40 SAT words Beginning with "Q" 40 words

Find lists of SAT words organized by every letter of the alphabet here: A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K & L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, and W, X, Y & Z.

  1. quack
    the harsh sound of a duck
    A family of ducks were slowly paddling about in front of me, making little furrows in the quiet water and giving an occasional placid quack.
    Arnim, Elizabeth von
  2. quadrilateral
    a four-sided polygon
    It is quadrilateral in shape, consisting of four unequal sides flanked by towers and built round a courtyard.
    Various
  3. quadruped
    an animal especially a mammal having four limbs specialized for walking
    In a moment they were on all fours, hopping about like so many quadrupeds.
    Patchin, Frank Gee
  4. quaff
    to swallow hurriedly or greedily or in one draught
    Gareth gave it to him, and quaffed deeply of the refreshing draught, for he was burning with thirst.
    Morris, Charles
  5. quagmire
    a soft wet area of low-lying land that sinks underfoot
    The heavy rain had reduced this low-lying ground to a veritable quagmire, making progress very difficult even for one as unburdened as he was.
    Putnam Weale, B. L. (Bertram Lenox)
  6. quaint
    attractively old-fashioned (but not necessarily authentic)
    She lives in a quaint old-fashioned house with casement windows and deep window seats, old oak staircase and panelled rooms.
    Strang, Mrs. Herbert
  7. qualified
    meeting the proper standards and requirements and training for an office or position or task
    All schools need administrators who are highly qualified, dedicated to the profession and not hired due to political connections.
    Washington Post (Aug 22, 2011)
  8. qualify
    prove capable or fit; meet requirements
    The housing bust wiped away $7 trillion in household equity, leaving many homeowners with too much debt to qualify for new loans.
    Wall Street Journal (May 9, 2012)
  9. qualitative
    involving distinctions based on qualities
    Qualitative research can help entrepreneurs to understand their customers' or clients' feelings, values, and perceptions of a particular product or service.
    Inc (Oct 25, 2010)
  10. qualm
    uneasiness about the fitness of an action
    Kenneth had no qualms about asking a neighboring table at the country club to stop cussing with his daughters in earshot.
    Inc (Feb 1, 2012)
  11. quandary
    a situation from which extrication is difficult especially an unpleasant or trying one
    Colleges and universities are in a quandary: Spending cuts, combined with a freeze on tuition, mean fewer teachers and the closing of certain programs.
    New York Times (Feb 20, 2012)
  12. quantitative
    expressible as a quantity or relating to or susceptible of measurement
    Agencies have not traditionally hired for skills like “number crunching, data visualization, quantitative analysis,” Mr. Neumann said.
    New York Times (Oct 30, 2011)
  13. quantity
    how much there is or how many there are of something that you can quantify
    Producing big quantities in America has become harder, as the authorities have cracked down on bulk purchases of the ingredients.
    Economist (Mar 22, 2012)
  14. quantum
    (physics) the smallest discrete quantity of some physical property that a system can possess (according to quantum theory)
    Physicists have used all manner of quantum objects to store qubits—electrons, atomic nuclei, photons and so on.
    Scientific American (Apr 11, 2012)
  15. quarantine
    isolation to prevent the spread of infectious disease
    The exact time when it is safe for a person to come out of quarantine and resume ordinary life varies in different diseases.
    Cross, American Red
  16. quarrel
    an angry dispute
    The slightest quarrel, the most commonplace street brawl are pretexts for rival factions to come out in battle array.
    Bastide, Charles
  17. quarry
    a surface excavation for extracting stone or slate
    But what about quarries from which are taken building stone, salt, kaolin or clay?
    Hoskin, Arthur J.
  18. quash
    put down by force or intimidation
    More than 500 people are thought to have been killed since mid-March as the security forces try to quash dissent.
    BBC (May 7, 2011)
  19. quay
    wharf usually built parallel to the shoreline
    The harbour accommodation is extensive and excellent, large new docks and quays having been recently built, and other works being under construction or contemplated.
    Various
  20. queasy
    feeling nausea; feeling about to vomit
    The ground still shook under his feet, and his insides were producing the queasy symptoms of motion sickness.
    Goodwin, Harold L. (Harold Leland)
  21. quell
    suppress or crush completely
    Burned cars and tires littered a street as police used tear gas to quell demonstrators who threw rocks and small explosives, local TV footage showed.
    Reuters (Sep 8, 2011)
  22. quench
    put out, as of fires, flames, or lights
    No fire was visible anywhere; every bit had been quenched by the flood which came in after Lutchi propped up the sky.
    Curtin, Jeremiah
  23. querulous
    habitually complaining
    In the first place, she is not rich; I could tell that by the querulous complaints of her middle‑class mother.
    Du Maurier, George
  24. query
    pose a question
    "How can such things be?" queried Reuben, stroking his beard in perplexity.
    Johnston, Annie F. (Annie Fellows)
  25. quest
    the act of searching for something
    In the never-ending quest to cut costs and increase money paid out of pocket by customers, airline perks have been disappearing for years.
    Time (Apr 6, 2012)
  26. queue
    form a queue, form a line, stand in line
    Voters queued up in orderly lines in Taipei and other cities islandwide after polls opened at 8 a.m.
    Reuters (Jan 14, 2012)
  27. quibble
    argue over petty things
    Philosophy, Sports People often dismiss philosophical disputes as mere quibbles about words.  
    New York Times (Mar 16, 2012)
  28. quiescent
    being quiet or still or inactive
    Under normal conditions, only a fraction of these blood-forming stem cells are active; the rest are deeply quiescent – asleep.
    The Guardian (Jan 17, 2011)
  29. quietude
    a state of peace and quiet
    She took the vacant seat with a sort of frozen quietude, and her limbs seemed to settle themselves rigidly into positions where they remained immovable.
    Ritchie, Anna Cora Ogden Mowatt
  30. quintessence
    the most typical example or representative of a type
    This composition, in many ways the most wonderful single piece we have from Chopin, is the quintessence of his genius.
    Spalding, Walter Raymond
  31. quip
    witty remark
    When Turkle said she had been at funerals where people checked their iPhones, Colbert quipped: "We all say goodbye in our own way."
    The Guardian (Jan 22, 2011)
  32. quirk
    a strange attitude or habit
    There are a few annoying quirks: For example, the PlayBook took a long time when scrolling through long documents or Web pages.
    Seattle Times (Apr 16, 2011)
  33. quirky
    informal terms; strikingly unconventional
    Quirky experiences abound: A vintage clothing store in a double-decker bus!
    Time (Apr 19, 2012)
  34. quisling
    someone who collaborates with an enemy occupying force
    Naturally enough, the attitude taken up by the Christians earned them fresh attacks from the Quisling followers.
    Snoek, Johan Martinus
  35. quiver
    shake with fast, tremulous movements
    His last words had scarcely rung out when my horse began to quiver under me and sway backward and forward.
    Weyman, Stanley John
  36. quixotic
    not sensible about practical matters; idealistic and unrealistic
    Granted, Latin American integration is an elusive if not quixotic goal: the region stretches farther than Africa, and its nations' interests are just as balkanized.
    Time (Dec 4, 2011)
  37. quizzical
    playfully vexing (especially by ridicule)
    Not too long ago, wearing Chicago Blackhawks gear would earn you quizzical looks or jokes about being the last of the team's fans.
    Seattle Times (Jun 1, 2010)
  38. quorum
    a gathering of the minimal number of members of an organization to conduct business
    Without a quorum of four, the commission was unable to do even basic things such as approving public funding for presidential candidates.
    Slate (Jan 25, 2011)
  39. quotation
    a passage or expression that is quoted or cited
    “Better fifty years of Europe Than a cycle of Cathay,” murmured Dick, yielding once more to his chronic habit of quotation.
    Duffield, J. W.
  40. quotidian
    found in the ordinary course of events
    More seriously, plenty of quotidian consumer staples, such as children's clothes, come from China.
    The Guardian (Apr 16, 2010)