Glossary of Corruption 37 words

Words pulled from Rupert Murdoch Testifies as Hacking Case Shifts Focus to a Minister (NY Times April 25 2012) was well as statements made by Murdoch and British Prime Minister David Cameron.
  1. scrutiny
    the act of examining something closely (as for mistakes)
    LONDON — With a political firestorm cascading over the British government’s ties to his media empire, Rupert Murdoch faced rare public scrutiny about his relationships with elected officials on Wednesday, seeking to deflect suggestions that he sought to use his links to powerful public figures to further corporate commercial interests.
  2. deflect
    draw someone's attention away from something
    LONDON — With a political firestorm cascading over the British government’s ties to his media empire, Rupert Murdoch faced rare public scrutiny about his relationships with elected officials on Wednesday, seeking to deflect suggestions that he sought to use his links to powerful public figures to further corporate commercial interests.
  3. testimony
    a solemn statement made under oath
    His appearance at the so-called Leveson inquiry came a day after testimony implicated a senior cabinet minister, or at least an aide claiming to speak for him, in a covert effort to win approval for his company’s $12 billion bid to take over the BSkyB network.
  4. claim
    assert or affirm strongly; state to be true or existing
    His appearance at the so-called Leveson inquiry came a day after testimony implicated a senior cabinet minister, or at least an aide claiming to speak for him, in a covert effort to win approval for his company’s $12 billion bid to take over the BSkyB network.
  5. covert
    secret or hidden; not openly practiced or engaged in or shown or avowed
    His appearance at the so-called Leveson inquiry came a day after testimony implicated a senior cabinet minister, or at least an aide claiming to speak for him, in a covert effort to win approval for his company’s $12 billion bid to take over the BSkyB network.
  6. collaboration
    act of working jointly
    A trove of e-mails, released at the same inquiry on Tuesday, pointed to hand-in-glove collaboration between a lobbyist for Mr. Murdoch’s News Corporation and the office of Culture Minister Jeremy Hunt, the official designated to pass judgment on the Murdoch proposal for full control of BSkyB.
  7. resignation
    the act of giving up (a claim or office or possession etc.)
    But during a raucous and confrontational session of Parliament on Wednesday, Mr. Hunt rejected opposition calls for his resignation and denied that he had acted improperly toward Mr. Murdoch.
  8. deny
    declare untrue; contradict
    But during a raucous and confrontational session of Parliament on Wednesday, Mr. Hunt rejected opposition calls for his resignation and denied that he had acted improperly toward Mr. Murdoch.
  9. assail
    attack in speech or writing
    He also assailed the Labour opposition over its own ties to Mr. Murdoch, particularly those of former Prime Minister Tony Blair, underscoring the importance that successive British administrations have attached to securing the endorsement of Mr. Murdoch’s tabloid daily, The Sun, for their electoral aspirations.
  10. endorsement
    the act of endorsing
    He also assailed the Labour opposition over its own ties to Mr. Murdoch, particularly those of former Prime Minister Tony Blair, underscoring the importance that successive British administrations have attached to securing the endorsement of Mr. Murdoch’s tabloid daily, The Sun, for their electoral aspirations.
  11. aspiration
    a cherished desire
    He also assailed the Labour opposition over its own ties to Mr. Murdoch, particularly those of former Prime Minister Tony Blair, underscoring the importance that successive British administrations have attached to securing the endorsement of Mr. Murdoch’s tabloid daily, The Sun, for their electoral aspirations.
  12. career
    the general progression of your working or professional life
    The BSkyB deal, which would have crowned Mr. Murdoch’s 60-year media career, was scuttled last year as the scandal over illicit phone hacking at his British newspapers exploded, and now appears out of his reach for years, if not permanently.
  13. scandal
    a disgraceful event
    The BSkyB deal, which would have crowned Mr. Murdoch’s 60-year media career, was scuttled last year as the scandal over illicit phone hacking at his British newspapers exploded, and now appears out of his reach for years, if not permanently.
  14. illicit
    contrary to or forbidden by law
    The BSkyB deal, which would have crowned Mr. Murdoch’s 60-year media career, was scuttled last year as the scandal over illicit phone hacking at his British newspapers exploded, and now appears out of his reach for years, if not permanently.
  15. influence
    a power to affect persons or events especially power based on prestige etc
    Much of the questioning centered on meetings with British political leaders and the pledges Mr. Murdoch had made not to influence his newspapers’ editorial policies.
  16. acknowledge
    declare to be true or admit the existence or reality or truth of
    He acknowledged meetings, dinners and shared quips with a series of prime ministers, but sought to dismiss suggestions that he wielded any influence.
  17. allegation
    (law) a formal accusation against somebody (often in a court of law)
    “I don’t know many politicians,” he said, on one of many occasions on which he denied allegations from Mr. Jay that his newspapers supported politicians whose policies might offer him some commercial benefit.
  18. benefit
    something that aids or promotes well-being
    “I don’t know many politicians,” he said, on one of many occasions on which he denied allegations from Mr. Jay that his newspapers supported politicians whose policies might offer him some commercial benefit.
  19. subtle
    difficult to detect or grasp by the mind or analyze
    As to suggestions that his power might be more subtle than such obvious exchanges, he responded, “I’m afraid I don’t have much subtlety about me.”
  20. obvious
    easily perceived by the senses or grasped by the mind
    As to suggestions that his power might be more subtle than such obvious exchanges, he responded, “I’m afraid I don’t have much subtlety about me.”
  21. laconic
    brief and to the point; effectively cut short
    On occasions, he seemed laconic and cautious in his responses to Mr. Jay, mildly disputing suggestions that he ran his companies as a charismatic figure.
  22. rebut
    overthrow by argument, evidence, or proof
    But Mr. Murdoch seemed keen to rebut allegations that he had sought political cover for his entry into the British newspaper market.
  23. emerge
    come out into view, as from concealment
    The Murdoch newspapers in Britain also include The Sun and the now defunct News of the World, a Sunday tabloid, which Mr. Murdoch closed last July as it emerged as the epicenter of the hacking scandal.
  24. tycoon
    a very wealthy or powerful businessman
    As the media tycoon smoothly parried questions at the inquiry, Britain’s political leaders played out a noisy drama in Parliament and elsewhere, with the Labour opposition seeking to pile pressure on the government by depicting Tuesday’s disclosures at the Leveson hearings as only the latest in a catalog of errors.
  25. parry
    avoid or try to avoid fulfilling, answering, or performing (duties, questions, or issues)
    As the media tycoon smoothly parried questions at the inquiry, Britain’s political leaders played out a noisy drama in Parliament and elsewhere, with the Labour opposition seeking to pile pressure on the government by depicting Tuesday’s disclosures at the Leveson hearings as only the latest in a catalog of errors.
  26. beleaguer
    annoy persistently
    Mr. Hunt, the beleaguered minister, insisted to reporters on Wednesday that he behaved “scrupulously fairly” and “with total integrity” in the BSkyB negotiations.
  27. integrity
    an undivided or unbroken completeness or totality with nothing wanting
    Mr. Hunt, the beleaguered minister, insisted to reporters on Wednesday that he behaved “scrupulously fairly” and “with total integrity” in the BSkyB negotiations.
  28. confidence
    a feeling of trust (in someone or something)
    Prime Minister David Cameron said on Tuesday that he had “full confidence” in Mr. Hunt and repeated that assurance to Parliament on Wednesday.
  29. furor
    a sudden outburst (as of protest)
    The political furor over Mr. Hunt erupted after James Murdoch, the media tycoon’s son, testified at the Leveson inquiry for five hours on Tuesday.
  30. coterie
    an exclusive circle of people with a common purpose
    Mr. Murdoch has been in London since last Thursday, conferring with a coterie of advisers, lawyers and communications consultants behind closed doors.
  31. expose
    to show, make visible or apparent
    Over the last year, the ever-growing scandal has exposed unsavory and sometimes illegal interlocking ties among figures in the government, political leadership, law enforcement and News International, the British newspaper arm of Mr. Murdoch’s News Corporation, along with Britain‘s other free-wheeling media outlets.
  32. unsavory
    morally offensive
    Over the last year, the ever-growing scandal has exposed unsavory and sometimes illegal interlocking ties among figures in the government, political leadership, law enforcement and News International, the British newspaper arm of Mr. Murdoch’s News Corporation, along with Britain‘s other free-wheeling media outlets.
  33. illegal
    prohibited by law or by official or accepted rules
    Over the last year, the ever-growing scandal has exposed unsavory and sometimes illegal interlocking ties among figures in the government, political leadership, law enforcement and News International, the British newspaper arm of Mr. Murdoch’s News Corporation, along with Britain‘s other free-wheeling media outlets.
  34. serious
    of great consequence
    The network generates billion-dollar annual profits and is increasingly a serious competitor to the BBC.
  35. manipulate
    influence or control shrewdly or deviously
    Mr. Smith’s e-mails depict Mr. Hunt as an avid supporter of the BSkyB takeover and ready, in effect, to manipulate the approval process in the Murdochs’ favor, in part by giving the lobbyist — and through him, James Murdoch — advance notice of government moves.
  36. cozy up
    ingratiate oneself to; often with insincere behavior
    Speaking at Prime Minister's Questions, the Prime Minister said: "I think hand on heart, we all did a bit too much cosying up to Rupert Murdoch." --PoliticsHome.com
  37. lazy
    disinclined to work or exertion
    Media tycoon Rupert Murdoch said he does not believe in journalists using phone hacking or private detectives, calling it "a lazy way of reporters doing their job." --CNN.com