. palpable
    capable of being perceived; especially capable of being handled or touched or felt
    There were times when the fact of
    impending death seemed as palpable as the bed they lay on, and they would
    cling together with a sort of despairing sensuality, like a damned soul
    grasping at his last morsel of pleasure when the clock is within five
    minutes of striking.
  935. week
    any period of seven consecutive days
    He had hoped to be alone for a little while during
    the lunch hour, but as bad luck would have it the imbecile Parsons flopped
    down beside him, the tang of his sweat almost defeating the tinny smell of
    stew, and kept up a stream of talk about the preparations for Hate Week.
  936. rot
    break down
    Hours
    and hours I've spent pasting their bloody rot all over London.
  937. scientific research
    research into questions posed by scientific theories and hypotheses
    In
    so far as scientific research still continues, this is its subject matter.
  938. dangerous
    involving or causing danger or risk; liable to hurt or harm
    It was a good
    hiding-place when once you got there, but the getting there was very
    dangerous.
  939. mated
    mated sexually
    It was like trying to make a move at chess when you
    were already mated.
  940. everlastingly
    for a limitless time
    Their lives are
    dedicated to world conquest, but they also know that it is necessary that
    the war should continue everlastingly and without victory.
  941. nip
    sever or remove by pinching or snipping
    The girl nipped nimbly
    round the lions at the base of the monument and joined in the rush.
  942. brown
    of a color similar to that of wood or earth
    They were probably brown, but people with dark hair
    sometimes had blue eyes.
  943. rooftop
    the top of a (usually flat) roof
    The Spies performed prodigies of activity in
    clambering over the rooftops and cutting the streamers that fluttered from
    the chimneys.
  944. beastly
    resembling a beast; showing lack of human sensibility
    I saw him stick his beastly nose out of the wainscoting.
  945. technical
    of or relating to technique or proficiency in a practical skill
    This failed to happen, partly
    because of the impoverishment caused by a long series of wars and
    revolutions, partly because scientific and technical progress depended on
    the empirical habit of thought, which could not survive in a strictly
    regimented society.
  946. wear down
    exhaust or get tired through overuse or great strain or stress
    One did not know what happened
    inside the Ministry of Love, but it was possible to guess: tortures, drugs,
    delicate instruments that registered your nervous reactions, gradual
    wearing-down by sleeplessness and solitude and persistent questioning.
  947. sweltering
    excessively hot and humid or marked by sweating and faintness
    He began telling Julia of
    something that had happened, or rather had failed to happen, on another
    sweltering summer afternoon, eleven years ago.
  948. hold
    have or hold in one's hands or grip
    She held out her free hand to him, and he helped her up.
  949. hand grenade
    a grenade designed to be thrown by hand
    The tank, the
    submarine, the torpedo, the machine gun, even the rifle and the hand
    grenade
    are still in use.
  950. longer
    for more time
    He did not consider any longer the
    possibility that she might be laying some kind of trap for him.
  951. anyway
    in any way whatsoever
    Hundreds of times--well, scores of times, anyway.'
  952. reverting
    a failure to maintain a higher state
    The heat and the manual work had even given him a pretext for reverting
    to shorts and an open shirt in the evenings.
  953. public property
    property owned by a government
    Factories, mines, land, houses,
    transport--everything had been taken away from them: and since these
    things were no longer private property, it followed that they must be
    public property.
  954. black market
    an illegal market in which goods or currencies are bought and sold in violation of rationing or controls
    As soon as they arrived they would sprinkle
    everything with pepper bought on the black market, tear off their clothes,
    and make love with sweating bodies, then fall asleep and wake to find that
    the bugs had rallied and were massing for the counter-attack.
  955. revolt
    make revolution
    It
    was merely one symptom of her revolt against the Party and all its ways,
    and somehow it seemed natural and healthy, like the sneeze of a horse that
    smells bad hay.
  956. conqueror
    someone who is victorious by force of arms
    The inhabitants of these areas, reduced more or less openly to the status
    of slaves, pass continually from conqueror to conqueror, and are expended
    like so much coal or oil in the race to turn out more armaments, to capture
    more territory, to control more labour power, to turn out more armaments,
    to capture more territory, and so on indefinitely.
  957. switch
    control consisting of a mechanical or electrical or electronic device for making or breaking or changing the connections in a circuit
    He stopped, turned aside and pressed a switch on the wall.
  958. love
    a strong positive emotion of regard and affection
    On it was written, in a large
    unformed handwriting:

    I LOVE YOU.

    For several seconds he was too stunned even to throw the incriminating
    thing into the memory hole.
  959. parenthood
    the state of being a parent
    They had played a similar
    trick with the instinct of parenthood.
  960. triviality
    a detail that is considered insignificant
    He wished that he were
    walking through the streets with her just as they were doing now but openly
    and without fear, talking of trivialities and buying odds and ends for the
    household.
  961. sing
    produce tones with the voice
    For whom, for what, was that bird singing?
  962. immediately
    without delay or hesitation; with no time intervening
    Immediately after lunch there arrived a
    delicate, difficult piece of work which would take several hours and
    necessitated putting everything else aside.
  963. standard
    a basis for comparison; a reference point against which other things can be evaluated
    It was not very skilfully done, but
    Winston's standards in such matters were not high.
  964. involve
    contain as a part
    He went on, conscious that what he was saying
    must sound both feeble and pretentious:

    'We believe that there is some kind of conspiracy, some kind of secret
    organization working against the Party, and that you are involved in it.
  965. cylinder
    a surface generated by rotating a parallel line around a fixed line
    Each time that Winston broke off for one of his spells of
    sleep he tried to leave his desk clear of work, and each time that he
    crawled back sticky-eyed and aching, it was to find that another shower
    of paper cylinders had covered the desk like a snowdrift, half-burying the
    speakwrite and overflowing on to the floor, so that the first job was
    always to stack them into a neat enough pile to give him room to work.
  966. four
    the cardinal number that is the sum of three and one
    Four days had gone
    past since the evening when he had run into her outside the junk-shop.
  967. boil over
    overflow or cause to overflow while boiling
    At every few moments the fury of the crowd boiled over and the
    voice of the speaker was drowned by a wild beast-like roaring that rose
    uncontrollably from thousands of throats.
  968. mahogany
    wood of any of various mahogany trees; much used for cabinetwork and furniture
    They flung their clothes off and climbed into the huge mahogany bed.
  969. on all fours
    on hands and knees
    The little man was sprawling on all fours, his tray had gone flying,
    two streams of soup and coffee were flowing across the floor.
  970. clawed
    having or resembling a claw or claws; often used as a combining form
    A little
    Rumpelstiltskin figure, contorted with hatred, he gripped the neck of the
    microphone with one hand while the other, enormous at the end of a bony
    arm, clawed the air menacingly above his head.
  971. directing
    showing the way by conducting or leading; imposing direction on
    There were further angry
    demonstrations, Goldstein was burned in effigy, hundreds of copies of the
    poster of the Eurasian soldier were torn down and added to the flames, and
    a number of shops were looted in the turmoil; then a rumour flew round
    that spies were directing the rocket bombs by means of wireless waves, and
    an old couple who were suspected of being of foreign extraction had their
    house set on fire and perished of suffocation.
  972. stand
    be standing; be upright
    Her face had turned a milky yellow colour against which her
    mouth stood out redder than ever.
  973. here
    in or at this place; where the speaker or writer is
    We're all
    right here.'
  974. emerge
    come out into view, as from concealment
    The third, Eastasia, only
    emerged as a distinct unit after another decade of confused fighting.
  975. matter
    that which has mass and occupies space
    'It doesn't matter if there's a crowd.'
  976. naked
    completely unclothed
    He thought of her naked,
    youthful body, as he had seen it in his dream.
  977. antibody
    any of a large variety of proteins normally present in the body or produced in response to an antigen which it neutralizes, thus producing an immune response
    Some are
    concerned simply with planning the logistics of future wars; others devise
    larger and larger rocket bombs, more and more powerful explosives, and more
    and more impenetrable armour-plating; others search for new and deadlier
    gases, or for soluble poisons capable of being produced in such quantities
    as to destroy the vegetation of whole continents, or for breeds of disease
    germs immunized against all possible antibodies; others strive to produce
    a vehicle that shall bore its wa...
  978. reclamation
    rescuing from error and returning to a rightful course
    As for his sister,
    she might have been removed, like Winston himself, to one of the colonies
    for homeless children (Reclamation Centres, they were called) which had
    grown up as a result of the civil war, or she might have been sent to the
    labour camp along with his mother, or simply left somewhere or other
    to die.
  979. listen
    hear with intention
    His whole mind and body seemed to be afflicted with an unbearable
    sensitivity, a sort of transparency, which made every movement, every
    sound, every contact, every word that he had to speak or listen to, an
    agony.
  980. fill
    make full, also in a metaphorical sense
    Lunch in the hot, crowded, noise-filled
    canteen was torment.
  981. big
    above average in size or number or quantity or magnitude or extent
    Probably
    she had crushed her hand while swinging round one of the big kaleidoscopes
    on which the plots of novels were 'roughed in'.
  982. contort
    twist and press out of shape
    A little
    Rumpelstiltskin figure, contorted with hatred, he gripped the neck of the
    microphone with one hand while the other, enormous at the end of a bony
    arm, clawed the air menacingly above his head.
  983. made
    produced by a manufacturing process
    He was particularly enthusiastic about a papier-mache model of Big
    Brother's head, two metres wide, which was being made for the occasion by
    his daughter's troop of Spies.
  984. instrument
    the means whereby some act is accomplished
    Actually, all the possible ways of communicating with her had occurred to
    him within five minutes of reading the note; but now, with time to think,
    he went over them one by one, as though laying out a row of instruments
    on a table.
  985. scrimmage
    (American football) practice play between a football team's squads
    Winston, at normal times the kind of person who gravitates to the outer
    edge of any kind of scrimmage, shoved, butted, squirmed his way forward
    into the heart of the crowd.
  986. scholarly
    characteristic of scholars or scholarship
    You
    take a scholarly interest in Newspeak, I believe?'
  987. titular
    existing in name only
    Oceania has
    no capital, and its titular head is a person whose whereabouts nobody
    knows.
  988. fatuous
    devoid of intelligence
    The irritating thing was that in the racket
    of voices Winston could hardly hear what Parsons was saying, and was
    constantly having to ask for some fatuous remark to be repeated.
  989. toothless
    lacking teeth
    The wooden-seated carriage in which he travelled was
    filled to overflowing by a single enormous family, ranging from a toothless
    great-grandmother to a month-old baby, going out to spend an afternoon
    with 'in-laws' in the country, and, as they freely explained to Winston,
    to get hold of a little black-market butter.
  990. paradise
    any place of complete bliss and delight and peace
    Dirty or
    clean, the room was paradise.
  991. noticed
    being perceived or observed
    If he had known where she lived, and at what time she left work,
    he could have contrived to meet her somewhere on her way home; but to try
    to follow her home was not safe, because it would mean loitering about
    outside the Ministry, which was bound to be noticed.
  992. sleep with
    have sexual intercourse with
    Which would you sooner sleep with, me or a skeleton?
  993. sprouted
    (of growing vegetation) having just emerged from the ground
    They were small ashes, which at some time had
    been cut down and had sprouted up again into a forest of poles, none of
    them thicker than one's wrist.
  994. corrupt
    not straight; dishonest or immoral or evasive
    I want everyone to be corrupt to the bones.'
  995. prepared
    made ready or fit or suitable beforehand
    He led a ghostlike existence between the
    tiny, dark shop, and an even tinier back kitchen where he prepared his
    meals and which contained, among other things, an unbelievably ancient
    gramophone with an enormous horn.
  996. pretext
    something serving to conceal plans; a fictitious reason that is concocted in order to conceal the real reason
    If she had worked in the Records Department it might have
    been comparatively simple, but he had only a very dim idea whereabouts in
    the building the Fiction Department lay, and he had no pretext for going
    there.
  997. tell
    narrate or give a detailed account of
    'Five minutes,' he told himself,
    'five minutes at the very least!'
  998. flats
    footwear (shoes or slippers) with no heel (or a very low heel)
    What time do they cut the
    lights off at your flats?'
  999. privilege
    a special advantage or immunity or benefit not enjoyed by all
    We have that privilege.'
  1000. gin
    strong liquor flavored with juniper berries
    He wolfed another tasteless meal in the canteen, hurried
    off to the Centre, took part in the solemn foolery of a 'discussion group',
    played two games of table tennis, swallowed several glasses of gin, and
    sat for half an hour through a lecture entitled 'Ingsoc in relation to
    chess'.
  1001. sleepy
    ready to fall asleep
    They were both sleepy.
  1002. differentiate
    become distinct and acquire a different character
    He began speaking with the peculiar grave
    courtesy that differentiated him from the majority of Inner Party members.
  1003. equilibrium
    a stable situation in which forces cancel one another
    Even after enormous
    upheavals and seemingly irrevocable changes, the same pattern has always
    reasserted itself, just as a gyroscope will always return to equilibrium,
    however far it is pushed one way or the other.
  1004. distinction
    a discrimination between things as different and distinct
    If it once
    became general, wealth would confer no distinction.
  1005. deliberately
    in a deliberate unhurried manner
    The music went on and on, minute after minute, with
    astonishing variations, never once repeating itself, almost as though the
    bird were deliberately showing off its virtuosity.
  1006. sleep
    a natural and periodic state of rest during which consciousness of the world is suspended
    Even in sleep he could not altogether escape from her image.
  1007. outnumber
    be larger in number
    The thing had been
    plastered on every blank space on every wall, even outnumbering the
    portraits of Big Brother.
  1008. nowadays
    in these times
    But you could not have pure
    love or pure lust nowadays.
  1009. inexhaustible
    that cannot be entirely consumed or used up
    One had the feeling that she would have been perfectly
    content, if the June evening had been endless and the supply of clothes
    inexhaustible, to remain there for a thousand years, pegging out diapers
    and singing rubbish.
  1010. torn
    having edges that are jagged from injury
    Almost as swiftly as he had imagined it, she had torn her clothes
    off, and when she flung them aside it was with that same magnificent
    gesture by which a whole civilization seemed to be annihilated.
  1011. stitching
    joining or attaching by stitches
    Squads of
    volunteers, organized by Parsons, were preparing the street for Hate Week,
    stitching banners, painting posters, erecting flagstaffs on the roofs, and
    perilously slinging wires across the street for the reception of streamers.
  1012. break
    destroy the integrity of; usually by force; cause to separate into pieces or fragments
    In front of him was an enemy
    who was trying to kill him: in front of him, also, was a human creature,
    in pain and perhaps with a broken bone.
  1013. ultimately
    as the end result of a succession or process
    But if the object
    was not to stay alive but to stay human, what difference did it ultimately
    make?
  1014. state
    the way something is with respect to its main attributes
    Suddenly, as one sometimes does with a book of which one
    knows that one will ultimately read and re-read every word, he opened it
    at a different place and found himself at Chapter III. He went on reading:


    Chapter III
    War is Peace

    The splitting up of the world into three great super-states was an event
    which could be and indeed was foreseen before the middle of the twentieth
    century.
  1015. smuggle
    import or export without paying customs duties
    At most, when it is absolutely
    necessary that someone should be silenced, we are occasionally able to
    smuggle a razor blade into a prisoner's cell.
  1016. dark-haired
    having hair of a dark color
    He was a small, dark-haired
    man in a white jacket, with a diamond-shaped, completely expressionless
    face which might have been that of a Chinese.
  1017. in fact
    in reality or actuality
    In the dream his deepest feeling was always one of
    self-deception, because he did in fact know what was behind the wall of
    darkness.
  1018. slip
    move obliquely or sideways, usually in an uncontrolled manner
    Nevertheless it had been very difficult not to
    betray a momentary surprise, for in the two or three seconds while he was
    helping her up the girl had slipped something into his hand.
  1019. richness
    abundant wealth
    The
    telescreen was dimmed to a low murmur; the richness of the dark-blue carpet
    gave one the impression of treading on velvet.
  1020. open
    affording free passage or access
    By a routine that
    was not even secret, all letters were opened in transit.
  1021. geared
    equipped with or connected by gears or having gears engaged
    With the establishment of
    self-contained economies, in which production and consumption are geared
    to one another, the scramble for markets which was a main cause of
    previous wars has come to an end, while the competition for raw materials
    is no longer a matter of life and death.
  1022. more than
    (comparative of `much' used with mass nouns) a quantifier meaning greater in size or amount or extent or degree
    This was the kind of thing that Winston was good at, and for more
    than
    two hours he succeeded in shutting the girl out of his mind
    altogether.
  1023. infallible
    incapable of failure or error
    She had even (an
    infallible mark of good reputation) been picked out to work in Pornosec,
    the sub-section of the Fiction Department which turned out cheap
    pornography for distribution among the proles.
  1024. sooty
    covered with or as if with soot
    Already on the walk from the station the May sunshine had made him
    feel dirty and etiolated, a creature of indoors, with the sooty dust of
    London in the pores of his skin.
  1025. drearily
    in a cheerless manner
    So, one evening every week, Winston spent four hours of paralysing
    boredom, screwing together small bits of metal which were probably parts
    of bomb fuses, in a draughty, ill-lit workshop where the knocking of
    hammers mingled drearily with the music of the telescreens.
  1026. live
    have life, be alive
    If he had known where she lived, and at what time she left work,
    he could have contrived to meet her somewhere on her way home; but to try
    to follow her home was not safe, because it would mean loitering about
    outside the Ministry, which was bound to be noticed.
  1027. indistinctly
    in a dim indistinct manner
    'I expect you were a beastly little swine in those days,' she said
    indistinctly.
  1028. doctrine
    a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
    Except where it touched upon her own life she had no
    interest in Party doctrine.
  1029. dampness
    a slight wetness
    He had the sensation
    of stepping into the dampness of a grave, and it was not much better
    because he had always known that the grave was there and waiting for him.
  1030. organized
    methodical and efficient in arrangement or function
    Any kind of
    organized revolt against the Party, which was bound to be a failure,
    struck her as stupid.
  1031. through
    having finished or arrived at completion
    As he passed through the lavatory door he transferred it to his
    pocket and felt it with the tips of his fingers.
  1032. side
    a place within a region identified relative to a center or reference location
    They did
    not speak again, and, so far as it was possible for two people sitting on
    opposite sides of the same table, they did not look at one another.
  1033. sense
    the faculty through which the external world is apprehended
    His first feeling was relief, but as
    he watched the strong slender body moving in front of him, with the scarlet
    sash that was just tight enough to bring out the curve of her hips, the
    sense of his own inferiority was heavy upon him.
  1034. encourage
    inspire with confidence; give hope or courage to
    The family could not actually be
    abolished, and, indeed, people were encouraged to be fond of their
    children, in almost the old-fashioned way.
  1035. fell
    cause to fall by or as if by delivering a blow
    They were perhaps four metres apart when the girl stumbled and fell almost
    flat on her face.
  1036. cling
    hold on tightly or tenaciously
    Winston and Julia clung
    together, fascinated.
  1037. lunge
    the act of moving forward suddenly
    Winston wriggled himself sideways, and with a violent lunge managed
    to drive his shoulder between them.
  1038. at most
    not more than
    You could only rebel
    against it by secret disobedience or, at most, by isolated acts of
    violence such as killing somebody or blowing something up.
  1039. social system
    the people in a society considered as a system organized by a characteristic pattern of relationships
    Actually the three philosophies are barely distinguishable,
    and the social systems which they support are not distinguishable at all.
  1040. differentiated
    made different (especially in the course of development) or shown to be different
    He began speaking with the peculiar grave
    courtesy that differentiated him from the majority of Inner Party members.
  1041. capitalism
    an economic system based on private ownership of capital
    This happened to a great extent during
    the final phase of capitalism, roughly between 1920 and 1940.
  1042. droning
    an unchanging intonation
    It was the second of May. From somewhere deeper
    in the heart of the wood came the droning of ring-doves.
  1043. divide
    a serious disagreement between two groups of people (typically producing tension or hostility)
    It was obvious that it
    ought to be divided into three equal parts.
  1044. spin out
    prolong or extend
    To hang on from day to day
    and from week to week, spinning out a present that had no future, seemed
    an unconquerable instinct, just as one's lungs will always draw the next
    breath so long as there is air available.
  1045. fortress
    a fortified defensive structure
    The fighting, when there is any, takes place on the vague
    frontiers whose whereabouts the average man can only guess at, or round
    the Floating Fortresses which guard strategic spots on the sea lanes.
  1046. immobile
    not capable of movement or of being moved
    For hours at a
    time she would sit almost immobile on the bed, nursing his young sister,
    a tiny, ailing, very silent child of two or three, with a face made simian
    by thinness.
  1047. hunched
    having the back and shoulders rounded; not erect
    The orator,
    still gripping the neck of the microphone, his shoulders hunched forward,
    his free hand clawing at the air, had gone straight on with his speech.
  1048. propaganda
    information that is spread for the purpose of promoting some cause
    In some ways she was far more acute than Winston, and far less susceptible
    to Party propaganda.
  1049. authoritarian
    characteristic of an absolute ruler or absolute rule; having absolute sovereignty
    But by the fourth decade of the
    twentieth century all the main currents of political thought were
    authoritarian.
  1050. long run
    a period of time sufficient for factors to work themselves out
    In the long run, a hierarchical society was only possible on a
    basis of poverty and ignorance.
  1051. difficulty
    an effort that is inconvenient
    And even now, though his intellect told him that the message probably
    meant death--still, that was not what he believed, and the unreasonable
    hope persisted, and his heart banged, and it was with difficulty that he
    kept his voice from trembling as he murmured his figures into the
    speakwrite.
  1052. fill up
    become full
    The girl's table filled up a few minutes later.
  1053. sour
    one of the four basic taste sensations; like the taste of vinegar or lemons
    All this marching
    up and down and cheering and waving flags is simply sex gone sour.
  1054. belly
    the region of the body of a vertebrate between the thorax and the pelvis
    He felt as though a
    fire were burning in his belly.
  1055. understand
    know and comprehend the nature or meaning of
    But from your general appearance--merely
    because you're young and fresh and healthy, you understand--I thought that
    probably----'

    'You thought I was a good Party member.
  1056. pass
    go across or through
    As he passed through the lavatory door he transferred it to his
    pocket and felt it with the tips of his fingers.
  1057. carry
    move while supporting, either in a vehicle or in one's hands or on one's body
    I always
    carry one end of a banner in the processions.
  1058. looted
    wrongfully emptied or stripped of anything of value
    There were further angry
    demonstrations, Goldstein was burned in effigy, hundreds of copies of the
    poster of the Eurasian soldier were torn down and added to the flames, and
    a number of shops were looted in the turmoil; then a rumour flew round
    that spies were directing the rocket bombs by means of wireless waves, and
    an old couple who were suspected of being of foreign extraction had their
    house set on fire and perished of suffocation.
  1059. over and over
    repeatedly
    He would ask his mother naggingly,
    over and over again, why there was not more food, he would shout and storm
    at her (he even remembered the tones of his voice, which was beginning to
    break prematurely and sometimes boomed in a peculiar way), or he would
    attempt a snivelling note of pathos in his efforts to get more than his
    share.
  1060. contained
    gotten under control
    He led a ghostlike existence between the
    tiny, dark shop, and an even tinier back kitchen where he prepared his
    meals and which contained, among other things, an unbelievably ancient
    gramophone with an enormous horn.
  1061. prettiness
    the quality of being appealing in a delicate or graceful way (of a girl or young woman)
    It was too soon, her youth and
    prettiness had frightened him, he was too much used to living without
    women--he did not know the reason.
  1062. discolour
    change color, often in an undesired manner
    Until now he had been too much ashamed of his pale and meagre body, with
    the varicose veins standing out on his calves and the discoloured patch
    over his ankle.
  1063. freedom of speech
    a civil right guaranteed by the First Amendment to the US Constitution
    The
    heirs of the French, English, and American revolutions had partly believed
    in their own phrases about the rights of man, freedom of speech, equality
    before the law, and the like, and have even allowed their conduct to be
    influenced by them to some extent.
  1064. fade out
    become weaker
    He even, seeming almost to fade
    out
    of existence as he did so, added that there were two entries to the
    house, one of them through the back yard, which gave on an alley.
  1065. problem
    a question raised for consideration or solution
    It was a physical problem that had to be solved: how to get in touch with
    the girl and arrange a meeting.
  1066. denounce
    speak out against
    And you
    thought that if I had a quarter of a chance I'd denounce you as a
    thought-criminal and get you killed off?'
  1067. stand guard
    watch over so as to protect
    Between meals, if his mother did not stand guard,
    he was constantly pilfering at the wretched store of food on the shelf.
  1068. move
    change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically
    It was like trying to make a move at chess when you
    were already mated.
  1069. stiffening
    the act of becoming stiff
    She described
    to him, almost as though she had seen or felt it, the stiffening of
    Katharine's body as soon as he touched her, the way in which she still
    seemed to be pushing him from her with all her strength, even when her
    arms were clasped tightly round him.
  1070. on and off
    not regularly
    As they drifted
    down the crowded pavements, not quite abreast and never looking at one
    another, they carried on a curious, intermittent conversation which flicked
    on and off like the beams of a lighthouse, suddenly nipped into silence
    by the approach of a Party uniform or the proximity of a telescreen, then
    taken up again minutes later in the middle of a sentence, then abruptly
    cut short as they parted at the agreed spot, then continued almost without
    introduction on the following day.
  1071. foot up
    add a column of numbers
    He settled
    deeper into the arm-chair and put his feet up on the fender.
  1072. while
    a period of indeterminate length (usually short) marked by some action or condition
    Probably
    she had crushed her hand while swinging round one of the big kaleidoscopes
    on which the plots of novels were 'roughed in'.
  1073. pilfer
    make off with belongings of others
    Between meals, if his mother did not stand guard,
    he was constantly pilfering at the wretched store of food on the shelf.
  1074. material
    the tangible substance that goes into the makeup of a physical object
    She must have slipped into some shop in the proletarian quarters and bought
    herself a complete set of make-up materials.
  1075. sister
    a female person who has the same parents as another person
    For hours at a
    time she would sit almost immobile on the bed, nursing his young sister,
    a tiny, ailing, very silent child of two or three, with a face made simian
    by thinness.
  1076. lane
    a narrow way or road
    A half-hour railway journey; turn left outside
    the station; two kilometres along the road; a gate with the top bar
    missing; a path across a field; a grass-grown lane; a track between bushes;
    a dead tree with moss on it.
  1077. sit down
    take a seat
    He went back to his cubicle, sat down, threw the fragment of paper
    casually among the other papers on the desk, put on his spectacles and
    hitched the speakwrite towards him.
  1078. follow
    to travel behind, go after, come after
    If he had known where she lived, and at what time she left work,
    he could have contrived to meet her somewhere on her way home; but to try
    to follow her home was not safe, because it would mean loitering about
    outside the Ministry, which was bound to be noticed.
  1079. hideously
    in a hideous manner
    The rat had never come back, but the bugs
    had multiplied hideously in the heat.
  1080. assume
    take to be the case or to be true; accept without verification or proof
    In general you could not assume that you were much safer in the
    country than in London.
  1081. rat
    any of various long-tailed rodents similar to but larger than a mouse
    'A rat.
  1082. squad
    a smallest army unit
    She could describe the whole process of composing a novel,
    from the general directive issued by the Planning Committee down to the
    final touching-up by the Rewrite Squad.
  1083. product
    an artifact that has been created by someone or some process
    But she was not interested in the
    finished product.
  1084. disengage
    release from something that holds fast, connects, or entangles
    He started forward
    to take her in his arms, but she disengaged herself rather hurriedly,
    partly because she was still holding the tool-bag.
  1085. after a fashion
    to some extent; not very well
    In the
    street it was usually possible to talk, after a fashion.
  1086. tuneful
    having a musical sound; especially a pleasing tune
    Her voice floated
    upward with the sweet summer air, very tuneful, charged with a sort of
    happy melancholy.
  1087. tuft
    a bunch of hair or feathers or growing grass
    But at this moment Winston noticed some
    tufts of loosestrife growing in the cracks of the cliff beneath them.
  1088. constantly
    without variation or change, in every case
    The irritating thing was that in the racket
    of voices Winston could hardly hear what Parsons was saying, and was
    constantly having to ask for some fatuous remark to be repeated.
  1089. countless
    too numerous to be counted
    It was one of countless
    similar songs published for the benefit of the proles by a sub-section of
    the Music Department.
  1090. demographic
    a statistic characterizing human populations (or segments of human populations broken down by age or sex or income etc.)
    Each of the three powers which now divide the world is in
    fact unconquerable, and could only become conquerable through slow
    demographic changes which a government with wide powers can easily avert.
  1091. floating
    borne up by or suspended in a liquid
    The fighting, when there is any, takes place on the vague
    frontiers whose whereabouts the average man can only guess at, or round
    the Floating Fortresses which guard strategic spots on the sea lanes.
  1092. blond
    being or having light colored skin and hair and usually blue or grey eyes
    A blond-headed, silly-faced young man named Wilsher, whom he barely knew,
    was inviting him with a smile to a vacant place at his table.
  1093. refuse
    show unwillingness towards
    Nor did the idea of refusing her advances even cross his
    mind.
  1094. atrocity
    an act of atrocious cruelty
    Julia's unit in the Fiction Department had been taken off the
    production of novels and was rushing out a series of atrocity pamphlets.
  1095. all fours
    card games in which points are won for taking the high or low or jack or game
    The little man was sprawling on all fours, his tray had gone flying,
    two streams of soup and coffee were flowing across the floor.
  1096. watch
    look attentively
    There was no place where you could be more certain that the telescreens
    were watched continuously.
  1097. scrubby
    sparsely covered with stunted trees or vegetation and underbrush
    From over scrubby cheekbones eyes
    looked into Winston's, sometimes with strange intensity, and flashed away
    again.
  1098. stay
    continue in a place, position, or situation
    At the sight of the words I LOVE YOU
    the desire to stay alive had welled up in him, and the taking of minor
    risks suddenly seemed stupid.
  1099. the Street
    used to allude to the securities industry of the United States
    He wandered round
    the base of the enormous fluted column, at the top of which Big Brother's
    statue gazed southward towards the skies where he had vanquished the
    Eurasian aeroplanes (the Eastasian aeroplanes, it had been, a few years
    ago) in the Battle of Airstrip One. In the street in front of it there was
    a statue of a man on horseback which was supposed to represent Oliver
    Cromwell.
  1100. within
    on the inside
    Actually, all the possible ways of communicating with her had occurred to
    him within five minutes of reading the note; but now, with time to think,
    he went over them one by one, as though laying out a row of instruments
    on a table.
  1101. done
    having finished or arrived at completion
    There was no
    question that she had done it intentionally.
  1102. good
    having desirable or positive qualities especially those suitable for a thing specified
    This was the kind of thing that Winston was good at, and for more
    than two hours he succeeded in shutting the girl out of his mind
    altogether.
  1103. want
    the state of needing something that is absent or unavailable
    'I didn't want to say anything in the lane,' she went on, 'in case there's
    a mike hidden there.
  1104. camouflage
    an outward semblance that misrepresents the true nature of something
    It paid, she said, it was camouflage.
  1105. all the same
    despite anything to the contrary (usually following a concession)
    The clever thing was to break the rules and stay
    alive all the same.
  1106. mouth
    the opening through which food is taken in and vocalizations emerge
    Her face had turned a milky yellow colour against which her
    mouth stood out redder than ever.
  1107. league
    an association of states or organizations or individuals for common action
    'It's this bloody thing that does it,' she said, ripping off the scarlet
    sash of the Junior Anti-Sex League and flinging it on to a bough.
  1108. unorthodox
    breaking with convention or tradition
    It would even
    have seemed slightly unorthodox, a dangerous eccentricity, like talking to
    oneself.
  1109. minuteness
    the property of being very small in size
    The scientist of today is either a mixture of psychologist and inquisitor,
    studying with real ordinary minuteness the meaning of facial expressions,
    gestures, and tones of voice, and testing the truth-producing effects of
    drugs, shock therapy, hypnosis, and physical torture; or he is chemist,
    physicist, or biologist concerned only with such branches of his special
    subject as are relevant to the taking of life.
  1110. overflowing
    covered with water
    The wooden-seated carriage in which he travelled was
    filled to overflowing by a single enormous family, ranging from a toothless
    great-grandmother to a month-old baby, going out to spend an afternoon
    with 'in-laws' in the country, and, as they freely explained to Winston,
    to get hold of a little black-market butter.
  1111. swallow
    pass through the esophagus as part of eating or drinking
    He wolfed another tasteless meal in the canteen, hurried
    off to the Centre, took part in the solemn foolery of a 'discussion group',
    played two games of table tennis, swallowed several glasses of gin, and
    sat for half an hour through a lecture entitled 'Ingsoc in relation to
    chess'.
  1112. avert
    turn away or aside
    It was no use, it changed nothing, it did not produce more
    chocolate, it did not avert the child's death or her own; but it seemed
    natural to her to do it.
  1113. front
    the side that is forward or prominent
    In front of him was an enemy
    who was trying to kill him: in front of him, also, was a human creature,
    in pain and perhaps with a broken bone.
  1114. loot
    goods or money obtained illegally
    There were further angry
    demonstrations, Goldstein was burned in effigy, hundreds of copies of the
    poster of the Eurasian soldier were torn down and added to the flames, and
    a number of shops were looted in the turmoil; then a rumour flew round
    that spies were directing the rocket bombs by means of wireless waves, and
    an old couple who were suspected of being of foreign extraction had their
    house set on fire and perished of suffocation.
  1115. muslin
    plain-woven cotton fabric
    Winston peeped out, secure in the
    protection of the muslin curtain.
  1116. both
    (used with count nouns) two considered together; the two
    Both
    Winston and the girl were eating steadily.
  1117. scent
    any property detected by the olfactory system
    He had got together a big bunch and was smelling their faint sickly
    scent when a sound at his back froze him, the unmistakable crackle of a
    foot on twigs.
  1118. discontent
    a longing for something better than the present situation
    Either it is conquered from without, or it governs so inefficiently that
    the masses are stirred to revolt, or it allows a strong and discontented
    Middle group to come into being, or it loses its own self-confidence and
    willingness to govern.
  1119. contrive
    make or work out a plan for; devise
    If he had known where she lived, and at what time she left work,
    he could have contrived to meet her somewhere on her way home; but to try
    to follow her home was not safe, because it would mean loitering about
    outside the Ministry, which was bound to be noticed.
  1120. right
    free from error; especially conforming to fact or truth
    As she came nearer he saw that her right arm was in a sling, not noticeable
    at a distance because it was of the same colour as her overalls.
  1121. swelter
    be uncomfortably hot
    He began telling Julia of
    something that had happened, or rather had failed to happen, on another
    sweltering summer afternoon, eleven years ago.
  1122. booming
    used of the voice
    Suddenly, as though he were
    listening to somebody else, Winston heard himself demanding in a loud
    booming voice that he should be given the whole piece.
  1123. principle
    a basic generalization that is accepted as true and that can be used as a basis for reasoning or conduct
    'Never go home
    the same way as you went out,' she said, as though enunciating an important
    general principle.
  1124. booklet
    a small book usually having a paper cover
    There she had remained for
    a year, helping to produce booklets in sealed packets with titles like
    'Spanking Stories' or 'One Night in a Girls' School', to be bought
    furtively by proletarian youths who were under the impression that they
    were buying something illegal.
  1125. easily
    with ease (`easy' is sometimes used informally for `easily')
    She began
    speaking in the same expressionless voice as before, with lips barely
    moving, a mere murmur easily drowned by the din of voices and the rumbling
    of the trucks.
  1126. defeat
    an unsuccessful ending to a struggle or contest
    He had hoped to be alone for a little while during
    the lunch hour, but as bad luck would have it the imbecile Parsons flopped
    down beside him, the tang of his sweat almost defeating the tinny smell of
    stew, and kept up a stream of talk about the preparations for Hate Week.
  1127. impenetrable
    not admitting of penetration or passage into or through
    Soon he was within arm's length of the girl,
    but the way was blocked by an enormous prole and an almost equally enormous
    woman, presumably his wife, who seemed to form an impenetrable wall of
    flesh.
  1128. permanent
    continuing or enduring without marked change in status or condition or place
    A peace that was truly
    permanent would be the same as a permanent war.
  1129. latent
    potentially existing but not presently evident or realized
    Ever since the end
    of the nineteenth century, the problem of what to do with the surplus of
    consumption goods has been latent in industrial society.
  1130. unfamiliar
    not known or well known
    The whole
    atmosphere of the huge block of flats, the richness and spaciousness of
    everything, the unfamiliar smells of good food and good tobacco, the
    silent and incredibly rapid lifts sliding up and down, the white-jacketed
    servants hurrying to and fro--everything was intimidating.
  1131. morsel
    a small amount of solid food; a mouthful
    There were times when the fact of
    impending death seemed as palpable as the bed they lay on, and they would
    cling together with a sort of despairing sensuality, like a damned soul
    grasping at his last morsel of pleasure when the clock is within five
    minutes of striking.
  1132. take a chance
    take a risk in the hope of a favorable outcome
    I thought I'd take a chance.
  1133. come into being
    be born or come into existence
    Either it is conquered from without, or it governs so inefficiently that
    the masses are stirred to revolt, or it allows a strong and discontented
    Middle group to come into being, or it loses its own self-confidence and
    willingness to govern.
  1134. pretend
    make believe with the intent to deceive
    He pretended not to hear.
  1135. sensation
    an unelaborated elementary awareness of stimulation
    But the truth was that he had no physical sensation, except that of mere
    contact.
  1136. contralto
    the lowest female singing voice
    Whenever her mouth was not corked with clothes pegs she
    was singing in a powerful contralto:


    It was only an 'opeless fancy.
  1137. peeling
    loss of bits of outer skin by peeling or shedding or coming off in scales
    He remembered long afternoons spent with other boys
    in scrounging round dustbins and rubbish heaps, picking out the ribs of
    cabbage leaves, potato peelings, sometimes even scraps of stale breadcrust
    from which they carefully scraped away the cinders; and also in waiting
    for the passing of trucks which travelled over a certain route and were
    known to carry cattle feed, and which, when they jolted over the bad
    patches in the road, sometimes spilt a few fragments of oil-cake.
  1138. predestined
    established or prearranged unalterably
    It was curious how that predestined horror moved in and out of one's
    consciousness.
  1139. disarming
    act of reducing or depriving of arms
    With the curious,
    disarming friendliness that he always managed to put in to the gesture he
    resettled his spectacles on his nose.
  1140. no longer
    not now
    The process of life had ceased
    to be intolerable, he had no longer any impulse to make faces at the
    telescreen or shout curses at the top of his voice.
  1141. psychologically
    with regard to psychology
    War, it will be seen, accomplishes the necessary destruction, but
    accomplishes it in a psychologically acceptable way.
  1142. fluctuating
    having unpredictable ups and downs
    Eastasia,
    smaller than the others and with a less definite western frontier,
    comprises China and the countries to the south of it, the Japanese islands
    and a large but fluctuating portion of Manchuria, Mongolia, and Tibet.
  1143. comrade
    a friend who is frequently in the company of another
    Thanks, comrade!'
  1144. chequer
    one of the flat round pieces used in playing the game of checkers
    They had left the clearing and were wandering again
    through the chequered shade, with their arms round each other's waists
    whenever it was wide enough to walk two abreast.
  1145. clear
    readily apparent to the mind
    When Winston
    followed her, he found that they were in a natural clearing, a tiny grassy
    knoll surrounded by tall saplings that shut it in completely.
  1146. existence
    the state or fact of existing
    She had never heard of
    the Brotherhood, and refused to believe in its existence.
  1147. flow out
    flow or spill forth
    A wave of admiration, almost of worship, flowed out
    from Winston towards O'Brien.
  1148. precede
    be earlier in time; go back further
    There it lay, fixed in future times, preceding death as
    surely as 99 precedes 100.
  1149. ragged
    being or dressed in clothes that are worn or torn
    In the ragged
    hedge on the opposite side the boughs of the elm trees swayed just
    perceptibly in the breeze, and their leaves stirred faintly in dense
    masses like women's hair.
  1150. sleepily
    in a sleepy manner
    Julia rolled sleepily
    against him, murmuring something that might have been 'What's the matter?'
  1151. unattended
    not watched
    After having been recognized, he could not go and sit at
    a table with an unattended girl.
  1152. perilously
    in a dangerous manner
    Squads of
    volunteers, organized by Parsons, were preparing the street for Hate Week,
    stitching banners, painting posters, erecting flagstaffs on the roofs, and
    perilously slinging wires across the street for the reception of streamers.
  1153. tingle
    cause a stinging or tingling sensation
    The heavy brief-case that he was carrying bumped
    against his knee at each step, sending a tingling sensation up and down
    the skin of his leg.
  1154. dingy
    thickly covered with ingrained dirt or soot
    Exactly as his mother
    had sat on the dingy white-quilted bed, with the child clinging to her, so
    she had sat in the sunken ship, far underneath him, and drowning deeper
    every minute, but still looking up at him through the darkening water.
  1155. recurrent
    recurring again and again
    The
    recurrent economic crises of past times were totally unnecessary and are
    not now permitted to happen, but other and equally large dislocations
    can and do happen without having political results, because there is no
    way in which discontent can become articulate.
  1156. pigeon
    wild and domesticated birds having a heavy body and short legs
    The air in the
    little square chamber above the bells was hot and stagnant, and smelt
    overpoweringly of pigeon dung.
  1157. bargaining
    the negotiation of the terms of a transaction or agreement
    There was a long, nagging argument that went round and
    round, with shouts, whines, tears, remonstrances, bargainings.
  1158. tolerate
    put up with something or somebody unpleasant
    But
    in matters of vital importance--meaning, in effect, war and police
    espionage--the empirical approach is still encouraged, or at least
    tolerated.
  1159. carpet
    floor covering consisting of a piece of thick heavy fabric (usually with nap or pile)
    The
    telescreen was dimmed to a low murmur; the richness of the dark-blue carpet
    gave one the impression of treading on velvet.
  1160. obvious
    easily perceived by the senses or grasped by the mind
    It was obvious that it
    ought to be divided into three equal parts.
  1161. outwards
    toward the outside
    We can only spread our knowledge outwards from individual to
    individual, generation after generation.
  1162. bakery
    a workplace where baked goods (breads and cakes and pastries) are produced or sold
    He remembered better the rackety, uneasy circumstances of
    the time: the periodical panics about air-raids and the sheltering in Tube
    stations, the piles of rubble everywhere, the unintelligible proclamations
    posted at street corners, the gangs of youths in shirts all the same
    colour, the enormous queues outside the bakeries, the intermittent
    machine-gun fire in the distance--above all, the fact that there was
    never enough to eat.
  1163. breast
    either of two soft fleshy milk-secreting glandular organs on the chest of a woman
    His heart bumped in his breast with
    frightening loudness.
  1164. real
    being or occurring in fact or actuality; having verified existence; not illusory
    It was impossible that this affair should end
    successfully; such things did not happen in real life.
  1165. passageway
    a path or channel or duct through or along which something may pass
    Winston
    could not remember ever to have seen a passageway whose walls were not
    grimy from the contact of human bodies.
  1166. rouge
    makeup consisting of a pink or red powder applied to the cheeks
    Her lips were deeply reddened,
    her cheeks rouged, her nose powdered; there was even a touch of something
    under the eyes to make them brighter.
  1167. fifty
    the cardinal number that is the product of ten and five
    'They were quite common in the
    fifties.
  1168. lunacy
    foolish or senseless behavior
    Both of them knew that it was lunacy.
  1169. struck
    (used in combination) affected by something overwhelming
    For the messages that it was occasionally
    necessary to send, there were printed postcards with long lists of phrases,
    and you struck out the ones that were inapplicable.
  1170. realized
    successfully completed or brought to an end
    As soon as she
    realized that they were lost Katharine became very uneasy.
  1171. several
    (used with count nouns) of an indefinite number more than 2 or 3 but not many
    On it was written, in a large
    unformed handwriting:

    I LOVE YOU.

    For several seconds he was too stunned even to throw the incriminating
    thing into the memory hole.
  1172. dislocation
    an event that results in a displacement or discontinuity
    The
    recurrent economic crises of past times were totally unnecessary and are
    not now permitted to happen, but other and equally large dislocations
    can and do happen without having political results, because there is no
    way in which discontent can become articulate.
  1173. crowded
    overfilled or compacted or concentrated
    Lunch in the hot, crowded, noise-filled
    canteen was torment.
  1174. jolt
    move or cause to move with a sudden jerky motion
    Occasionally when a truck jolted there
    was a clank-clank of metal: all the prisoners were wearing leg-irons.
  1175. weakling
    a person who is physically weak and ineffectual
    Between the two branches of the Party
    there is a certain amount of interchange, but only so much as will ensure
    that weaklings are excluded from the Inner Party and that ambitious
    members of the Outer Party are made harmless by allowing them to rise.
  1176. word for word
    using exactly the same words
    If
    the last copy were gone, we could reproduce it almost word for word.
  1177. denial
    renunciation of your own interests in favor of the interests of others
    Who knew, perhaps the Party was rotten under the surface,
    its cult of strenuousness and self-denial simply a sham concealing
    iniquity.
  1178. woman
    an adult female person (as opposed to a man)
    Soon he was within arm's length of the girl,
    but the way was blocked by an enormous prole and an almost equally enormous
    woman, presumably his wife, who seemed to form an impenetrable wall of
    flesh.
  1179. working
    a mine or quarry that is being or has been worked
    Winston's working week was sixty hours, Julia's was even longer, and
    their free days varied according to the pressure of work and did not
    often coincide.
  1180. white
    being of the achromatic color of maximum lightness; having little or no hue owing to reflection of almost all incident light
    A kind of fever seized him at the thought that he might
    lose her, the white youthful body might slip away from him!
  1181. abreast
    alongside each other, facing in the same direction
    They had left the clearing and were wandering again
    through the chequered shade, with their arms round each other's waists
    whenever it was wide enough to walk two abreast.
  1182. arrive
    reach a destination; arrive by movement or progress
    Immediately after lunch there arrived a
    delicate, difficult piece of work which would take several hours and
    necessitated putting everything else aside.
  1183. indefinitely
    to an indefinite extent; for an indefinite time
    Their luck would hold indefinitely, and they would carry on their
    intrigue, just like this, for the remainder of their natural lives.
  1184. floor
    the inside lower horizontal surface (as of a room, hallway, tent, or other structure)
    The little man was sprawling on all fours, his tray had gone flying,
    two streams of soup and coffee were flowing across the floor.
  1185. idea
    the content of cognition; the main thing you are thinking about
    No doubt the idea was absurd, but it had sprung into his mind in the very
    instant of feeling the scrap of paper in his hand.
  1186. texture
    the feel of a surface or a fabric
    What was even
    better than the taste of the coffee was the silky texture given to it by
    the sugar, a thing Winston had almost forgotten after years of saccharine.
  1187. writhe
    to move in a twisting or contorted motion, (especially when struggling)
    His soul writhed with boredom, but for once he had had no impulse
    to shirk his evening at the Centre.
  1188. apathetic
    showing little or no emotion or animation
    The proles, normally apathetic about the war,
    were being lashed into one of their periodical frenzies of patriotism.
  1189. tepid
    moderately warm
    Winston, still carrying the brief-case containing the
    book, which had remained between his feet while he worked and under his
    body while he slept, went home, shaved himself, and almost fell asleep in
    his bath, although the water was barely more than tepid.
  1190. go back
    return in thought or speech to something
    He went back to his cubicle, sat down, threw the fragment of paper
    casually among the other papers on the desk, put on his spectacles and
    hitched the speakwrite towards him.
  1191. near
    near in time or place or relationship
    If he could get her at a table by herself,
    somewhere in the middle of the room, not too near the telescreens, and
    with a sufficient buzz of conversation all round--if these conditions
    endured for, say, thirty seconds, it might be possible to exchange a few
    words.
  1192. sidelong
    inclining or directed to one side
    Winston could not help snatching another sidelong glance at Martin's
    Mongolian face.
  1193. settle
    become resolved, fixed, established, or quiet
    Without opening her
    eyes she rolled over and settled herself into a more comfortable position.
  1194. couple
    two items of the same kind
    It was not till a couple
    of minutes later that the other, more probable explanation had occurred to
    him.
  1195. ways
    structure consisting of a sloping way down to the water from the place where ships are built or repaired
    Actually, all the possible ways of communicating with her had occurred to
    him within five minutes of reading the note; but now, with time to think,
    he went over them one by one, as though laying out a row of instruments
    on a table.
  1196. tasteless
    lacking flavor
    He wolfed another tasteless meal in the canteen, hurried
    off to the Centre, took part in the solemn foolery of a 'discussion group',
    played two games of table tennis, swallowed several glasses of gin, and
    sat for half an hour through a lecture entitled 'Ingsoc in relation to
    chess'.
  1197. ramification
    a development that complicates a situation
    In the ramifications of party doctrine she had not the faintest interest.
  1198. grown
    (of animals) fully developed
    A half-hour railway journey; turn left outside
    the station; two kilometres along the road; a gate with the top bar
    missing; a path across a field; a grass-grown lane; a track between bushes;
    a dead tree with moss on it.
  1199. boom
    a deep prolonged loud noise
    He would ask his mother naggingly,
    over and over again, why there was not more food, he would shout and storm
    at her (he even remembered the tones of his voice, which was beginning to
    break prematurely and sometimes boomed in a peculiar way), or he would
    attempt a snivelling note of pathos in his efforts to get more than his
    share.
  1200. tube
    a hollow cylindrical shape
    He rolled up the completed bundle of work and slid it into the pneumatic
    tube.
  1201. nagging
    continually complaining or faultfinding
    There was a long, nagging argument that went round and
    round, with shouts, whines, tears, remonstrances, bargainings.
  1202. knowing
    alert and fully informed
    He wondered vaguely how many others like her there
    might be in the younger generation people who had grown up in the world of
    the Revolution, knowing nothing else, accepting the Party as something
    unalterable, like the sky, not rebelling against its authority but simply
    evading it, as a rabbit dodges a dog.
  1203. stupid
    lacking or marked by lack of intellectual acuity
    At the sight of the words I LOVE YOU
    the desire to stay alive had welled up in him, and the taking of minor
    risks suddenly seemed stupid.
  1204. curious
    eager to investigate and learn or learn more (sometimes about others' concerns)
    A curious emotion stirred in Winston's heart.
  1205. privation
    act of depriving someone of food or money or rights
    What was more
    important was that sexual privation induced hysteria, which was desirable
    because it could be transformed into war-fever and leader-worship.
  1206. at work
    on the job
    The agents of Goldstein had been at work!
  1207. really
    in actual fact
    And with that she walked on in the direction in which she had been going,
    as briskly as though it had really been nothing.
  1208. side by side
    nearest in space or position; immediately adjoining without intervening space
    They were sitting side by side on the dusty floor.
  1209. restricting
    restricting the scope or freedom of action
    Nor was it a satisfactory solution to keep the masses in poverty by
    restricting the output of goods.
  1210. above
    in or to a place that is higher
    THEM, it appeared, meant the Party, and above all the Inner Party, about
    whom she talked with an open jeering hatred which made Winston feel uneasy,
    although he knew that they were safe here if they could be safe anywhere.
  1211. complete
    perfect and complete in every respect; having all necessary qualities
    He rolled up the completed bundle of work and slid it into the pneumatic
    tube.
  1212. enveloping
    surrounding and closing in on or hemming in
    The dream was still vivid in his mind, especially the enveloping protecting
    gesture of the arm in which its whole meaning seemed to be contained.
  1213. arms
    weapons considered collectively
    The next moment, it was hard to say by whose act, she was in his arms.
  1214. entail
    have as a logical consequence
    It was more than a month distant, but the enormous, complex
    preparations that it entailed were throwing extra work on to everybody.
  1215. wrenching
    causing great physical or mental suffering
    With a deadly effort, like wrenching a piece out of his own
    brain, he could even have dragged the thing into the open.
  1216. possession
    anything owned or possessed
    It was all-important to speak at once, before anyone else came, but now
    a terrible fear had taken possession of him.
  1217. beetle
    insect having biting mouthparts and front wings modified to form horny covers overlying the membranous rear wings
    The person immediately
    ahead of him in the queue was a small, swiftly-moving, beetle-like man
    with a flat face and tiny, suspicious eyes.
  1218. roar
    make a loud noise, as of animal
    They
    were passing in silence down a side-street (Julia would never speak when
    they were away from the main streets) when there was a deafening roar, the
    earth heaved, and the air darkened, and Winston found himself lying on his
    side, bruised and terrified.
  1219. repeat
    to say, state, or perform again
    'It's nothing,' she repeated shortly.
  1220. must
    a necessary or essential thing
    She must have
    fallen right on the injured arm.
  1221. everywhere
    to or in any or all places
    He was everywhere at once,
    pushing, pulling, sawing, hammering, improvising, jollying everyone along
    with comradely exhortations and giving out from every fold of his body what
    seemed an inexhaustible supply of acrid-smelling sweat.
  1222. boil
    come to the boiling point and change from a liquid to vapor
    Winston lit the burner and set a pan of water
    to boil.
  1223. track down
    pursue for food or sport (as of wild animals)
    They could be tracked down
    by enquiry, they could be squeezed out of you by torture.
  1224. junk
    the remains of something that has been destroyed or broken up
    Four days had gone
    past since the evening when he had run into her outside the junk-shop.
  1225. first
    preceding all others in time or space or degree
    A week had gone by since
    she had first approached him.
  1226. round table
    a meeting of peers for discussion and exchange of views
    Put them on the round table.
  1227. lay
    put into a certain place or abstract location
    He did not consider any longer the
    possibility that she might be laying some kind of trap for him.
  1228. high
    (literal meaning) being at or having a relatively great or specific elevation or upward extension (sometimes used in combinations like `knee-high')
    The June sun was still high in the sky,
    and in the sun-filled court below, a monstrous woman, solid as a Norman
    pillar, with brawny red forearms and a sacking apron strapped about her
    middle, was stumping to and fro between a washtub and a clothes line,
    pegging out a series of square white things which Winston recognized as
    babies' diapers.
  1229. irritably
    in a petulant manner
    Even now it was
    quite conceivable that he was simply a busy man wondering irritably why he
    had been interrupted.
  1230. a little
    to a small degree; somewhat
    While he stood at the urinal he managed, with a little more fingering, to
    get it unfolded.
  1231. get married
    take in marriage
    They did not discuss the possibility of getting married.
  1232. evaporate
    change into a vapor
    The sealed world in which he lives would be broken, and the
    fear, hatred, and self-righteousness on which his morale depends might
    evaporate.
  1233. suffocation
    the condition of being deprived of oxygen (as by having breathing stopped)
    There were further angry
    demonstrations, Goldstein was burned in effigy, hundreds of copies of the
    poster of the Eurasian soldier were torn down and added to the flames, and
    a number of shops were looted in the turmoil; then a rumour flew round
    that spies were directing the rocket bombs by means of wireless waves, and
    an old couple who were suspected of being of foreign extraction had their
    house set on fire and perished of suffocation.
  1234. encircle
    form a circle around
    The plan is, by a combination of fighting, bargaining, and
    well-timed strokes of treachery, to acquire a ring of bases completely
    encircling one or other of the rival states, and then to sign a pact of
    friendship with that rival and remain on peaceful terms for so many years
    as to lull suspicion to sleep.
  1235. development
    a process in which something passes by degrees to a different stage (especially a more advanced or mature stage)
    Until he could be alone it was impossible
    to think this new development out.
  1236. fanatic
    a person motivated by irrational enthusiasm (as for a cause)
    However
    much in earnest he might be, he had nothing of the single-mindedness that
    belongs to a fanatic.
  1237. noticeable
    capable of being detected
    As she came nearer he saw that her right arm was in a sling, not noticeable
    at a distance because it was of the same colour as her overalls.
  1238. future
    the time yet to come
    She
    did not understand that there was no such thing as happiness, that the
    only victory lay in the far future, long after you were dead, that from
    the moment of declaring war on the Party it was better to think of yourself
    as a corpse.
  1239. everyday
    commonplace and ordinary
    He noticed that she never used Newspeak words
    except the ones that had passed into everyday use.
  1240. someone
    a human being
    The queue edged forward till Winston was almost at the counter, then was
    held up for two minutes because someone in front was complaining that he
    had not received his tablet of saccharine.
  1241. hip
    either side of the body below the waist and above the thigh
    For a moment it felt as though his
    entrails were being ground to pulp between the two muscular hips, then he
    had broken through, sweating a little.
  1242. go on
    move forward, also in the metaphorical sense
    He went on picking bluebells.
  1243. presently
    at this time or period; now
    Presently they had reached the edge of the little wood.
  1244. deprecating
    tending to diminish or disparage
    'It just occurred to me you might be interested,' he
    would say with a deprecating little laugh whenever he produced a new
    fragment.
  1245. eared
    having ears (or appendages resembling ears) or having ears of a specified kind; often used in combination
    He might have
    flinched altogether from speaking if at this moment he had not seen
    Ampleforth, the hairy-eared poet, wandering limply round the room with
    a tray, looking for a place to sit down.
  1246. record
    anything (such as a document or a phonograph record or a photograph) providing permanent evidence of or information about past events
    If she had worked in the Records Department it might have
    been comparatively simple, but he had only a very dim idea whereabouts in
    the building the Fiction Department lay, and he had no pretext for going
    there.
  1247. vagueness
    unclearness by virtue of being poorly expressed or not coherent in meaning
    'We have come here because----'

    He paused, realizing for the first time the vagueness of
    his own motives.
  1248. struggle
    strenuous effort
    It was like struggling with some crushing physical task,
    something which one had the right to refuse and which one was nevertheless
    neurotically anxious to accomplish.
  1249. ladle
    a spoon-shaped vessel with a long handle; frequently used to transfer liquids from one container to another
    He would cry out
    with rage when she stopped ladling, he would try to wrench the saucepan
    and spoon out of her hands, he would grab bits from his sister's plate.
  1250. split up
    separate into parts or portions
    Suddenly, as one sometimes does with a book of which one
    knows that one will ultimately read and re-read every word, he opened it
    at a different place and found himself at Chapter III. He went on reading:


    Chapter III
    War is Peace

    The splitting up of the world into three great super-states was an event
    which could be and indeed was foreseen before the middle of the twentieth
    century.
  1251. main
    most important element
    They
    were passing in silence down a side-street (Julia would never speak when
    they were away from the main streets) when there was a deafening roar, the
    earth heaved, and the air darkened, and Winston found himself lying on his
    side, bruised and terrified.
  1252. instant
    a very short time (as the time it takes the eye to blink or the heart to beat)
    No doubt the idea was absurd, but it had sprung into his mind in the very
    instant of feeling the scrap of paper in his hand.
  1253. five
    the cardinal number that is the sum of four and one
    Only five nights ago he had contemplated smashing her skull in with
    a cobblestone, but that was of no importance.
  1254. better
    (comparative of `good') superior to another (of the same class or set or kind) in excellence or quality or desirability or suitability; more highly skilled than another
    She had regained
    some of her colour, and appeared very much better.
  1255. death
    the permanent end of all life functions in an organism or part of an organism
    And even now, though his intellect told him that the message probably
    meant death--still, that was not what he believed, and the unreasonable
    hope persisted, and his heart banged, and it was with difficulty that he
    kept his voice from trembling as he murmured his figures into the
    speakwrite.
  1256. bit
    a small piece or quantity of something
    'I only gave my wrist a bit of a
    bang.
  1257. steam engine
    external-combustion engine in which heat is used to raise steam which either turns a turbine or forces a piston to move up and down in a cylinder
    (In his own
    schooldays, Winston remembered, in the late fifties, it was only the
    helicopter that the Party claimed to have invented; a dozen years later,
    when Julia was at school, it was already claiming the aeroplane; one
    generation more, and it would be claiming the steam engine.)
  1258. item
    a distinct part that can be specified separately in a group of things that could be enumerated on a list
    Winston, in addition to his regular work, spent long periods every day in
    going through back files of 'The Times' and altering and embellishing news
    items which were to be quoted in speeches.
  1259. darkness
    absence of light or illumination
    It was not till twenty-three hours, when he
    was home and in bed--in the darkness, where you were safe even from the
    telescreen so long as you kept silent--that he was able to think
    continuously.
  1260. sound
    mechanical vibrations transmitted by an elastic medium
    His whole mind and body seemed to be afflicted with an unbearable
    sensitivity, a sort of transparency, which made every movement, every
    sound, every contact, every word that he had to speak or listen to, an
    agony.
  1261. thinking
    endowed with the capacity to reason
    He stopped
    thinking and merely felt.
  1262. pure
    free of extraneous elements of any kind
    Pure in word and deed.
  1263. get in
    to come or go into
    It was a physical problem that had to be solved: how to get in touch with
    the girl and arrange a meeting.
  1264. besiege
    surround so as to force to give up
    The social atmosphere is that of a besieged city, where the
    possession of a lump of horseflesh makes the difference between wealth and
    poverty.
  1265. silk stocking
    women's stockings made from a sheer material (nylon or rayon or silk)
    I'll wear silk stockings and high-heeled
    shoes!
  1266. antiseptic
    thoroughly clean and free of or destructive to disease-causing organisms
    In the early twentieth century, the vision of
    a future society unbelievably rich, leisured, orderly, and efficient--a
    glittering antiseptic world of glass and steel and snow-white concrete--was
    part of the consciousness of nearly every literate person.
  1267. a couple of
    more than one but indefinitely small in number
    It was not till a couple
    of
    minutes later that the other, more probable explanation had occurred to
    him.
  1268. frightened
    made afraid
    Obviously she had been frightened out of her wits, as well
    she might be.
  1269. procession
    the act of moving forward (as toward a goal)
    Banners,
    processions, slogans, games, community hikes all that stuff.
  1270. odds and ends
    a motley assortment of things
    He wished that he were
    walking through the streets with her just as they were doing now but openly
    and without fear, talking of trivialities and buying odds and ends for the
    household.
  1271. deathly
    having the physical appearance of death
    Suddenly he became aware of Julia's face a few centimetres from his
    own, deathly white, as white as chalk.
  1272. wall
    an architectural partition with a height and length greater than its thickness; used to divide or enclose an area or to support another structure
    When he came into the canteen she was sitting at a table well out from the
    wall, and was quite alone.
  1273. gymnastics
    a sport that involves exercises intended to display strength and balance and agility
    At
    school she had been captain of the hockey team and had won the gymnastics
    trophy two years running.
  1274. today
    on this day as distinct from yesterday or tomorrow
    But if the
    same thing happened today, I should keep it.'
  1275. split
    separate into parts or portions
    Suddenly, as one sometimes does with a book of which one
    knows that one will ultimately read and re-read every word, he opened it
    at a different place and found himself at Chapter III. He went on reading:


    Chapter III
    War is Peace

    The splitting up of the world into three great super-states was an event
    which could be and indeed was foreseen before the middle of the twentieth
    century.
  1276. next
    immediately following in time or order
    He re-adjusted his spectacles on his nose,
    sighed, and drew the next batch of work towards him, with the scrap of
    paper on top of it.
  1277. person
    a human being
    The person immediately
    ahead of him in the queue was a small, swiftly-moving, beetle-like man
    with a flat face and tiny, suspicious eyes.
  1278. sham
    something that is a counterfeit; not what it seems to be
    Who knew, perhaps the Party was rotten under the surface,
    its cult of strenuousness and self-denial simply a sham concealing
    iniquity.
  1279. crush
    to compress with violence, out of natural shape or condition
    Probably
    she had crushed her hand while swinging round one of the big kaleidoscopes
    on which the plots of novels were 'roughed in'.
  1280. jeering
    showing your contempt by derision
    THEM, it appeared, meant the Party, and above all the Inner Party, about
    whom she talked with an open jeering hatred which made Winston feel uneasy,
    although he knew that they were safe here if they could be safe anywhere.
  1281. used to
    in the habit
    In the last truck he could see an
    aged man, his face a mass of grizzled hair, standing upright with wrists
    crossed in front of him, as though he were used to having them bound
    together.
  1282. eliminate
    terminate, end, or take out
    If the
    machine were used deliberately for that end, hunger, overwork, dirt,
    illiteracy, and disease could be eliminated within a few generations.
  1283. pornography
    creative activity (writing or pictures or films etc.) of no literary or artistic value other than to stimulate sexual desire
    She had even (an
    infallible mark of good reputation) been picked out to work in Pornosec,
    the sub-section of the Fiction Department which turned out cheap
    pornography for distribution among the proles.
  1284. sixty
    the cardinal number that is the product of ten and six
    Winston's working week was sixty hours, Julia's was even longer, and
    their free days varied according to the pressure of work and did not
    often coincide.
  1285. go out
    move out of or depart from
    The wooden-seated carriage in which he travelled was
    filled to overflowing by a single enormous family, ranging from a toothless
    great-grandmother to a month-old baby, going out to spend an afternoon
    with 'in-laws' in the country, and, as they freely explained to Winston,
    to get hold of a little black-market butter.
  1286. new
    not of long duration; having just (or relatively recently) come into being or been made or acquired or discovered
    Until he could be alone it was impossible
    to think this new development out.
  1287. exterminate
    kill en masse; kill on a large scale; kill many
    If Oceania were
    to conquer the areas that used once to be known as France and Germany, it
    would be necessary either to exterminate the inhabitants, a task of great
    physical difficulty, or to assimilate a population of about a hundred
    million people, who, so far as technical development goes, are roughly on
    the Oceanic level.
  1288. delightedly
    with delight
    The girl laughed delightedly, evidently taking this as a
    tribute to the excellence of her disguise.
  1289. skin
    a natural protective body covering and site of the sense of touch
    The air
    seemed to kiss one's skin.
  1290. face up
    deal with (something unpleasant) head on
    The youthful
    body was strained against his own, the mass of dark hair was against his
    face, and yes! actually she had turned her face up and he was kissing the
    wide red mouth.
  1291. grow
    increase in size by natural process
    A half-hour railway journey; turn left outside
    the station; two kilometres along the road; a gate with the top bar
    missing; a path across a field; a grass-grown lane; a track between bushes;
    a dead tree with moss on it.
  1292. name
    a language unit by which a person or thing is known
    In any case he did not
    know the girl's name, let alone her address.
  1293. shut
    move so that an opening or passage is obstructed; make shut
    This was the kind of thing that Winston was good at, and for more
    than two hours he succeeded in shutting the girl out of his mind
    altogether.
  1294. scientific
    conforming with the principles or methods used in science
    This failed to happen, partly
    because of the impoverishment caused by a long series of wars and
    revolutions, partly because scientific and technical progress depended on
    the empirical habit of thought, which could not survive in a strictly
    regimented society.
  1295. sun-ray
    a ray of artificial ultraviolet light from a sunray lamp
    Some are
    concerned simply with planning the logistics of future wars; others devise
    larger and larger rocket bombs, more and more powerful explosives, and more
    and more impenetrable armour-plating; others search for new and deadlier
    gases, or for soluble poisons capable of being produced in such quantities
    as to destroy the vegetation of whole continents, or for breeds of disease
    germs immunized against all possible antibodies; others strive to produce
    a vehicle that shall bore its way under...
  1296. take hold of
    take hold of so as to seize or restrain or stop the motion of
    It
    struck him that when one lived with a woman this particular disappointment
    must be a normal, recurring event; and a deep tenderness, such as he had
    not felt for her before, suddenly took hold of him.
  1297. assimilate
    make similar
    If Oceania were
    to conquer the areas that used once to be known as France and Germany, it
    would be necessary either to exterminate the inhabitants, a task of great
    physical difficulty, or to assimilate a population of about a hundred
    million people, who, so far as technical development goes, are roughly on
    the Oceanic level.
  1298. wander
    to move or cause to move in a sinuous, spiral, or circular course
    He might have
    flinched altogether from speaking if at this moment he had not seen
    Ampleforth, the hairy-eared poet, wandering limply round the room with
    a tray, looking for a place to sit down.
  1299. vast
    unusually great in size or amount or degree or especially extent or scope
    It was a vast, luminous dream in which his whole life seemed to
    stretch out before him like a landscape on a summer evening after rain.
  1300. mastered
    understood perfectly
    'And now I must go,' she said as soon as he had mastered his instructions.
  1301. conceal
    prevent from being seen or discovered
    What was even
    worse than having to focus his mind on a series of niggling jobs was the
    need to conceal his agitation from the telescreen.
  1302. unexplored
    not yet discovered
    The frontiers of Eurasia flow back and forth between the basin of the Congo
    and the northern shore of the Mediterranean; the islands of the Indian
    Ocean and the Pacific are constantly being captured and recaptured by
    Oceania or by Eastasia; in Mongolia the dividing line between Eurasia and
    Eastasia is never stable; round the Pole all three powers lay claim to
    enormous territories which in fact are largely uninhabited and unexplored:
    but the balance of power always remains roughly even...
  1303. hunger
    a physiological need for food; the consequence of food deprivation
    Above all he remembered his continuous hunger, and the
    fierce sordid battles at mealtimes.
  1304. grip
    hold fast or firmly
    When
    once you were in the grip of the Party, what you felt or did not feel,
    what you did or refrained from doing, made literally no difference.
  1305. routine
    an unvarying or habitual method or procedure
    Fortunately the piece of work he was engaged on was
    mere routine, the rectification of a long list of figures, not needing
    close attention.
  1306. technique
    a practical method or art applied to some particular task
    In his capacity
    as an administrator, it is often necessary for a member of the Inner Party
    to know that this or that item of war news is untruthful, and he may often
    be aware that the entire war is spurious and is either not happening or
    is being waged for purposes quite other than the declared ones: but such
    knowledge is easily neutralized by the technique of DOUBLETHINK.
  1307. totalitarian
    characterized by a government in which the political authority exercises absolute and centralized control
    But they had been
    foreshadowed by the various systems, generally called totalitarian, which
    had appeared earlier in the century, and the main outlines of the world
    which would emerge from the prevailing chaos had long been obvious.
  1308. station
    the position where someone (as a guard or sentry) stands or is assigned to stand
    Go to Paddington
    Station----'

    With a sort of military precision that astonished him, she outlined the
    route that he was to follow.
  1309. recognition
    the process of recognizing something or someone by remembering
    Winston looked
    out into the field beyond, and underwent a curious, slow shock of
    recognition.
  1310. natural
    in accordance with nature; relating to or concerning nature
    When Winston
    followed her, he found that they were in a natural clearing, a tiny grassy
    knoll surrounded by tall saplings that shut it in completely.
  1311. armament
    weaponry used by military or naval force
    The inhabitants of these areas, reduced more or less openly to the status
    of slaves, pass continually from conqueror to conqueror, and are expended
    like so much coal or oil in the race to turn out more armaments, to capture
    more territory, to control more labour power, to turn out more armaments,
    to capture more territory, and so on indefinitely.
  1312. loaf of bread
    a shaped mass of baked bread that is usually sliced before eating
    And here's a loaf of bread--proper
    white bread, not our bloody stuff--and a little pot of jam.
  1313. connexion
    a relation between things or events (as in the case of one causing the other or sharing features with it)
    There was a direct intimate connexion
    between chastity and political orthodoxy.
  1314. vanished
    having passed out of existence
    Nor did
    one know what became of them, apart from the few who were hanged as
    war-criminals: the others simply vanished, presumably into forced-labour
    camps.
  1315. issue
    some situation or event that is thought about
    She could describe the whole process of composing a novel,
    from the general directive issued by the Planning Committee down to the
    final touching-up by the Rewrite Squad.
  1316. earthenware
    ceramic ware made of porous clay fired at low heat
    There was a gas ring
    in the fender, and a shelf where food was kept, and on the landing outside
    there was a brown earthenware sink, common to several rooms.
  1317. sensitivity
    sensitivity to emotional feelings (of self and others)
    His whole mind and body seemed to be afflicted with an unbearable
    sensitivity, a sort of transparency, which made every movement, every
    sound, every contact, every word that he had to speak or listen to, an
    agony.
  1318. effect
    a phenomenon that follows and is caused by some previous phenomenon
    The family had become in effect an extension
    of the Thought Police.
  1319. inimical
    not friendly
    Inefficient
    nations were always conquered sooner or later, and the struggle for
    efficiency was inimical to illusions.
  1320. sneeze
    exhale spasmodically, as when an irritant entered one's nose
    It
    was merely one symptom of her revolt against the Party and all its ways,
    and somehow it seemed natural and healthy, like the sneeze of a horse that
    smells bad hay.
  1321. tended to
    having a caretaker or other watcher
    All rulers in all ages have tried
    to impose a false view of the world upon their followers, but they could
    not afford to encourage any illusion that tended to impair military
    efficiency.
  1322. italic
    characterized by slanting characters
    Meanwhile I shall
    send you a copy of THE BOOK'--even O'Brien, Winston noticed, seemed to
    pronounce the words as though they were in italics--'Goldstein's book, you
    understand, as soon as possible.
  1323. fight
    be engaged in a fight; carry on a fight
    'You understand,' he said, 'that you will be fighting in the dark.
  1324. song
    a short musical composition with words
    It spread out its wings, fitted them carefully into place
    again, ducked its head for a moment, as though making a sort of obeisance
    to the sun, and then began to pour forth a torrent of song.
  1325. bush
    a low woody perennial plant usually having several major stems
    A half-hour railway journey; turn left outside
    the station; two kilometres along the road; a gate with the top bar
    missing; a path across a field; a grass-grown lane; a track between bushes;
    a dead tree with moss on it.
  1326. number
    a concept of quantity involving zero and units
    Underneath were a number
    of neat paper packets.
  1327. child
    a human offspring (son or daughter) of any age
    The family could not actually be
    abolished, and, indeed, people were encouraged to be fond of their
    children, in almost the old-fashioned way.
  1328. call
    utter a sudden loud cry
    Then a voice behind him called, 'Smith!'
  1329. quarter
    one of four equal parts
    And you
    thought that if I had a quarter of a chance I'd denounce you as a
    thought-criminal and get you killed off?'
  1330. wanted
    desired or wished for or sought
    'I wanted to rape you and then murder
    you afterwards.
  1331. invent
    come up with (an idea, plan, explanation, theory, or principle) after a mental effort
    The tales about Goldstein and his
    underground army, she said, were simply a lot of rubbish which the Party
    had invented for its own purposes and which you had to pretend to believe
    in.
  1332. under
    below some quantity or limit
    It consisted in falsifying a
    series of production reports of two years ago, in such a way as to cast
    discredit on a prominent member of the Inner Party, who was now under a
    cloud.
  1333. fear
    an emotion experienced in anticipation of some specific pain or danger (usually accompanied by a desire to flee or fight)
    Her eyes were fixed on his, with an
    appealing expression that looked more like fear than pain.
  1334. sub
    a submersible warship usually armed with torpedoes
    A long line of trucks, with wooden-faced guards armed with sub-machine
    guns standing upright in each corner, was passing slowly down the street.
  1335. privileged
    blessed with privileges
    It was possible, no
    doubt, to imagine a society in which WEALTH, in the sense of personal
    possessions and luxuries, should be evenly distributed, while POWER
    remained in the hands of a small privileged caste.
  1336. lymph
    a thin coagulable fluid (similar to plasma but) containing white blood cells (lymphocytes) and chyle; is conveyed to the blood stream by lymphatic vessels
    All the blood and
    lymph had been drained out of him by an enormous debauch of work, leaving
    only a frail structure of nerves, bones, and skin.
  1337. strike
    deliver a sharp blow, as with the hand, fist, or weapon
    For the messages that it was occasionally
    necessary to send, there were printed postcards with long lists of phrases,
    and you struck out the ones that were inapplicable.
  1338. cavernous
    being or suggesting a cavern
    He remembered the half-darkness of a basement
    kitchen, and a woman's cavernous mouth.
  1339. counter
    a calculator that keeps a record of the number of times something happens
    The queue edged forward till Winston was almost at the counter, then was
    held up for two minutes because someone in front was complaining that he
    had not received his tablet of saccharine.
  1340. pocket
    a small pouch inside a garment for carrying small articles
    As he passed through the lavatory door he transferred it to his
    pocket and felt it with the tips of his fingers.
  1341. machine gun
    a rapidly firing automatic gun (often mounted)
    A long line of trucks, with wooden-faced guards armed with sub-machine
    guns
    standing upright in each corner, was passing slowly down the street.
  1342. acrid
    strong and sharp;"the pungent taste of radishes"
    He was everywhere at once,
    pushing, pulling, sawing, hammering, improvising, jollying everyone along
    with comradely exhortations and giving out from every fold of his body what
    seemed an inexhaustible supply of acrid-smelling sweat.
  1343. decisive
    characterized by decision and firmness
    To understand the nature of the present war--for in spite of the regrouping
    which occurs every few years, it is always the same war--one must realize
    in the first place that it is impossible for it to be decisive.
  1344. shoulder in
    push one's way in with one's shoulders
    Wandering about among his worthless stock, with his long nose and
    thick spectacles and his bowed shoulders in the velvet jacket, he had
    always vaguely the air of being a collector rather than a tradesman.
  1345. go past
    move past
    Four days had gone
    past
    since the evening when he had run into her outside the junk-shop.
  1346. fingering
    the placement of the fingers for playing different notes (or sequences of notes) on a musical instrument
    While he stood at the urinal he managed, with a little more fingering, to
    get it unfolded.
  1347. servant
    a person working in the service of another (especially in the household)
    But of course waiters and servants and people pinch things,
    and--look, I got a little packet of tea as well.'
  1348. announce
    make known; make an announcement
    He told her of the strange intimacy that
    existed, or seemed to exist, between himself and O'Brien, and of the
    impulse he sometimes felt, simply to walk into O'Brien's presence, announce
    that he was the enemy of the Party, and demand his help.
  1349. hated
    treated with contempt
    'I hated the sight of you,' he said.
  1350. head
    the upper part of the human body or the front part of the body in animals; contains the face and brains
    But there
    was another, wilder possibility that kept raising its head, though he
    tried vainly to suppress it.
  1351. rippled
    shaken into waves or undulations as by wind
    Without words said, a wave of understanding rippled through the crowd.
  1352. stopper
    blockage consisting of an object designed to fill a hole tightly
    With a sort of faded enthusiasm he would finger this scrap of rubbish or
    that--a china bottle-stopper, the painted lid of a broken snuffbox, a
    pinchbeck locket containing a strand of some long-dead baby's hair--never
    asking that Winston should buy it, merely that he should admire it.
  1353. whatever
    one or some or every or all without specification
    Whatever was written on the paper, it must have some kind of political
    meaning.
  1354. month
    one of the twelve divisions of the calendar year
    The wooden-seated carriage in which he travelled was
    filled to overflowing by a single enormous family, ranging from a toothless
    great-grandmother to a month-old baby, going out to spend an afternoon
    with 'in-laws' in the country, and, as they freely explained to Winston,
    to get hold of a little black-market butter.
  1355. anti
    not in favor of (an action or proposal etc.)
    'It's this bloody thing that does it,' she said, ripping off the scarlet
    sash of the Junior Anti-Sex League and flinging it on to a bough.
  1356. capture
    capture as if by hunting, snaring, or trapping
    They've captured India, or
    something,' she said vaguely.
  1357. discredit
    the state of being held in low esteem
    It consisted in falsifying a
    series of production reports of two years ago, in such a way as to cast
    discredit on a prominent member of the Inner Party, who was now under a
    cloud.
  1358. extent
    the point or degree to which something extends
    Motives which were already present to some small extent in the
    great wars of the early twentieth century have now become dominant and
    are consciously recognized and acted upon.
  1359. drastically
    in a drastic manner
    Working hours had been drastically increased in anticipation of
    Hate Week.
  1360. certain
    established beyond doubt or question; definitely known
    There was no place where you could be more certain that the telescreens
    were watched continuously.
  1361. harden
    make hard or harder
    He explored the long fingers, the shapely nails, the
    work-hardened palm with its row of callouses, the smooth flesh under the
    wrist.
  1362. coarseness
    the quality of being composed of relatively large particles
    A thing that astonished him about her was the coarseness of her language.
  1363. put
    cause to be in a certain state; cause to be in a certain relation
    He went back to his cubicle, sat down, threw the fragment of paper
    casually among the other papers on the desk, put on his spectacles and
    hitched the speakwrite towards him.
  1364. sexuality
    the properties that distinguish organisms on the basis of their reproductive roles
    With Julia, everything came back
    to her own sexuality.
  1365. consumption
    the act of consuming something
    In
    the centres of civilization war means no more than a continuous shortage
    of consumption goods, and the occasional crash of a rocket bomb which may
    cause a few scores of deaths.
  1366. usual
    occurring or encountered or experienced or observed frequently or in accordance with regular practice or procedure
    On the day after that she was in the
    canteen at the usual time, but with three other girls and immediately
    under a telescreen.
  1367. take part
    share in something
    He wolfed another tasteless meal in the canteen, hurried
    off to the Centre, took part in the solemn foolery of a 'discussion group',
    played two games of table tennis, swallowed several glasses of gin, and
    sat for half an hour through a lecture entitled 'Ingsoc in relation to
    chess'.
  1368. dully
    without liveliness
    The little girl took hold
    of it and looked at it dully, perhaps not knowing what it was.
  1369. leprosy
    chronic granulomatous communicable disease occurring in tropical and subtropical regions; characterized by inflamed nodules beneath the skin and wasting of body parts; caused by the bacillus Mycobacterium leprae
    If he could have infected the whole lot of them with leprosy or
    syphilis, how gladly he would have done so!
  1370. in a way
    from some points of view
    In a way she realized
    that she herself was doomed, that sooner or later the Thought Police would
    catch her and kill her, but with another part of her mind she believed
    that it was somehow possible to construct a secret world in which you could
    live as you chose.
  1371. dirty
    soiled or likely to soil with dirt or grime
    The round Mogol faces had given way to faces of a more European
    type, dirty, bearded and exhausted.
  1372. reach out
    reach outward in space
    He reached out for
    the discarded overalls and pulled them partly over her.
  1373. taste
    the faculty of distinguishing sweet, sour, bitter, and salty properties in the mouth
    Chocolate normally was
    dull-brown crumbly stuff that tasted, as nearly as one could describe it,
    like the smoke of a rubbish fire.
  1374. tyranny
    a form of government in which the ruler is an absolute dictator (not restricted by a constitution or laws or opposition etc.)
    In the
    past the Middle had made revolutions under the banner of equality, and
    then had established a fresh tyranny as soon as the old one was overthrown.
  1375. avaricious
    immoderately desirous of acquiring e.g. wealth
    As compared with their
    opposite numbers in past ages, they were less avaricious, less tempted by
    luxury, hungrier for pure power, and, above all, more conscious of what
    they were doing and more intent on crushing opposition.
  1376. either
    after a negative statement used as an intensive meaning something like `likewise' or `also'
    When once they get hold of us there will be nothing, literally
    nothing, that either of us can do for the other.
  1377. film
    a form of entertainment that enacts a story by sound and a sequence of images giving the illusion of continuous movement
    Processions, meetings,
    military parades, lectures, waxworks, displays, film shows, telescreen
    programmes all had to be organized; stands had to be erected, effigies
    built, slogans coined, songs written, rumours circulated, photographs
    faked.
  1378. flooded
    covered with water
    As he took her in his arms a wave of synthetic violets
    flooded his nostrils.
  1379. also
    in addition
    In front of him was an enemy
    who was trying to kill him: in front of him, also, was a human creature,
    in pain and perhaps with a broken bone.
  1380. postcard
    a card for sending messages by post without an envelope
    For the messages that it was occasionally
    necessary to send, there were printed postcards with long lists of phrases,
    and you struck out the ones that were inapplicable.
  1381. believe in
    have a firm conviction as to the goodness of something
    She had never heard of
    the Brotherhood, and refused to believe in its existence.
  1382. use
    put into service; make work or employ for a particular purpose or for its inherent or natural purpose
    It was no use.
  1383. choose
    pick out, select, or choose from a number of alternatives
    He did not know why the Thought Police should
    choose to deliver their messages in such a fashion, but perhaps they had
    their reasons.
  1384. heart
    the hollow muscular organ located behind the sternum and between the lungs; its rhythmic contractions move the blood through the body
    A curious emotion stirred in Winston's heart.
  1385. tomorrow
    the day after today
    Perhaps
    tomorrow, perhaps after a long delay--he was not certain.
  1386. periodical
    happening or recurring at regular intervals
    The proles, normally apathetic about the war,
    were being lashed into one of their periodical frenzies of patriotism.
  1387. extinct
    no longer in existence; lost or especially having died out leaving no living representatives
    The room
    was a world, a pocket of the past where extinct animals could walk.
  1388. days
    the time during which someone's life continues
    Four days had gone
    past since the evening when he had run into her outside the junk-shop.
  1389. line
    a length (straight or curved) without breadth or thickness; the trace of a moving point
    A long line of trucks, with wooden-faced guards armed with sub-machine
    guns standing upright in each corner, was passing slowly down the street.
  1390. instalment
    a part of a broadcast serial
    Julia appeared to be quite used to this
    kind of conversation, which she called 'talking by instalments'.
  1391. astonish
    affect with wonder
    Go to Paddington
    Station----'

    With a sort of military precision that astonished him, she outlined the
    route that he was to follow.
  1392. adulation
    servile flattery; exaggerated and hypocritical praise
    Even the humblest Party member is
    expected to be competent, industrious, and even intelligent within narrow
    limits, but it is also necessary that he should be a credulous and ignorant
    fanatic whose prevailing moods are fear, hatred, adulation, and orgiastic
    triumph.
  1393. mirrored
    like or characteristic of a mirror image
    Actually the idea had first floated into his head in
    the form of a vision, of the glass paperweight mirrored by the surface
    of the gateleg table.
  1394. keyhole
    the hole where a key is inserted
    He was alone: no telescreen, no ear at
    the keyhole, no nervous impulse to glance over his shoulder or cover the
    page with his hand.
  1395. slab
    block consisting of a thick piece of something
    Then,
    as though touching her waist had reminded her of something, she felt in
    the pocket of her overalls and produced a small slab of chocolate.
  1396. secret
    not openly made known
    By a routine that
    was not even secret, all letters were opened in transit.
  1397. once and for all
    in a conclusive way
    The two aims of the Party are to conquer the whole surface of
    the earth and to extinguish once and for all the possibility of independent
    thought.
  1398. ruler
    a person who rules or commands
    All rulers in all ages have tried
    to impose a false view of the world upon their followers, but they could
    not afford to encourage any illusion that tended to impair military
    efficiency.
  1399. married couple
    two people who are married to each other
    He wished that they
    were a married couple of ten years' standing.
  1400. in reality
    used to imply that one would expect the fact to be the opposite of that stated; surprisingly
    In
    reality
    there was no escape.
  1401. isolate
    place or set apart
    You could only rebel
    against it by secret disobedience or, at most, by isolated acts of
    violence such as killing somebody or blowing something up.
  1402. thirty-nine
    being nine more than thirty
    'I'm thirty-nine years old.
  1403. interest
    a sense of concern with and curiosity about someone or something
    When he did so, although he knew very well the
    danger of showing too much interest, he could not resist reading it once
    again, just to make sure that the words were really there.
  1404. cellar
    the lowermost portion of a structure partly or wholly below ground level; often used for storage
    As he sat waiting on the
    edge of the bed he thought again of the cellars of the Ministry of Love.
  1405. make sure
    make a point of doing something; act purposefully and intentionally
    When he did so, although he knew very well the
    danger of showing too much interest, he could not resist reading it once
    again, just to make sure that the words were really there.
  1406. picking
    the act of picking (crops or fruit or hops etc.)
    He knelt down and began
    picking some partly to pass the time away, but also from a vague idea that
    he would like to have a bunch of flowers to offer to the girl when they
    met.
  1407. darken
    make dark or darker
    They
    were passing in silence down a side-street (Julia would never speak when
    they were away from the main streets) when there was a deafening roar, the
    earth heaved, and the air darkened, and Winston found himself lying on his
    side, bruised and terrified.
  1408. wandering
    travelling about without any clear destination
    He might have
    flinched altogether from speaking if at this moment he had not seen
    Ampleforth, the hairy-eared poet, wandering limply round the room with
    a tray, looking for a place to sit down.
  1409. destruction
    an event (or the result of an event) that completely destroys something
    At present, when
    few human beings even have enough to eat, this problem is obviously not
    urgent, and it might not have become so, even if no artificial processes
    of destruction had been at work.
  1410. class
    a collection of things sharing a common attribute
    War was a
    sure safeguard of sanity, and so far as the ruling classes were concerned
    it was probably the most important of all safeguards.
  1411. push out
    push to thrust outward
    It was a memory that he must have deliberately pushed out of
    his consciousness over many years.
  1412. unanswerable
    impossible to answer
    It is to be achieved either by gradually acquiring more
    and more territory and so building up an overwhelming preponderance of
    power, or by the discovery of some new and unanswerable weapon.
  1413. sink in
    pass through
    Even while he was
    speaking to O'Brien, when the meaning of the words had sunk in, a chilly
    shuddering feeling had taken possession of his body.
  1414. storey
    a structure consisting of a room or set of rooms at a single position along a vertical scale
    Reality
    only exerts its pressure through the needs of everyday life--the need to
    eat and drink, to get shelter and clothing, to avoid swallowing poison or
    stepping out of top-storey windows, and the like.
  1415. distance
    the property created by the space between two objects or points
    As she came nearer he saw that her right arm was in a sling, not noticeable
    at a distance because it was of the same colour as her overalls.
  1416. standard of living
    a level of material comfort in terms of goods and services available to someone or some group
    The primary aim of modern warfare (in accordance with the principles of
    DOUBLETHINK, this aim is simultaneously recognized and not recognized by
    the directing brains of the Inner Party) is to use up the products of the
    machine without raising the general standard of living.
  1417. press
    exert pressure or force to or upon
    The girl's shoulder, and
    her arm right down to the elbow, were pressed against his.
  1418. pact
    a written agreement between two states or sovereigns
    The plan is, by a combination of fighting, bargaining, and
    well-timed strokes of treachery, to acquire a ring of bases completely
    encircling one or other of the rival states, and then to sign a pact of
    friendship with that rival and remain on peaceful terms for so many years
    as to lull suspicion to sleep.
  1419. subject matter
    what a communication that is about something is about
    In
    so far as scientific research still continues, this is its subject matter.
  1420. bone
    rigid connective tissue that makes up the skeleton of vertebrates
    In front of him was an enemy
    who was trying to kill him: in front of him, also, was a human creature,
    in pain and perhaps with a broken bone.
  1421. dear
    a beloved person; used as terms of endearment
    'Never mind, dear.
  1422. practice
    a customary way of operation or behavior
    The inscription on the title-page ran:


    THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF
    OLIGARCHICAL COLLECTIVISM
    by
    Emmanuel Goldstein


    Winston began reading:


    Chapter I
    Ignorance is Strength

    Throughout recorded time, and probably since the end of the Neolithic Age,
    there have been three kinds of people in the world, the High, the Middle,
    and the Low. They have been subdivided in many ways, they have borne
    countless different names, and their relative numbers, as well as their
    attitude toward...
  1423. raise
    move upwards
    But there
    was another, wilder possibility that kept raising its head, though he
    tried vainly to suppress it.
  1424. efficient
    being effective without wasting time or effort or expense
    In the early twentieth century, the vision of
    a future society unbelievably rich, leisured, orderly, and efficient--a
    glittering antiseptic world of glass and steel and snow-white concrete--was
    part of the consciousness of nearly every literate person.
  1425. needs
    in such a manner as could not be otherwise
    In any case each of the three
    super-states is so vast that it can obtain almost all the materials that
    it needs within its own boundaries.
  1426. taken
    understood in a certain way; made sense of
    The whole incident could
    not have taken as much as half a minute.
  1427. speckled
    having a pattern of dots
    Sometimes it stopped
    for a few seconds, spread out and resettled its wings, then swelled its
    speckled breast and again burst into song.
  1428. plugged
    completely obstructed or closed off
    The new tune which was to be the theme-song of Hate Week (the Hate Song,
    it was called) had already been composed and was being endlessly plugged
    on the telescreens.
  1429. ache
    a dull persistent (usually moderately intense) pain
    Each time that Winston broke off for one of his spells of
    sleep he tried to leave his desk clear of work, and each time that he
    crawled back sticky-eyed and aching, it was to find that another shower
    of paper cylinders had covered the desk like a snowdrift, half-burying the
    speakwrite and overflowing on to the floor, so that the first job was
    always to stack them into a neat enough pile to give him room to work.
  1430. pick out
    pick out, select, or choose from a number of alternatives
    She had even (an
    infallible mark of good reputation) been picked out to work in Pornosec,
    the sub-section of the Fiction Department which turned out cheap
    pornography for distribution among the proles.
  1431. gone
    no longer retained
    Four days had gone
    past since the evening when he had run into her outside the junk-shop.
  1432. lay claim
    demand as being one's due or property; assert one's right or title to
    The frontiers of Eurasia flow back and forth between the basin of the Congo
    and the northern shore of the Mediterranean; the islands of the Indian
    Ocean and the Pacific are constantly being captured and recaptured by
    Oceania or by Eastasia; in Mongolia the dividing line between Eurasia and
    Eastasia is never stable; round the Pole all three powers lay claim to
    enormous territories which in fact are largely uninhabited and unexplored:
    but the balance of power always remains roughly even...
  1433. zoom
    the act of rising upward into the air
    But at this moment there was a din of
    shouting and a zoom of heavy vehicles from somewhere to the left.
  1434. filter
    device that removes something from whatever passes through it
    The sunlight, filtering
    through innumerable leaves, was still hot on their faces.
  1435. convince
    make (someone) agree, understand, or realize the truth or validity of something
    Slowly, in
    mild afternoon sunshine, he walked up a dingy street in the direction
    of Mr Charrington's shop, keeping one eye open for the patrols, but
    irrationally convinced that this afternoon there was no danger of anyone
    interfering with him.
  1436. regenerate
    reestablish on a new, usually improved, basis or make new or like new
    For the first time in his life he did not
    despise the proles or think of them merely as an inert force which would
    one day spring to life and regenerate the world.
  1437. aloud
    using the voice; not silently
    Party members were supposed not to swear, and Winston himself very seldom
    did swear, aloud, at any rate.
  1438. vague
    lacking clarity or distinctness
    In his vague way Ampleforth
    was attached to Winston, and would certainly sit down at his table if
    he caught sight of him.
  1439. formulate
    prepare according to a formula
    But this would violate the principle, followed on
    all sides though never formulated, of cultural integrity.
  1440. geographical
    of or relating to the science of geography
    Even the
    geographical knowledge that one needed in transferring the war from one
    part of the world to another was considerable.
  1441. meeting
    the social act of assembling for some common purpose
    It was a physical problem that had to be solved: how to get in touch with
    the girl and arrange a meeting.
  1442. set on fire
    set fire to; cause to start burning
    There were further angry
    demonstrations, Goldstein was burned in effigy, hundreds of copies of the
    poster of the Eurasian soldier were torn down and added to the flames, and
    a number of shops were looted in the turmoil; then a rumour flew round
    that spies were directing the rocket bombs by means of wireless waves, and
    an old couple who were suspected of being of foreign extraction had their
    house set on fire and perished of suffocation.
  1443. just as
    at the same time as
    One, much
    the more likely, was that the girl was an agent of the Thought Police,
    just as he had feared.
  1444. times
    a more or less definite period of time now or previously present
    Winston, at normal times the kind of person who gravitates to the outer
    edge of any kind of scrimmage, shoved, butted, squirmed his way forward
    into the heart of the crowd.
  1445. harmonize
    bring into consonance or accord
    As though to harmonize with the general mood, the rocket bombs had been
    killing larger numbers of people than usual.
  1446. talk of
    discuss or mention
    He wished that he were
    walking through the streets with her just as they were doing now but openly
    and without fear, talking of trivialities and buying odds and ends for the
    household.
  1447. light
    (physics) electromagnetic radiation that can produce a visual sensation
    A solitary figure was coming towards him from the other end of the long,
    brightly-lit corridor.
  1448. panic
    an overwhelming feeling of fear and anxiety
    Already the black instant of panic was half-forgotten.
  1449. ring
    a toroidal shape
    It was the second of May. From somewhere deeper
    in the heart of the wood came the droning of ring-doves.
  1450. entrails
    internal organs collectively (especially those in the abdominal cavity)
    For a moment it felt as though his
    entrails were being ground to pulp between the two muscular hips, then he
    had broken through, sweating a little.
  1451. surprise
    come upon or take unawares
    Nevertheless it had been very difficult not to
    betray a momentary surprise, for in the two or three seconds while he was
    helping her up the girl had slipped something into his hand.
  1452. all right
    being satisfactory or in satisfactory condition
    It'll be all right in a second.'
  1453. locket
    a small ornamental case; usually contains a picture or a lock of hair and is worn on a necklace
    With a sort of faded enthusiasm he would finger this scrap of rubbish or
    that--a china bottle-stopper, the painted lid of a broken snuffbox, a
    pinchbeck locket containing a strand of some long-dead baby's hair--never
    asking that Winston should buy it, merely that he should admire it.
  1454. intelligible
    capable of being apprehended or understood
    The cyclical movement of history was now
    intelligible, or appeared to be so; and if it was intelligible, then it
    was alterable.
  1455. tinkle
    make or emit a high sound
    To
    talk to him was like listening to the tinkling of a worn-out musical-box.
  1456. practicable
    capable of being done with means at hand and circumstances as they are
    Even the one plan that was practicable,
    suicide, they had no intention of carrying out.
  1457. unendurable
    incapable of being put up with
    He was standing in front of a wall of darkness,
    and on the other side of it there was something unendurable, something too
    dreadful to be faced.
  1458. top
    the upper part of anything
    He re-adjusted his spectacles on his nose,
    sighed, and drew the next batch of work towards him, with the scrap of
    paper on top of it.
  1459. suicidal
    dangerous to yourself or your interests
    Folly, folly, his heart kept saying: conscious, gratuitous, suicidal folly.
  1460. hidden
    not accessible to view
    'I didn't want to say anything in the lane,' she went on, 'in case there's
    a mike hidden there.
  1461. kneel
    rest one's weight on one's knees
    He knelt down and began
    picking some partly to pass the time away, but also from a vague idea that
    he would like to have a bunch of flowers to offer to the girl when they
    met.
  1462. lunch
    a midday meal
    Lunch in the hot, crowded, noise-filled
    canteen was torment.
  1463. supersede
    take the place or move into the position of
    Helicopters are more used than they were formerly, bombing
    planes have been largely superseded by self-propelled projectiles, and the
    fragile movable battleship has given way to the almost unsinkable Floating
    Fortress; but otherwise there has been little development.
  1464. each
    (used of count nouns) every one considered individually
    They
    passed each other without a glance.
  1465. cooly
    (ethnic slur) an offensive name for an unskilled Asian laborer
    Whichever
    power controls equatorial Africa, or the countries of the Middle East, or
    Southern India, or the Indonesian Archipelago, disposes also of the bodies
    of scores or hundreds of millions of ill-paid and hard-working coolies.
  1466. political
    involving or characteristic of politics or parties or politicians
    Whatever was written on the paper, it must have some kind of political
    meaning.
  1467. acquire
    come into the possession of something concrete or abstract
    Not to let one's feelings appear
    in one's face was a habit that had acquired the status of an instinct,
    and in any case they had been standing straight in front of a telescreen
    when the thing happened.
  1468. creak
    make a high-pitched, screeching noise
    His overalls fretted his shoulders, the pavement tickled
    his feet, even the opening and closing of a hand was an effort that made
    his joints creak.
  1469. overt
    open and observable; not secret or hidden
    The ruling groups
    were always infected to some extent by liberal ideas, and were content to
    leave loose ends everywhere, to regard only the overt act and to be
    uninterested in what their subjects were thinking.
  1470. conspirator
    a member of a conspiracy
    For what evidence had he in reality that O'Brien was any
    kind of political conspirator?
  1471. soon
    in the near future
    Soon he was within arm's length of the girl,
    but the way was blocked by an enormous prole and an almost equally enormous
    woman, presumably his wife, who seemed to form an impenetrable wall of
    flesh.
  1472. so far
    to the degree or extent that
    So far as he could see there were two possibilities.
  1473. yet
    up to the present time
    It could not have been ten seconds, and yet it seemed a long time that
    their hands were clasped together.
  1474. syntax
    studies of the rules for forming admissible sentences
    The thing that impressed Winston in looking back was that the speaker had
    switched from one line to the other actually in midsentence, not only
    without a pause, but without even breaking the syntax.
  1475. intelligent
    having the capacity for thought and reason especially to a high degree
    He did not
    suppose, from what he could remember of her, that she had been an unusual
    woman, still less an intelligent one; and yet she had possessed a kind of
    nobility, a kind of purity, simply because the standards that she obeyed
    were private ones.
  1476. suitably
    in an appropriate manner
    Perhaps it could be dug out of
    Mr Charrington's memory, if he were suitably prompted.
  1477. conquest
    the act of conquering
    All members of the Inner Party believe in this coming conquest as an
    article of faith.
  1478. saw
    hand tool having a toothed blade for cutting
    As she came nearer he saw that her right arm was in a sling, not noticeable
    at a distance because it was of the same colour as her overalls.
  1479. prevail
    be larger in number, quantity, power, status or importance
    The prevailing emotion was simply curiosity.
  1480. identity
    the individual characteristics by which a thing or person is recognized or known
    'You are prepared to lose your identity and live out the rest of your life
    as a waiter or a dock-worker?'
  1481. dead
    no longer having or seeming to have or expecting to have life
    A half-hour railway journey; turn left outside
    the station; two kilometres along the road; a gate with the top bar
    missing; a path across a field; a grass-grown lane; a track between bushes;
    a dead tree with moss on it.
  1482. preponderance
    exceeding in heaviness; having greater weight
    It is to be achieved either by gradually acquiring more
    and more territory and so building up an overwhelming preponderance of
    power, or by the discovery of some new and unanswerable weapon.
  1483. able
    (usually followed by `to') having the necessary means or skill or know-how or authority to do something
    It was not till twenty-three hours, when he
    was home and in bed--in the darkness, where you were safe even from the
    telescreen so long as you kept silent--that he was able to think
    continuously.
  1484. bottomless
    having no bottom
    But above all they contain a bottomless reserve of cheap labour.
  1485. grasp
    hold firmly
    Unlike Winston, she had grasped the inner
    meaning of the Party's sexual puritanism.
  1486. equivocal
    open to two or more interpretations; or of uncertain nature or significance; or (often) intended to mislead
    Nothing but a flash of the eyes and a single
    equivocal remark: beyond that, only his own secret imaginings, founded on
    a dream.
  1487. lead on
    entice or induce especially when unwise or mistaken
    But none of these projects ever comes anywhere near realization, and none
    of the three super-states ever gains a significant lead on the others.
  1488. first step
    the first of a series of actions
    Sometimes, too, they talked of engaging in active rebellion against the
    Party, but with no notion of how to take the first step.
  1489. nimbly
    in a nimble or agile manner; with quickness and lightness and ease
    The girl nipped nimbly
    round the lions at the base of the monument and joined in the rush.
  1490. silent
    marked by absence of sound
    It was not till twenty-three hours, when he
    was home and in bed--in the darkness, where you were safe even from the
    telescreen so long as you kept silent--that he was able to think
    continuously.
  1491. turn out
    be shown or be found to be
    She had even (an
    infallible mark of good reputation) been picked out to work in Pornosec,
    the sub-section of the Fiction Department which turned out cheap
    pornography for distribution among the proles.
  1492. lank
    long and thin and often limp
    On a scarlet-draped platform an orator of the Inner Party, a small
    lean man with disproportionately long arms and a large bald skull over
    which a few lank locks straggled, was haranguing the crowd.
  1493. violently
    in a violent manner
    She flung herself into his arms, kissed him almost violently, and a moment
    later pushed her way through the saplings and disappeared into the wood
    with very little noise.
  1494. splinters
    wood in small pieces or splinters
    We shall take part in it as handfuls
    of dust and splinters of bone.
  1495. survive
    continue in existence after (an adversity, etc.)
    If it survives
    anywhere, it's in a few solid objects with no words attached to them, like
    that lump of glass there.
  1496. easing
    the act of reducing something unpleasant (as pain or annoyance)
    Everywhere at about the same time the work
    was easing off.
  1497. muck
    any thick, viscous matter
    It was nicknamed Muck House
    by the people who worked in it, she remarked.
  1498. conspiracy
    a plot to carry out some harmful or illegal act (especially a political plot)
    The
    conspiracy that he had dreamed of did exist, and he had reached the outer
    edges of it.
  1499. disbelieve
    reject as false; refuse to accept
    We
    disbelieve in the principles of Ingsoc.
  1500. street corner
    the intersection of two streets
    He remembered better the rackety, uneasy circumstances of
    the time: the periodical panics about air-raids and the sheltering in Tube
    stations, the piles of rubble everywhere, the unintelligible proclamations
    posted at street corners, the gangs of youths in shirts all the same
    colour, the enormous queues outside the bakeries, the intermittent
    machine-gun fire in the distance--above all, the fact that there was
    never enough to eat.
  1501. boiled
    cooked in hot water
    'Half that water's boiled away,' she said.
  1502. suppose
    expect, believe, or suppose
    He wandered round
    the base of the enormous fluted column, at the top of which Big Brother's
    statue gazed southward towards the skies where he had vanquished the
    Eurasian aeroplanes (the Eastasian aeroplanes, it had been, a few years
    ago) in the Battle of Airstrip One. In the street in front of it there was
    a statue of a man on horseback which was supposed to represent Oliver
    Cromwell.
  1503. transfer
    move from one place to another
    As he passed through the lavatory door he transferred it to his
    pocket and felt it with the tips of his fingers.
  1504. moving
    in motion
    The person immediately
    ahead of him in the queue was a small, swiftly-moving, beetle-like man
    with a flat face and tiny, suspicious eyes.
  1505. squat
    sit on one's heels
    In the trucks little yellow men in shabby greenish uniforms were squatting,
    jammed close together.
  1506. connected
    joined or linked together
    He always woke
    up without discovering what it was: but somehow it was connected with what
    Julia had been saying when he cut her short.
  1507. smash
    hit violently
    Only five nights ago he had contemplated smashing her skull in with
    a cobblestone, but that was of no importance.
  1508. knowledge
    the psychological result of perception and learning and reasoning
    She obviously had a practical cunning which
    Winston lacked, and she seemed also to have an exhaustive knowledge of the
    countryside round London, stored away from innumerable community hikes.
  1509. backward
    at or to or toward the back or rear
    However, no patrols had appeared, and on the walk from the
    station he had made sure by cautious backward glances that he was not
    being followed.
  1510. boyish
    befitting or characteristic of a young boy
    Her short hair and boyish overalls merely added
    to the effect.
  1511. conceivably
    within the realm of possibility
    Six months, a year--five years, conceivably.
  1512. habit
    an established custom
    Not to let one's feelings appear
    in one's face was a habit that had acquired the status of an instinct,
    and in any case they had been standing straight in front of a telescreen
    when the thing happened.
  1513. uneasy
    causing or fraught with or showing anxiety
    THEM, it appeared, meant the Party, and above all the Inner Party, about
    whom she talked with an open jeering hatred which made Winston feel uneasy,
    although he knew that they were safe here if they could be safe anywhere.
  1514. saying
    a word or phrase that particular people use in particular situations
    The irritating thing was that in the racket
    of voices Winston could hardly hear what Parsons was saying, and was
    constantly having to ask for some fatuous remark to be repeated.
  1515. strategy
    an elaborate and systematic plan of action
    Later I shall send you a book from which you will
    learn the true nature of the society we live in, and the strategy by which
    we shall destroy it.
  1516. at any rate
    if nothing else (`leastwise' is informal and `leastways' is colloquial)
    Party members were supposed not to swear, and Winston himself very seldom
    did swear, aloud, at any rate.
  1517. part-time
    involving less than the standard or customary time for an activity
    She even induced
    Winston to mortgage yet another of his evenings by enrolling himself for
    the part-time munition work which was done voluntarily by zealous Party
    members.
  1518. cabbage
    any of various cultivars of the genus Brassica oleracea grown for their edible leaves or flowers
    He remembered long afternoons spent with other boys
    in scrounging round dustbins and rubbish heaps, picking out the ribs of
    cabbage leaves, potato peelings, sometimes even scraps of stale breadcrust
    from which they carefully scraped away the cinders; and also in waiting
    for the passing of trucks which travelled over a certain route and were
    known to carry cattle feed, and which, when they jolted over the bad
    patches in the road, sometimes spilt a few fragments of oil-cake.
  1519. roughly
    with rough motion as over a rough surface
    The frontiers of Eurasia flow back and forth between the basin of the Congo
    and the northern shore of the Mediterranean; the islands of the Indian
    Ocean and the Pacific are constantly being captured and recaptured by
    Oceania or by Eastasia; in Mongolia the dividing line between Eurasia and
    Eastasia is never stable; round the Pole all three powers lay claim to
    enormous territories which in fact are largely uninhabited and unexplored:
    but the balance of power always remains roughly even...
  1520. bloodthirsty
    marked by eagerness to resort to violence and bloodshed
    This is not to say that either the conduct of war, or the prevailing
    attitude towards it, has become less bloodthirsty or more chivalrous.
  1521. theory
    a belief that can guide behavior
    The theory was that men, whose sex
    instincts were less controllable than those of women, were in greater
    danger of being corrupted by the filth they handled.
  1522. pick up
    take and lift upward
    There were no telescreens, of course, but there
    was always the danger of concealed microphones by which your voice might
    be picked up and recognized; besides, it was not easy to make a journey
    by yourself without attracting attention.
  1523. exchange
    the act of changing one thing for another thing
    If he could get her at a table by herself,
    somewhere in the middle of the room, not too near the telescreens, and
    with a sufficient buzz of conversation all round--if these conditions
    endured for, say, thirty seconds, it might be possible to exchange a few
    words.
  1524. appearance
    outward or visible aspect of a person or thing
    There was a vacant place at a
    table further away, but something in the little man's appearance suggested
    that he would be sufficiently attentive to his own comfort to choose the
    emptiest table.
  1525. wrench
    a sharp strain on muscles or ligaments
    With a deadly effort, like wrenching a piece out of his own
    brain, he could even have dragged the thing into the open.
  1526. start
    take the first step or steps in carrying out an action
    Already he had instinctively
    started forward to help her.
  1527. chair
    a seat for one person, with a support for the back
    With one hand in her pocket and a piece of bread and jam in the other,
    Julia wandered about the room, glancing indifferently at the bookcase,
    pointing out the best way of repairing the gateleg table, plumping herself
    down in the ragged arm-chair to see if it was comfortable, and examining
    the absurd twelve-hour clock with a sort of tolerant amusement.
  1528. steadily
    at a steady rate or pace
    Both
    Winston and the girl were eating steadily.
  1529. obeisance
    bending the head or body or knee as a sign of reverence or submission or shame or greeting
    It spread out its wings, fitted them carefully into place
    again, ducked its head for a moment, as though making a sort of obeisance
    to the sun, and then began to pour forth a torrent of song.
  1530. illusion
    an erroneous mental representation
    But there were also times when they had the illusion
    not only of safety but of permanence.
  1531. sit up
    change to an upright sitting position
    He sat up and watched the freckled face, still
    peacefully asleep, pillowed on the palm of her hand.
  1532. starve
    die of food deprivation
    He knew that he was starving the other two, but he could not help it; he
    even felt that he had a right to do it.
  1533. lense
    a transparent optical device used to converge or diverge transmitted light and to form images
    Some are
    concerned simply with planning the logistics of future wars; others devise
    larger and larger rocket bombs, more and more powerful explosives, and more
    and more impenetrable armour-plating; others search for new and deadlier
    gases, or for soluble poisons capable of being produced in such quantities
    as to destroy the vegetation of whole continents, or for breeds of disease
    germs immunized against all possible antibodies; others strive to produce
    a vehicle that shall bore its way under...
  1534. after all
    in spite of expectations
    Perhaps the Brotherhood existed after all!
  1535. hardening
    the act of making something harder (firmer or tighter or more compact)
    And in the
    general hardening of outlook that set in round about 1930, practices which
    had been long abandoned, in some cases for hundreds of years--imprisonment
    without trial, the use of war prisoners as slaves, public executions,
    torture to extract confessions, the use of hostages, and the deportation
    of whole populations--not only became common again, but were tolerated
    and even defended by people who considered themselves enlightened and
    progressive.
  1536. convoy
    the act of escorting while in transit
    As he ran, he gathered from some shouted remarks that
    a convoy of Eurasian prisoners was passing.
  1537. chopper
    an aircraft without wings that obtains its lift from the rotation of overhead blades
    But anyway I remember it ends
    up, "Here comes a candle to light you to bed, here comes a chopper to chop
    off your head!"'
  1538. transparency
    the quality of being clear and transparent
    His whole mind and body seemed to be afflicted with an unbearable
    sensitivity, a sort of transparency, which made every movement, every
    sound, every contact, every word that he had to speak or listen to, an
    agony.
  1539. citizen
    a native or naturalized member of a state or other political community
    War prisoners apart, the average
    citizen of Oceania never sets eyes on a citizen of either Eurasia or
    Eastasia, and he is forbidden the knowledge of foreign languages.
  1540. finally
    as the end result of a succession or process
    Finally he decided that the
    safest place was the canteen.
  1541. upright
    in a vertical position; not sloping
    A long line of trucks, with wooden-faced guards armed with sub-machine
    guns standing upright in each corner, was passing slowly down the street.
  1542. overtime
    work done in addition to regular working hours
    The preparations for Hate Week were in full swing, and the
    staffs of all the Ministries were working overtime.
  1543. six
    the cardinal number that is the sum of five and one
    Julia was twenty-six years old.
  1544. sun
    the star that is the source of light and heat for the planets in the solar system
    It was in the sun, they in
    the shade.
  1545. emanation
    the act of emitting; causing to flow forth
    The smell was
    already filling the room, a rich hot smell which seemed like an emanation
    from his early childhood, but which one did occasionally meet with even
    now, blowing down a passage-way before a door slammed, or diffusing itself
    mysteriously in a crowded street, sniffed for an instant and then lost
    again.
  1546. dim
    lacking in light; not bright or harsh
    If she had worked in the Records Department it might have
    been comparatively simple, but he had only a very dim idea whereabouts in
    the building the Fiction Department lay, and he had no pretext for going
    there.
  1547. pyramid
    a polyhedron having a polygonal base and triangular sides with a common vertex
    In principle it would
    be quite simple to waste the surplus labour of the world by building
    temples and pyramids, by digging holes and filling them up again, or even
    by producing vast quantities of goods and then setting fire to them.
  1548. realization
    coming to understand something clearly and distinctly
    But none of these projects ever comes anywhere near realization, and none
    of the three super-states ever gains a significant lead on the others.
  1549. acuteness
    the quality of having a sharp edge or point
    As soon as this was touched upon in any way she was
    capable of great acuteness.
  1550. rowdy
    disturbing the public peace; loud and rough
    Late at night, when crowds of
    rowdy proles roamed the streets, the town had a curiously febrile air.
  1551. Indonesian
    of or relating to or characteristic of Indonesia or its people or languages
    Whichever
    power controls equatorial Africa, or the countries of the Middle East, or
    Southern India, or the Indonesian Archipelago, disposes also of the bodies
    of scores or hundreds of millions of ill-paid and hard-working coolies.
  1552. jacket
    a short coat
    Wandering about among his worthless stock, with his long nose and
    thick spectacles and his bowed shoulders in the velvet jacket, he had
    always vaguely the air of being a collector rather than a tradesman.
  1553. block
    obstruct
    Already a dense mass of people was blocking the south side of the square.
  1554. bring
    take something or somebody with oneself somewhere
    His first feeling was relief, but as
    he watched the strong slender body moving in front of him, with the scarlet
    sash that was just tight enough to bring out the curve of her hips, the
    sense of his own inferiority was heavy upon him.
  1555. fundamental principle
    principles from which other truths can be derived
    The
    empirical method of thought, on which all the scientific achievements of
    the past were founded, is opposed to the most fundamental principles of
    Ingsoc.
  1556. threadbare
    having the nap worn away so that the threads show through
    There were no sheets, but the blanket they lay on was
    threadbare and smooth, and the size and springiness of the bed astonished
    both of them.
  1557. youthful
    suggestive of youth; vigorous and fresh
    He thought of her naked,
    youthful body, as he had seen it in his dream.
  1558. din
    a loud harsh or strident noise
    But at this moment there was a din of
    shouting and a zoom of heavy vehicles from somewhere to the left.
  1559. repeated
    recurring again and again
    'It's nothing,' she repeated shortly.
  1560. more and more
    advancing in amount or intensity
    It is to be achieved either by gradually acquiring more
    and more
    territory and so building up an overwhelming preponderance of
    power, or by the discovery of some new and unanswerable weapon.
  1561. recapture
    the act of taking something back
    The frontiers of Eurasia flow back and forth between the basin of the Congo
    and the northern shore of the Mediterranean; the islands of the Indian
    Ocean and the Pacific are constantly being captured and recaptured by
    Oceania or by Eastasia; in Mongolia the dividing line between Eurasia and
    Eastasia is never stable; round the Pole all three powers lay claim to
    enormous territories which in fact are largely uninhabited and unexplored:
    but the balance of power always remains roughly even...
  1562. perceptibly
    in a noticeable manner
    In the ragged
    hedge on the opposite side the boughs of the elm trees swayed just
    perceptibly in the breeze, and their leaves stirred faintly in dense
    masses like women's hair.
  1563. squatting
    the act of assuming or maintaining a crouching position with the knees bent and the buttocks near the heels
    In the trucks little yellow men in shabby greenish uniforms were squatting,
    jammed close together.
  1564. shaded
    protected from heat and light with shade or shadow
    At the far end of the room
    O'Brien was sitting at a table under a green-shaded lamp, with a mass of
    papers on either side of him.
  1565. hazel
    Australian tree grown especially for ornament and its fine-grained wood and bearing edible nuts
    They were standing in the shade of hazel bushes.
  1566. pour
    cause to run
    It spread out its wings, fitted them carefully into place
    again, ducked its head for a moment, as though making a sort of obeisance
    to the sun, and then began to pour forth a torrent of song.
  1567. papers
    writing that provides information (especially information of an official nature)
    He went back to his cubicle, sat down, threw the fragment of paper
    casually among the other papers on the desk, put on his spectacles and
    hitched the speakwrite towards him.
  1568. throughout
    from first to last
    For several moments he had had the feeling of being back in a
    nightmare which had recurred from time to time throughout his life.
  1569. clamorous
    conspicuously and offensively loud; given to vehement outcry
    The clamorous hunger in his belly
    seemed to justify him.
  1570. fallen
    having dropped by the force of gravity
    She must have
    fallen right on the injured arm.
  1571. twist
    cause (a plastic object) to assume a crooked or angular form
    She twisted herself round and pressed her bosom against him.
  1572. crushed
    subdued or brought low in condition or status
    Probably
    she had crushed her hand while swinging round one of the big kaleidoscopes
    on which the plots of novels were 'roughed in'.
  1573. step
    the act of changing location by raising the foot and setting it down
    Chapter 2



    Winston picked his way up the lane through dappled light and shade,
    stepping out into pools of gold wherever the boughs parted.
  1574. oligarchy
    a political system governed by a few people
    It had long been realized that the
    only secure basis for oligarchy is collectivism.
  1575. pull up
    remove, usually with some force or effort; also used in an abstract sense
    They had only lagged behind
    the others for a couple of minutes, but they took a wrong turning, and
    presently found themselves pulled up short by the edge of an old chalk
    quarry.
  1576. necessitate
    require as useful, just, or proper
    Immediately after lunch there arrived a
    delicate, difficult piece of work which would take several hours and
    necessitated putting everything else aside.
  1577. uniformed
    dressed in a uniform
    Although he had
    a good pretext for coming here, he was haunted at every step by the fear
    that a black-uniformed guard would suddenly appear from round the corner,
    demand his papers, and order him to get out.
  1578. wage
    something that remunerates
    More
    exactly, the reasons for which war is waged have changed in their order of
    importance.
  1579. sack
    a bag made of paper or plastic for holding customer's purchases
    The June sun was still high in the sky,
    and in the sun-filled court below, a monstrous woman, solid as a Norman
    pillar, with brawny red forearms and a sacking apron strapped about her
    middle, was stumping to and fro between a washtub and a clothes line,
    pegging out a series of square white things which Winston recognized as
    babies' diapers.
  1580. mere
    being nothing more than specified
    Fortunately the piece of work he was engaged on was
    mere routine, the rectification of a long list of figures, not needing
    close attention.
  1581. leaflet
    a small book usually having a paper cover
    I've got to put in two hours for the
    Junior Anti-Sex League, handing out leaflets, or something.
  1582. grow up
    become an adult
    He wondered vaguely how many others like her there
    might be in the younger generation people who had grown up in the world of
    the Revolution, knowing nothing else, accepting the Party as something
    unalterable, like the sky, not rebelling against its authority but simply
    evading it, as a rabbit dodges a dog.
  1583. crushing
    physically or spiritually devastating; often used in combination
    It was like struggling with some crushing physical task,
    something which one had the right to refuse and which one was nevertheless
    neurotically anxious to accomplish.
  1584. take hold
    have or hold in one's hands or grip
    It
    struck him that when one lived with a woman this particular disappointment
    must be a normal, recurring event; and a deep tenderness, such as he had
    not felt for her before, suddenly took hold of him.
  1585. sheer
    so thin as to transmit light
    At the beginning he had no feeling except sheer incredulity.
  1586. list
    a database containing an ordered array of items (names or topics)
    Fortunately the piece of work he was engaged on was
    mere routine, the rectification of a long list of figures, not needing
    close attention.
  1587. sodden
    wet through and through; thoroughly wet
    He lay back with his eyes shut, still sodden in the atmosphere of the
    dream.
  1588. realize
    be fully aware or cognizant of
    Do you realize that the past,
    starting from yesterday, has been actually abolished?
  1589. lying
    the deliberate act of deviating from the truth
    You can watch them lying
    in the pools under the willow trees, waving their tails.'
  1590. courtesy
    a courteous manner
    And when
    they had such a place, it was only common courtesy in anyone else who knew
    of it to keep his knowledge to himself.
  1591. rape
    the crime of forcing a woman to submit to sexual intercourse against her will
    'I wanted to rape you and then murder
    you afterwards.
  1592. using
    an act that exploits or victimizes someone (treats them unfairly)
    Julia, however, seemed unable to mention
    the Party, and especially the Inner Party, without using the kind of words
    that you saw chalked up in dripping alley-ways.
  1593. comradeship
    the quality of affording easy familiarity and sociability
    You will get no
    comradeship and no encouragement.
  1594. tempo
    (music) the speed at which a composition is to be played
    By their labour the slave populations allow the tempo
    of continuous warfare to be speeded up.
  1595. thickly
    with a thick consistency
    Both of their faces were thickly coated with plaster.
  1596. beginning
    the act of starting something
    At the beginning he had no feeling except sheer incredulity.
  1597. the absurd
    a situation in which life seems irrational and meaningless
    With one hand in her pocket and a piece of bread and jam in the other,
    Julia wandered about the room, glancing indifferently at the bookcase,
    pointing out the best way of repairing the gateleg table, plumping herself
    down in the ragged arm-chair to see if it was comfortable, and examining
    the absurd twelve-hour clock with a sort of tolerant amusement.
  1598. solved
    explained or answered
    It was a physical problem that had to be solved: how to get in touch with
    the girl and arrange a meeting.
  1599. decade
    a period of 10 years
    The third, Eastasia, only
    emerged as a distinct unit after another decade of confused fighting.
  1600. behind
    in or to or toward the rear
    Then a voice behind him called, 'Smith!'
  1601. bookcase
    a piece of furniture with shelves for storing books
    With one hand in her pocket and a piece of bread and jam in the other,
    Julia wandered about the room, glancing indifferently at the bookcase,
    pointing out the best way of repairing the gateleg table, plumping herself
    down in the ragged arm-chair to see if it was comfortable, and examining
    the absurd twelve-hour clock with a sort of tolerant amusement.
  1602. shattering
    the act of breaking something into small pieces
    War is a way of shattering to pieces,
    or pouring into the stratosphere, or sinking in the depths of the sea,
    materials which might otherwise be used to make the masses too comfortable,
    and hence, in the long run, too intelligent.
  1603. meal
    any of the occasions for eating food that occur by custom or habit at more or less fixed times
    He wolfed another tasteless meal in the canteen, hurried
    off to the Centre, took part in the solemn foolery of a 'discussion group',
    played two games of table tennis, swallowed several glasses of gin, and
    sat for half an hour through a lecture entitled 'Ingsoc in relation to
    chess'.
  1604. drag out
    last unnecessarily long
    He had dragged out from the corners of his memory some more fragments of
    forgotten rhymes.
  1605. threaded
    (of bolts or screws) having screw threads
    Quickly, with an occasional crackle of twigs, they threaded their way back
    to the clearing.
  1606. talk about
    to consider or examine in speech or writing
    He had hoped to be alone for a little while during
    the lunch hour, but as bad luck would have it the imbecile Parsons flopped
    down beside him, the tang of his sweat almost defeating the tinny smell of
    stew, and kept up a stream of talk about the preparations for Hate Week.
  1607. explore
    travel to or penetrate into
    He explored the long fingers, the shapely nails, the
    work-hardened palm with its row of callouses, the smooth flesh under the
    wrist.
  1608. forward
    at or to or toward the front
    Already he had instinctively
    started forward to help her.
  1609. spread out
    extend in one or more directions
    It spread out its wings, fitted them carefully into place
    again, ducked its head for a moment, as though making a sort of obeisance
    to the sun, and then began to pour forth a torrent of song.
  1610. daunted
    caused to show discomposure
    The sweetness of the air and the greenness of the leaves daunted
    him.
  1611. pan
    shallow container made of metal
    Winston lit the burner and set a pan of water
    to boil.
  1612. desirable
    worth having or seeking or achieving
    In the
    old days, he thought, a man looked at a girl's body and saw that it was
    desirable, and that was the end of the story.
  1613. known
    apprehended with certainty
    If he had known where she lived, and at what time she left work,
    he could have contrived to meet her somewhere on her way home; but to try
    to follow her home was not safe, because it would mean loitering about
    outside the Ministry, which was bound to be noticed.
  1614. bump
    an impact (as from a collision)
    His heart bumped in his breast with
    frightening loudness.
  1615. stand watch
    watch over so as to protect
    Winston
    stood watching her for a moment.
  1616. dispute
    coming into conflict with
    In practice no one power ever controls the whole of the
    disputed area.
  1617. balance of power
    an equilibrium of power between nations
    The frontiers of Eurasia flow back and forth between the basin of the Congo
    and the northern shore of the Mediterranean; the islands of the Indian
    Ocean and the Pacific are constantly being captured and recaptured by
    Oceania or by Eastasia; in Mongolia the dividing line between Eurasia and
    Eastasia is never stable; round the Pole all three powers lay claim to
    enormous territories which in fact are largely uninhabited and unexplored:
    but the balance of power always remains roughly even...
  1618. shorts
    trousers that end at or above the knee
    The heat and the manual work had even given him a pretext for reverting
    to shorts and an open shirt in the evenings.
  1619. writhed
    twisted (especially as in pain or struggle)
    His soul writhed with boredom, but for once he had had no impulse
    to shirk his evening at the Centre.
  1620. carpeted
    covered with or as if with carpeting or with carpeting as specified; often used in combination
    The passage down which he
    led them was softly carpeted, with cream-papered walls and white
    wainscoting, all exquisitely clean.
  1621. starving
    suffering from lack of food
    He knew that he was starving the other two, but he could not help it; he
    even felt that he had a right to do it.
  1622. waiting
    the act of waiting (remaining inactive in one place while expecting something)
    As he sat waiting on the
    edge of the bed he thought again of the cellars of the Ministry of Love.
  1623. administrator
    someone who manages a government agency or department
    In his capacity
    as an administrator, it is often necessary for a member of the Inner Party
    to know that this or that item of war news is untruthful, and he may often
    be aware that the entire war is spurious and is either not happening or
    is being waged for purposes quite other than the declared ones: but such
    knowledge is easily neutralized by the technique of DOUBLETHINK.
  1624. sulphuric acid
    (H2SO4) a highly corrosive acid made from sulfur dioxide; widely used in the chemical industry
    'If, for example, it would somehow serve our interests to throw sulphuric
    acid
    in a child's face--are you prepared to do that?'
  1625. unceasingly
    with unflagging resolve
    The search
    for new weapons continues unceasingly, and is one of the very few remaining
    activities in which the inventive or speculative type of mind can find any
    outlet.
  1626. imposture
    pretending to be another person
    The war, therefore, if we judge it by the standards of previous wars, is
    merely an imposture.
  1627. advance
    move forward, also in the metaphorical sense
    Nor did the idea of refusing her advances even cross his
    mind.
  1628. shouting
    uttering a loud inarticulate cry as of pain or excitement
    But at this moment there was a din of
    shouting and a zoom of heavy vehicles from somewhere to the left.
  1629. rectify
    make right or correct
    Reports and records of all kinds, newspapers, books,
    pamphlets, films, sound-tracks, photographs--all had to be rectified at
    lightning speed.
  1630. drop
    let fall to the ground
    A rocket bomb must have dropped quite near at
    hand.
  1631. look up
    seek information from
    Neither of them looked up; steadily they spooned the
    watery stuff into their mouths, and between spoonfuls exchanged the few
    necessary words in low expressionless voices.
  1632. London
    the capital and largest city of England; located on the Thames in southeastern England; financial and industrial and cultural center
    In general you could not assume that you were much safer in the
    country than in London.
  1633. colour in
    add color to
    With just a few dabs of colour
    in
    the right places she had become not only very much prettier, but, above
    all, far more feminine.
  1634. enjoy
    derive or receive pleasure from; get enjoyment from; take pleasure in
    She enjoyed her work, which consisted
    chiefly in running and servicing a powerful but tricky electric motor.
  1635. eat
    take in solid food
    He unpacked his tray and promptly began eating.
  1636. discredited
    being unjustly brought into disrepute
    The earthly paradise had been discredited at exactly the
    moment when it became realizable.
  1637. agree
    consent or assent to a condition, or agree to do something
    As they drifted
    down the crowded pavements, not quite abreast and never looking at one
    another, they carried on a curious, intermittent conversation which flicked
    on and off like the beams of a lighthouse, suddenly nipped into silence
    by the approach of a Party uniform or the proximity of a telescreen, then
    taken up again minutes later in the middle of a sentence, then abruptly
    cut short as they parted at the agreed spot, then continued almost without
    introduction on the following day.
  1638. disconcerting
    causing an emotional disturbance
    If he persisted in talking of such subjects,
    she had a disconcerting habit of falling asleep.
  1639. reappear
    appear again
    The next day she reappeared.
  1640. inquisitor
    a questioner who is excessively harsh
    The scientist of today is either a mixture of psychologist and inquisitor,
    studying with real ordinary minuteness the meaning of facial expressions,
    gestures, and tones of voice, and testing the truth-producing effects of
    drugs, shock therapy, hypnosis, and physical torture; or he is chemist,
    physicist, or biologist concerned only with such branches of his special
    subject as are relevant to the taking of life.
  1641. individual
    being or characteristic of a single thing or person
    She would not accept it as a law
    of nature that the individual is always defeated.
  1642. ticking
    a metallic tapping sound
    The old-fashioned clock with the twelve-hour face was
    ticking away on the mantelpiece.
  1643. meanwhile
    at the same time but in another place
    Meanwhile I shall
    send you a copy of THE BOOK'--even O'Brien, Winston noticed, seemed to
    pronounce the words as though they were in italics--'Goldstein's book, you
    understand, as soon as possible.
  1644. thinker
    someone who exercises the mind (usually in an effort to reach a decision)
    To return to the agricultural past, as
    some thinkers about the beginning of the twentieth century dreamed of
    doing, was not a practicable solution.
  1645. general
    applying to all or most members of a category or group
    In general you could not assume that you were much safer in the
    country than in London.
  1646. secure
    free from danger or risk
    But the girl was still alone
    when Winston secured his tray and began to make for her table.
  1647. finger
    any of the terminal members of the hand (sometimes excepting the thumb)
    As he passed through the lavatory door he transferred it to his
    pocket and felt it with the tips of his fingers.
  1648. stupidly
    in a stupid manner
    'We're all right here?'
    he repeated stupidly.
  1649. poverty
    the state of having little or no money and few or no material possessions
    For if leisure and security were
    enjoyed by all alike, the great mass of human beings who are normally
    stupefied by poverty would become literate and would learn to think for
    themselves; and when once they had done this, they would sooner or later
    realize that the privileged minority had no function, and they would sweep
    it away.
  1650. practise
    engage in a rehearsal (of)
    Newspapers and history
    books were, of course, always coloured and biased, but falsification of
    the kind that is practised today would have been impossible.
  1651. dreamed
    conceived of or imagined or hoped for
    The
    conspiracy that he had dreamed of did exist, and he had reached the outer
    edges of it.
  1652. however
    in whatever way or manner
    However, no patrols had appeared, and on the walk from the
    station he had made sure by cautious backward glances that he was not
    being followed.
  1653. tacitly
    in a tacit manner; by unexpressed agreement
    Under this lies a fact never mentioned aloud, but tacitly understood and
    acted upon: namely, that the conditions of life in all three super-states
    are very much the same.
  1654. bandaged
    covered or wrapped with a bandage
    In the moment when he had seen her fall on
    the bandaged arm, it had been as though he felt the pain in his own body.
  1655. self
    your consciousness of your own identity
    Who knew, perhaps the Party was rotten under the surface,
    its cult of strenuousness and self-denial simply a sham concealing
    iniquity.
  1656. opening
    an open or empty space in or between things
    The girl hopped over and forced apart
    the bushes, in which there did not seem to be an opening.
  1657. dodge
    a quick evasive movement
    Obviously she had been that way
    before, for she dodged the boggy bits as though by habit.
  1658. bones
    a percussion instrument consisting of a pair of hollow pieces of wood or bone (usually held between the thumb and fingers) that are made to click together (as by Spanish dancers) in rhythm with the dance
    I want everyone to be corrupt to the bones.'
  1659. too much
    more than necessary
    When he did so, although he knew very well the
    danger of showing too much interest, he could not resist reading it once
    again, just to make sure that the words were really there.
  1660. take aback
    surprise greatly; knock someone's socks off
    Even in the midst
    of his panic, Winston was too much taken aback to be able to hold his
    tongue.
  1661. step out
    go outside a room or building for a short period of time
    Chapter 2



    Winston picked his way up the lane through dappled light and shade,
    stepping out into pools of gold wherever the boughs parted.
  1662. history
    a record or narrative description of past events
    It's a little chunk of history that
    they've forgotten to alter.
  1663. tinkling
    like the short high ringing sound of a small bell
    To
    talk to him was like listening to the tinkling of a worn-out musical-box.
  1664. hardened
    converted to solid form (as concrete)
    He explored the long fingers, the shapely nails, the
    work-hardened palm with its row of callouses, the smooth flesh under the
    wrist.
  1665. varied
    characterized by variety
    Winston's working week was sixty hours, Julia's was even longer, and
    their free days varied according to the pressure of work and did not
    often coincide.
  1666. from time to time
    now and then or here and there
    They sat talking for hours on the dusty,
    twig-littered floor, one or other of them getting up from time to time to
    cast a glance through the arrowslits and make sure that no one was coming.
  1667. attitude
    a complex mental state involving beliefs and feelings and values and dispositions to act in certain ways
    The inscription on the title-page ran:


    THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF
    OLIGARCHICAL COLLECTIVISM
    by
    Emmanuel Goldstein


    Winston began reading:


    Chapter I
    Ignorance is Strength

    Throughout recorded time, and probably since the end of the Neolithic Age,
    there have been three kinds of people in the world, the High, the Middle,
    and the Low. They have been subdivided in many ways, they have borne
    countless different names, and their relative numbers, as well as their
    attitude toward...
  1668. leaf
    the main organ of photosynthesis and transpiration in higher plants
    The sweetness of the air and the greenness of the leaves daunted
    him.
  1669. wear off
    diminish, as by friction
    The blissful feeling of being alone with the
    forbidden book, in a room with no telescreen, had not worn off.
  1670. fragmentary
    consisting of small disconnected parts
    When they met in the church tower the gaps in their fragmentary
    conversation were filled up.
  1671. other than
    in another and different manner
    It was inconceivable that this
    was anything other than a reference to Syme.
  1672. stench
    a distinctive odor that is offensively unpleasant
    In the labyrinthine Ministry the windowless,
    air-conditioned rooms kept their normal temperature, but outside the
    pavements scorched one's feet and the stench of the Tubes at the rush hours
    was a horror.
  1673. moreover
    in addition
    Moreover she took it for granted that everyone, or nearly
    everyone, secretly hated the Party and would break the rules if he thought
    it safe to do so.
  1674. inhabitant
    a person who inhabits a particular place
    Eurasia is protected by its vast land spaces, Oceania
    by the width of the Atlantic and the Pacific, Eastasia by the fecundity
    and industriousness of its inhabitants.
  1675. uniform
    clothing of distinctive design worn by members of a particular group as a means of identification
    In the trucks little yellow men in shabby greenish uniforms were squatting,
    jammed close together.
  1676. silky
    having a smooth, gleaming surface reflecting light
    What was even
    better than the taste of the coffee was the silky texture given to it by
    the sugar, a thing Winston had almost forgotten after years of saccharine.
  1677. of course
    as might be expected
    There were no telescreens, of course, but there
    was always the danger of concealed microphones by which your voice might
    be picked up and recognized; besides, it was not easy to make a journey
    by yourself without attracting attention.
  1678. wait
    stay in one place and anticipate or expect something
    You may have to wait.
  1679. murder
    unlawful premeditated killing of a human being by a human being
    'I wanted to rape you and then murder
    you afterwards.
  1680. bring out
    make visible
    His first feeling was relief, but as
    he watched the strong slender body moving in front of him, with the scarlet
    sash that was just tight enough to bring out the curve of her hips, the
    sense of his own inferiority was heavy upon him.
  1681. kissing
    affectionate play (or foreplay without contact with the genital organs)
    The youthful
    body was strained against his own, the mass of dark hair was against his
    face, and yes! actually she had turned her face up and he was kissing the
    wide red mouth.
  1682. avoid
    stay clear from; keep away from; keep out of the way of someone or something
    She might have been vaporized, she might
    have committed suicide, she might have been transferred to the other end
    of Oceania: worst and likeliest of all, she might simply have changed her
    mind and decided to avoid him.
  1683. permanence
    the property of being able to exist for an indefinite duration
    But there were also times when they had the illusion
    not only of safety but of permanence.
  1684. rubble
    the remains of something that has been destroyed or broken up
    He remembered better the rackety, uneasy circumstances of
    the time: the periodical panics about air-raids and the sheltering in Tube
    stations, the piles of rubble everywhere, the unintelligible proclamations
    posted at street corners, the gangs of youths in shirts all the same
    colour, the enormous queues outside the bakeries, the intermittent
    machine-gun fire in the distance--above all, the fact that there was
    never enough to eat.
  1685. emotion
    any strong feeling
    A curious emotion stirred in Winston's heart.
  1686. coloured
    having color or a certain color; sometimes used in combination
    He walked slowly up to the north side of the square and
    got a sort of pale-coloured pleasure from identifying St Martin's Church,
    whose bells, when it had bells, had chimed 'You owe me three farthings.'
  1687. Manchuria
    a region in northeastern China
    Eastasia,
    smaller than the others and with a less definite western frontier,
    comprises China and the countries to the south of it, the Japanese islands
    and a large but fluctuating portion of Manchuria, Mongolia, and Tibet.
  1688. exploited
    developed or used to greatest advantage
    Moreover, the labour of the exploited peoples round the Equator is not
    really necessary to the world's economy.
  1689. arbitrary
    based on or subject to individual discretion or preference or sometimes impulse or caprice
    The
    frontiers between the three super-states are in some places arbitrary, and
    in others they fluctuate according to the fortunes of war, but in general
    they follow geographical lines.
  1690. written
    set down in writing in any of various ways
    Obviously there must be a message of some kind written on
    it.
  1691. infrequently
    not many times
    Now that they had a
    secure hiding-place, almost a home, it did not even seem a hardship that
    they could only meet infrequently and for a couple of hours at a time.
  1692. touched
    having come into contact
    Except where it touched upon her own life she had no
    interest in Party doctrine.
  1693. soluble
    (of a substance) capable of being dissolved in some solvent (usually water)
    Some are
    concerned simply with planning the logistics of future wars; others devise
    larger and larger rocket bombs, more and more powerful explosives, and more
    and more impenetrable armour-plating; others search for new and deadlier
    gases, or for soluble poisons capable of being produced in such quantities
    as to destroy the vegetation of whole continents, or for breeds of disease
    germs immunized against all possible antibodies; others strive to produce
    a vehicle that shall bore its wa...
  1694. wave
    (physics) a movement up and down or back and forth
    You can watch them lying
    in the pools under the willow trees, waving their tails.'
  1695. tidal
    of or relating to or caused by tides
    Some are
    concerned simply with planning the logistics of future wars; others devise
    larger and larger rocket bombs, more and more powerful explosives, and more
    and more impenetrable armour-plating; others search for new and deadlier
    gases, or for soluble poisons capable of being produced in such quantities
    as to destroy the vegetation of whole continents, or for breeds of disease
    germs immunized against all possible antibodies; others strive to produce
    a vehicle that shall bore its way under...
  1696. route
    an established line of travel or access
    Go to Paddington
    Station----'

    With a sort of military precision that astonished him, she outlined the
    route that he was to follow.
  1697. coral
    marine colonial polyp characterized by a calcareous skeleton; masses in a variety of shapes often forming reefs
    The inexhaustibly interesting thing was not the fragment of coral but the
    interior of the glass itself.
  1698. interested
    having or showing interest; especially curiosity or fascination or concern
    But she was not interested in the
    finished product.
  1699. focus
    the concentration of attention or energy on something
    What was even
    worse than having to focus his mind on a series of niggling jobs was the
    need to conceal his agitation from the telescreen.
  1700. orange
    any citrus tree bearing oranges
    The fragment of rhyme that Mr Charrington had taught him came back into
    his head, and he added half-nostalgically: "Oranges and lemons, say the
    bells of St Clement's!"
  1701. expend
    use up, consume fully
    The inhabitants of these areas, reduced more or less openly to the status
    of slaves, pass continually from conqueror to conqueror, and are expended
    like so much coal or oil in the race to turn out more armaments, to capture
    more territory, to control more labour power, to turn out more armaments,
    to capture more territory, and so on indefinitely.
  1702. facial
    of or concerning the face
    The scientist of today is either a mixture of psychologist and inquisitor,
    studying with real ordinary minuteness the meaning of facial expressions,
    gestures, and tones of voice, and testing the truth-producing effects of
    drugs, shock therapy, hypnosis, and physical torture; or he is chemist,
    physicist, or biologist concerned only with such branches of his special
    subject as are relevant to the taking of life.
  1703. sulphuric
    of or relating to or containing sulfur
    'If, for example, it would somehow serve our interests to throw sulphuric
    acid in a child's face--are you prepared to do that?'
  1704. tingling
    a somatic sensation as from many tiny prickles
    The heavy brief-case that he was carrying bumped
    against his knee at each step, sending a tingling sensation up and down
    the skin of his leg.
  1705. organization
    an ordered manner; orderliness by virtue of being methodical and well organized
    This was, that the message did not come from
    the Thought Police at all, but from some kind of underground organization.
  1706. vanish
    become invisible or unnoticeable
    Nor did
    one know what became of them, apart from the few who were hanged as
    war-criminals: the others simply vanished, presumably into forced-labour
    camps.
  1707. concerned
    feeling or showing worry or solicitude
    What is concerned here is not the morale of masses,
    whose attitude is unimportant so long as they are kept steadily at work,
    but the morale of the Party itself.
  1708. gratuitous
    unnecessary and unwarranted
    Folly, folly, his heart kept saying: conscious, gratuitous, suicidal folly.
  1709. kiss
    touch with the lips or press the lips (against someone's mouth or other body part) as an expression of love, greeting, etc.
    The air
    seemed to kiss one's skin.
  1710. guise
    an artful or simulated semblance
    One
    literally never saw them except in the guise of prisoners, and even as
    prisoners one never got more than a momentary glimpse of them.
  1711. forearm
    the part of the superior limb between the elbow and the wrist
    The June sun was still high in the sky,
    and in the sun-filled court below, a monstrous woman, solid as a Norman
    pillar, with brawny red forearms and a sacking apron strapped about her
    middle, was stumping to and fro between a washtub and a clothes line,
    pegging out a series of square white things which Winston recognized as
    babies' diapers.
  1712. bunch
    a grouping of a number of similar things
    He knelt down and began
    picking some partly to pass the time away, but also from a vague idea that
    he would like to have a bunch of flowers to offer to the girl when they
    met.
  1713. nothingness
    the state of nonexistence
    What made it sit at the edge of the lonely wood
    and pour its music into nothingness?
  1714. old
    (used especially of persons) having lived for a relatively long time or attained a specific age
    The wooden-seated carriage in which he travelled was
    filled to overflowing by a single enormous family, ranging from a toothless
    great-grandmother to a month-old baby, going out to spend an afternoon
    with 'in-laws' in the country, and, as they freely explained to Winston,
    to get hold of a little black-market butter.
  1715. uninhabited
    not having inhabitants; not lived in
    The frontiers of Eurasia flow back and forth between the basin of the Congo
    and the northern shore of the Mediterranean; the islands of the Indian
    Ocean and the Pacific are constantly being captured and recaptured by
    Oceania or by Eastasia; in Mongolia the dividing line between Eurasia and
    Eastasia is never stable; round the Pole all three powers lay claim to
    enormous territories which in fact are largely uninhabited and unexplored:
    but the balance of power always remains roughly even...
  1716. underworld
    (religion) the world of the dead
    You have imagined, probably, a
    huge underworld of conspirators, meeting secretly in cellars, scribbling
    messages on walls, recognizing one another by codewords or by special
    movements of the hand.
  1717. vanquish
    come out better in a competition, race, or conflict
    He wandered round
    the base of the enormous fluted column, at the top of which Big Brother's
    statue gazed southward towards the skies where he had vanquished the
    Eurasian aeroplanes (the Eastasian aeroplanes, it had been, a few years
    ago) in the Battle of Airstrip One. In the street in front of it there was
    a statue of a man on horseback which was supposed to represent Oliver
    Cromwell.
  1718. encircling
    being all around the edges; enclosing
    The plan is, by a combination of fighting, bargaining, and
    well-timed strokes of treachery, to acquire a ring of bases completely
    encircling one or other of the rival states, and then to sign a pact of
    friendship with that rival and remain on peaceful terms for so many years
    as to lull suspicion to sleep.
  1719. fix up
    make arrangements for
    And now listen, dear, we've got to fix
    up
    about the next time we meet.
  1720. knocking
    the sound of knocking (as on a door or in an engine or bearing)
    So, one evening every week, Winston spent four hours of paralysing
    boredom, screwing together small bits of metal which were probably parts
    of bomb fuses, in a draughty, ill-lit workshop where the knocking of
    hammers mingled drearily with the music of the telescreens.
  1721. outwit
    beat through cleverness and wit
    They could spy
    upon you night and day, but if you kept your head you could still outwit
    them.
  1722. mentality
    a habitual or characteristic mental attitude that determines how you will interpret and respond to situations
    In other words it is necessary that he should have the mentality
    appropriate to a state of war.
  1723. comparatively
    in a relative manner; by comparison to something else
    If she had worked in the Records Department it might have
    been comparatively simple, but he had only a very dim idea whereabouts in
    the building the Fiction Department lay, and he had no pretext for going
    there.
  1724. tone of voice
    the quality of a person's voice
    The scientist of today is either a mixture of psychologist and inquisitor,
    studying with real ordinary minuteness the meaning of facial expressions,
    gestures, and tones of voice, and testing the truth-producing effects of
    drugs, shock therapy, hypnosis, and physical torture; or he is chemist,
    physicist, or biologist concerned only with such branches of his special
    subject as are relevant to the taking of life.
  1725. going
    the act of departing
    And with that she walked on in the direction in which she had been going,
    as briskly as though it had really been nothing.
  1726. dispose
    give, sell, or transfer to another
    Whichever
    power controls equatorial Africa, or the countries of the Middle East, or
    Southern India, or the Indonesian Archipelago, disposes also of the bodies
    of scores or hundreds of millions of ill-paid and hard-working coolies.
  1727. openly
    in an open way
    He wished that he were
    walking through the streets with her just as they were doing now but openly
    and without fear, talking of trivialities and buying odds and ends for the
    household.
  1728. nevertheless
    despite anything to the contrary (usually following a concession)
    Nevertheless it had been very difficult not to
    betray a momentary surprise, for in the two or three seconds while he was
    helping her up the girl had slipped something into his hand.
  1729. larger
    large or big relative to something else
    As though to harmonize with the general mood, the rocket bombs had been
    killing larger numbers of people than usual.
  1730. riotous
    characterized by unrest or disorder or insubordination
    There was a riotous
    interlude while posters were ripped from the walls, banners torn to shreds
    and trampled underfoot.
  1731. the like
    a similar kind
    Reality
    only exerts its pressure through the needs of everyday life--the need to
    eat and drink, to get shelter and clothing, to avoid swallowing poison or
    stepping out of top-storey windows, and the like.
  1732. foreigner
    a person who comes from a foreign country; someone who does not owe allegiance to your country
    Foreigners,
    whether from Eurasia or from Eastasia, were a kind of strange animal.
  1733. momentary
    lasting for a markedly brief time
    Nevertheless it had been very difficult not to
    betray a momentary surprise, for in the two or three seconds while he was
    helping her up the girl had slipped something into his hand.
  1734. military
    the military forces of a nation
    Go to Paddington
    Station----'

    With a sort of military precision that astonished him, she outlined the
    route that he was to follow.
  1735. climax
    the highest point of anything conceived of as growing or developing or unfolding
    Their embrace had been a battle, the climax
    a victory.
  1736. ripping
    resembling a sound of violent tearing as of something ripped apart or lightning splitting a tree
    'It's this bloody thing that does it,' she said, ripping off the scarlet
    sash of the Junior Anti-Sex League and flinging it on to a bough.
  1737. somebody
    a human being
    Under the window somebody was singing.
  1738. capitalist
    of or relating to capitalism or capitalists
    It had always been assumed that if the capitalist class
    were expropriated, Socialism must follow: and unquestionably the
    capitalists had been expropriated.
  1739. shock
    an unpleasant or disappointing surprise
    But that would be shocking folly, as he well knew.
  1740. bound
    confined by bonds
    If he had known where she lived, and at what time she left work,
    he could have contrived to meet her somewhere on her way home; but to try
    to follow her home was not safe, because it would mean loitering about
    outside the Ministry, which was bound to be noticed.
  1741. youth
    a young person (especially a young man or boy)
    It was too soon, her youth and
    prettiness had frightened him, he was too much used to living without
    women--he did not know the reason.
  1742. stew
    cook slowly and for a long time in liquid
    He had hoped to be alone for a little while during
    the lunch hour, but as bad luck would have it the imbecile Parsons flopped
    down beside him, the tang of his sweat almost defeating the tinny smell of
    stew, and kept up a stream of talk about the preparations for Hate Week.
  1743. forget
    dismiss from the mind; stop remembering
    If there was any relief, it was in
    his work, in which he could sometimes forget himself for ten minutes at a
    stretch.
  1744. irritate
    cause annoyance in; disturb, especially by minor irritations
    The irritating thing was that in the racket
    of voices Winston could hardly hear what Parsons was saying, and was
    constantly having to ask for some fatuous remark to be repeated.
  1745. govern
    exercise authority over; as of nations
    They
    were governed by private loyalties which they did not question.
  1746. snatch
    to grasp hastily or eagerly
    Then with a sudden swift spring he had
    snatched the piece of chocolate out of his sister's hand and was fleeing
    for the door.
  1747. subside
    sink to a lower level or form a depression
    He had grown fatter, his varicose ulcer had subsided,
    leaving only a brown stain on the skin above his ankle, his fits of
    coughing in the early morning had stopped.
  1748. struggling
    engaged in a struggle to overcome especially poverty or obscurity
    It was like struggling with some crushing physical task,
    something which one had the right to refuse and which one was nevertheless
    neurotically anxious to accomplish.
  1749. fixture
    the quality of being fixed in place as by some firm attachment
    The brawny red-armed woman whom Winston
    had seen there on his first visit was almost a fixture in the yard.
  1750. short
    (primarily spatial sense) having little length or lacking in length
    Winston stopped short.
  1751. utterly
    completely and without qualification; used informally as intensifiers
    Their sad, Mongolian faces gazed out over the sides
    of the trucks utterly incurious.
  1752. shove
    come into rough contact with while moving
    Winston, at normal times the kind of person who gravitates to the outer
    edge of any kind of scrimmage, shoved, butted, squirmed his way forward
    into the heart of the crowd.
  1753. recall
    call to mind
    But what really recalled
    her to him at this moment was the stifling heat of the afternoon, which
    had brought the sweat out on his forehead.
  1754. outline
    the line that appears to bound an object
    Go to Paddington
    Station----'

    With a sort of military precision that astonished him, she outlined the
    route that he was to follow.
  1755. trolley
    a wheeled vehicle that runs on rails and is propelled by electricity
    Mattresses were brought
    up from the cellars and pitched all over the corridors: meals consisted of
    sandwiches and Victory Coffee wheeled round on trolleys by attendants from
    the canteen.
  1756. help
    give help or assistance; be of service
    Already he had instinctively
    started forward to help her.
  1757. point
    a distinguishing or individuating characteristic
    She even leaned out over the cliff face to see where he was
    pointing.
  1758. wood
    the hard fibrous lignified substance under the bark of trees
    It was the second of May. From somewhere deeper
    in the heart of the wood came the droning of ring-doves.
  1759. endlessly
    continuing forever without end
    The new tune which was to be the theme-song of Hate Week (the Hate Song,
    it was called) had already been composed and was being endlessly plugged
    on the telescreens.
  1760. helpless
    unable to function; without help
    The young, strong body, now helpless in sleep, awoke in him a pitying,
    protecting feeling.
  1761. shortage
    the property of being an amount by which something is less than expected or required
    In
    the centres of civilization war means no more than a continuous shortage
    of consumption goods, and the occasional crash of a rocket bomb which may
    cause a few scores of deaths.
  1762. dab
    a light touch or stroke
    With just a few dabs of colour
    in the right places she had become not only very much prettier, but, above
    all, far more feminine.
  1763. prop
    a support placed beneath or against something to keep it from shaking or falling
    On the contrary,
    so long as they remain in conflict they prop one another up, like three
    sheaves of corn.
  1764. true
    consistent with fact or reality; not false
    That was very true, he thought.
  1765. below
    in or to a place that is lower
    The June sun was still high in the sky,
    and in the sun-filled court below, a monstrous woman, solid as a Norman
    pillar, with brawny red forearms and a sacking apron strapped about her
    middle, was stumping to and fro between a washtub and a clothes line,
    pegging out a series of square white things which Winston recognized as
    babies' diapers.
  1766. well out
    flow freely and abundantly
    When he came into the canteen she was sitting at a table well out from the
    wall, and was quite alone.
  1767. compare
    examine and note the similarities or differences of
    The world of today is a bare, hungry,
    dilapidated place compared with the world that existed before 1914, and
    still more so if compared with the imaginary future to which the people of
    that period looked forward.
  1768. pretentious
    making claim to or creating an appearance of (often undeserved) importance or distinction
    He went on, conscious that what he was saying
    must sound both feeble and pretentious:

    'We believe that there is some kind of conspiracy, some kind of secret
    organization working against the Party, and that you are involved in it.
  1769. ignore
    refuse to acknowledge
    He almost ignored Julia, seeming to take it for granted that
    Winston could speak for her.
  1770. sixteen
    the cardinal number that is the sum of fifteen and one
    She had had her first love-affair when she was sixteen, with a Party member
    of sixty who later committed suicide to avoid arrest.
  1771. a bit
    to a small degree; somewhat
    'I only gave my wrist a bit of a
    bang.
  1772. watching
    the act of observing; taking a patient look
    There might be someone watching.
  1773. position
    the particular portion of space occupied by something
    She was one of those
    people who can go to sleep at any hour and in any position.
  1774. evidently
    unmistakably (`plain' is often used informally for `plainly')
    He started
    to his feet with a malignant glance at Winston, whom he evidently
    suspected of having tripped him up.
  1775. frigid
    extremely cold
    He told
    her about the frigid little ceremony that Katharine had forced him to go
    through on the same night every week.
  1776. endorse
    be behind; approve of
    For distances of less than
    100 kilometres it was not necessary to get your passport endorsed, but
    sometimes there were patrols hanging about the railway stations, who
    examined the papers of any Party member they found there and asked awkward
    questions.
  1777. protecting
    shielding (or designed to shield) against harm or discomfort
    The young, strong body, now helpless in sleep, awoke in him a pitying,
    protecting feeling.
  1778. extricate
    release from entanglement of difficulty
    But for the moment they could not
    extricate themselves from the crowd.
  1779. man
    an adult person who is male (as opposed to a woman)
    A blond-headed, silly-faced young man named Wilsher, whom he barely knew,
    was inviting him with a smile to a vacant place at his table.
  1780. spoon
    a piece of cutlery with a shallow bowl-shaped container and a handle; used to stir or serve or take up food
    Neither of them looked up; steadily they spooned the
    watery stuff into their mouths, and between spoonfuls exchanged the few
    necessary words in low expressionless voices.
  1781. therefore
    (used to introduce a logical conclusion) from that fact or reason or as a result
    It was not merely that the sex
    instinct created a world of its own which was outside the Party's control
    and which therefore had to be destroyed if possible.
  1782. luck
    an unknown and unpredictable phenomenon that causes an event to result one way rather than another
    He had hoped to be alone for a little while during
    the lunch hour, but as bad luck would have it the imbecile Parsons flopped
    down beside him, the tang of his sweat almost defeating the tinny smell of
    stew, and kept up a stream of talk about the preparations for Hate Week.
  1783. whisper
    speaking softly without vibration of the vocal cords
    They did not
    speak above a whisper.
  1784. gaze
    a long fixed look
    He wandered round
    the base of the enormous fluted column, at the top of which Big Brother's
    statue gazed southward towards the skies where he had vanquished the
    Eurasian aeroplanes (the Eastasian aeroplanes, it had been, a few years
    ago) in the Battle of Airstrip One. In the street in front of it there was
    a statue of a man on horseback which was supposed to represent Oliver
    Cromwell.
  1785. kill
    cause to die; put to death, usually intentionally or knowingly
    In front of him was an enemy
    who was trying to kill him: in front of him, also, was a human creature,
    in pain and perhaps with a broken bone.
  1786. criminal
    someone who has committed a crime or has been legally convicted of a crime
    Nor did
    one know what became of them, apart from the few who were hanged as
    war-criminals: the others simply vanished, presumably into forced-labour
    camps.
  1787. erecting
    the act of building or putting up
    Squads of
    volunteers, organized by Parsons, were preparing the street for Hate Week,
    stitching banners, painting posters, erecting flagstaffs on the roofs, and
    perilously slinging wires across the street for the reception of streamers.
  1788. rash
    imprudently incurring risk
    Curiously enough,
    this did not strike her as an impossibly rash thing to do.
  1789. squirm
    to move in a twisting or contorted motion, (especially when struggling)
    Winston, at normal times the kind of person who gravitates to the outer
    edge of any kind of scrimmage, shoved, butted, squirmed his way forward
    into the heart of the crowd.
  1790. self-confidence
    freedom from doubt; belief in yourself and your abilities
    Either it is conquered from without, or it governs so inefficiently that
    the masses are stirred to revolt, or it allows a strong and discontented
    Middle group to come into being, or it loses its own self-confidence and
    willingness to govern.
  1791. worship
    the activity of worshipping
    What was more
    important was that sexual privation induced hysteria, which was desirable
    because it could be transformed into war-fever and leader-worship.
  1792. connect
    connect, fasten, or put together two or more pieces
    He always woke
    up without discovering what it was: but somehow it was connected with what
    Julia had been saying when he cut her short.
  1793. large
    above average in size or number or quantity or magnitude or extent
    On it was written, in a large
    unformed handwriting:

    I LOVE YOU.

    For several seconds he was too stunned even to throw the incriminating
    thing into the memory hole.
  1794. point of view
    a mental position from which things are viewed
    From the point of view of
    the Low, no historic change has ever meant much more than a change in the
    name of their masters.
  1795. ankle
    a gliding joint between the distal ends of the tibia and fibula and the proximal end of the talus
    Until now he had been too much ashamed of his pale and meagre body, with
    the varicose veins standing out on his calves and the discoloured patch
    over his ankle.
  1796. perversion
    the action of perverting something (turning it to a wrong use)
    Since each of the three
    super-states is unconquerable, each is in effect a separate universe within
    which almost any perversion of thought can be safely practised.
  1797. essential
    basic and fundamental
    He began telling her the story of his married life, but curiously enough
    she appeared to know the essential parts of it already.
  1798. machinery
    machines or machine systems collectively
    She was 'not clever', but was fond of using her hands and felt at home
    with machinery.
  1799. names
    verbal abuse; a crude substitute for argument
    Times beyond number, at Party rallies and spontaneous demonstrations,
    she had shouted at the top of her voice for the execution of people whose
    names she had never heard and in whose supposed crimes she had not the
    faintest belief.
  1800. abruptly
    quickly and without warning
    As they drifted
    down the crowded pavements, not quite abreast and never looking at one
    another, they carried on a curious, intermittent conversation which flicked
    on and off like the beams of a lighthouse, suddenly nipped into silence
    by the approach of a Party uniform or the proximity of a telescreen, then
    taken up again minutes later in the middle of a sentence, then abruptly
    cut short as they parted at the agreed spot, then continued almost without
    introduction on the following day.
  1801. Antarctic
    the region around the south pole: Antarctica and surrounding waters
    In the vast laboratories
    of the Ministry of Peace, and in the experimental stations hidden in the
    Brazilian forests, or in the Australian desert, or on lost islands of
    the Antarctic, the teams of experts are indefatigably at work.
  1802. milky
    resembling milk in color not clear
    Her face had turned a milky yellow colour against which her
    mouth stood out redder than ever.
  1803. cosmetic
    serving an esthetic rather than a useful purpose
    He had never before
    seen or imagined a woman of the Party with cosmetics on her face.
  1804. imbecile
    a person of subnormal intelligence
    He had hoped to be alone for a little while during
    the lunch hour, but as bad luck would have it the imbecile Parsons flopped
    down beside him, the tang of his sweat almost defeating the tinny smell of
    stew, and kept up a stream of talk about the preparations for Hate Week.
  1805. grizzled
    having dark hairs mixed with grey or white
    In the last truck he could see an
    aged man, his face a mass of grizzled hair, standing upright with wrists
    crossed in front of him, as though he were used to having them bound
    together.
  1806. walk out of
    leave, usually as an expression of disapproval
    'Has it ever occurred to you,' he said,
    'that the best thing for us to do would be simply to walk out of here
    before it's too late, and never see each other again?'
  1807. extraction
    the action of taking out something (especially using effort or force)
    There were further angry
    demonstrations, Goldstein was burned in effigy, hundreds of copies of the
    poster of the Eurasian soldier were torn down and added to the flames, and
    a number of shops were looted in the turmoil; then a rumour flew round
    that spies were directing the rocket bombs by means of wireless waves, and
    an old couple who were suspected of being of foreign extraction had their
    house set on fire and perished of suffocation.
  1808. voluptuous
    displaying luxury and furnishing gratification to the senses
    With a sort of voluptuous creaking in his joints he climbed the stair above
    Mr Charrington's shop.
  1809. pendulum
    an apparatus consisting of an object mounted so that it swings freely under the influence of gravity
    The familiar pendulum swing was to happen once
    more, and then stop.
  1810. lip
    either of two fleshy folds of tissue that surround the mouth and play a role in speaking
    She began
    speaking in the same expressionless voice as before, with lips barely
    moving, a mere murmur easily drowned by the din of voices and the rumbling
    of the trucks.
  1811. thumping
    a heavy dull sound (as made by impact of heavy objects)
    Winston's heart was thumping so hard that he doubted whether he would be
    able to speak.
  1812. usually
    under normal conditions
    In the
    street it was usually possible to talk, after a fashion.
  1813. scepticism
    the disbelief in any claims of ultimate knowledge
    From the point of view of our present rulers, therefore,
    the only genuine dangers are the splitting-off of a new group of able,
    under-employed, power-hungry people, and the growth of liberalism and
    scepticism in their own ranks.
  1814. at a time
    simultaneously
    For the rest they could meet only in the streets, in a different
    place every evening and never for more than half an hour at a time.
  1815. relapse
    deteriorate in health
    Her large
    shapely body seemed to relapse naturally into stillness.
  1816. solid
    not soft or yielding to pressure
    Don't you like feeling: This is me, this is my hand,
    this is my leg, I'm real, I'm solid, I'm alive!
  1817. spurious
    plausible but false
    In his capacity
    as an administrator, it is often necessary for a member of the Inner Party
    to know that this or that item of war news is untruthful, and he may often
    be aware that the entire war is spurious and is either not happening or
    is being waged for purposes quite other than the declared ones: but such
    knowledge is easily neutralized by the technique of DOUBLETHINK.
  1818. grave
    a place for the burial of a corpse (especially beneath the ground and marked by a tombstone)
    It was as though they were
    intentionally stepping nearer to their graves.
  1819. relevant
    having a bearing on or connection with the subject at issue
    The scientist of today is either a mixture of psychologist and inquisitor,
    studying with real ordinary minuteness the meaning of facial expressions,
    gestures, and tones of voice, and testing the truth-producing effects of
    drugs, shock therapy, hypnosis, and physical torture; or he is chemist,
    physicist, or biologist concerned only with such branches of his special
    subject as are relevant to the taking of life.
  1820. forgotten
    not noticed inadvertently
    Already the black instant of panic was half-forgotten.
  1821. undisputed
    generally agreed upon; not subject to dispute
    Meanwhile
    no Inner Party member wavers for an instant in his mystical belief that
    the war is real, and that it is bound to end victoriously, with Oceania
    the undisputed master of the entire world.
  1822. peaceful
    not disturbed by strife or turmoil or war
    He wondered vaguely whether in the abolished past it had
    been a normal experience to lie in bed like this, in the cool of a summer
    evening, a man and a woman with no clothes on, making love when they chose,
    talking of what they chose, not feeling any compulsion to get up, simply
    lying there and listening to peaceful sounds outside.
  1823. Indian Ocean
    the 3rd largest ocean; bounded by Africa on the west, Asia on the north, Australia on the east and merging with the Antarctic Ocean to the south
    The frontiers of Eurasia flow back and forth between the basin of the Congo
    and the northern shore of the Mediterranean; the islands of the Indian
    Ocean
    and the Pacific are constantly being captured and recaptured by
    Oceania or by Eastasia; in Mongolia the dividing line between Eurasia and
    Eastasia is never stable; round the Pole all three powers lay claim to
    enormous territories which in fact are largely uninhabited and unexplored:
    but the balance of power always remains roughly even...
  1824. enormity
    the quality of extreme wickedness
    They could be made to accept the most flagrant violations
    of reality, because they never fully grasped the enormity of what was
    demanded of them, and were not sufficiently interested in public events to
    notice what was happening.
  1825. underneath
    on the lower or downward side; on the underside of
    Underneath were a number
    of neat paper packets.
  1826. exhaustive
    performed comprehensively and completely
    She obviously had a practical cunning which
    Winston lacked, and she seemed also to have an exhaustive knowledge of the
    countryside round London, stored away from innumerable community hikes.
  1827. waking
    marked by full consciousness or alertness
    There was the dream itself, and there was a memory connected
    with it that had swum into his mind in the few seconds after waking.
  1828. sociologist
    a social scientist who studies the institutions and development of human society
    The new
    aristocracy was made up for the most part of bureaucrats, scientists,
    technicians, trade-union organizers, publicity experts, sociologists,
    teachers, journalists, and professional politicians.
  1829. hereditary
    occurring among members of a family usually by heredity
    In principle, membership of these three groups is not hereditary.
  1830. coolie
    (ethnic slur) an offensive name for an unskilled Asian laborer
    Whichever
    power controls equatorial Africa, or the countries of the Middle East, or
    Southern India, or the Indonesian Archipelago, disposes also of the bodies
    of scores or hundreds of millions of ill-paid and hard-working coolies.
  1831. all-powerful
    having unlimited power
    Big Brother is infallible and all-powerful.
  1832. shape
    a perceptual structure
    But there was still that memory moving round the edges of
    his consciousness, something strongly felt but not reducible to definite
    shape, like an object seen out of the corner of one's eye.
  1833. sink
    fall or descend to a lower place or level
    His hopes sank again.
  1834. speech
    (language) communication by word of mouth
    Winston, in addition to his regular work, spent long periods every day in
    going through back files of 'The Times' and altering and embellishing news
    items which were to be quoted in speeches.
  1835. beyond
    farther along in space or time or degree
    He walked
    casually towards her, his eyes searching for a place at some table beyond
    her.
  1836. callous
    having calluses; having skin made tough and thick through wear
    He explored the long fingers, the shapely nails, the
    work-hardened palm with its row of callouses, the smooth flesh under the
    wrist.
  1837. furtively
    in a furtive manner
    There she had remained for
    a year, helping to produce booklets in sealed packets with titles like
    'Spanking Stories' or 'One Night in a Girls' School', to be bought
    furtively by proletarian youths who were under the impression that they
    were buying something illegal.
  1838. last
    coming after all others in time or space or degree or being the only one remaining
    In the last truck he could see an
    aged man, his face a mass of grizzled hair, standing upright with wrists
    crossed in front of him, as though he were used to having them bound
    together.
  1839. gripping
    capable of arousing and holding the attention
    The orator,
    still gripping the neck of the microphone, his shoulders hunched forward,
    his free hand clawing at the air, had gone straight on with his speech.
  1840. irony
    incongruity between what might be expected and what actually occurs
    More even than of strength, he gave an
    impression of confidence and of an understanding tinged by irony.
  1841. result
    something that results
    As for his sister,
    she might have been removed, like Winston himself, to one of the colonies
    for homeless children (Reclamation Centres, they were called) which had
    grown up as a result of the civil war, or she might have been sent to the
    labour camp along with his mother, or simply left somewhere or other
    to die.
  1842. dedicate
    give entirely to a specific person, activity, or cause
    Their lives are
    dedicated to world conquest, but they also know that it is necessary that
    the war should continue everlastingly and without victory.
  1843. numbering
    a numbered list
    Below that come the dumb masses whom we habitually refer to as 'the
    proles', numbering perhaps 85 per cent of the population.
  1844. debauch
    a wild gathering involving excessive drinking and promiscuity
    All the blood and
    lymph had been drained out of him by an enormous debauch of work, leaving
    only a frail structure of nerves, bones, and skin.
  1845. feelings
    emotional or moral sensitivity (especially in relation to personal principles or dignity)
    Not to let one's feelings appear
    in one's face was a habit that had acquired the status of an instinct,
    and in any case they had been standing straight in front of a telescreen
    when the thing happened.
  1846. impression
    a vague idea in which some confidence is placed
    There she had remained for
    a year, helping to produce booklets in sealed packets with titles like
    'Spanking Stories' or 'One Night in a Girls' School', to be bought
    furtively by proletarian youths who were under the impression that they
    were buying something illegal.
  1847. seizing
    the act of gripping something firmly with the hands (or the tentacles)
    Portions of it are constantly changing hands, and it is the
    chance of seizing this or that fragment by a sudden stroke of treachery
    that dictates the endless changes of alignment.
  1848. track
    a line or route along which something travels or moves
    A half-hour railway journey; turn left outside
    the station; two kilometres along the road; a gate with the top bar
    missing; a path across a field; a grass-grown lane; a track between bushes;
    a dead tree with moss on it.
  1849. blackmail
    extortion of money by threats to divulge discrediting information
    'You are prepared to cheat, to forge, to blackmail, to corrupt the minds
    of children, to distribute habit-forming drugs, to encourage prostitution,
    to disseminate venereal diseases--to do anything which is likely to cause
    demoralization and weaken the power of the Party?'
  1850. slow
    not moving quickly; taking a comparatively long time
    She stood before him very upright, with a smile on her face that
    looked faintly ironical, as though she were wondering why he was so slow
    to act.
  1851. interlude
    an intervening period or episode
    There was a riotous
    interlude while posters were ripped from the walls, banners torn to shreds
    and trampled underfoot.
  1852. whiff
    a short light gust of air
    The first whiff of its scent
    had stirred up some memory which he could not pin down, but which was
    powerful and troubling.
  1853. entitle
    give the right to
    He wolfed another tasteless meal in the canteen, hurried
    off to the Centre, took part in the solemn foolery of a 'discussion group',
    played two games of table tennis, swallowed several glasses of gin, and
    sat for half an hour through a lecture entitled 'Ingsoc in relation to
    chess'.
  1854. glassy
    (used of eyes) lacking liveliness
    It was as when
    Winston had gazed into the heart of the paperweight, with the feeling that
    it would be possible to get inside that glassy world, and that once inside
    it time could be arrested.
  1855. laying
    the production of eggs (especially in birds)
    He did not consider any longer the
    possibility that she might be laying some kind of trap for him.
  1856. face to face
    involving close contact; confronting each other
    He pulled her down so that they were kneeling face to face.
  1857. evidence
    your basis for belief or disbelief; knowledge on which to base belief
    After the thing is done, no evidence
    ever remains.
  1858. foreshadow
    indicate by signs
    But they had been
    foreshadowed by the various systems, generally called totalitarian, which
    had appeared earlier in the century, and the main outlines of the world
    which would emerge from the prevailing chaos had long been obvious.
  1859. flagrant
    conspicuously and outrageously bad or reprehensible
    They could be made to accept the most flagrant violations
    of reality, because they never fully grasped the enormity of what was
    demanded of them, and were not sufficiently interested in public events to
    notice what was happening.
  1860. residue
    matter that remains after something has been removed
    They simply swallowed everything, and what they swallowed did them no harm,
    because it left no residue behind, just as a grain of corn will pass
    undigested through the body of a bird.
  1861. forerunner
    something that precedes and indicates the approach of something or someone
    After the revolutionary period of the fifties and sixties, society
    regrouped itself, as always, into High, Middle, and Low. But the new High
    group, unlike all its forerunners, did not act upon instinct but knew what
    was needed to safeguard its position.
  1862. copy
    a thing made to be similar or identical to another thing
    There were further angry
    demonstrations, Goldstein was burned in effigy, hundreds of copies of the
    poster of the Eurasian soldier were torn down and added to the flames, and
    a number of shops were looted in the turmoil; then a rumour flew round
    that spies were directing the rocket bombs by means of wireless waves, and
    an old couple who were suspected of being of foreign extraction had their
    house set on fire and perished of suffocation.
  1863. enemy
    a personal enemy
    In front of him was an enemy
    who was trying to kill him: in front of him, also, was a human creature,
    in pain and perhaps with a broken bone.
  1864. biologist
    (biology) a scientist who studies living organisms
    The scientist of today is either a mixture of psychologist and inquisitor,
    studying with real ordinary minuteness the meaning of facial expressions,
    gestures, and tones of voice, and testing the truth-producing effects of
    drugs, shock therapy, hypnosis, and physical torture; or he is chemist,
    physicist, or biologist concerned only with such branches of his special
    subject as are relevant to the taking of life.
  1865. clean out
    deprive completely of money or goods
    You were lifted clean out of the stream of history.
  1866. nobody
    a person of no influence
    There was nobody of whom they could ask the way.
  1867. parted
    having a margin incised almost to the base so as to create distinct divisions or lobes
    Chapter 2



    Winston picked his way up the lane through dappled light and shade,
    stepping out into pools of gold wherever the boughs parted.
  1868. intolerable
    incapable of being put up with
    Then the memory of her face came back, and with it a raging,
    intolerable desire to be alone.
  1869. primitive
    little evolved from or characteristic of an earlier ancestral type
    They had held on to the
    primitive emotions which he himself had to re-learn by conscious effort.
  1870. thick
    not thin; of a specific thickness or of relatively great extent from one surface to the opposite usually in the smallest of the three solid dimensions
    The bluebells were so thick underfoot
    that it was impossible not to tread on them.
  1871. glimpse
    a brief or incomplete view
    Just once
    he caught a glimpse of the girl, at a table with two other girls at the
    far end of the room.
  1872. diffuse
    spread out; not concentrated in one place
    The smell was
    already filling the room, a rich hot smell which seemed like an emanation
    from his early childhood, but which one did occasionally meet with even
    now, blowing down a passage-way before a door slammed, or diffusing itself
    mysteriously in a crowded street, sniffed for an instant and then lost
    again.
  1873. baby
    a very young mammal
    The wooden-seated carriage in which he travelled was
    filled to overflowing by a single enormous family, ranging from a toothless
    great-grandmother to a month-old baby, going out to spend an afternoon
    with 'in-laws' in the country, and, as they freely explained to Winston,
    to get hold of a little black-market butter.
  1874. burst
    come open suddenly and violently, as if from internal pressure
    Sometimes it stopped
    for a few seconds, spread out and resettled its wings, then swelled its
    speckled breast and again burst into song.
  1875. economic
    of or relating to an economy, the system of production and management of material wealth
    In so far as the war has a direct
    economic purpose, it is a war for labour power.
  1876. snow-white
    of the white color of snow
    In the early twentieth century, the vision of
    a future society unbelievably rich, leisured, orderly, and efficient--a
    glittering antiseptic world of glass and steel and snow-white concrete--was
    part of the consciousness of nearly every literate person.
  1877. speed
    a rate (usually rapid) at which something happens
    Presently the rising and falling of their breasts slowed to
    normal speed, and in a sort of pleasant helplessness they fell apart.
  1878. unpack
    remove from its packing
    He unpacked his tray and promptly began eating.
  1879. ten
    the cardinal number that is the sum of nine and one; the base of the decimal system
    If there was any relief, it was in
    his work, in which he could sometimes forget himself for ten minutes at a
    stretch.
  1880. efficiently
    with efficiency; in an efficient manner
    For long periods
    the High seem to be securely in power, but sooner or later there always
    comes a moment when they lose either their belief in themselves or their
    capacity to govern efficiently, or both.
  1881. bombing
    an attack by dropping bombs
    His voice, made metallic by
    the amplifiers, boomed forth an endless catalogue of atrocities, massacres,
    deportations, lootings, rapings, torture of prisoners, bombing of
    civilians, lying propaganda, unjust aggressions, broken treaties.
  1882. higher up
    in or to a place that is higher
    The splitting of the intelligence which
    the Party requires of its members, and which is more easily achieved in an
    atmosphere of war, is now almost universal, but the higher up the ranks
    one goes, the more marked it becomes.
  1883. shaped
    having the shape of
    The room they were standing in was long-shaped and softly lit.
  1884. phraseology
    the manner in which something is expressed in words
    Ingsoc, which grew out of the earlier Socialist movement
    and inherited its phraseology, has in fact carried out the main item in
    the Socialist programme; with the result, foreseen and intended beforehand,
    that economic inequality has been made permanent.
  1885. monument
    a structure erected to commemorate persons or events
    'Victory Square, near the monument.'
  1886. worn-out
    used until no longer useful
    To
    talk to him was like listening to the tinkling of a worn-out musical-box.
  1887. turned out
    dressed well or smartly
    She had even (an
    infallible mark of good reputation) been picked out to work in Pornosec,
    the sub-section of the Fiction Department which turned out cheap
    pornography for distribution among the proles.
  1888. morning
    the time period between dawn and noon
    It was the middle of the morning, and Winston had left the cubicle to go
    to the lavatory.
  1889. buy
    obtain by purchase; acquire by means of a financial transaction
    There she had remained for
    a year, helping to produce booklets in sealed packets with titles like
    'Spanking Stories' or 'One Night in a Girls' School', to be bought
    furtively by proletarian youths who were under the impression that they
    were buying something illegal.
  1890. gun
    a weapon that discharges a missile at high velocity (especially from a metal tube or barrel)
    A long line of trucks, with wooden-faced guards armed with sub-machine
    guns standing upright in each corner, was passing slowly down the street.
  1891. inventive
    (used of persons or artifacts) marked by independence and creativity in thought or action
    The search
    for new weapons continues unceasingly, and is one of the very few remaining
    activities in which the inventive or speculative type of mind can find any
    outlet.
  1892. elegantly
    with elegance; in a tastefully elegant manner
    'But you write it very elegantly,' said O'Brien.
  1893. main street
    street that serves as a principal thoroughfare for traffic in a town
    They
    were passing in silence down a side-street (Julia would never speak when
    they were away from the main streets) when there was a deafening roar, the
    earth heaved, and the air darkened, and Winston found himself lying on his
    side, bruised and terrified.
  1894. moulding
    sculpture produced by molding
    It is a problem of continuously moulding the consciousness both of the
    directing group and of the larger executive group that lies immediately
    below it.
  1895. credulous
    showing a lack of judgment or experience
    Even the humblest Party member is
    expected to be competent, industrious, and even intelligent within narrow
    limits, but it is also necessary that he should be a credulous and ignorant
    fanatic whose prevailing moods are fear, hatred, adulation, and orgiastic
    triumph.
  1896. yellow
    yellow color or pigment; the chromatic color resembling the hue of sunflowers or ripe lemons
    Her face had turned a milky yellow colour against which her
    mouth stood out redder than ever.
  1897. stifle
    impair the respiration of or obstruct the air passage of
    But what really recalled
    her to him at this moment was the stifling heat of the afternoon, which
    had brought the sweat out on his forehead.
  1898. imaginary
    not based on fact; unreal
    The world of today is a bare, hungry,
    dilapidated place compared with the world that existed before 1914, and
    still more so if compared with the imaginary future to which the people of
    that period looked forward.
  1899. impose
    impose and collect
    In a way, the world-view
    of the Party imposed itself most successfully on people incapable of
    understanding it.
  1900. broke
    lacking funds
    She
    broke it in half and gave one of the pieces to Winston.
  1901. grimy
    thickly covered with ingrained dirt or soot
    Winston
    could not remember ever to have seen a passageway whose walls were not
    grimy from the contact of human bodies.
  1902. formulated
    devised; developed according to an orderly plan
    But this would violate the principle, followed on
    all sides though never formulated, of cultural integrity.
  1903. stand up
    rise to one's feet
    With a rather
    absent-minded air O'Brien pushed them towards the others, took one himself,
    then stood up and began to pace slowly to and fro, as though he could think
    better standing.
  1904. lid
    either of two folds of skin that can be moved to cover or open the eye
    With a sort of faded enthusiasm he would finger this scrap of rubbish or
    that--a china bottle-stopper, the painted lid of a broken snuffbox, a
    pinchbeck locket containing a strand of some long-dead baby's hair--never
    asking that Winston should buy it, merely that he should admire it.
  1905. on it
    on that
    Obviously there must be a message of some kind written on
    it
    .
  1906. informer
    one who reveals confidential information in return for money
    It was a device by means of which everyone could be
    surrounded night and day by informers who knew him intimately.
  1907. dusty
    covered with a layer of dust
    They sat talking for hours on the dusty,
    twig-littered floor, one or other of them getting up from time to time to
    cast a glance through the arrowslits and make sure that no one was coming.
  1908. stream
    a natural body of running water flowing on or under the earth
    He had hoped to be alone for a little while during
    the lunch hour, but as bad luck would have it the imbecile Parsons flopped
    down beside him, the tang of his sweat almost defeating the tinny smell of
    stew, and kept up a stream of talk about the preparations for Hate Week.
  1909. spent
    depleted of energy, force, or strength
    Hours
    and hours I've spent pasting their bloody rot all over London.
  1910. settled
    established in a desired position or place; not moving about
    Without opening her
    eyes she rolled over and settled herself into a more comfortable position.
  1911. blocking
    the act of obstructing or deflecting someone's movements
    Already a dense mass of people was blocking the south side of the square.
  1912. deviation
    a variation that deviates from the standard or norm
    The children, on the other hand,
    were systematically turned against their parents and taught to spy on them
    and report their deviations.
  1913. production
    the act or process of producing something
    It consisted in falsifying a
    series of production reports of two years ago, in such a way as to cast
    discredit on a prominent member of the Inner Party, who was now under a
    cloud.
  1914. maddened
    marked by extreme anger
    It was
    almost impossible to listen to him without being first convinced and then
    maddened.
  1915. blackbird
    common black European thrush
    There was one about four and twenty blackbirds, and
    another about a cow with a crumpled horn, and another about the death
    of poor Cock Robin.
  1916. alley
    a narrow street with walls on both sides
    Julia, however, seemed unable to mention
    the Party, and especially the Inner Party, without using the kind of words
    that you saw chalked up in dripping alley-ways.
  1917. enclosing
    the act of enclosing something inside something else
    It was as though the surface of the glass
    had been the arch of the sky, enclosing a tiny world with its atmosphere
    complete.
  1918. get up
    rise to one's feet
    They sat talking for hours on the dusty,
    twig-littered floor, one or other of them getting up from time to time to
    cast a glance through the arrowslits and make sure that no one was coming.
  1919. basis
    the fundamental assumptions from which something is begun or developed or calculated or explained
    In the long run, a hierarchical society was only possible on a
    basis of poverty and ignorance.
  1920. claw
    sharp curved horny process on the toe of a bird or some mammals or reptiles
    A little
    Rumpelstiltskin figure, contorted with hatred, he gripped the neck of the
    microphone with one hand while the other, enormous at the end of a bony
    arm, clawed the air menacingly above his head.
  1921. Tibet
    an autonomous region of the Peoples Republic of China; located in the Himalayas
    Eastasia,
    smaller than the others and with a less definite western frontier,
    comprises China and the countries to the south of it, the Japanese islands
    and a large but fluctuating portion of Manchuria, Mongolia, and Tibet.
  1922. tricky
    having concealed difficulty
    She enjoyed her work, which consisted
    chiefly in running and servicing a powerful but tricky electric motor.
  1923. control
    power to direct or determine
    It was not merely that the sex
    instinct created a world of its own which was outside the Party's control
    and which therefore had to be destroyed if possible.
  1924. apex
    the highest point (of something)
    At the apex of the pyramid comes
    Big Brother.
  1925. coughing
    a sudden noisy expulsion of air from the lungs that clears the air passages; a common symptom of upper respiratory infection or bronchitis or pneumonia or tuberculosis
    He had grown fatter, his varicose ulcer had subsided,
    leaving only a brown stain on the skin above his ankle, his fits of
    coughing in the early morning had stopped.
  1926. deafening
    loud enough to cause (temporary) hearing loss
    They
    were passing in silence down a side-street (Julia would never speak when
    they were away from the main streets) when there was a deafening roar, the
    earth heaved, and the air darkened, and Winston found himself lying on his
    side, bruised and terrified.
  1927. intoxicating
    extremely exciting as if by alcohol or a narcotic
    For some reason
    he had always thought of wine as having an intensely sweet taste, like
    that of blackberry jam and an immediate intoxicating effect.
  1928. caterpillar
    a wormlike and often brightly colored and hairy or spiny larva of a butterfly or moth
    On the sixth day of Hate Week, after the processions, the speeches, the
    shouting, the singing, the banners, the posters, the films, the waxworks,
    the rolling of drums and squealing of trumpets, the tramp of marching feet,
    the grinding of the caterpillars of tanks, the roar of massed planes,
    the booming of guns--after six days of this, when the great orgasm was
    quivering to its climax and the general hatred of Eurasia had boiled up
    into such delirium that if the crowd could have got th...
  1929. strategic
    relating to or concerned with strategy
    The fighting, when there is any, takes place on the vague
    frontiers whose whereabouts the average man can only guess at, or round
    the Floating Fortresses which guard strategic spots on the sea lanes.
  1930. pamphlet
    a small book usually having a paper cover
    Julia's unit in the Fiction Department had been taken off the
    production of novels and was rushing out a series of atrocity pamphlets.
  1931. committed
    bound or obligated, as under a pledge to a particular cause, action, or attitude
    She might have been vaporized, she might
    have committed suicide, she might have been transferred to the other end
    of Oceania: worst and likeliest of all, she might simply have changed her
    mind and decided to avoid him.
  1932. hammering
    the act of pounding (delivering repeated heavy blows)
    He was everywhere at once,
    pushing, pulling, sawing, hammering, improvising, jollying everyone along
    with comradely exhortations and giving out from every fold of his body what
    seemed an inexhaustible supply of acrid-smelling sweat.
  1933. at all
    in the slightest degree or in any respect
    This was, that the message did not come from
    the Thought Police at all, but from some kind of underground organization.
  1934. hole
    an opening into or through something
    On it was written, in a large
    unformed handwriting:

    I LOVE YOU.

    For several seconds he was too stunned even to throw the incriminating
    thing into the memory hole.
  1935. greenish
    of the color between blue and yellow in the color spectrum; similar to the color of fresh grass
    In the trucks little yellow men in shabby greenish uniforms were squatting,
    jammed close together.
  1936. window
    a framework of wood or metal that contains a glass windowpane and is built into a wall or roof to admit light or air
    Beside the window the enormous bed was made up, with ragged blankets and
    a coverless bolster.
  1937. fretted
    having frets
    His overalls fretted his shoulders, the pavement tickled
    his feet, even the opening and closing of a hand was an effort that made
    his joints creak.
  1938. recurrence
    happening again (especially at regular intervals)
    By the late nineteenth century the recurrence of this pattern had become
    obvious to many observers.
  1939. inert
    unable to move or resist motion
    For the first time in his life he did not
    despise the proles or think of them merely as an inert force which would
    one day spring to life and regenerate the world.
  1940. Tangier
    a city of northern Morocco at the west end of the Strait of Gibraltar
    Between the frontiers of
    the super-states, and not permanently in the possession of any of them,
    there lies a rough quadrilateral with its corners at Tangier, Brazzaville,
    Darwin, and Hong Kong, containing within it about a fifth of the population
    of the earth.
  1941. find
    discover or determine the existence, presence, or fact of
    Presumably she could be trusted to find a safe
    place.
  1942. country
    the territory occupied by a nation
    In general you could not assume that you were much safer in the
    country than in London.
  1943. following
    the act of pursuing in an effort to overtake or capture
    On the following day he very nearly succeeded in speaking to her.
  1944. swing
    change direction with a swinging motion; turn
    Probably
    she had crushed her hand while swinging round one of the big kaleidoscopes
    on which the plots of novels were 'roughed in'.
  1945. speaker
    someone who expresses in language; someone who talks (especially someone who delivers a public speech or someone especially garrulous)
    At every few moments the fury of the crowd boiled over and the
    voice of the speaker was drowned by a wild beast-like roaring that rose
    uncontrollably from thousands of throats.
  1946. describe
    give a description of
    Chocolate normally was
    dull-brown crumbly stuff that tasted, as nearly as one could describe it,
    like the smoke of a rubbish fire.
  1947. stagnant
    not growing or changing; without force or vitality
    The air in the
    little square chamber above the bells was hot and stagnant, and smelt
    overpoweringly of pigeon dung.
  1948. preparation
    the activity of putting or setting in order in advance of some act or purpose
    He had hoped to be alone for a little while during
    the lunch hour, but as bad luck would have it the imbecile Parsons flopped
    down beside him, the tang of his sweat almost defeating the tinny smell of
    stew, and kept up a stream of talk about the preparations for Hate Week.
  1949. trample
    tread or stomp heavily or roughly
    There was a riotous
    interlude while posters were ripped from the walls, banners torn to shreds
    and trampled underfoot.
  1950. community
    a group of people living in a particular local area
    Tonight was one of his nights at the
    Community Centre.
  1951. rag
    a small piece of cloth or paper
    In the ragged
    hedge on the opposite side the boughs of the elm trees swayed just
    perceptibly in the breeze, and their leaves stirred faintly in dense
    masses like women's hair.
  1952. even as
    at the same time as
    One
    literally never saw them except in the guise of prisoners, and even as
    prisoners one never got more than a momentary glimpse of them.
  1953. blissful
    completely happy and contented
    The blissful feeling of being alone with the
    forbidden book, in a room with no telescreen, had not worn off.
  1954. fundamentally
    in essence; at bottom or by one's (or its) very nature
    Here it is necessary to repeat what has been said earlier, that
    by becoming continuous war has fundamentally changed its character.
  1955. overflow
    flow or run over (a limit or brim)
    The wooden-seated carriage in which he travelled was
    filled to overflowing by a single enormous family, ranging from a toothless
    great-grandmother to a month-old baby, going out to spend an afternoon
    with 'in-laws' in the country, and, as they freely explained to Winston,
    to get hold of a little black-market butter.
  1956. spend
    pass time in a specific way
    The wooden-seated carriage in which he travelled was
    filled to overflowing by a single enormous family, ranging from a toothless
    great-grandmother to a month-old baby, going out to spend an afternoon
    with 'in-laws' in the country, and, as they freely explained to Winston,
    to get hold of a little black-market butter.
  1957. plastered
    (of walls) covered with a coat of plaster
    The thing had been
    plastered on every blank space on every wall, even outnumbering the
    portraits of Big Brother.
  1958. lose
    fail to keep or to maintain; cease to have, either physically or in an abstract sense
    A kind of fever seized him at the thought that he might
    lose her, the white youthful body might slip away from him!
  1959. bureaucrat
    an official of a bureaucracy
    The new
    aristocracy was made up for the most part of bureaucrats, scientists,
    technicians, trade-union organizers, publicity experts, sociologists,
    teachers, journalists, and professional politicians.
  1960. burner
    an apparatus for burning fuel (or refuse)
    Winston lit the burner and set a pan of water
    to boil.
  1961. noisy
    full of or characterized by loud and nonmusical sounds
    It was a street in one of the poorer quarters, where there was an
    open market which was generally crowded and noisy.
  1962. ironical
    characterized by often poignant difference or incongruity between what is expected and what actually is
    She stood before him very upright, with a smile on her face that
    looked faintly ironical, as though she were wondering why he was so slow
    to act.
  1963. fixedly
    in a fixed manner
    They were
    shoulder to shoulder, both staring fixedly in front of them.
  1964. refrigerator
    white goods in which food can be stored at low temperatures
    In a world in which everyone worked short hours, had enough to
    eat, lived in a house with a bathroom and a refrigerator, and possessed
    a motor-car or even an aeroplane, the most obvious and perhaps the most
    important form of inequality would already have disappeared.
  1965. well up
    come up (as of feelings and thoughts, or other ephemeral things)
    At the sight of the words I LOVE YOU
    the desire to stay alive had welled up in him, and the taking of minor
    risks suddenly seemed stupid.
  1966. represent
    be a delegate or spokesperson for; represent somebody's interest or be a proxy or substitute for, as of politicians and office holders representing their constituents, or of a tenant representing other tenants in a housing dispute
    He wandered round
    the base of the enormous fluted column, at the top of which Big Brother's
    statue gazed southward towards the skies where he had vanquished the
    Eurasian aeroplanes (the Eastasian aeroplanes, it had been, a few years
    ago) in the Battle of Airstrip One. In the street in front of it there was
    a statue of a man on horseback which was supposed to represent Oliver
    Cromwell.
  1967. syphilis
    a common venereal disease caused by the treponema pallidum spirochete; symptoms change through progressive stages; can be congenital (transmitted through the placenta)
    If he could have infected the whole lot of them with leprosy or
    syphilis, how gladly he would have done so!
  1968. suddenness
    the quality of happening with headlong haste or without warning
    Merely
    it became known, with extreme suddenness and everywhere at once, that
    Eastasia and not Eurasia was the enemy.
  1969. question
    a sentence of inquiry that asks for a reply
    There was no
    question that she had done it intentionally.
  1970. Pole
    a native or inhabitant of Poland
    The frontiers of Eurasia flow back and forth between the basin of the Congo
    and the northern shore of the Mediterranean; the islands of the Indian
    Ocean and the Pacific are constantly being captured and recaptured by
    Oceania or by Eastasia; in Mongolia the dividing line between Eurasia and
    Eastasia is never stable; round the Pole all three powers lay claim to
    enormous territories which in fact are largely uninhabited and unexplored:
    but the balance of power always remains roughly even...
  1971. caption
    brief description accompanying an illustration
    It had no caption,
    and represented simply the monstrous figure of a Eurasian soldier, three
    or four metres high, striding forward with expressionless Mongolian face
    and enormous boots, a submachine gun pointed from his hip.
  1972. blow
    be in motion due to some air or water current
    On the next day she
    did not appear in the canteen until he was leaving it, the whistle having
    already blown.
  1973. ideology
    an orientation that characterizes the thinking of a group or nation
    These new movements, of course, grew out of the
    old ones and tended to keep their names and pay lip-service to their
    ideology.
  1974. astonished
    filled with the emotional impact of overwhelming surprise or shock
    Go to Paddington
    Station----'

    With a sort of military precision that astonished him, she outlined the
    route that he was to follow.
  1975. opposite
    being directly across from each other; facing
    They did
    not speak again, and, so far as it was possible for two people sitting on
    opposite sides of the same table, they did not look at one another.
  1976. lump
    a compact mass
    If it survives
    anywhere, it's in a few solid objects with no words attached to them, like
    that lump of glass there.
  1977. surface
    the outer boundary of an artifact or a material layer constituting or resembling such a boundary
    Who knew, perhaps the Party was rotten under the surface,
    its cult of strenuousness and self-denial simply a sham concealing
    iniquity.
  1978. interchange
    cause to change places
    Between the two branches of the Party
    there is a certain amount of interchange, but only so much as will ensure
    that weaklings are excluded from the Inner Party and that ambitious
    members of the Outer Party are made harmless by allowing them to rise.
  1979. tracked
    having tracks
    They could be tracked down
    by enquiry, they could be squeezed out of you by torture.
  1980. demur
    take exception to
    O'Brien's servant, however,
    had admitted the two of them without demur.
  1981. stand out
    be highly noticeable
    Her face had turned a milky yellow colour against which her
    mouth stood out redder than ever.
  1982. reprisal
    a retaliatory action against an enemy in wartime
    On the contrary, war hysteria is continuous and universal in all countries,
    and such acts as raping, looting, the slaughter of children, the reduction
    of whole populations to slavery, and reprisals against prisoners which
    extend even to boiling and burying alive, are looked upon as normal,
    and, when they are committed by one's own side and not by the enemy,
    meritorious.
  1983. tool
    an implement used in the practice of a vocation
    She was carrying a tool-bag of coarse brown canvas, such as he had
    sometimes seen her carrying to and fro at the Ministry.
  1984. summons
    a request to be present
    The thing that was written on the paper might be a threat, a
    summons, an order to commit suicide, a trap of some description.
  1985. nearer
    (comparative of `near' or `close') within a shorter distance
    As she came nearer he saw that her right arm was in a sling, not noticeable
    at a distance because it was of the same colour as her overalls.
  1986. leaving
    the act of departing
    On the next day she
    did not appear in the canteen until he was leaving it, the whistle having
    already blown.
  1987. luxury
    something that is an indulgence rather than a necessity
    It was possible, no
    doubt, to imagine a society in which WEALTH, in the sense of personal
    possessions and luxuries, should be evenly distributed, while POWER
    remained in the hands of a small privileged caste.
  1988. reddened
    (especially of the face) reddened or suffused with or as if with blood from emotion or exertion
    Her lips were deeply reddened,
    her cheeks rouged, her nose powdered; there was even a touch of something
    under the eyes to make them brighter.
  1989. sight
    the ability to see; the visual faculty
    At the sight of the words I LOVE YOU
    the desire to stay alive had welled up in him, and the taking of minor
    risks suddenly seemed stupid.
  1990. sugar
    a white crystalline carbohydrate used as a sweetener and preservative
    'It isn't sugar?' he said.
  1991. dome
    a concave shape whose distinguishing characteristic is that the concavity faces downward
    It had all occurred inside the glass paperweight, but the surface of the
    glass was the dome of the sky, and inside the dome everything was flooded
    with clear soft light in which one could see into interminable distances.
  1992. philosophy
    the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
    In Oceania the prevailing philosophy is called
    Ingsoc, in Eurasia it is called Neo-Bolshevism, and in Eastasia it is
    called by a Chinese name usually translated as Death-Worship, but perhaps
    better rendered as Obliteration of the Self.
  1993. treachery
    an act of deliberate betrayal
    Portions of it are constantly changing hands, and it is the
    chance of seizing this or that fragment by a sudden stroke of treachery
    that dictates the endless changes of alignment.
  1994. cause
    events that provide the generative force that is the origin of something
    'To commit acts of sabotage which may cause the death of hundreds of
    innocent people?'
  1995. present
    temporal sense; intermediate between past and future; now existing or happening or in consideration
    To hang on from day to day
    and from week to week, spinning out a present that had no future, seemed
    an unconquerable instinct, just as one's lungs will always draw the next
    breath so long as there is air available.
  1996. stair
    support consisting of a place to rest the foot while ascending or descending a stairway
    At this moment there was a quick step on the stairs.
  1997. catch
    take hold of so as to seize or restrain or stop the motion of
    Just once
    he caught a glimpse of the girl, at a table with two other girls at the
    far end of the room.
  1998. self-denial
    the trait of practicing self discipline
    Who knew, perhaps the Party was rotten under the surface,
    its cult of strenuousness and self-denial simply a sham concealing
    iniquity.
  1999. vestibule
    a large entrance or reception room or area
    On the third day Winston went into the vestibule of the
    Records Department to look at the notice-board.
  2000. liberalism
    a political orientation that favors social progress by reform and by changing laws rather than by revolution
    From the point of view of our present rulers, therefore,
    the only genuine dangers are the splitting-off of a new group of able,
    under-employed, power-hungry people, and the growth of liberalism and
    scepticism in their own ranks.
  2001. device
    an instrumentality invented for a particular purpose
    It was a device by means of which everyone could be
    surrounded night and day by informers who knew him intimately.
  2002. at the most
    not more than
    They had been talking to one another for a couple of minutes at the most.
  2003. purpose
    what something is used for
    Nor did he seem shocked or become offensively
    knowing when it was made clear that Winston wanted the room for the purpose
    of a love-affair.
  2004. make off
    run away; usually includes taking something or somebody along
    The
    girl finished her lunch quickly and made off, while Winston stayed to
    smoke a cigarette.
  2005. prematurely
    too soon; in a premature manner
    He would ask his mother naggingly,
    over and over again, why there was not more food, he would shout and storm
    at her (he even remembered the tones of his voice, which was beginning to
    break prematurely and sometimes boomed in a peculiar way), or he would
    attempt a snivelling note of pathos in his efforts to get more than his
    share.
  2006. hurry
    move very fast
    He wolfed another tasteless meal in the canteen, hurried
    off to the Centre, took part in the solemn foolery of a 'discussion group',
    played two games of table tennis, swallowed several glasses of gin, and
    sat for half an hour through a lecture entitled 'Ingsoc in relation to
    chess'.
  2007. littered
    filled or scattered with a disorderly accumulation of objects or rubbish
    They sat talking for hours on the dusty,
    twig-littered floor, one or other of them getting up from time to time to
    cast a glance through the arrowslits and make sure that no one was coming.
  2008. hang on
    fix to; attach
    To hang on from day to day
    and from week to week, spinning out a present that had no future, seemed
    an unconquerable instinct, just as one's lungs will always draw the next
    breath so long as there is air available.
  2009. aback
    by surprise
    Even in the midst
    of his panic, Winston was too much taken aback to be able to hold his
    tongue.
  2010. fix
    restore by replacing a part or putting together what is torn or broken
    Her eyes were fixed on his, with an
    appealing expression that looked more like fear than pain.
  2011. British Empire
    a former empire consisting of Great Britain and all the territories under its control; reached its greatest extent at the end of World War I; it included the British Isles, British West Indies, Canada, British Guiana; British West Africa, British East Africa, India, Australia, New Zealand
    With the absorption of Europe by Russia and of the British Empire
    by the United States, two of the three existing powers, Eurasia and
    Oceania, were already effectively in being.
  2012. stupefied
    as if struck dumb with astonishment and surprise
    For if leisure and security were
    enjoyed by all alike, the great mass of human beings who are normally
    stupefied by poverty would become literate and would learn to think for
    themselves; and when once they had done this, they would sooner or later
    realize that the privileged minority had no function, and they would sweep
    it away.
  2013. fixed
    fixed and unmoving
    Her eyes were fixed on his, with an
    appealing expression that looked more like fear than pain.
  2014. march
    walk fast, with regular or measured steps; walk with a stride
    All this marching
    up and down and cheering and waving flags is simply sex gone sour.
  2015. playground
    an area where many people go for recreation
    Another bomb fell on a piece of waste ground which was used as a playground
    and several dozen children were blown to pieces.
  2016. write
    write or name the letters that comprise the conventionally accepted form of (a word or part of a word)
    Obviously there must be a message of some kind written on
    it.
  2017. populated
    furnished with inhabitants
    It is for the possession of these thickly-populated regions,
    and of the northern ice-cap, that the three powers are constantly
    struggling.
  2018. caste
    (Hinduism) a hereditary social class among Hindus; stratified according to ritual purity
    It was possible, no
    doubt, to imagine a society in which WEALTH, in the sense of personal
    possessions and luxuries, should be evenly distributed, while POWER
    remained in the hands of a small privileged caste.
  2019. hockey
    a game played on an ice rink by two opposing teams of six skaters each who try to knock a flat round puck into the opponents' goal with angled sticks
    At
    school she had been captain of the hockey team and had won the gymnastics
    trophy two years running.
  2020. as usual
    in the usual manner
    As usual, Winston hardly looked
    at Julia as they drifted towards one another in the crowd, but from the
    short glance he gave her it seemed to him that she was paler than usual.
  2021. composite
    consisting of separate interconnected parts
    Instead of anything directly connected with O'Brien or the
    Brotherhood, there came into his mind a sort of composite picture of the
    dark bedroom where his mother had spent her last days, and the little room
    over Mr Charrington's shop, and the glass paperweight, and the steel
    engraving in its rosewood frame.
  2022. have a look
    look at with attention
    She brought
    the glass paperweight over to the bed to have a look at it in a better
    light.
  2023. bunting
    any of numerous seed-eating songbirds of Europe or North America
    Parsons boasted that Victory Mansions alone would display four hundred
    metres of bunting.
  2024. meritorious
    deserving reward or praise
    On the contrary, war hysteria is continuous and universal in all countries,
    and such acts as raping, looting, the slaughter of children, the reduction
    of whole populations to slavery, and reprisals against prisoners which
    extend even to boiling and burying alive, are looked upon as normal,
    and, when they are committed by one's own side and not by the enemy,
    meritorious.
  2025. spoonful
    as much as a spoon will hold
    Neither of them looked up; steadily they spooned the
    watery stuff into their mouths, and between spoonfuls exchanged the few
    necessary words in low expressionless voices.
  2026. be full
    be sated, have enough to eat
    The train was full of proles, in holiday mood because of
    the summery weather.
  2027. ignored
    disregarded
    He almost ignored Julia, seeming to take it for granted that
    Winston could speak for her.
  2028. cheating
    a deception for profit to yourself
    When she said that she could not come, he had the feeling
    that she was cheating him.
  2029. obey