Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird" Chapters 11-20 180 words

Vocabulary study list for Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird" (Chapters 11-20).
  1. ambidextrous
    equally skillful with each hand
    "About your writing with your left hand, are you ambidextrous, Mr. Ewell?"
  2. undulate
    move in a wavy pattern or with a rising and falling motion
    From time to time she would open her mouth wide, and I could see her tongue undulate faintly.
  3. leftovers
    food remaining from a previous meal
    Dill made his way through the leftovers and was reaching for a can of pork and beans in the pantry when Miss Rachel's Do-oo Je-sus went off in the hall.
  4. viscous
    having a relatively high resistance to flow
    Occasionally it would say, "Pt," like some viscous substance coming to a boil.
  5. myopic
    unable to see distant objects clearly
    Instead, Maycomb grew and sprawled out from its hub, Sinkfield's Tavern, because Sinkfield reduced his guests to myopic drunkenness one evening, induced them to bring forward their maps and charts, lop off a little here, add a bit there, and adjust
  6. wispy
    thin and weak
    A shock of wispy new-washed hair stood up from his forehead; his nose was thin, pointed, and shiny; he had no chin to speak of-it seemed to be part of his crepey neck.
    "-so help me God," he crowed.
  7. rankle
    gnaw into; make resentful or angry
    Atticus's remarks were still rankling, which made me miss the request in Jem's question.
  8. antagonize
    provoke the hostility of
    Of course Jem antagonized me sometimes until I could kill him, but when it came down to it he was all I had.
  9. manacle
    shackle that consists of a metal loop that can be locked around the wrist; usually used in pairs
    Still in wrist manacles, he wandered two miles out of Meridian where he discovered a small animal show and was immediately engaged to wash the camel.
  10. resilient
    recovering readily from adversity, depression, or the like
    As I passed the bed I stepped on something warm, resilient, and rather smooth.
  11. begrudge
    be envious of; set one's heart on
    I don't think anybody in Maycomb'll begrudge me a client, with times this hard."
  12. encumber
    hold back
    Walking toward the office, Dill and I fell into step behind Atticus and Jem. Dill was encumbered by the chair, and his pace was slower.
  13. gouge
    an impression in a surface (as made by a blow)
    He was still on the bed and I couldn't get a firm stance, so I threw myself at him as hard as I could, hitting, pulling, pinching, gouging.
  14. protrude
    extend out or project in space
    Her bottom plate was not in, and her upper lip protruded; from time to time she would draw her nether lip to her upper plate and carry her chin with it.
  15. vacate
    leave behind empty; move out of
    Atticus picked up the Mobile Press and sat down in the rocking chair Jem had vacated.
  16. infuriate
    make furious
    I tried to explain to Atticus that it wasn't so much what Francis said that had infuriated me as the way he had said it.
  17. cantankerous
    stubbornly obstructive and unwilling to cooperate
    Conscious," he smiled, "and cantankerous.
  18. browbeat
    discourage or frighten with threats or a domineering manner; intimidate
    "I don't know how he done it, but he done it - I said it all happened so fast I---"
    "Now let's consider this calmly-" began Atticus, but Mr. Gilmer interrupted with an objection: he was not irrelevant or immaterial, but Atticus was browbeating the
  19. succinct
    briefly giving the gist of something
    "Called 'em off on a snipe hunt," was the succinct answer.
  20. elucidate
    make clear and (more) comprehensible
    We asked Miss Maudie to elucidate: she said Miss Stephanie seemed to know so much about the case she might as well be called on to testify.
  21. acrimonious
    marked by strong resentment or cynicism
    We could tell, however, when debate became more acrimonious than professional, but this was from watching lawyers other than our father.
  22. umbrage
    a feeling of anger caused by being offended
    I wasn't sure what Jem resented most, but I took umbrage at Mrs. Dubose's assessment of the family's mental hygiene.
  23. expertly
    in an expert manner
    Unaware of public scrutiny from above, Judge Taylor disposed of the severed end by propelling it expertly to his lips and saying, "Fhluck!"
  24. dangle
    hang freely
    As he read along, I noticed that Mrs. Dubose's corrections grew fewer and farther between, that Jem had even left one sentence dangling in mid-air.
  25. gavel
    a small mallet used by a presiding officer or a judge
    So serene was Judge Taylor's court, that he had few occasions to use his gavel, but he hammered fully five minutes.
  26. ramshackle
    in deplorable condition
    As they had come, in ones and twos the men shuffled back to their ramshackle cars.
  27. persisting
    relentless and indefatigable in pursuit or as if in pursuit
    We forgot her, trooped upstairs to church, and were listening quietly to the sermon when a dreadful banging issued from the radiator pipes, persisting until someone investigated and brought forth Eunice Ann saying she didn't want to play Shadrach a
  28. beholden
    under a moral obligation to someone
    "She said she was going to leave this world beholden to nothing and nobody.
  29. snicker
    laugh quietly
    The club snickered.
  30. garish
    tastelessly showy
    At each seat was a cheap cardboard fan bearing a garish Garden of Gethsemane, courtesy Tyndal's Hardware Co. (You-Name-It-We-Sell-It).
  31. rile
    cause annoyance in; disturb, especially by minor irritations
    "When he's - riled, has he ever beaten you?"
  32. aggregation
    the act of gathering something together
    "Entailments are bad," I was advising him, when I slowly awoke to the fact that I was addressing the entire aggregation.
  33. corroborate
    give evidence for
    All the spectators were as relaxed as Judge Taylor, except Jem. His mouth was twisted into a purposeful half-grin, and his eyes happy about, and he said something about corroborating evidence, which made me sure he was showing off.
  34. corrugated
    shaped into alternating parallel grooves and ridges
    The cabin's plank walls were supplemented with sheets of corrugated iron, its roof shingled with tin cans hammered flat, so only its general shape suggested its original design: square, with four tiny rooms opening onto a shotgun hall, the cabin re
  35. forthright
    directly and without evasion; not roundabout
    His sermon was a forthright denunciation of sin, an austere declaration of the motto on the wall behind him: he warned his flock against the evils of heady brews, gambling, and strange women.
  36. contentious
    inclined or showing an inclination to dispute or disagree, even to engage in law suits
    Don't pay no 'tention to Lula, she's contentious because Reverend Sykes threatened to church her.
  37. congenital
    present at birth but not necessarily hereditary; acquired during fetal development
    No truant officers could keep their numerous offspring in school; no public health officer could free them from congenital defects, various worms, and the diseases indigenous to filthy surroundings.
  38. complicate
    make more complicated
    The fact that I had a permanent fiance was little compensation for his absence: I had never thought about it, but summer was Dill by the fishpool smoking string, Dill's eyes alive with complicated plans to make Boo Radley emerge; summer was the swi
  39. trauma
    an emotional wound or shock often having long-lasting effects
    We acquired no traumas from watching our father win or lose.
  40. evaluation
    act of ascertaining or fixing the value or worth of
    I sometimes think Atticus subjected every crisis of his life to tranquil evaluation behind The Mobile Register, The Birmingham News and The Montgomery Advertiser.
  41. connivance
    agreement on a secret plot
    When asked upon what grounds, Judge Taylor said, "Champertous connivance," and declared he hoped to God the litigants were satisfled by each having had their public say.
  42. convene
    meet formally
    He was from Abbottsville; we saw him only when court convened, and that rarely, for court was of no special interest to Jem and me.
  43. fascinate
    to render motionless, as with a fixed stare or by arousing terror or awe
    Jem seemed fascinated by a rose in the carpet.
  44. grudging
    petty or reluctant in giving or spending
    Mayella's hostility, which had subsided to grudging neutrality, flared again.
  45. refine
    reduce to a fine, unmixed, or pure state; separate from extraneous matter or cleanse from impurities
    There was indeed a caste system in Maycomb, but to my mind it worked this way: the older citizens, the present generation of people who had lived side by side for years and years, were utterly predictable to one another: they took for granted attitudes, c
  46. tirade
    a speech of violent denunciation
    I was expecting a tirade, but all she said was, "You may commence reading, Jeremy."
  47. unreliable
    not worthy of reliance or trust
    From the other side, however, Greek revival columns clashed with a big nineteenth-century clock tower housing a rusty unreliable instrument, a view indicating a people determined to preserve every physical scrap of the past.
  48. unobtrusive
    not obtrusive or undesirably noticeable
    I found myself in the middle of the Idlers' Club and made myself as unobtrusive as possible.
  49. venue
    the scene of any event or action (especially the place of a meeting)
    "Change of venue," said Mr. Tate.
  50. swivel
    turn on a pivot
    Atticus would flee to his office directly after dinner, where if we sometimes looked in on him, we would find him sitting back in his swivel chair reading.
  51. flail
    an implement consisting of handle with a free swinging stick at the end; used in manual threshing
    We had just come to her gate when Jem snatched my baton and ran flailing wildly up the steps into Mrs. Dubose's front yard, forgetting everything Atticus had said, forgetting that she packed a pistol under her shawls, forgetting that if Mrs. Dubose
  52. aroma
    any property detected by the olfactory system
    Jem and I detected squirrel cooking, but it took an old countryman like Atticus to identify possum and rabbit, aromas that vanished when we rode back past the Ewell residence.
  53. mollify
    cause to be more favorably inclined; gain the good will of
    Mollified, Mayella gave Atticus a final terrified glance and said to Mr. Gilmer, "Well sir, I was on the porch and -and he came along and, you see, there was this old chiffarobe in the yard Papa'd brought in to chop up for kindlin'-Papa told me to
  54. aggravate
    make worse
    It aggravates 'em.
  55. escapade
    any carefree episode
    She'd have spent the rest of her life on it and died without so much agony, but she was too contrary-"
    "Sir?" said Jem.
    Atticus said, "Just before your escapade she called me to make her will.
  56. terse
    brief and to the point; effectively cut short
    I whispered, and got a terse, "Sh-h!"
  57. budge
    move very slightly
    We were accustomed to prompt, if not always cheerful acquiescence to Atticus's instructions, but from the way he stood Jem was not thinking of budging.
  58. erosion
    (geology) the mechanical process of wearing or grinding something down (as by particles washing over it)
    And for goodness' sake put some of the county back where it belongs, the soil erosion's bad enough as it is."
  59. interdict
    command against
    What Jem did was something I'd do as a matter of course had I not been under Atticus's interdict, which I assumed included not fighting horrible old ladies.
  60. giggle
    laugh nervously
    Let a sixteen-year-old girl giggle in the choir and Aunty would say, "It just goes to show you, all the Penfield women are flighty."
  61. altercation
    noisy quarrel
    After one altercation when Jem hollered, "It's time you started bein' a girl and acting right!"
  62. qualm
    uneasiness about the fitness of an action
    I did likewise with no qualms.
  63. subpoena
    a writ issued by court authority to compel the attendance of a witness at a judicial proceeding; disobedience may be punishable as a contempt of court
    "Better be careful he doesn't hand you a subpoena."
  64. predictable
    capable of being foretold
    There was indeed a caste system in Maycomb, but to my mind it worked this way: the older citizens, the present generation of people who had lived side by side for years and years, were utterly predictable to one another: they took for granted attit
  65. exodus
    a journey by a large group to escape from a hostile environment
    As a rule, a recess meant a general exodus, but today people weren't moving.
  66. skulk
    avoid responsibilities and duties, e.g., by pretending to be ill
    We skulked around the kitchen until Calpurnia threw us out.
  67. fluctuation
    an instance of change; the rate or magnitude of change
    No economic fluctuations changed their status people like the Ewells lived as guests of the county in prosperity as well as in the depths of a depression.
  68. hap
    come to pass
    Per- haps she had given him a dose of calomel.
  69. rectitude
    righteousness as a consequence of being honorable and honest
    In later years, I sometimes wondered exactly what made Jem do it, what made him break the bonds of "You just be a gentleman, son," and the phase of self-conscious rectitude he had recently entered.
  70. nether
    lower
    Her bottom plate was not in, and her upper lip protruded; from time to time she would draw her nether lip to her upper plate and carry her chin with it.
  71. subside
    sink to a lower level or form a depression
    Here Judge Taylor glanced sharply at the witness and must have decided his speculations devoid of evil intent, for he subsided sleepily.
  72. volition
    the act of making a choice
    He seemed to be a respectable Negro, and a respectable Negro would never go up into somebody's yard of his own volition.
  73. carnal
    of or relating to the body or flesh
    He sighed, and said rape was carnal knowledge of a female by force and without consent.
  74. bode
    indicate by signs
    The beginning of that summer boded well: Jem could do as he pleased;
    Calpurnia would do until Dill came.
  75. participating
    taking part in an activity
    To all parties present and participating in the life of the county, Aunt Alexandra was one of the last of her kind: she had river-boat, boarding-school manners; let any moral come along and she would uphold it; she was born in the objective case; s
  76. taut
    pulled or drawn tight
    Punk, punk, punk, her needle broke the taut circle.
  77. contrasting
    strikingly different; tending to contrast
    As Atticus's fists went to his hips, so did Jem's, and as they faced each other I could see little resemblance between them: Jem's soft brown hair and eyes, his oval face and snug-fitting ears were our mother's, contrasting oddly with Atticus's gra
  78. stance
    a rationalized mental attitude
    He was still on the bed and I couldn't get a firm stance, so I threw myself at him as hard as I could, hitting, pulling, pinching, gouging.
  79. impassive
    having or revealing little emotion or sensibility; not easily aroused or excited
    I looked around and up at Mr. Cunningham, whose face was equally impassive.
  80. impurity
    the condition of being impure
    Again, as I had often met it in my own church, I was confronted with the Impurity of Women doctrine that seemed to preoccupy all clergymen.
  81. dictum
    an authoritative declaration
    Thus the dicta No Crawford Minds His Own Business, Every Third Merriweather Is Morbid, The Truth Is Not in the Delafields, All the Bufords Walk Like That, were simply guides to daily living: never take a check from a Delafield without a discreet ca
  82. reconnaissance
    the act of reconnoitring (especially to gain information about an enemy or potential enemy)
    He set me on my feet, and I made a secret reconnaissance of Jem. He seemed to be all in one piece, but he had a queer look on his face.
  83. stifle
    impair the respiration of or obstruct the air passage of
    Atticus tried to stifle a smile but didn't make it.
  84. sniff
    perceive by inhaling through the nose
    Mayella sniffed wrathfully and looked at Atticus.
  85. reverent
    feeling or showing profound respect or veneration
    Jem's voice was reverent.
  86. evoke
    call forth (emotions, feelings, and responses)
    Judge Taylor was not the kind of figure that ever evoked pity, but I did feel a pang for him as he tried to explain.
  87. bristle
    a stiff hair
    Giant monkey-puzzle bushes bristled on each corner, and between them an iron hitching rail glistened under the street lights.
  88. caption
    brief description accompanying an illustration
    We were surprised one morning to see a cartoon in the Montgomery Advertiser above the caption, "Maycomb's Finch."
  89. glean
    gather, as of natural products
    The varmints had a lean time of it, for the Ewells gave the dump a thorough gleaning every day, and the fruits of their industry (those that were not eaten) made the plot of ground around the cabin look like the playhouse of an insane child: what p
  90. confuse
    mistake one thing for another
    "Never heard of any Catholics in Maycomb either," said Atticus, "you're confusing that with something else.
  91. pantomime
    a performance using gestures and body movements without words
    Like Mr. Heck Tate, I imagined a person facing me, went through a swift mental pantomime, and concluded that he might have held her with his right hand and pounded her with his left.
  92. affluent
    having an abundant supply of money or possessions of value
    The more affluent chased their food with drugstore Coca-Cola in bulb-shaped soda glasses.
  93. persevere
    be persistent, refuse to stop
    "Gentle breeding," he continued, when I had found and scratched it, "and that you should try to live up to your name--' Atticus persevered in spite of us: "She asked me to tell you you must try to behave like the little lady and gentleman that you
  94. oblivious
    (followed by `to' or `of') lacking conscious awareness of
    He was sitting in one of his office chairs, and he was reading, oblivious of the nightbugs dancing over his head.
  95. indigenous
    originating where it is found
    No truant officers could keep their numerous offspring in school; no public health officer could free them from congenital defects, various worms, and the diseases indigenous to filthy surroundings.
  96. jubilee
    a special anniversary (or the celebration of it)
    On the dying notes of " Jubilee," Zeebo said, "In that far-off sweet forever, just beyond the shining river."
  97. tentative
    unsettled in mind or opinion
    Jem made a tentative swipe under the bed.
  98. buttress
    a support usually of stone or brick; supports the wall of a building
    Starkly out of place in a town of square-faced stores and steep-roofed houses, the Maycomb jail was a miniature Gothic joke one cell wide and two cells high, complete with tiny battlements and flying buttresses.
  99. scamper
    to move about or proceed hurriedly
    Below us, heads turned, feet scraped the floor, babies were shifted to shoulders, and a few children scampered out of the courtroom.
  100. invoke
    request earnestly (something from somebody); ask for aid or protection
    He used all his money for a ticket, boarded the train as he had done many times, coolly chatted with the conductor, to whom Dill was a familiar sight, but he had not the nerve to invoke the rule on small children traveling a distance alone: if you'
  101. livid
    furiously angry
    I did not remember our mother, but Jem, did-he would tell me about her sometimes-and he went livid when Mrs. Dubose shot us this message.
  102. eccentricity
    strange and unconventional behavior
    After nine hours of listening to the eccentricities of Old Sarum's inhabitants, Judge Taylor threw the case out of court.
  103. scald
    burn with a hot liquid or steam
    In Maycomb County, it was easy to tell when someone bathed regularly, as opposed to yearly lavations: Mr. Ewell had a scalded look; as if an overnight soaking had deprived him of protective layers of dirt, his skin appeared to be sensitive to the e
  104. uncouth
    lacking refinement or cultivation or taste
    Atticus's mouth, even, was half-open, an attitude he had once described as uncouth.
  105. arid
    lacking sufficient water or rainfall
    Atticus's voice had lost its comfortableness; he was speaking in his arid, detached professional voice.
  106. moat
    ditch dug as a fortification and usually filled with water
    Although her fits had passed off, she was in every other way her old self: when Sir Walter Scott became involved in lengthy descriptions of moats and castles, Mrs. Dubose would become bored and pick on us:
    "Jeremy Finch, I told you you'd live to re
  107. irrelevant
    having no bearing on or connection with the subject at issue
    Slowly but surely I began to see the pattern of Atticus's questions: from questions that Mr. Gilmer did not deem sufficiently irrelevant or immaterial to object to, Atticus was quietly building up before the jury a picture of the Ewells' home life.
  108. elusive
    skillful at eluding capture
    In his lawyer's voice, without a shade of inflection, he said: "Your aunt has asked me to try and impress upon you and Jean Louise that you are not from run-of-the-mill people, that you are the product of several generations' gentle breeding --' Atticus p
  109. criterion
    the ideal in terms of which something can be judged
    The Levy family met all criteria for being Fine Folks: they did the best they could with the sense they had, and they had been living on the same plot of ground in Maycomb for five generations.
  110. facade
    the face or front of a building
    Its fantasy was heightened by its red brick facade and the thick steel bars at its ecclesiastical windows.
  111. pensive
    deeply or seriously thoughtful
    Atticus looked pensive.
  112. nimble
    moving quickly and lightly
    But Maycomb would have been closer to the river had it not been for the nimble-wittedness of one Sinkfield, who in the dawn of history operated an inn where two pig-trails met, the only tavern in the territory.
  113. sluggish
    moving slowly
    It was plain that Aunty thought me dull in the extreme, because I once heard her tell Atticus that I was sluggish.
  114. locate
    discover the location of; determine the place of; find by searching or examining
    Business was excellent when Governor William Wyatt Bibb, with a view to promoting the newly created county's domestic tranquility, dispatched a team of surveyors to locate its exact center and there establish its seat of government.
  115. confines
    a bounded scope
    The surveyors, Sinkfield's guests, told their host that he was in the territorial confines of Maycomb County, and showed him the probable spot where the county seat would be built.
  116. propel
    cause to move forward with force
    I wanted to stay and explore, but Calpurnia propelled me up the aisle ahead of her.
  117. chuckle
    a soft partly suppressed laugh
    "From rape to riot to runaways," we heard him chuckle.
  118. giddy
    lacking seriousness; given to frivolity
    She was not fat, but solid, and she chose protective garments that drew up her bosom to giddy heights, pinched in her waist, flared out her rear, and managed to suggest that Aunt Alexandra's was once an hour-glass figure.
  119. hinge
    a joint that holds two parts together so that one can swing relative to the other
    Th' old door's off its hinges an' fall's comin' on pretty fast.'
  120. snug
    enjoying or affording comforting warmth and shelter especially in a small space
    As Atticus's fists went to his hips, so did Jem's, and as they faced each other I could see little resemblance between them: Jem's soft brown hair and eyes, his oval face and snug-fitting ears were our mother's, contrasting oddly with Atticus's gra
  121. ripple
    a small wave on the surface of a liquid
    Occasionally someone would return from Montgomery or Mobile with an outsider, but the result caused only a ripple in the quiet stream of family resemblance.
  122. morbid
    suggesting the horror of death and decay
    Aunt Alexandra, in underlining the moral of young Sam Merriweather's suicide, said it was caused by a morbid streak in the family.
  123. grudge
    a resentment strong enough to justify retaliation
    "I don't want either of you bearing a grudge about this thing, no matter what happens."
  124. maneuver
    a military training exercise
    But the ultimate wisdom of Sinkfield's maneuver is open to question.
  125. filthy
    disgustingly dirty; filled or smeared with offensive matter
    He carried my baton in one hand; its filthy yellow tassel trailed on the rug.
  126. discreet
    marked by prudence or modesty and wise self-restraint
    Thus the dicta No Crawford Minds His Own Business, Every Third Merriweather Is Morbid, The Truth Is Not in the Delafields, All the Bufords Walk Like That, were simply guides to daily living: never take a check from a Delafield without a discreet ca
  127. dispel
    to cause to separate and go in different directions
    It was dim inside, with a damp coolness slowly dispelled by the gathering congregation.
  128. devoid
    completely wanting or lacking
    Jem's chin would come up, and he would gaze at Mrs. Dubose with a face devoid of resentment.
  129. prerogative
    a right reserved exclusively by a particular person or group (especially a hereditary or official right)
    She was never bored, and given the slightest chance she would exercise her royal prerogative: she would arrange, advise, caution, and warn.
  130. participate
    become a participant; be involved in
    To all parties present and participating in the life of the county, Aunt Alexandra was one of the last of her kind: she had river-boat, boarding-school manners; let any moral come along and she would uphold it; she was born in the objective case; s
  131. rusty
    covered with or consisting of rust
    From the other side, however, Greek revival columns clashed with a big nineteenth-century clock tower housing a rusty unreliable instrument, a view indicating a people determined to preserve every physical scrap of the past.
  132. concede
    give over; surrender or relinquish to the physical control of another
    "He might have hurt me a little," Atticus conceded, "but son, you'll understand folks a little better when you're older.
  133. sear
    become superficially burned
    "You know he wouldn't bother you, you know you ain't seared of Atticus."
  134. ruddy
    inclined to a healthy reddish color often associated with outdoor life
    Judge Taylor looked like most judges I had ever seen: amiable, white-haired, slightly ruddy-faced, he was a man who ran his court with an alarming informality he sometimes propped his feet up, he often cleaned his fingernails with his pocket knife.
  135. isolation
    the act of isolating something; setting something apart from others
    Through my tears I saw Jem standing in a similar pool of isolation, his head cocked to one side.
  136. squat
    sit on one's heels
    Somewhere, I had received the impression that Fine Folks were people who did the best they could with the sense they had, but Aunt Alexandra was of the opinion, obliquely expressed, that the longer a family had been squatting on one patch of land t
  137. revive
    cause to regain consciousness
    The door was opened, and the gust of warm air revived us.
  138. concentrate
    make denser, stronger, or purer
    Her whole mind and body were concentrated on that alarm clock.
  139. normally
    under normal conditions
    The next afternoon at Mrs. Dubose's was the same as the first, and so was the next, until gradually a pattern emerged: everything would begin normally-that is, Mrs. Dubose would hound Jem for a while on her favorite subjects, her camellias and our
  140. tranquil
    (of a body of water) free from disturbance by heavy waves
    Jem had probably stood as much guff about Atticus lawing for niggers as had I, and I took it for granted that he kept his temperhe had a naturally tranquil disposition and a slow fuse.
  141. poke
    hit hard with the hand, fist, or some heavy instrument
    Refreshed by food, Dill recited this narrative: having been bound in chains and left to die in the basement (there were basements in Meridian) by his new father, who disliked him, and secretly kept alive on raw field peas by a passing farmer who heard his
  142. glisten
    be shiny, as if wet
    Her face was the color of a dirty pillowcase, and the corners of her mouth glistened with wet, which inched like a glacier down the deep grooves enclosing her chin.
  143. miniature
    being on a very small scale
    Jem thought he had enough to buy a miniature steam engine for himself and a twirling baton for me.
  144. category
    a general concept that marks divisions or coordinations in a conceptual scheme
    Aunty had a way of declaring What Is Best For The Family, and I suppose her coming to live with us was in that category.
  145. tedious
    so lacking in interest as to cause mental weariness
    The Reverend took a long time unwindin' this morning, he's not usually so tedious."
  146. fret
    be agitated or irritated
    "Don't you fret too much over Mister Jem--' she began.
  147. emerge
    come out into view, as from concealment
    The next afternoon at Mrs. Dubose's was the same as the first, and so was the next, until gradually a pattern emerged: everything would begin normally-that is, Mrs. Dubose would hound Jem for a while on her favorite subjects, her camellias and our
  148. academic
    associated with academia or an academy
    The Cunninghams married the Coninghams until the spelling of the names was academic -academic until a Cunningham disputed a Coningham over land titles and took to the law.
  149. ignore
    refuse to acknowledge
    Aunt Alexandra ignored my question.
  150. aisle
    a long narrow passage (as in a cave or woods)
    Zeebo rose from his pew and walked down the center aisle, stopping in front of us and facing the congregation.
  151. sullen
    showing a brooding ill humor
    They were sullen-looking, sleepy-eyed men who seemed unused to late hours.
  152. relaxed
    without strain or anxiety
    All the spectators were as relaxed as Judge Taylor, except Jem. His mouth was twisted into a purposeful half-grin, and his eyes happy about, and he said something about corroborating evidence, which made me sure he was showing off.
  153. overall
    including everything
    "And you-" she pointed an arthritic finger at me-"what are you doing in those overalls?
  154. premise
    a statement that is assumed to be true and from which a conclusion can be drawn
    I pulled at his sleeve, and we were followed up the sidewalk by a philippic on our family's moral degeneration, the major premise of which was that half the Finches were in the asylum anyway, but if our mother were living we would not have come to
  155. detached
    no longer connected or joined
    Through the weeks he had cultivated an expression of polite and detached interest, which he would present to her in answer to her most blood-curdling inventions.
  156. transportation
    the act of moving something from one location to another
    He placed the young town too far away from the only kind of public transportation in those days river-boat-and it took a man from the north end of the county two days to travel to Maycomb for store-bought goods.
  157. confine
    place limits on (extent or access)
    When we were small, Jem and I confined our activities to the southern neighborhood, but when I was well into the second grade at school and tormenting Boo Radley became pass6, the business section of Maycomb drew us frequently up the street past th
  158. dusty
    covered with a layer of dust
    Dusty.
  159. haughty
    having or showing arrogant superiority to and disdain of those one views as unworthy
    She's a troublemaker from way back, got fancy ideas an' haughty ways-we're mighty glad to have you all."
  160. thrive
    make steady progress; be at the high point in one's career or reach a high point in historical significance or importance
    "That makes the Ewells fine folks, then," said Jem. The tribe of which Burris Ewell and his brethren consisted had lived on the same plot of earth behind the Maycomb dump, and had thrived on county welfare money for three generations.
  161. despise
    look down on with disdain
    "He despises Negroes, won't have one near him."
  162. meditation
    continuous and profound contemplation or musing on a subject or series of subjects of a deep or abstruse nature
    She left the room and returned with a purple-covered book on which Meditations of Joshua S. St. Clair was stamped in gold.
  163. caste
    (Hinduism) a hereditary social class among Hindus; stratified according to ritual purity
    There was indeed a caste system in Maycomb, but to my mind it worked this way: the older citizens, the present generation of people who had lived side by side for years and years, were utterly predictable to one another: they took for granted attit
  164. ignored
    disregarded
    Aunt Alexandra ignored my question.
  165. dusk
    the time of day immediately following sunset
    In the frosty December dusk, their cabins looked neat and snug with pale blue smoke rising from the chimneys and doorways glowing amber from the fires inside.
  166. refined
    (used of persons and their behavior) cultivated and genteel
    There was indeed a caste system in Maycomb, but to my mind it worked this way: the older citizens, the present generation of people who had lived side by side for years and years, were utterly predictable to one another: they took for granted attitudes, c
  167. resume
    take up or begin anew
    When she settled in with us and life resumed its daily pace, Aunt Alexandra seemed as if she had always lived with us.
  168. kin
    a person having kinship with another or others
    She never let a chance escape her to point out the shortcomings of other tribal groups to the greater glory of our own, a habit that amused Jem rather than annoyed him: "Aunty better watch how she talks-scratch most folks in Maycomb and they're kin
  169. levy
    impose and collect
    They paraded by Mr. Sam Levy's house one night, but Sam just stood on his porch and told 'em things had come to a pretty pass, he'd sold 'em the very sheets on their backs.
  170. install
    set up for use
    It was a sad thing that my father had neglected to tell me about the Finch Family, or to install any pride into his children.
  171. compassion
    a deep awareness of and sympathy for another's suffering
    "Scout," said Atticus, "when summer comes you'll have to keep your head about far worse things . . . it's not fair for you and Jem, I know that, but sometimes we have to make the best of things, and the way we conduct ourselves when the chips are down-wel
  172. detach
    cause to become detached or separated; take off
    Through the weeks he had cultivated an expression of polite and detached interest, which he would present to her in answer to her most blood-curdling inventions.
  173. objective
    the goal intended to be attained (and which is believed to be attainable)
    To all parties present and participating in the life of the county, Aunt Alexandra was one of the last of her kind: she had river-boat, boarding-school manners; let any moral come along and she would uphold it; she was born in the objective case; s
  174. register
    an official written record of names or events or transactions
    I sometimes think Atticus subjected every crisis of his life to tranquil evaluation behind The Mobile Register, The Birmingham News and The Montgomery Advertiser.
  175. pasture
    a field covered with grass or herbage and suitable for grazing by livestock
    So Dill and I spent our Sundays creeping around in Deer's Pasture.
  176. requirement
    required activity
    Instead, Maycomb grew and sprawled out from its hub, Sinkfield's Tavern, because Sinkfield reduced his guests to myopic drunkenness one evening, induced them to bring forward their maps and charts, lop off a little here, add a bit there, and adjust the ce
  177. patriot
    one who loves and defends his or her country
    Sinkfield, no patriot, served and supplied am- munition to Indians and settlers alike, neither knowing or caring whether he was a part of the Alabama Territory or the Creek Nation so long as business was good.
  178. promote
    give a promotion to or assign to a higher position
    Business was excellent when Governor William Wyatt Bibb, with a view to promoting the newly created county's domestic tranquility, dispatched a team of surveyors to locate its exact center and there establish its seat of government.
  179. positively
    so as to be positive; in a positive manner
    There was a story behind all this, but I had no desire to extract it from her then: today was Sunday, and Aunt Alexandra was positively irritable on the Lord's Day. I guess it was her Sunday corset.
  180. delicacy
    the quality of being beautiful and delicate in appearance
    Her Missionary Society refreshments added to her reputation as a hostess (she did not permit Calpurnia to make the delicacies required to sustain the Society through long reports on Rice Christians) ; she joined and became Secretary of the Maycomb