100 SAT Words Beginning with "G" 100 words

Find lists of SAT words organized by every letter of the alphabet here: A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K & L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, and W, X, Y & Z.

  1. gaffe
    a socially awkward or tactless act
    Later, Mr. Perry made a minor gaffe by misstating the voting age, which is 18.
    New York Times (Nov 30, 2011)
  2. gallant
    unflinching in battle or action
    Now straining up steep ascents, and now swimming deep rivers, the fearless and gallant band pressed forward.
    Headley, Joel Tyler
  3. galvanize
    to stimulate to action
    “It’s going to galvanize people” and inspire more to attend today’s events, he said by telephone.
    BusinessWeek (Nov 17, 2011)
  4. gamut
    a complete extent or range: "a face that expressed a gamut of emotions"
    The program spans the entire cultural gamut, encompassing fine art, sculpture, dance, music, cinema, literature and theater.
    New York Times (Jan 24, 2011)
  5. garb
    provide with clothes or put clothes on
    Some are garbed in burgundy monks’ robes, others in jeans and trucker hats.
    New York Times (Jan 28, 2012)
  6. garish
    tastelessly showy
    The garish colors, fabrics, trim and gaudy interior looks like it was done by a 12 year old.
    Forbes (Dec 21, 2011)
  7. garment
    an article of clothing
    He and two of his sisters work at a nearby tailoring shop, cutting off loose threads from nearly finished garments.
    New York Times (Dec 2, 2011)
  8. garnish
    something (such as parsley) added to a dish for flavor or decoration
    Lemon, hard-boiled egg and capers may also be used as garnish for chicken salad.
    Richards, Lenore
  9. garrulous
    full of trivial conversation
    He was not in the best of spirits, for the drink was dying out of him; but his garrulous, inconsequent talk amused me mightily.
    Bullen, Frank T.
  10. gastronomy
    the art and practice of choosing and preparing and eating good food
    Cooking is there esteemed a service of especial merit, hence France ranks all nations in gastronomy.
    Ronald, Mary
  11. gaudy
    tastelessly showy
    In fact, he seemed incapable of using any colors but gaudy or resplendent ones, and is nothing if not exaggerated, and using heaps of words.
    Mitchell, Donald G.
  12. gaunt
    very thin especially from disease or hunger or cold
    Gaunt, starved, and ragged, the men marched northwards, leaving the Touat country upon their left hand.
    Mason, A. E. W. (Alfred Edward Woodley)
  13. gender
    the properties that distinguish organisms on the basis of their reproductive roles
    Once strict gender roles softened and sexual mores loosened, the notion of a proposing woman began to seem less patently ridiculous.
    Slate (Feb 28, 2012)
  14. genealogy
    the study or investigation of ancestry and family history
    The genealogies and family histories are excellent, and many particulars are given of the lives and works of authors not easily found elsewhere.
    Various
  15. generalization
    the process of formulating general concepts by abstracting common properties of instances
    With this purpose in view he has kept closely to concrete statement and above all has tried to avoid vagueness and loose generalization.
    Kelly, Edmond
  16. generation
    all the people living at the same time or of approximately the same age
    There they are, staring from photographic portraits on the entrance wall, looking much like ancestral grandfather and the family’s new generation.
    New York Times (Mar 26, 2012)
  17. generic
    applicable to an entire class or group
    But rather than asking a generic question like "Are you happy here?" inquire about things that matter to your loved one.
    US News (Feb 7, 2012)
  18. genetic
    of or relating to or produced by or being a gene
    DNA testing confirmed that the patient carried the genetic abnormality behind the disease.
    New York Times (Mar 2, 2012)
  19. genial
    diffusing warmth and friendliness
    Perhaps there is nothing that prolongs life more than genial, hearty laughter.
    McCarty, Louis Philippe
  20. genre
    an expressive style of music
    Over the years, the series has featured just about every genre of American arts and music, including pop, country, jazz, blues, theater and dance.
    Seattle Times (Feb 16, 2012)
  21. genteel
    marked by refinement in taste and manners
    "Mrs. D.," said he, turning on me like a tiger, "are you going to teach me polite breeding and genteel manners?"
    Lever, Charles James
  22. gentility
    elegance by virtue of fineness of manner and expression
    Obviously, that level of gentility and decorum is difficult to maintain at regular tour events.
    New York Times (Mar 27, 2010)
  23. gentry
    the most powerful members of a society
    In my young days the people with means were the landed gentry and the nobility.
    Hine, Muriel
  24. genuflect
    bend the knees and bow in church or before a religious superior or image
    When you enter, bless yourself with holy water and go quietly to your seat, genuflect on your right knee and enter the pew.
    Anonymous
  25. genuine
    not fake or counterfeit
    While partial relief may be obtained through other channels, real, genuine, and lasting redress can only be obtained by organized action at the polls.
    Cloud, D. C.
  26. germane
    relevant and appropriate
    But such questions are not germane to my central theme, and so I pass them over lightly.
    Coit, Stanton
  27. germinal
    containing seeds of later development
    The most valuable means of securing this all-important growth is “play,” which Froebel said contained the germinal leaves of all later life.
    Nearing, Scott
  28. germinate
    cause to grow or sprout
    Nothing might come of it just then, but Elmer hoped the seed would find lodging, and perhaps later on germinate.
    Douglas, Alan
  29. gerrymander
    divide unfairly and to one's advantage; of voting districts
    In practice, though, officials in both parties often try to gerrymander districts to help themselves and their parties win more elections.
    New York Times (Sep 7, 2010)
  30. gestate
    be pregnant with
    In her womb they were gestated and formed.
    Burroughs, John
  31. gesticulation
    a deliberate and vigorous gesture or motion
    Then the clapping and gesticulations broke forth with increased violence.
    Mudge, Zachariah Atwell
  32. gesture
    motion of hands or body to emphasize or help to express a thought or feeling
    At that, one of the younger men lifted a hand--a quick, nervous gesture, denoting at once surprise and consternation.
    Gilson, Charles
  33. ghastly
    shockingly repellent; inspiring horror
    From here events build up to highly shocking climaxes, including a ghastly murder.
    Bradley, Marion Zimmer
  34. gibberish
    unintelligible talking
    But the answer was a gurgling gibberish that made no sense at all!
    Various
  35. gibe
    an aggressive remark directed at a person like a missile and intended to have a telling effect
    When nothing but charred end-logs and glowing coals remained, Kent’s men tramped off through the deep snows shouting gibes and taunts at their enemies.
    Chisholm, A. M. (Arthur Murray)
  36. giddy
    lacking seriousness; given to frivolity
    Another party of giddy, laughing girls, chatter away in a different strain.
    Anonymous
  37. gingerly
    in a gingerly manner
    Newman got hurt during practice Wednesday, walking gingerly off the field after getting tangled with a receiver during pass coverage drills.
    Washington Post (Aug 4, 2011)
  38. gird
    prepare oneself for a military confrontation
    In this semantic skirmish, the White House, bolstered by the momentum of victory and allies old and new, is girded for combat.
    Time (Mar 22, 2010)
  39. girder
    a beam made usually of steel; a main support in a structure
    The 130-year-old stone cathedral stands broken and deconsecrated, with stained-glass windows shattered and the west wall propped up by girders.
    BusinessWeek (Feb 21, 2012)
  40. girth
    the distance around a person's body
    Others posted messages saying they were looking for "a fat guy called Ai"– a reference to the artist's impressive girth.
    The Guardian (Apr 6, 2011)
  41. gist
    the choicest or most essential or most vital part of some idea or experience
    To sum up the gist of Anglo-American relations in half a dozen pages, as Mr. Ayres does here, is surely a remarkable achievement.
    Ayres, Harry Morgan
  42. glacial
    relating to or derived from a glacier
    But no mammoth remains have been found around the White Sea; it was still covered with glacial ice when mammoths died out in Europe.
    Scientific American (Nov 22, 2011)
  43. glean
    gather, as of natural products
    A group of men and boys stood round awestruck, anxious to glean every bit of information that could be given.
    Reynolds, Mrs. Baillie
  44. glib
    marked by lack of intellectual depth
    The other sort of engineer understands that glib comparisons between computers and humans don't do justice to the complexities of either.
    Forbes (Jul 22, 2010)
  45. glimmer
    shine brightly, like a star or a light
    The leaves were black overhead, but the white birch trunks round me glimmered like pale ghosts.
    Weyman, Stanley J.
  46. gloat
    dwell on with satisfaction
    Vixetta was in high spirits; she and her familiars hatched mischief together, and gloated over their evil doings in fiendish glee.
    Harrison, Constance Cary
  47. globalization
    growth to a global or worldwide scale
    Stock markets around the world have grown more correlated, thanks to the effects of globalization.
    New York Times (Jun 12, 2010)
  48. glower
    look angry or sullen, wrinkle one's forehead, as if to signal disapproval
    Nils was glowering, and Erik saw the scolding in his eyes.
    Brandeis, Madeline
  49. glum
    moody and melancholic
    The music stayed somber and steadfast, determinedly maintaining its glum tone.
    New York Times (Apr 22, 2010)
  50. glut
    the quality of being so overabundant that prices fall
    While mining companies may be making more money than ever, the shipping companies are contending with a glut rather than shortages.
    BusinessWeek (May 17, 2011)
  51. glutinous
    having the sticky properties of an adhesive
    The young were very little larger, and had a glutinous surface, which caused them to adhere together on being taken from the water.
    Various
  52. glutton
    a person who is devoted to eating and drinking to excess
    He was a glutton, and stuffed himself so at meals that he did little but choke and wheeze through the latter half of them.
    Rives, Hallie Erminie
  53. gluttony
    habitual eating to excess
    Moderation in eating was advised at all times, and any serious excess set down as gluttony, one of the seven deadly sins.
    Walsh, James J. (James Joseph)
  54. gnarled
    used of old persons or old trees; covered with knobs or knots
    She was about forty years old, with stooping shoulders, and hands gnarled and twisted by hard work.
    Sage, William
  55. goad
    stab or urge on as if with a pointed stick
    With oaths and savage lashings they were goaded on through deep, new-fallen snow.
    Williamson, A. M. (Alice Muriel)
  56. gorge
    overeat or eat immodestly; make a pig of oneself
    True, he lay moaning and groaning all night, but next morning would be quite ready to gorge an equal meal.
    Strang, Herbert
  57. gorgeous
    dazzlingly beautiful
    The leaves had assumed their gorgeous autumnal tints, and the masses of timber, variegated in colour, presented an inexpressibly beautiful appearance.
    Ainsworth, William Harrison
  58. gory
    covered with blood
    And then they showed Denver’s pistol; the one he had borrowed from Bunker, all gory with hair and blood.
    Coolidge, Dane
  59. gossamer
    characterized by unusual lightness and delicacy
    After an atmospheric episode, the piece broke into a spiraling dance, sometimes crazed, sometimes delicate with gossamer textures.
    New York Times (Apr 16, 2011)
  60. gouge
    make a groove in
    The door was massive, hand-hewn timber that was liberally scratched and gouged, and Joe frowned as he looked at it.
    Kjelgaard, James Arthur
  61. gourmand
    a person who is devoted to eating and drinking to excess
    With ravenous appetites they partook of a feast which any gourmand might covet.
    Abbott, John S. C. (John Stevens Cabot)
  62. gourmet
    a person devoted to refined sensuous enjoyment (especially good food and drink)
    Prince Koltsoff had enjoyed his luncheon, as only an exacting gourmet whose every canon of taste has been satisfied, can.
    McFall, J. V.
  63. govern
    exercise authority over; as of nations
    Saying they do not want to govern, the generals are due to hand power to an elected president by mid-year.
    Reuters (Jan 4, 2012)
  64. governance
    the act of governing; exercising authority
    He explained that an interim government would immediately take over to provide day-to-day governance and keep order, the Associated Press news agency reports.
    BBC (May 6, 2011)
  65. grading
    evaluation of performance by assigning a grade or score
    Each commissioner’s smock came adorned with a bright blue “A” rating, a nod to the city’s new grading system for restaurant cleanliness.
    New York Times (Mar 23, 2012)
  66. graduated
    marked with or divided into degrees
    Latterly he took to using paper scales graduated to millimeters.
    Darwin, Charles
  67. graduation
    the successful completion of a program of study
    People who have earned advanced degrees are “hooded” as part of the graduation ceremony.
    Slate (Mar 22, 2012)
  68. graft
    (surgery) tissue or organ transplanted from a donor to a recipient; in some cases the patient can be both donor and recipient
    UPS already has a good business ensuring that organs and skin grafts get to hospitals in good time.
    Economist (Mar 22, 2012)
  69. granary
    a storehouse for threshed grain or animal feed
    Here is where he does his husking, and the "clear corn" produced is stored away in some underground granary till It is needed.
    Seton, Ernest Thompson
  70. grandeur
    the quality of being magnificent or splendid or grand
    Honest Jack was perfectly astounded at seeing so much beauty and grandeur where he expected to find nothing except solitude and savage desert.
    Garibaldi, Giuseppe
  71. grandiloquent
    puffed up with vanity
    There was something theatrical and grandiloquent about him, and he seemed to pose like an actor who attracts admiration.
    Gautier, Théophile
  72. grandiose
    impressive because of unnecessary largeness or grandeur; used to show disapproval
    Even in a state known for grandiose real estate deals, the proposed development has set new standards for ambition or, depending on one’s view, recklessness.
    New York Times (Feb 18, 2012)
  73. graphic
    written or drawn or engraved
    Unlike in the West, where graphic novels are accepted, the Iranian comic book is struggling to make headway.
    New York Times (Apr 12, 2012)
  74. grapple
    come to terms with
    Spanish borrowing costs have fared better than Italy’s as both nations grapple with the debt crisis.
    BusinessWeek (Oct 12, 2011)
  75. gratify
    make happy or satisfied
    This matter was engineered through so handsomely by Mr. Applegate, that Dr. White expressed himself highly gratified and pleased.
    Gray, William Henry
  76. gratitude
    a feeling of thankfulness and appreciation
    He has saved my life, and I owe him much gratitude.
    Allen, Grant
  77. gratuitous
    unnecessary and unwarranted
    The reader is treated to pedantic little footnotes, and given a good deal of information which is either gratuitous or uninteresting.
    Hay, Ian
  78. gratuity
    a relatively small amount of money given for services rendered (as by a waiter)
    Room service is supplied by the nearby Park Avenue Bistro, with a $3.50 surcharge for each plate, plus a 25 percent gratuity.
    New York Times (Jun 18, 2010)
  79. graze
    let feed in a field or pasture or meadow
    As soon as haymaking was over, the meadows became common grazing land for horses, cows, and oxen.
    Reilly, S. A.
  80. gregarious
    instinctively or temperamentally seeking and enjoying the company of others
    The Bison is gregarious, associating in herds many hundreds strong.
    Various
  81. grievance
    a complaint about a (real or imaginary) wrong that causes resentment and is grounds for action
    In the open letter, Students & Scholars Against Corporate Misbehaviour, listed grievances cited by employees at Apple suppliers, including "poverty wages" and excessive and forced overtime.
    Chicago Tribune (Mar 27, 2012)
  82. grievous
    shockingly brutal or cruel
    He was convicted of recklessly causing grievous bodily harm to Cowley, who sustained fractures to his jaw, eye socket, cheekbone and nose.
    Seattle Times (Mar 18, 2012)
  83. grim
    harshly uninviting or formidable in manner or appearance
    As he lay awake through the small hours, the sinister truth grew clear that grim forces were closing upon him again.
    Snaith, J. C.
  84. grimace
    contort the face to indicate a certain mental or emotional state
    As people squinted, frowned, glared, grinned, grimaced, snarled and other ways looked at the screens, their pictures were snapped, silently.
    New York Times (Jul 20, 2011)
  85. gripe
    complain
    The night drivers come in griping about drunken passengers, bad tippers and unfair summonses.
    New York Times (Mar 24, 2012)
  86. grisly
    shockingly repellent; inspiring horror
    Television video showed a heavily damaged building and a grisly scene inside, with clothing and prayer mats scattered across a blood-splattered floor.
    New York Times (Aug 19, 2011)
  87. groan
    indicate pain, discomfort, or displeasure
    The wounded man's eyes were open, and he was moving his head uneasily and slowly, groaning deeply every now and then.
    Reynolds, Mrs. Baillie
  88. groggy
    stunned or confused and slow to react (as from blows or drunkenness or exhaustion)
    Narcotics dulled the pain but left him groggy and nauseous.
    Seattle Times (Dec 12, 2011)
  89. groom
    give a neat appearance to
    The deep green, meticulously groomed, Wimbledon-like front lawn is undeniably attractive.
    Time (Apr 13, 2012)
  90. grovel
    show submission or fear
    The two young men who drove them had fallen flat and were grovelling and wailing for mercy.
    Mitford, Bertram
  91. grudging
    petty or reluctant in giving or spending
    Toyota's slow response—doubt, grudging acceptance, and then surrender—prompted Toyota owners to pick their heads up.
    Time (Feb 8, 2011)
  92. grueling
    characterized by effort to the point of exhaustion; especially physical effort
    Afterward, a dejected Seraphin admitted to being physically and mentally fatigued from the Wizards’ grueling schedule and his increased playing load.
    Washington Post (Apr 9, 2012)
  93. gruff
    brusque and surly and forbidding
    Mr. Napier’s formidable jaw, gruff demeanor and growling bass voice lent themselves to rugged parts.
    New York Times (Oct 7, 2011)
  94. guild
    a formal association of people with similar interests
    More than 50 permanently disabled jockeys receive assistance from the Jockeys’ Guild, he said.
    New York Times (Mar 24, 2012)
  95. guile
    the use of tricks to deceive someone (usually to extract money from them)
    He was subtle, ambitious, designing, crafty—dishonorably resorting to guile, where he dared not venture on overt acts of hostility.
    Various
  96. guileless
    free of deceit
    There was nothing alarming in this apparently simple and guileless missive.
    Bolderwood, Rolf
  97. guise
    an artful or simulated semblance
    But more broadly, 30 years of near total rule by one man under the guise of democracy has stunted the country's political development.
    Time (Jan 31, 2011)
  98. gullible
    naive and easily deceived or tricked
    The people were gullible; they might be made to believe that the senators of Rome were their best friends.
    Morris, Charles
  99. gumption
    fortitude and determination
    But he said the fact that he kept running for higher office showed admirable gumption.
    New York Times (Sep 9, 2011)
  100. gustatory
    of or relating to gustation
    By gastronomical tests, we mean dishes of so delicious a flavor that their very appearance excites the gustatory organs of every healthy man.
    Robinson, Fayette